BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

Meeting

 

 

 

Tuesday 23 February 2021        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Randwick City Council		1300 722 542
30 Frances Street			council@randwick.nsw.gov.au
Randwick NSW 2031			www.randwick.nsw.gov.au
 



Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council meeting of Randwick City Council

will be held in the Prince Henry Centre, 2 Coast Hospital Road, Little Bay on

Tuesday, 23 February 2021 at 6pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of Country

I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on the land of the Bidjigal and the Gadigal peoples who occupied the Sydney Coast, being the traditional owners.  On behalf of Randwick City Council, I acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders past and present, and to Aboriginal people in attendance today.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council - 8 December 2020

Extraordinary Council - 15 December 2020

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 5.20-5.23 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

MM1/21       Financial Support and Donations - January to February 2021........................................ 1

MM2/21       Vale Mr Kenneth (Ken) Finn........................................................................................ 3

MM3/21       Proposed Public Art Activation Trial............................................................................. 5

MM4/21       Pagewood Green - Meriton Development..................................................................... 7

MM5/21       Little Bay Cove Planning Proposal............................................................................... 9   

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

GM1/21        Randwick City Council Quarterly Progress Report - December 2020............................ 11

Director City Planning Reports

CP1/21        Variation to Development Standard - Clause 4.6 - 24 November  2020 - 12 January 2021 47

CP2/21        Anzac Parade Heritage Study.................................................................................... 55

CP3/21        Port Botany - Low Frequency Noise Assessment........................................................ 63

CP4/21        Blak Markets Partnership Proposal........................................................................... 143

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting required)

CP5/21        417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra (DA/480/2020 - Concept Development Application).............................................................................................................................. 147

CP6/21        417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra (DA/486/2020 - Stage 2 Detailed Development Application)............................................................................................................. 189

Director City Planning Reports

CP7/21        Coogee Bay Road - Streets as Shared Spaces Project.............................................. 279

CP8/21        La Perouse Ferry Wharf Project Update.................................................................... 457

Director City Services Reports

CS1/21        Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee................................................ 469

CS2/21        Fitzgerald Avenue / Robey Street Intersection Controls.............................................. 499

CS3/21        Fallen Lifesavers Memorial - Stage 2 Update............................................................ 503

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO1/21        Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers.............................................................................................................................. 523

CO2/21        2021 National General Assembly of Local Government.............................................. 549

CO3/21        Investment Report - November 2020........................................................................ 553

CO4/21        Investment Report - December 2020........................................................................ 565

CO5/21        Investment Report - January 2021............................................................................ 577

CO6/21        Monthly Financial Report as at 30 November 2020.................................................... 589

CO7/21        Monthly Financial Report as at 31 December 2020.................................................... 595

CO8/21        Monthly Financial Report as at 31 January 2021....................................................... 601

CO9/21        Quarterly Budget Review - December 2020.............................................................. 607

CO10/21      Location of Council Meetings................................................................................... 625  

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM1/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Da Rocha - Recognition of staff performance during once in a generation pandemic............................................................................................... 629

NM2/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Da Rocha - Reaching out to our most vulnerable citizens...... 631

NM3/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Da Rocha - Providing safe and open areas for residents to exercise with the pets........................................................................................................... 633

NM4/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Da Rocha - Combatting litter in and around our coastal areas 635

NM5/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Request Councils be given greater power to audit private building certifiers..................................................................................................... 637

NM6/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Stage 2 of Meriton's Pagewood Green Development 639

NM7/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - SMART Drumlines................................................ 641

NM8/21        Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Celebrating Chinese New Year in Randwick City.. 643

NM9/21        Notice of Motion from Cr Andrews - Emergency Phone to be installed at Mahon Pool.. 645

NM10/21      Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Inquiry into State Government Grants including the Stronger Communities Fund.................................................................................................. 647

NM11/21      Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Transitional Housing Program for Women and Children. Support for Temporary Visa Holders impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic................. 649

NM12/21      Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Declining health of Light Rail tree offsets planted on Alison Road...................................................................................................................... 651

NM13/21      Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - Safety improvements at Clovelly Beach.................. 653  

Closed Session

CO11/21      SSROC Tender for Stationery and Associated Products - Tender No. T2020-06

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

 

 

 

Therese Manns

General Manager


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Mayoral Minute No. MM1/21

 

Subject:        Financial Support and Donations - January to February 2021

 

 

Motion:

That Council:

 

a)   Waive fees totalling $8,873.50 associated with WSL Maroubra Pro event being held at Maroubra Beach on 26 February to 28 February 2021 inclusive and contribute $10,000 in sponsorship towards the event, to be funded from the 2020-21 Contingency Fund; and

 

b)   Donate plants from Council’s Nursery to the value of $300 to St Agnes’ Catholic Primary School, Matraville towards their sensory garden project and provide advice and/or assistance with setting up the composting area with bins as part of the FOGO program.

 

Background:

Council has received the following requests for financial assistance for January to February 2021:

Surfing NSW Maroubra Pro

Surfing NSW has written to Council seeking the continuation of support for the World Surf League (WSL) Maroubra Pro being held at Maroubra Beach on 26 to 28 February 2021.

The event will have a live global webcast playing through multiple WSL and Surfing NSW channels featuring some of the world’s best surfers from Australia and New Zealand.  Surfers competing in this event are competing for points to qualify for the Challenger Series which is the highest level of qualifying events below the Elite world tour.

The fees associated with the event are as follows:

Beach Hire $651 x 3 days                                                  $1,953.00

Lifeguard Fee $128.00 x 9 hours x 2 days                         $2,304.00

Lifeguard Fee $250.00 x 9 hours x 1 day (Sunday)           $2,250.00

Jet Ski $80.50 per hour x 9 hours x 3 days                        $2,173.50

Application Fee                                                                  $193.00 (no GST)

 

TOTAL (ALL INCLUSIVE OF GST)                                  $8,873.50

Sponsorship of the event entitles Council to acknowledgment with logo on Surfing NSW website and WSL website, blurb in commentator notes, tagging in all event related social media posts, feature in 2021 Athlete Guide and the Mayor being given a speaking and photo opportunity at the event presentation.

The WSL Maroubra Pro event will benefit the local area as well as promoting Maroubra Beach to both the Australian and international surfing communities.  It is a unique event for the community to witness and will provide some of our local up and coming surfers the chance to experience competition at the elite position.  As such, I propose to waive the fees associated with the event and provide sponsorship, as done in previous years.

St Agnes’ Catholic Primary School, Matraville – Donation of plants

St Agnes’ Catholic Primary School in Matraville is currently establishing a sustainable school organic composting bin and Food Organics Garden Organics (FOGO) program to create healthy and organic soil to boost their sensory garden project. 

The school has requested Council’s support by way of a donation of plants from Council’s Nursery, hoping to fill a total of 5 garden beds as part of this project.

Randwick City Council will be introducing FOGO as a new food and garden waste collection service to help residents to recycle their food scraps along with garden waste in the one bin.  Beginning in March 2021, the new service will allow us to divert food waste from landfill, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and use the waste to create compost that can be used in farms, parks, sports fields or in gardens.

Council support for this initiative from St Agnes’ Catholic Primary School will promote Council’s value and respect for the environment, and the new FOGO service that we will be rolling out with the message that a small change can make a big difference.

I propose that Council provide a donation of plants from Council’s Nursery to the value of $300 for this project, and provide advice and/or assistance with setting up the composting area with bins as part of the FOGO program.

Source of funding:

Should the report recommendation be endorsed, the financial implication to Council would be $9,173.50 in-kind and $10,000 in cash contributions to be funded from the 2020-21 Mayor’s Contingency Fund.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      The Mayor, Cr Danny Said     

 

File Reference:               F2021/06574

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Mayoral Minute No. MM2/21

 

Subject:        Vale Mr Kenneth (Ken) Finn

 

 

Motion:

That Council hold a minute silence in remembrance and make a donation of $500, to be funded from the 2020-21 Mayor’s Contingency Fund, to the St Vincent de Paul Society in honour of former Mayor and Councillor, Mr Kenneth (Ken) Finn.

 

Background:

I was saddened to hear of the passing of former Mayor and Councillor Mr Kenneth (Ken) Finn on 4 January 2021 at Prince of Wales Hospital.  Mr Finn was a Councillor from 1977 to 2001, and held the position of Mayor between 1979-1980, and 1997-1998, and Deputy Mayor 1996-1997.

 

The funeral was held on 12 January 2021 at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Church, Randwick.  The General Manager, Therese Manns and I attended the funeral on behalf of Council and Council’s flags were flown at half-mast on the day, in honour of our former Mayor and Councillor.

 

Source of funding:

Should Council endorse the report recommendation, the financial implication to Council will be $500 to be funded from the 2020-21 Mayor’s Contingency Fund.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      The Mayor, Cr Danny Said     

 

File Reference:               F2021/06574

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Mayoral Minute No. MM3/21

 

Subject:        Proposed Public Art Activation Trial

 

 

Motion:

That Council bring back a report on the feasibility of a public art activation program for murals at identified locations, using Malabar as the pilot in a trial.  The report should include proposed locations within Malabar and details regarding the application process and criteria for local artists to participate.

 

Background:

I recently had a discussion with representatives from the Malabar Precinct Committee about the possibility of creating opportunities for local artists to create murals on Council assets, such as on the walls of Council amenity buildings, in an effort to activate and beautify our local area.

 

Randwick City Council is developing an Arts and Culture Strategy in line with feedback received from the community, which seeks to provide opportunities for local residents and visitors to participate in artistic and cultural expression across our City. 

 

Arts and culture play an important role in people’s daily lives, influencing our views and values.  In line with the Arts and Culture strategy and provide opportunities for participating in artistic and cultural expression across our City, I propose a public art activation trial, using Malabar as a pilot.

 

A proposal for such a program should include identified locations and details regarding the application process and criteria for local artists to participate.  This would be a fantastic opportunity for local aspiring artists to create murals at identified locations in Malabar for residents and visitors to experience and enjoy.  There would be potential for the program to be extended to other areas within our Local Government Area, following success of a trial in Malabar.

 

Source of funding:

There is no financial implication to Council at this stage.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      The Mayor, Cr Danny Said     

 

File Reference:               F2021/06574

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Mayoral Minute No. MM4/21

 

Subject:        Pagewood Green - Meriton Development

 

 

Motion:

That Council write to Bayside Council, the Minister for Planning & Public Spaces and Minister for Transport expressing concerns about the impact of this development and urging a halt to this development until the infrastructure and capacity issues are addressed.

 

Background:

Meriton has submitted a development application (DA) related to the Stage 2 redevelopment of the Pagewood Green site located in the Bayside Council Local Government Area (LGA). The DA was submitted to Bayside Council in December 2020 and proposes two towers reaching a height of 16 and 17 storeys containing 383 units. 

 

Stage 2 of the BATA site was rezoned in 2019 to allow for a zoning of R4 High Density Residential and an FSR of 2.35:1. Council raised significant concerns with the rezoning of this site including;

 

·      Excessive intensification of use of the site compared to existing planning controls;

·      Excessive building height;

·      Inadequate assessment of the transport impacts of the proposal; and

·      Ambiguous commitment to the delivery of public open space;

 

Due to the site’s close proximity to our LGA, I am concerned about the significant increase in population, and the added demand this will place upon community facilities and services, open space and other physical and social assets within Randwick City.  Apart from Eastgardens, the local services that the occupants of the development will be accessing will be in the Randwick Council LGA. 

 

It is important to add our voice in opposition of this development, given the impacts it will have to Council’s infrastructure and the amenity of our community.

 

Source of funding:

N/A.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      The Mayor, Cr Danny Said     

 

File Reference:               F2021/06574

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Mayoral Minute No. MM5/21

 

Subject:        Little Bay Cove Planning Proposal

 

Motion:

That Council:

a)    write to the NSW Minister for Planning and Public Spaces requesting that Council and the community be consulted prior to any report being finalised in relation to the current investigations being undertaken by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) for increased density along the Anzac Parade corridor; and

 

b)    seek a meeting with the Minister to express Council’s concerns with the process being undertaken by DPIE given the previous commitment made that any investigations for urban renewal along the corridor would align with delivery of new transport infrastructure and would be carried out in collaboration with Randwick City Council.

 

Background:

On 23 June 2021, Council resolved not to support the Planning Proposal for Little Bay Cove proceeding to Gateway Determination.  Concurrent with Council’s assessment of the proposal, the Applicant requested a rezoning review.  The DPIE has referred the planning proposal to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel, but has advised that prior to the Panel’s consideration of the proposal, they are investigating the development potential along the Anzac Parade corridor due to the release of the South Eastern Sydney Transport Strategy (SESTS).  The Preferred Scenario in the SESTS identifies potential rapid bus routes and a Metro extension to La Perouse.  However, the Metro extension is not planned to be delivered until 2041.  The DPIE has advised that the investigation will focus on the larger NSW Government and privately owned sites along the corridor.

 

The rezoning review for the Little Bay Cove planning proposal will be informed by the planning report being prepared on these investigations.  I am concerned that the investigations being undertaken by the DPIE would undermine the strategic land use vision and directions that Council has adopted in its Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) and Housing Strategy.  The provision of transport and community infrastructure needed to support any significant increase in density such as that proposed at Little Bay Cove and other large sites is unable to be delivered in the time frame of Council’s new LEP and would therefore be inconsistent with Council’s LSPS and Housing Strategy.  Further, DPIE in their letter to Council in May 2018 on behalf of the then Minister for Planning, the Hon Anthony Roberts MP, advised that the “timing of planned precinct investigations are aligned with corresponding transport or other infrastructure investigations. In the case of Anzac Parade, the transport investigation timeframe makes this a longer term project.”  I also note that Council was advised in this letter that “the Department is committed to ensuring that future work is designed and delivered in collaboration with Randwick City Council.”

 

In view of the circumstances associated with the processing of the rezoning review application for the Little Bay Cove planning proposal, the community needs to be reassured that the NSW Government is following due process and working within the rules it has set through the NSW planning framework.

 

Source of funding:

There is no financial impact to Council in relation to this matter.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      The Mayor, Cr Danny Said     

 

File Reference:               RZ/4/2019

  


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

General Manager's Report No. GM1/21

 

Subject:         Randwick City Council Quarterly Progress Report - December 2020

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·      This report tracks progress against the 2020-21 Operational Plan actions for the October – December 2020 quarter.

 

·      Council’s operations in this quarter continued to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Many staff continued to work from home, events and meetings were modified to ensure the health and wellbeing of our community and staff, and public areas were managed in accordance with public health orders.

 

·      Council continued to implement a range of support measures to help businesses, sporting and community groups impacted by COVID-19.

 

·      A summary of performance tracking is shown in the following table.

 

Status tracking summary

3

1.3%

 

Complete

211

87.9%

 

On track or ahead of schedule

23

9.6%

 

Progressing at a slower rate

3

1.3%

 

On hold / indefinitely delayed / stopped

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the December Quarterly Progress Report for the 2020-21 Annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

December 2020 Quarterly Progress Report

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2020-21 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on 28 July 2020, to deliver on the third year of the 2018-22 Delivery Program.

 

Discussion

 

The attached December 2020 Quarterly Progress Report shows achievement against planned 2020-21 activities and provides status tracking and comments for each action. 

 

Throughout the second quarter of the 2020-21 financial year, Council has continued to closely monitor the COVID-19 situation and adjust operations as required to manage the health risk and continue to deliver the essential services and projects needed by our community.

 

We have followed all public health orders regarding the use of public areas (including beaches, parks, libraries, community centres and the DRLC), facilitated ongoing work from home arrangements (where appropriate), changed the format of some events and meetings (including moving them online), and continued to implement a range of measures to help businesses, sporting and community groups impacted by COVID-19.

 

Despite the ongoing disruption caused by the pandemic, most projects proceeded as planned and where possible services (not affected by COVID-19 restrictions) were delivered to agreed standards.

 

Some of the highlights included:

 

·      A Digital Inclusion Showcase in collaboration with the Eastern Sydney Aged and Disability IT Working Group. The online presentation showcased creative ideas and solutions for helping older people and people with disabilities to get online.

·      La Perouse Museum programming which featured First Nations providers, community artists and speakers, alongside a variety of exhibitions on display, including the Max Dupain exhibition

·      Weekly delivery of over 1200 ready cooked meals to at risk residents through the Lexington Hub food security program.

·      Online events including the Sports Awards, the Lionel Bowen Writer’s Awards, the Garden Awards, the Bali Memorial service, and the spring wildflower walk with Dan Hall.

·      Official opening of the Coogee Surf Life Saving Club in December 2020

·      Removal of 2490 square metres of graffiti in the period from 1 Oct 2020 to 23 Dec 2020.

·      Successfully securing grant funding (with precinct partners) towards transport management initiatives within the Randwick Hospital and University precinct; and a pilot study for developing a net zero emissions precinct.

·      Christmas activations around the LGA; including the successful busker music program which provided 9,450 minutes of live music over two and a half weeks, across 9 locations in the LGA.

·      Additional e-bikes purchased for Depot staff with additional electric vehicle charging infrastructure being investigated for Works Depot and Bowen Library.

·      Successful funding has also been advised (to the value of $250,000) for additional tree planting in Randwick via the NSW Govt Greening our City grants program.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 


Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

1. Leadership in sustainability

Direction

1a. Council has a long-term vision based on sustainability.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

There are no direct financial implications for this report. Council has developed a 2020-21 budget that responds to financial pressures of the pandemic while building a resilient Randwick and creating economic stimulus to support the local community and businesses.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

In accordance with Section 404(5) of the Local Government Act 1993, Council is required to make at least two progress reports with respect to the principal activities detailed in its delivery program each year. Randwick Council currently provides these reports on a quarterly basis.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the attached December Quarterly Progress Report is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2020-21 Annual Operational Plan.

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Emma Fitzroy, Business Strategist     

 

File Reference:               F2020/03001

 


December 2020 Quarterly Progress Report

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP1/21

 

Subject:         Variation to Development Standard - Clause 4.6 - 24 November  2020 - 12 January 2021

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·       The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP 1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report provides Council with the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under Clause 4.6.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 Register - 24 Nov 2020 to 12 Jan 2021

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)         Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6;

 

2)         Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)         Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6; and

 

4)         Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on Council’s website.

 

Discussion

 

This report is in response to point 3 above. A table is attached to this report detailing all Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 24 November 2020 – 12 January 2021

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

4. Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction

4b. New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements.

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Terry Papaioannou, Environmental Planner Officer (Technical - Research)     

 

File Reference:               F2008/00122

 


SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 Register - 24 Nov 2020 to 12 Jan 2021

Attachment 1

 

 

SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 24 NOVEMBER TO 12 JANUARY 2021

Council DA reference No.

Lot No.

DP No.

Street No.

Street name

Suburb/ Town

Post-code

Category of development

EPI

Zone

Development standard to be varied

Justification of variation

Extent of variation

Concurring authority

Date DA determined

Approved by

 

DA/633/2019

15

36835

18

Lasseter Ave

CHIFLEY

2036

 3: Residential - New second occupancy

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.3  - Building height of 9.5m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Building height is up to 9.811m or up to 3.1%

NSW Dept of Planning

17-Dec-20

DEL

 

DA473/2020

55

36560

14

Mawson Pde

CHIFLEY

2036

 3: Residential - New second occupancy

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.4  - FSR = 0.5:1

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

FSR increased to 0.524  or 4.7%

NSW Dept of Planning

17-Dec-20

DEL

 

DA/637/2019

12

847232

59

Beach Street

COOGEE

2034

 1: Residential - Alterations & additions

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.3  - Building height of 9.5m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Building height is up to 9.7m or up to 2.1%

NSW Dept of Planning

26-Nov-20

RLPP

 

DA/351/2020

A

442243

8

Victoria Street

RANDWICK

2031

 1: Residential - Alterations & additions

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.3  - Building height of 9.5m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Building height is up to 9.9m or up to 4.2%

NSW Dept of Planning

26-Nov-20

RLPP

 

DA/657/2019

5

15535

141

Mount St

COOGEE

2034

 1: Residential - Alterations & additions

RLEP 2012

R3 - Medium Density

Clause 4.3  - Building height of 12m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Building height is up to 12.6m or up to 5%

NSW Dept of Planning

10-Dec-20

RLPP

 

DA/442/2020

2

10161

37-39

Prince Street

RANDWICK

2031

 1: Residential - Alterations & additions

RLEP 2012

R3 - Medium Density

Clause 4.4  - FSR = 0.9:1

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

FSR increased to 1.13:1 or 22.81% ; Existing = 1.03:1

NSW Dept of Planning

10-Dec-20

RLPP

 

DA/375/2020

A

433137

53-55

Carrington road

RANDWICK

2031

 1: Residential - Alterations & additions

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.1 - Minimum Lot Size

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Lot A- 18.2m2 / Lot B -  185.7m2 or 47% (same as existing)

NSW Dept of Planning

10-Dec-20

RLPP

 

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP2/21

 

Subject:         Anzac Parade Heritage Study

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·       This report outlines the key findings, statement of heritage significance and recommendations made in the Anzac Parade Heritage Study and seeks Council’s endorsement for public exhibition. The Study was completed by Sue Rosen Associates, expert heritage consultants.

 

·       The Anzac Parade Heritage Study comprehensively explores the pre- and post-colonial history of Anzac parade as a unique, ‘cultural route’. This includes the places previously and continually used for defence purposes. In many cases, these uses still exist to this day. The Heritage Study identifies 19 associated military sites and 10 sites of memorialisation. No other site in Australia has an equivalent or as powerful a connection with such a fundamental theme, nor the density of surviving relics and evidence that can express it.

 

·       The Study concludes that Anzac Parade is a unique, ‘cultural route’ connecting a great number of important sites with a high degree of heritage significance locally, in the state and nationally under the themes of ‘defence’, ‘memorialization’ and ‘governing’. The heritage significance of the cultural route is a sum of its parts, bound together by the connecting spine of Anzac Parade.

 

·       The Study includes a number of recommendations in order to conserve and enhance the heritage value of Anzac Parade as a cultural route, including further community consultation, heritage interpretation, as well as seeking local, state and national heritage recognition.

 

·       As part of the public exhibition process, Council officers will directly engage with agencies such as Heritage NSW, State Government agencies, the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and community groups to explore options for heritage recognition and protection of important sites.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)    endorse the Anzac Parade Heritage Study for public exhibition and consultation;

b)    consult with Heritage NSW, and other key stakeholders to explore options for heritage recognition, protection, conservation and interpretation of Anzac Parade as a cultural route; and

c)    create a dedicated page on Council’s website to promote the history and heritage of Anzac Parade as a cultural route.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Link to the Anzac Parade Heritage Study

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

The purpose of this report is to provide an analysis of the Anzac Parade Heritage Study and its recommended actions to recognise, protect, conserve and activate the route. This includes:

 

·       A brief summary of the extensive historical context of Anzac Parade and its associated sites

 

·       An explanation of the statement of heritage significance for Anzac Parade as a cultural route. A statement of heritage significance is an integral part of justifying its heritage value, assessing the site against the NSW heritage assessment criteria.

 

·       A summary of recommendations made, including heritage listing and developing enhancement and activation strategies to protect the built and intangible heritage of the route.

 

Background

 

Process

In 2017, Randwick City Council was approached by a local resident of Randwick and daughter of an Anzac, Margaret Hope, with a request that the significance of Anzac Parade be recognised through realising the original 1917 intent for an end marker in La Perouse. At the February 2017 Council meeting a motion was passed unanimously resolving that:

 

a)   This council formally gives it support to the Daughters of ANZAC project.

b)   Commits to working with all relevant stake-holder to endeavour to restore and re-create the ANZAC Parade corridor as intended with the 1917 dedication of ANZAC Parade, including the construction of an appropriate monument at La Perouse.

c)   Council commit to constructing an appropriate monument at La Perouse to mark 100 years of the naming of Anzac Parade.

 

In support of Council’s resolution, a heritage study of Anzac Parade was commissioned and included as an action in the Randwick ‘Vision 2040’ Local Strategic Planning Statement (action 4.3 on page 30) which was endorsed by Council in February 2020.

 

In June 2020, Council engaged the successful applicant, Sue Rosen Associates to undertake the Anzac Parade Heritage Study. Thorough historical research, heritage assessment and further recommendations for protection were based on INCOMOS methodologies. S. Rosen completed the Study with a critical emphasis on community consultation, working extensively with Margaret Hope and other key stakeholders. Councilors were briefed on the findings of the report in October 2020.

 

Subject Site

Anzac Parade is a cultural route that runs from the Moore Park Road intersection at Paddington to

the La Perouse Headland, a distance of some 13 kilometres through both the City of Sydney and Randwick City Council LGAs.

 

Bisecting Moore Park and after passage through the commercial centre of Kensington and the educational and health precincts of UNSW and the Prince of Wales Hospital, Anzac Parade trundles through the high street commercial precincts of Kingsford and Maroubra and the residential areas of Daceyville, Matraville, Malabar, Chifley, La Perouse, and Little Bay, the former site of the Prince Henry Hospital. It terminates in a loop on the La Perouse Headland having skirted the Malabar Headland with its parks and rifle range, the Long Bay Correctional Centre and the western boundary of Kamay Botany Bay National Park. The shape and width of the route changes greatly from north to south. There are war memorials along the route at Malabar and Maroubra.


Historical Context of Anzac Parade

 

As a route, Anzac Parade evolved from the natural topography and its geographical position and association with the founding of the colony at Port Jackson in 1788. This project has revealed that Anzac Parade is a spine associated with intense military/defence activity from at least 1788 until the second half of the 20th Century, with significant elements still functional today. The story is fundamental to the history of the development of Randwick, its shape and character as a municipality.

 

Two types of defence-related places associated with Anzac Parade have been identified in this study:

 

·       places used for defence purposes, ranging from recruitment and training, to actual conflict, to rehabilitation and post conflict welfare. The defence-related places have evolved from, and became associated with, defence and strategy often through pressing need in a time of crisis, such as the Cape Banks Battery. Some, such as Victoria Barracks, were planned as functioning facilities and constructed in a relatively leisurely fashion. Many had ‘other lives’, such as showgrounds and racecourses, and adaptation and responsiveness are at their core.

·       places of memorialisation are the monuments and reminders in the streetscapes of tragic and pivotal conflicts with a national and international significance. The memorials are deliberate constructs, planned and installed at a particular time in response to community feeling. The memorials reflect the community’s deep feelings of respect, sadness and loss, and pride concerning the conflicts commemorated so prolifically along the route of Anzac Parade.

 

The Anzac Parade Heritage study identifies and explores 19 associated military sites and 10 sites of memorialisation (see table below). No other site in Australia has an equivalent or as powerful a connection with such a fundamental theme, nor the density of surviving relics and evidence that can express it. This connection is referenced in the numerous sites individually listed on heritage registers – state, local and national.

 

The Study also includes a comprehensive timeline/chronology of events and development surrounding Anzac Parade. The chronology of events focuses specifically on military history, however, also includes Aboriginal history pre and post colonisation, as well as local history. This section of the study reveals that the history of Anzac Parade starts with the arrival of The First Fleet in 1788 and first road from Sydney Cove to Botany Bay in 1790. The route was formed by following a ridge through otherwise sandy and/or swampy country, making it an easier route than that directly south from Sydney Cove (Now Circular Quay). A survey map from 1853 displays the oldest record of Anzac Parade, named ‘Old Botany Road’ (pg. 152).

 

The early establishment of Victoria Barracks at the northern most end of the Parade in the 1840s initiated the establishment of associated military facilities, that morphed into civil facilities, such as the Centennial Parklands, the Sydney Cricket Ground and the Royal Agricultural Society’s Showground which were drawn on by the military as a general resource in times of war, particularly since 1885 (Sudan); 1899 (Boer War); 1914 (World War I); 1939 (World War II) and their immediate aftermaths in the first half of the 20th Century.

 

The following table shows the existing heritage listing of significant sites along the spine of Anzac Parade and its immediate vicinity.

 

Significant sites along the Spine of Anzac Parade

Significance

Site

State Significant

·      Bare Island Fort

·      Big Stable - Newmarket

·      Centennial Park, Moore park and Queens Park

·      Daceyville Garden Suburb

·      Kamay Botany Bay National Park (North and South) and Towra Point Nature Reserve

·      Malabar Headland

·      Price Henry Hospital Site

Local Significance and contributory item

·      Anti Landing Craft Boom Anchors at Little Bay x 4

·      Bare Island Fort and Causeway

·      Big Stable Newmarket

·      Botany Bay National Park Heritage Conservation Area

·      Centennial Park Group

·      Daceyville Garden suburb

·      Daceyville Public School

·      Former Toll House, Moore Park

·      Henry Head Fort

·      La Perouse Memorial

·      Macquarie Watchtower

·      Malabar Headland HCA

·      Members Stand Royal Randwick Racecourse

·      Prince Henry Hospital Precinct

·      Prince of Wales Hospital Group

·      Randwick Barracks, School of Musketry & Officers Mess

·      Randwick Environmental Park HCA

·      Soldiers Settlement House, Matraville

·      Soldier Settlement Public School

·      Sydney Girls High School – Building BOOA and Grounds

·      Tomb of Pere le Receveur

 

Heritage significance of Anzac Parade

 

Anzac Parade as a Cultural Route

The statement of heritage significance produced as part of the Study establishes that Anzac Parade is a cultural route with a high degree of significance locally, in the State and Nationally.

 

According to The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), A Cultural Route is “the result of humans travelling across the environment, exchanging ideas and goods over long distances and for many years. Cultural routes make up the connective web of the world’s heritage, tying regions, countries and global cultures together.” The 2008 ICOMOS Charter on Cultural Routes was developed to aid the identification of cultural routes that could be vast in extent, traversing continents and cultures over millennia. National examples include the Great Ocean Road and Scenic Environs in Victoria which are recognised as a memorial road for First World War Service-people.

 

When a cultural route is assessed, the entire route is valued over and above its constituent parts. It should be noted that while a cultural route is always part of a landscape and could cross many landscapes, its significance differs from that of a landscape because of its unique role as a route.

 

Despite the recognition given to cultural routes by the ICOMOS Charter, to which Australia is a signatory, no such categorisation exists in NSW on a state heritage level. In NSW there are several listings of items categorised as ‘roads’, or segments or parts of roads on the State Heritage Register including a number of portions of the Great Western Road, but these are all categorised as physical architectural features, rather than routes. No listings in NSW embrace the notion of a cultural route. The only item on the State Heritage Register that has been described as a ‘cultural route’ is the Bundian Way, an Aboriginal pathway between the coast and mountains in far south NSW. However, in the NSW heritage register, it has been classified as a cultural landscape.

 

A cultural landscape is defined as an area which clearly represents or reflects the patterns of settlement or use of the landscape over a long time, as well as the evolution of cultural values, forms and attitudes towards the land. Whilst a cultural route is always part of a landscape and could cross many landscapes, a cultural route differs as it is a defined thoroughfare, through a space, with a starting point and a destination.

 

The Anzac Parade Heritage Study compares existing state heritage items listed or described as roads or routes with Anzac Parade (Table 3.3.1.1, on pg. 185). The analysis concludes that there is no current example of a NSW heritage item that embodies the qualities of a Cultural Route, making the classification of Anzac Parade as a cultural route unprecedented and exceptional.

 

Statement of heritage significance summary

In reviewing the heritage significance of Anzac Parade, S. Rosen writes:

 

“Anzac Parade is a cultural route with a high degree of significance locally, in the state and

nationally. This significance is related to the national historic theme of ‘Governing’ and the NSW

historic theme of ‘Defence’. As has been shown in Section 2, Anzac Parade connects numerous and diverse sites associated with numerous and diverse defence activities and functions along its entire length and for the entire history of the area since the commencement of European occupation in 1788. The dominance of the defence theme across its history gives Anzac Parade a remarkable homogeneity and consistency in its expression of that theme. For some, Anzac Parade featured both in the enlistment and training for combat to post-war rehabilitation and housing. Anzac Parade is capable of demonstrating the integration of the many facets of the defence theme by the proximity and the connectedness of recruitment, training, mobilisation, housing, rehabilitation, administration and logistical facilities provided along its route. There was constant movement along the route as these purposes were fulfilled, unlike other streets that have the name ‘parade’. Anzac Parade which was an early use of expression, was an actual route along which troops marched, it was the spine that connected numerous active military sites and may be unique among Anzac Parades around the country which are often related to commercial or suburban developments and were created as memorials that had no link to actual military activity. With interpretation, Anzac Parade is capable of demonstrating the dense web of defence associations. Anzac Parade as a cultural route embodies a set of values which is greater than the sum of the individual elements associated with it and it is these connections that give Anzac Parade its meaning.”

 

Anzac Parade meets all 7 of the NSW Heritage criterion for assessing heritage significance. In short, Anzac Parade and its associated sites represents a unique course of NSW cultural history for a community that plays a prominent part in the post-colonial Australian story.

 

Recommendations and future actions

 

Study Recommendations

Through the Anzac Parade Heritage Study, S. Rosen’s key recommendations are:

 

·       That Council list Anzac Parade as a cultural route with the associated sites as part of its curtilage on the heritage schedule of the Local Environmental Plan (LEP) and consider nominating the complex for listing on the State and National heritage registers.

·       That Council continue with and expand discussions with the community and stakeholders as to how best to articulate the defence/strategic theme and the multitude of connections along the route, including neighbouring Councils, such as City of Sydney and Bayside and the New South Wales (NSW) National Parks and Wildlife Service and the Commonwealth Department of Defence who have substantial assets associated with the route.

 

These recommendations are expanded upon in the conclusion of the report:

 

1)    If the concept of Anzac Parade as a cultural route is adopted by Council then every effort should be made to develop, express and maintain the distinctive character of the route – that is, its connection with the theme of defence and defence-related sites within the catchment of the route. This should include archaeological relics and built structures such as the batteries at Cape Banks, Henry Head and Boora Point; the relationships with Prince of Wales Hospital, the former Prince Henry Hospital; with Daceyville; the Matraville Soldier Settlement; the Anzac Rifle Range; the Centennial Parkland;, Victoria Barracks; the former Showground; the former Kensington and Roseberry racecourses; and Randwick Barracks. See those listed in section 2.8.

 

2)    Council should consider heritage listing the route of Anzac Parade on the LEP and nominating the routes for inclusion on the State Heritage Register and the National Heritage List.

3)    If the cultural route concept is adopted, further attempts should be made to involve stakeholders in developing the concept through interpretation activities and installations.

4)    If heritage listed (at whatever level), discussions will need to take place with the owners of the various associated sites regarding how they can be managed to reflect their relationship with the route.

5)    Ways need to be found in draw out the history connections between the places so far identified and thought given to other possible sites. This might take the form of:

a route with distinctive, but low key way-finding street signage that draws attention to the interconnectedness of the places associated with Anzac Parade as a cultural route

adoption of ‘apps’ that open up to histories of places and take people on a tour or just provide information on a particular site

engagement with educational institutions to develop interpretation at all levels from the simple to the complex; design students as well as history and archaeology students could be encouraged via competitions for suggestions

publishing a guide booklet for free distribution at the libraries, information centres

and museums

creating a dedicated page on Council’s website adopting planning policies that would opportunistically enhance public awareness of Anzac Parade as a cultural route, and enhance understandings for what is now a suburban community that grew from Anzac Parade’s extensive and intensive use for defence-related purposes.

Endorsement and Community Consultation

To complete actions 3 and 4, it is recommended that the Anzac Parade Heritage Study be placed on public exhibition for a 4-week period. Stakeholders and the community will also be invited to identify further contributory items and provide feedback and recommendations for interpretation activities and installations. Council will contact key stakeholders and agencies requesting their feedback on the report’s content and findings. This will be used to further inform an interpretation plan and strategy to contribute and further develop the Anzac Parade Heritage story.

 

Heritage listing

The key recommendation from the Anzac Parade Heritage Study is to list the entire Anzac Parade corridor as a cultural route with the associated sites as part of its curtilage under Schedule 5 of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (LEP) and consider nominating the complex for listing on the State and National heritage registers.

 

It is recommended that Council explore options and seek advice from Heritage NSW and other stakeholders through the community consultation process to suitably recognise, conserve, promote and interpret Anzac Parade as a ‘route’ or ‘landscape’ given the findings of this Study. This aligns with Council’s objectives for this project which was to investigate future options for recognition and conservation of the route of Anzac Parade. Other actions suggested in the Study are outlined below.

 

Anzac Parade History and Heritage webpage

A dedicated page in the local history section of Randwick City Council’s website will help further the mission and intent of the Study, promote its findings, and tie together the history of Randwick’s significant sites of military heritage through their common connection to Anzac Parade. The page will also link to related projects such as the Anzac monument at La Perouse and the Daughters of Anzac website.

 

Heritage Interpretation Plan

In order to enact recommendation 5 of the Anzac Parade Heritage Study, it is recommended that Council prepare an interpretation plan. An interpretation plan details strategies, installations and activities to best promote, conserve, protect and enhance the heritage value of Anzac Parade as a cultural route. These may take the form of walking routes, way-finding signage and installations, virtual tour guides and booklets, and partnerships with local organisations. As a unique and expansive place of great heritage significance, an interpretation plan completed by a suitably qualified heritage consultant, detailing specific and targeted options with installation advice and estimated costings will help draw out the historical connections between the sites, promoting community awareness.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

7. Heritage that is protected and celebrated.

Direction

7a. Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated.

 

As previously mentioned, The Anzac Parade Heritage Study is strategically aligned to the Randwick ‘Vision 2040’ Local Strategic Planning Statement as action 4.3 ‘Undertake a heritage study to investigate the potential heritage significance of Anzac Parade’, which was endorsed by Council in February 2020.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

The Anzac Parade Heritage Study was funded from the Strategic Planning Operational budget for 2019-20.

 

Commissioning a consultant to complete a heritage interpretation strategy for Anzac Parade (as suggested by the consultant) will require a further budget allocation.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

Heritage Conservation section 5.10 of the Randwick Local Environment Plan 2012, State and National registers have been considered by the consultant in the development of the Study.

Conclusion

 

As previously stated, Anzac Parade is a unique and incomparable ‘cultural route’ connecting a great number of important sites with a high degree of heritage significance locally, in the state and nationally under the themes of ‘defence’, ‘memorialization’ and ‘governing’. Anzac Parade as a defence themed cultural route serves as a spine connecting various military installations, memorials and as a literal place of parade. The heritage significance of the cultural route is a sum of its parts that must be considered holistically.

 

Recognizing, protecting, conserving, and celebrating the living and memorialized heritage of Anzac Parade is of great value to Randwick City, creating a sense of place and connection to culture. It is recommended that Council place the Study on public exhibition, promote the Study on Council’s web site and liaise with relevant government agencies, the community and other relevant stakeholders in relation to the Study’s recommendations for recognising Anzac Parade as a cultural route.

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Leonardo Shaw-Voysey, Student Environmental Planning Officer     

 

File Reference:               F2019/01571

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP3/21

 

Subject:         Port Botany - Low Frequency Noise Assessment

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·           In response to an increased number of complaints relating to low-frequency noise from port-related activities, Council made representations to NSW Ports, EPA and NSW Minister for Energy & Environment.

 

·           NSW Ports commissioned Wilkinson Murray, Acoustic Consultants to undertake a detailed noise investigation, which has recently been completed.

 

·           The noise investigation evaluates noise emissions from port-related activities and the likely contributory factors to the increased number of complaints made during winter 2020.

 

·           The noise assessment recommends further investigations and monitoring be carried out.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council continue to liaise with NSW Ports, EPA, industry representatives and stakeholder forums (including Port Botany Community Consultative Committee) to follow-up with the recommendations encompassed in the Wilkinson Murray report and to address concerns about noise from Port Botany or nearby industrial or port-related activities.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

NSW Ports - Noise Investigation Summary

 

2.

NSW Ports - Noise Investigation Report Final - Public Release

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

In response to a number of noise complaints relating to low-frequency noise emanating from port-related activities, Council resolved at its meeting held on 28 July 2020:

 

“(Da Rocha/Stavrinos) that Council:

 

a)    arrange a meeting with the Minister for the Environment, officials from the Port, EPA, Bayside Council and the South Ward Councillors to discuss noise pollution coming from the Port area;

b)    engage representatives from businesses operating in the Port area and related industries;

c)    advocate for the implementation of a noise abatement strategy and increased noise monitoring;

d)    investigate establishing a noise monitoring committee made up of representatives from local and state government and residents affected by the noise;

e)    provide a report back to Council at the next Council meeting; and

f)     build mitigation devices to reduce noise pollution, including an aesthetic sound wall to absorb and reduce Port noise.”

 

On 14 September 2020 a teleconference was held between a number of Councillors, the Mayor, Council officers, NSW Port representatives, EPA and the Hon. Matthew Kean MP, Minister for Energy and Environment.

 

At this teleconference, NSW Ports advised that they were in the process of appointing acoustic consultants to undertake an assessment of the low-frequency noise, together with an assessment of relevant Port activities and associated factors (e.g. wind and weather conditions, ship movements etc).

 

Discussion

 

Noise Investigation & Assessment

On 18 January 2021 NSW Ports held a briefing with representatives and Councillors from Randwick City Council and Bayside Council and EPA, to advise of the outcome of the investigation into the low-frequency noise.

 

NSW Ports have provided a summary of the investigation, a copy of which is attached. The noise investigation was conducted by Wilkinson Murray, Acoustic Consultants and a copy of their report dated January 2021 is also attached for your information.

 

The noise investigation was quite comprehensive and included noise monitoring at a number of permanent and temporary (residential) locations, between 28 August and 28 September 2020. The investigation also included an assessment of Port activities, ship movements and berthing, wind and weather data and complaints assessment.

 

In summary, the report by Wilkinson Murray includes the following conclusions:

 

·      The period of increased noise complaints (April to September 2020) was representative of normal port activity, with berth occupancy during this period comparable with the year prior.

·      Berth occupancy during the noise monitoring period (28 August to 28 September 2020) was higher than the average across the April to September 2020 period and consistent with occupancy levels in 2019.

·      Residential premises surrounding Port Botany are impacted by a range of noise sources including road traffic, construction works, industrial activities and port operations.

·      There was a significant decrease in background and low frequency noise levels at Foreshore Road in 2020 compared to previous years – likely due to impacts of COVID-19 ‘lock-down’. At Botany Road (east), broadband noise level differences were minor while increases in ‘low frequency noise’ of up to 3dB were measured.

·      Based on attended measurements at locations near industrial and port facilities, the predominant source of the low frequency noise was ships berthed at Port Botany. There were other sources of low frequency noise from the industrial precinct surrounding Port Botany which have localised impacts. Intermittent crashes and bangs are also audible at some residences, but not all are attributable to the Port.

·      The strongest correlation between nights with high perceived noise levels was noise enhancing weather conditions (generally low winds with speeds 0.5 – 3m/s and temperature inversions).

·      There was no observable correlation between high perceived noise levels and number of vessels at berth.

·      Light weight housing construction has poorer noise attenuation in low frequencies when compared to mid and high frequencies – meaning external low frequency noise sources can appear louder internally.

 

The acoustic consultants have recommended that:

·      The location of the permanent noise monitors should be reviewed and a permanent noise monitor be installed towards the south east to capture noise levels in the Little Bay area.

·      Noise measurements be conducted to confirm the source noise levels of the ships in Port Botany. The NEPTUNES noise measurement protocol for moored ships which was developed by the Environmental Ship Index organisation should be considered for as the measurement procedure.

 

NSW Ports advise that the recommendation made by the acoustic consultants are progressing. They are currently having discussions with a landowner about a preferred location for the residential noise monitor and the ship noise monitoring recommendation is also underway and information will be provided to the working group around March/April 2021.

 

Summary of actions under Council’s resolution:

 

a)   arrange a meeting with the Minister for the Environment, officials from the Port, EPA, Bayside Council and the South Ward Councillors to discuss noise pollution coming from the Port area;

 

A teleconference was held on 14 September 2020 to discuss Council’s concerns and the resolution.

 

b)   engage representatives from businesses operating in the Port area and related industries;

 

Concerns about the Port facilities, including noise impacts are appropriately referred to the Port Botany Community Consultative Committee for consideration. This committee has a wide range of representatives including; NSW Ports, Community members, Electorate office, Port Business representatives, NSW EPA, Department of Planning Industry & Environment, Roads & Maritime Services, Chamber of commerce, Randwick & Bayside Council.

 

c)   advocate for the implementation of a noise abatement strategy and increased noise monitoring;

 

As detailed above NSW Ports engaged Wilkinson Murray to undertake a comprehensive noise assessment, which has been completed. NSW Ports have also advised that the recommendations in the acoustic report will be progressed, including further noise monitoring towards the Little Bay area and noise emissions from ships.

 

The outcome of these actions will be followed up by Council officers and NSW Ports and referred to the Port Botany Community Consultative Committee, together with any further proposed noise mitigation and management strategies.

 

d)   investigate establishing a noise monitoring committee made up of representatives from local and state government and residents affected by the noise;

 

The Port Botany Community Consultative Committee is already established and has a wide range of representatives (s detailed above) and key stakeholders consider that the establishment of another committee, with the same or similar representatives, is unnecessary.

 

e)   provide a report back to Council at the next Council meeting; and

 

This report has been provided as soon as practicable following completion of the noise monitoring.

 

f)    build mitigation devices to reduce noise pollution, including an aesthetic sound wall to absorb and reduce Port noise.”

 

The Wilkinson Murray acoustic report indicates that the noise in the area cannot be attributed to any one or more sources, including port facilities, ships, other port and non-port related development and activities. The report also recommends that further noise monitoring equipment be installed and noise from shipping be monitored and investigated. Therefore, at this point, it is not possible to identify whether or not the construction of such a wall would assist or if it is feasible, having regard to the broad location and nature of noise sources.

 

Further consideration can be given to any possible noise mitigation strategies upon completion of the noise monitoring strategies and outcomes from the meetings of the Port Botany Community Consultative Committee.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

6. A liveable city.

Direction

6c. The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and stategies.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

The report does not involve additional resourcing or financial costs.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

·      Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997

·      Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

·      Compliance & Enforcement Policy.

 

Conclusion

 

An increased number of concerns were raised by residents in the Matraville, Little Bay, Chifley, La Perouse and Pagewood areas during the winter months of 2020, relating to low-frequency noise emanating from Port Botany.

 

In response to the community concerns and representations made by Council, NSW Ports commissioned Wilkinson Murray, Acoustic Consultants to undertake an investigation into the noise which appeared to be caused by port-related activities.

 

Overall, the investigation identifies a number of factors which appear to have contributed to the level of noise (particularly low-frequency noise), experienced by residents, including noise from ships, port operations, road traffic, construction activities and nearby industrial activities.

 

The investigation also identifies the correlation between the high night-time noise levels experienced by residents in some locations and ‘noise enhancing weather conditions’ (e.g. wind direction and speed and also temperature inversions).

 

The investigation, however, did not identify any specific significant noise source or sources which could be appropriately managed to address the concerns of residents in the area.  Further investigations and measurements of the noise from ships are recommended, together with a recommendation to install an additional permanent noise monitor towards the south east to capture noise levels in the Little Bay area.

 

Council officers will continue to work with NSW Ports, EPA, industry representatives and stakeholder forums (including Port Botany Community Consultative Committee) to follow-up with the proposed recommendations in the Wilkinson Murray report and other noise abatement strategies to manage noise from the Port related activities.

 

Council officers will advise the Councillor’s of the outcome of the further noise investigations and any further developments relating to noise from the port-related activities. 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Roman Wereszczynski, Manager Health Building and Regulatory Services     

 

File Reference:               F2021/06146

 


NSW Ports - Noise Investigation Summary

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NSW Ports - Noise Investigation Report Final - Public Release

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP4/21

 

Subject:         Blak Markets Partnership Proposal

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·           The Blak Markets, run by First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation, is an established social enterprise designed to be a platform for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment, business development and capacity building.

 

·           First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation has requested ongoing financial support to continue running the Blak Markets to provide arts, craft, tourism and performing arts businesses with an opportunity to test their products and services in a real-time marketplace.

 

·           Council has an opportunity to work in partnership with and First Hand Solutions to build capacity through providing business mentoring, indigenous employment, business incubation and acceleration to support resilience, enterprise and growth in the indigenous community.

 

·           The Blak Markets will act as a platform and action learning environment in achieving these goals along with partnering on other professional development and employment initiatives.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)   Council contribute $40,000 annually for a minimum of four (4) markets per year plus a minimum of two (2) business development and employment programs annually over a three (3) year period to First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation;

 

b)   a funding agreement between First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation and Randwick City Council be entered into that will include:

 

i.    Delivery of the Blak Markets

ii.    Business mentoring opportunities

iii.   Indigenous employment goals

iv.   Business incubation and acceleration opportunities

v.   Preferred local engagement

vi.   Acquittal requirements;

 

c)    First Hand Aboriginal Corporation undertake to appropriately and prominently acknowledge and promote Council’s contribution to the partnership; and

 

d)    the Mayor or the Mayor’s representative be given the opportunity to address the event on behalf of Council.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 


 

Introduction

 

First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation was established October 2012 in La Perouse with a mission to build empowered and resilient indigenous communities through cultural reconnection, education, employment, and enterprise. First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation combines social innovation, cultural protection, education, and social enterprises to bring significant positive change through a variety of social indicators including community regeneration, financial inclusion, pathways to further education and employment including self-employment through small business.

First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation started the Blak Markets on Bare Island at La Perouse as a social enterprise to provide economic development opportunities to local indigenous people by providing the opportunity to sell original and affordable aboriginal artworks, handicrafts, homewares, and jewelry. The Blak Markets also trains and employs local young Aboriginal people in barista, retail, food preparation and supervision to work in the pop-up coffee, food and retail stores at the Blak Markets.

Since the launch at Bare Island eight years ago the Blak Markets has become a well-known and respected brand with the scope of the market extended to also provide opportunities to remote communities to showcase and sell their art and craft. Every Blak Markets showcases a free indigenous cultural performance program featuring authentic experiences including Smoking, Whale and Healing Ceremonies, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander dancers and singers as well as traditional Aboriginal craft workshops. This indigenous cultural performance program attracts many people from across Sydney to La Perouse for the Blak Market events with attendance averaging at around 1,500 people for every market.

Discussion

 

First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation approached Council to request further financial support to continue to run the Blak Markets and the associated indigenous cultural performance program on Bare Island at La Perouse. Due to their low stallholder fee structure and the financial cost of providing the free cultural performance program, as a social enterprise First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation cannot run the Blak Markets on Bare Island at La Perouse without additional financial support.

First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation have previously received funding for the Blak Markets from Council through the Cultural and Community Grants Program, two Mayoral Minutes in September and December 2018 and through the economic development budget to deliver six (6) markets over 18 months in 2019 and 2020.

 

Council staff met with First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation to discuss options of how further funding could be a partnership arrangement rather than a sponsorship model for the Blak Markets only.

 

The partnership agreement will include initiatives to reflect the full vision of the corporation which is to ‘build empowered and resilient indigenous communities using cultural reconnection to build pride and resilience; and the power of business as a tool to show youth and Indigenous communities the value of their culture in the modern world’.

 

The partnership will achieve this through:

 

·      Continuing to support the delivery of the Blak Markets, as a key action learning environment where businesses can test, refine and re-test their products. Dates for the 2021 markets are: 21 March, 9 May, 5 September, and 5 December.

 

·      Delivering business development and employment programs annually, which we will develop together with First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation and could include running professional development workshops, having ideation forums, providing a start-up grant and incubation program, doing feedback sessions, and providing business compliance support.

 

The cost to Council would be $40,000 per year over a 3-year period, with an approximate breakdown of $30,000 per year to deliver 4 markets and $10,000 per year invested into business development and employment programs as agreed with Council.

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

2. A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction

2a. Meet the needs of our diverse community and provide equitable access to social services and infrastructure.

Direction

2b. Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

Direction

2d. Our cultural diversity is appreciated and respected.

Direction

7a. Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated.

Direction

8c. Develop and stengthen effective partnerships with key locally based organisations.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

Should Council endorse this partnership, the first two markets are able to be funded through the current operational budget for the 2020-21 Financial year. The funding required for the markets and business/employment programs beyond the current financial year will be included in subsequent operational budgets.

 

 

Responsible officer:      Jodi Tweed, Manager Community Development     

 

File Reference:               F2014/00593

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP5/21

 

Subject:        417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra (DA/480/2020 - Concept Development Application)

 

Proposal:                         Concept Development Application for in-principle proposal including demolition of existing buildings and structures within the site; tree removal; land uses including for a ‘recreation facility (indoor)’ and a ‘café’ with ancillary administration uses; site layout and configuration including the general location and size of car parking areas, buildings, and vehicular access to Bunnerong Road via the existing signalised intersection at Flint Street; and a building envelope.

Ward:                             Central Ward

Applicant:                      Randwick City Council

Owner:                           Department of Planning Industry & Environment – Crown Lands

Cost of works:               $45,650,000.00 (associated with the Stage 2 “Works” DA)

Recommendation

That the recommendations in SECPP assessment report for DA/480/2020, 417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra be endorsed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: multiple submissions received from numerous properties within the wider area which are not identified in the above map. Refer to attached SECPP report for submission list.

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

 

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Locality Plan

 

1.       Executive Summary

 

Council is in receipt of a Concept Development Application (DA) seeking approval for the redevelopment of the site known as 417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra. The site is part of Heffron Park, which is the largest recreational park in Randwick and includes playing fields, tennis and netball courts, a cycling criterium track, and an aquatic and leisure centre.

 

The proposal forming the Concept DA are as follows:

 

·      In Principle demolition of existing site improvements and associated tree removal;

·      Land uses, including for a ‘recreation facility (indoor)’ and a ‘café’, including ancillary administration uses provided for the purpose of operating the recreation facilities;

·      Site layout and configuration, including the general location and size of car parking areas, buildings, and vehicular access to Bunnerong Road via the existing signalised intersection at Flint Street; and

·      A building envelope as detailed in the Building Envelope Plans prepared by Co-op Studio and other supporting technical information submitted with the application.

 

A separate Development Application (DA/486/2020) has also been submitted for Stage 2 development that provides for the physical works including a new recreational facility known as the “Heffron Centre” located at Heffron Park. DA/480/2020 and DA/486/2020 are being assessed and determined concurrently.

 

For Council’s reference, DA/486/2020 is a Stage 2 Detailed Development Application seeking approval for the following:

 

·      Demolition of existing buildings and structures within the site.

·      Site preparation works, including termination or relocation of site services and infrastructure, remediation, tree removal and the erection of site protection fencing.

·      Construction of the new Heffron Centre, including:

− A Community and High-Performance Centre (CHPC).

− An indoor multi-purpose sporting facility.

− A local indoor gymnastics centre.

− Café.

− Installation of floodlighting to the approved Showcase Field.

·      Car parking for 143 spaces, including a combination of staff and visitor spaces, accessed via the existing signalised intersection of Bunnerong Road and Flint Street.

·      Building identification signage.

·      Public domain works within the site, including new landscaping and tree planting.

 

The Concept DA is submitted to satisfy Clause 6.12 of the Randwick LEP 2012, which requires development on land with a site area of more than 10,000m2 to have a site-specific development control plan. The Concept DA can be used to satisfy the requirement for a site-specific development control plan under Section 4.23 of the EP&A Act 1979.

 

The Concept DA is directly related to the works application, which has an estimated cost of $45,650,000 and the applicant is Randwick Council. As the application is for Council related development over $5 million, the proposal is classified as Regionally Significant Development pursuant to Schedule 7 of SEPP (State and Regional Development 2011). The Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel (SECPP) is the consent authority for both DA/480/2020 and DA/486/2020 pursuant to Section 4.7 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

The application was notified to the Department of Planning, Industry & Environment – Crown Lands (Crown Lands) as owner of the land. The requirement for owners consent from Crown Lands is being obtained pursuant to Clause 49(2) of the EP & A Regulations 2000, which states:

 

“(2) The consent of the owner of the land is not required for a development application made by a public authority, or for a development application for public notification development, if the applicant instead gives notice of the application—

(a)  to the owner of the land before the application is made, or

(b)  by publishing a notice no later than 14 days after the application is made—

(i)  in a newspaper circulating in the area in which the development is to be carried out, and

(ii)  in the case of an application made by a public authority, on the public authority’s website, or, in the case of public notification development, on the NSW planning portal.”

 

The Plan of Management applying to Heffron Park from 2009 is required to be updated under the Crown Land Management Act (CLM) 2016 to authorise the proposed development. Council is currently undertaking this process of updating the Plan of Management with a target date of May 2021 for public exhibition and a resolution date of the 30 June 2021 (subject to no additional public exhibitions being required).

 

As owners consent needs to be obtained prior to an operational consent being issued, the recommendation that a deferred commencement condition be imposed requiring the necessary authority under the CLM Act to be obtained prior to carrying out the development is noted and will be included in the recommended conditions of consent imposed under the Stage 2 Detailed Development Application (DA/486/2020).

 

In relation to the Aboriginal interests, Crown Lands recommends that Randwick Council engage with the relevant Aboriginal Land Councils to either obtain written consent that the proposal can proceed or to have their claim withdrawn from the development area. This is not a required condition of consent and will be included in the advisory section under the recommended conditions of consent imposed under the Stage 2 Detailed Development Application (DA/486/2020). We note that as part of the Plan of Management update, the Council has identified that written advice from the native title manager will be sought prior to the Plan of Management being finalised.

 

The purpose of this report is to allow Council to consider the attached assessment report and determine whether to make a submission to the SECPP.

 


 

2.       The site and background to the proposal

 

The site forms part of Heffron Park, which is the largest recreational park in Randwick and includes playing fields (rugby league, soccer, touch football, oz tag and cricket), tennis and netball courts, a cycling criterium track, gymnastics and indoor sports centre, and an aquatic and leisure centre. Heffron Park is 44 hectares in size and is a significant regional park which provides for a range of sporting facilities as well as passive recreation areas such as walking and children’s play areas.

 

The Park is Crown Land owned by the Department of Planning Industry & Environment – Crown Lands. Care, control and management of the Park is the responsibility of the Heffron Park (Reserve 81741) Reserve Trust and Randwick City Council manages the affairs of the Trust. Randwick City Council acts as the Reserve Manager.

 

The specific area within Heffron Park where the Concept DA works apply is located in the south-west corner and is legally referred to as Lot 7027 in Deposited Plan 1026884, also known as 417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra. The specific area (referred to as “the site” within this report) has a total area of approximately 51,000m2.

 

In 2013, the South Sydney Rabbitohs Rugby League Club approached Randwick City Council to consider a request to relocate their training and administration facilities from Redfern Oval to Heffron Park following opportunities for substantial Federal and State Government grant funding towards this project.

 

In 2019, Council entered into an Agreement for Lease and License with the South Sydney District Rugby League Football Club (the Rabbitohs) under a Public Private Partnership (PPP) to accommodate administration, training and community facilities within a CHPC to be delivered as one component of the Heffron Centre.

 

On 25 August 2020, the Concept Design for Heffron Park was reported to the Ordinary Council meeting and Council endorsed the design to allow the Project Team to progress with lodgement of a Development Application.

 

The existing buildings fronting Bunnerong Road, comprising the Matraville Indoor Sports Centre and Bunnerong Gymnastics Centre, are over 40 years old. The concept proposal offers an opportunity to provide for modern facilities for community sports in conjunction with the CHPC. The proposal has been developed based on an integrated model to bring together grassroots, civic context, elite sporting initiatives and a variety of programming opportunities to benefit the local community and Randwick City Council.

 

3.       Public Exhibition and Notification

 

A range of community consultation activities was undertaken during the preparation of the project design, including presentations to Precinct Planning Committees, Council’s Mayor and Councillors, precinct groups, representatives from key sporting organisations including Football NSW, Volleyball NSW, Gymnastics NSW and Netball NSW, and to the community via letters and the Randwick City Council website.

 

The Concept DA was subject to public exhibition in accordance with Council’s Community Participation Plan involving an advertisement on Council’s website, a site notification attached to the subject site and written notice to surrounding property owners both within the Randwick LGA and nearby Bayside Council LGA. The Concept DA was placed on public exhibition in conjunction with DA/486/2020 seeking the works to the site under the Stage 2 Detailed DA.

 

As a result of the notification process for both applications, a total of 170 unique submissions were received.

 

Many of the submissions related to the gymnastics facility, in relation to meeting the requirements of the current local gymnastics community and Gymnastics NSW; whether there would be opportunity to expand student numbers within the facility; and questioning whether priority was being made to Souths rather than the community. There were also submissions relating to design and landscaping, and light spillage from the external lights. Refer to the attached SECPP report that provides detailed responses to the submissions insofar as they relate to the conceptual layout. The report relating to DA/486/2020 provides further responses on these submissions, as they relate to design issues associated with the physical works / the facility.

 

4.       Relevant Environmental Planning Instruments

 

The subject site is zoned RE1 – Public Recreation under Randwick Local Environmental Plan (RLEP) 2012. The proposal is consistent with the zoning objectives in that it:

 

•     Provides for the continued use of land for recreational purposes;

•     Protects and enhances the natural environment for recreational uses;

•     Supports a range of recreational activities and compatible land uses; and

•     Is sited and designed to minimise environmental impacts.

 

The land uses proposed are defined as ‘recreation facility (indoor)’ and ‘café’ which are permissible uses in the zone. The additional land uses of community classrooms and meeting rooms, administration areas, change facilities, equipment storage, merchandise shop and general administration areas are ancillary to the main indoor recreation facility. It is noted that a ‘community facility’ is also a permissible use in the zone.

 

Due to the RE1 zoning and nature of the development there are no applicable development standards for the subject site.

 

5.       Key Issue - Design Excellence and Built Form

 

Due to the size of the subject site being greater than 10,000m2, the site is subject to Clause 6.11 – Design Excellence of RLEP 2012 which requires the development to exhibit design excellence. As such, the application was referred to Randwick Design Excellence Panel (DEP) for review and recommendations prior to lodgement (on 7 August 2020) and post-lodgement (on 13 October 2020). The DEP raised concerns in relation to the proposal with particular regards to scale and built form, landscaping, amenity and aesthetics. In response to the DEP comments, the applicant made design changes to the proposal as part of an amended submission under DA/486/2020. The overall design concept, in terms of layout, footprint and building mass largely remained as submitted under the Concept DA (DA/480/2020).

 

The application was referred to the DEP again on 7 December 2020, the summary and recommendations are excerpted below:

 

“As previously noted, the proposal provides a rare opportunity to create a landmark in a visible place that serves the community, demonstrates Council’s ongoing commitment to sustainability and community, and houses an iconic sports team with all of the unique identity attributes that offers. The proposal provides an opportunity to realise exemplary sustainability outcomes, create a building that merges with its sweeping landscape while providing both public and private amenity.

 

The Panel believes the scheme needs to go further in attaining these aspirations. Art and materiality should be only one part of this further development.”

 

Of particular issue, the DEP considered that the building should read as a series of elements rather than a single large massing. The DEP believed that the massing should be modulated and an overall approach to the landscape of the entrances and spine should be considered, with use of native landscape that once occupied the site. The internal legibility and connection with the landscape was raised.

 

The DEP noted that while the changes made were positive, they did not go far enough to address the Panel’s concerns relating to the provision of public art linking with the landscaping of the site to improve the architectural outcome.

 

Noting the DEP comments, it is considered that the amended design does result in an improvement to the external modulation of the built form and provides a good level of amenity to the internal spaces. The intent of the Heffron Centre is that it operates as an integrated facility allowing a blending of uses and shared spaces. The end uses of the Centre also requires the built form to accommodate large open spaces. The front entrance and internal pedestrian link to the Showcase Field has been reduced in scale and the use of skylights compliment the clear vistas through the building. The landscape concept for the Centre details the use of landscape dunes and Australian native grasses, trees, shrubs and groundcovers to reflect the historical landscape setting of Maroubra.

 

A Public Art Strategy has also been developed since the DEP meeting to support the holistic approach by Randwick Council to deliver public art across the LGA and specifically through the design and implementation of artwork as part of the Heffron Centre.

 

5.       Conclusion

 

The Heffron Centre will deliver the upgraded community indoor recreation facilities which have been earmarked for the site for many years. It will also provide a new home for the South Sydney Rabbitohs Rugby League team and accommodate the team’s headquarters and training facilities through the Community and High Performance Centre in association with the approved Showcase NRL Field. In addition, it will provide a new base for Souths Cares to double their health, education and employment programs for communities across South Sydney and broader NSW.

 

The Heffron Centre will deliver more than 200 jobs during construction, and more than 60 ongoing jobs through the operation of the facility.

 

The project is a shared vision between Randwick City Council, its key project partner the South Sydney District Rugby League Football Club (Rabbitohs) and the NSW State Government (through the Office of Sport).

 

The project has been through extensive community consultation which has assisted the applicant and their design team in forming the proposal that is now before Council.

 

The Concept proposal is consistent with the Heffron Park Plan of Management and the Landscape Masterplan. The proposal achieves the key objective of the Plan of Management, which is to ensure that Heffron Park retains its importance as a sporting park while providing increased opportunities and improvements in passive recreation.

 

It is recommended that the Concept DA be endorsed by Council and that the application be referred to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel for approval.

 

6.       Recommendation

 

It is recommended that the Concept DA be endorsed by Council and that the application be referred to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel for approval.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel Report DA/480/2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      GAT & Associates, Town Planners     

 

File Reference:               DA/480/2020

 


Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel Report DA/480/2020

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP6/21

 

Subject:        417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra (DA/486/2020 - Stage 2 Detailed Development Application)

 

Proposal:                       Demolition of existing buildings and structures on site; site preparation works including termination or relocation of site services and infrastructure, remediation, tree removal, erection of site protection fencing; and construction of the new Heffron Centre with associated car parking for 143 spaces, building identification signage and public domain works within the site, including new landscaping and tree planting

Ward:                             Central Ward

Applicant:                      Randwick City Council

Owner:                           Department of Planning Industry & Environment – Crown Lands

Cost of works:               $45,650,000.00

Recommendation

That the recoomedation in the SECPP assessment report for DA/486/2020, 417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra be endorsed.

 

 


 

Note: multiple submissions received from numerous properties within the wider area which are not identified in the above map. Refer to attached SECPP report for submission list.

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 

1.       Introduction

 

Council is in receipt of a development application seeking consent for the redevelopment of the site known as 417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra. The site is part of Heffron Park, which is the largest recreational park in Randwick and includes playing fields, tennis and netball courts, a cycling criterium track, and an aquatic and leisure centre.

 

The DA seeks approval for the following:

 

·      Demolition of existing buildings and structures within the site.

·      Site preparation works, including termination or relocation of site services and infrastructure, remediation, tree removal and the erection of site protection fencing.

·      Construction of the new Heffron Centre, including:

− A Community and High-Performance Centre (CHPC).

− An indoor multi-purpose sporting facility.

− A local indoor gymnastics centre.

− Café.

− Installation of floodlighting to the Showcase Field.

·      Car parking for 143 spaces, including a combination of staff and visitor spaces, accessed via the existing signalised intersection of Bunnerong Road and Flint Street.

·      Building identification signage.

·      Public domain works within the site, including new landscaping and tree planting.

 

This is a Stage 2 Detailed DA which has been submitted concurrently with a Concept DA (DA/480/2020) for the site which seeks approval for the in-principle demolition of existing site improvements and associated tree removal; land uses, including for a ‘recreation facility (indoor)’ and a ‘café’, including ancillary administration uses provided for the purpose of operating the recreation facilities; site layout and configuration, including the general location and size of car parking areas, buildings, and vehicular access to Bunnerong Road via the existing signalised intersection at Flint Street; and a building envelope as detailed in the Building Envelope Plans prepared by Co-op Studio.

 

The Concept DA is required to satisfy Clause 6.12 of the Randwick LEP 2012, which requires development on land with a site area of more than 10,000m2 to have a site-specific development control plan. The Concept DA can be used to satisfy the requirement for a site-specific development control plan under Section 4.23 of the EP&A Act 1979.

 

The Concept DA under DA/480/2020 and the Stage 2 works DA under DA/486/2020 are assessed concurrently.

 

The application has an estimated cost of $45,650,000 and the applicant is Randwick Council. The Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel (SECPP) is the consent authority for the Development Application pursuant to Section 4.7, of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Schedule 7 of the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011 as the applicant for the development is Randwick City Council with a capital investment value in excess of $5 million and is defined as Regionally Significant Development.

 

The application was notified to the Department of Planning, Industry & Environment – Crown Lands (Crown Lands) as owner of the land. The requirement for owners consent from Crown Lands is being obtained pursuant to Clause 49(2) of the EP & A Regulations 2000, which states:

 

“(2)  The consent of the owner of the land is not required for a development application made by a public authority, or for a development application for public notification development, if the applicant instead gives notice of the application—

(a)  to the owner of the land before the application is made, or

(b)  by publishing a notice no later than 14 days after the application is made—

(i)  in a newspaper circulating in the area in which the development is to be carried out, and

(ii)  in the case of an application made by a public authority, on the public authority’s website, or, in the case of public notification development, on the NSW planning portal.”

 

The Plan of Management applying to Heffron Park from 2009 is required to be updated under the Crown Land Management Act (CLM) 2016 to authorise the proposed development. Council is currently undertaking this process of updating the Plan of Management with a target date of May 2021 for public exhibition and a resolution date of the 30 June 2021 (subject to no additional public exhibitions being required).

 

As owners consent needs to be obtained prior to an operational consent being issued, the recommendation that a deferred commencement condition be imposed requiring the necessary authority under the CLM Act to be obtained prior to carrying out the development is noted and will be included in the recommended conditions of consent imposed under the Stage 2 Detailed Development Application (DA/486/2020).

 

In relation to the Aboriginal interests, Crown Lands recommends that Randwick Council engage with the relevant Aboriginal Land Councils to either obtain written consent that the proposal can proceed or to have their claim withdrawn from the development area. This is not a required condition of consent and will be included in the advisory section under the recommended conditions of consent imposed under the Stage 2 Detailed Development Application (DA/486/2020). We note that as part of the Plan of Management update, the Council has identified that written advice from the native title manager will be sought prior to the Plan of Management being finalised.

 

The purpose of this report is to allow Council to consider the attached assessment report and determine whether to make a submission to the SECPP.

 

2.      The site and background to the proposal

 

The site forms part of Heffron Park, which is the largest recreational park in Randwick and includes playing fields (rugby league, soccer, touch football, oz tag and cricket), tennis and netball courts, a cycling criterium track, gymnastics and indoor sports centre, and an aquatic and leisure centre. Heffron Park is 44 hectares in size and is a significant regional park which provides for a range of sporting facilities as well as passive recreation areas such as walking and children’s play areas.

 

The Park is Crown Land owned by the Department of Planning Industry & Environment – Crown Lands. Care, control and management of the Park is the responsibility of the Heffron Park (Reserve 81741) Reserve Trust and Randwick City Council manages the affairs of the Trust. Randwick City Council acts as the Reserve Manager.

 

The specific area within Heffron Park where the development works apply is located in the south-west corner and is legally referred to as Lot 7027 in Deposited Plan 1026884, also known as 417-439 Bunnerong Road, Maroubra. The specific area (referred to hereon as “the site” within this report) has a total area of approximately 51,000m2.

 

The site has a primary frontage to Bunnerong Road to the west. Pedestrian access to the site is currently provided from Bunnerong Road, Jersey Road and Fitzgerald Avenue and vehicular access is provided off Bunnerong Road.

 

The existing buildings on the Bunnerong Road site, comprising the Matraville Indoor Sports Centre and Bunnerong Gymnastics Centre, are over 40 years old.

 

The submission of this DA follows on from 2019 when Council entered into an Agreement for Lease and License with the South Sydney District Rugby League Football Club (the Rabbitohs) under a Public Private Partnership (PPP) to accommodate administration, training and community facilities within a Community and High-Performance Centre (CHPC) to be delivered as one component of the Heffron Centre.

 

3.       Issues

 

Public Exhibition and Notification

 

A range of community consultation activities was undertaken during the preparation of the project design, including presentations to Precinct Planning Committees, Council’s Mayor and Councillors, precinct groups, representatives from key sporting organisations including Football NSW, Volleyball NSW, Gymnastics NSW and Netball NSW, and to the community via letters and the Randwick City Council website.

 

The Stage 2 Detailed Development Application was subject to public exhibition in accordance with Council’s Community Participation Plan involving an advertisement on Council’s website, a site notification attached to the subject site and written notice to surrounding property owners including those within the Randwick LGA and nearby Bayside Council LGA. The Stage 2 Detailed DA was placed on public exhibition in conjunction with the Concept Application DA/480/2020.

 

As a result of the notification process for both applications, a total of 170 unique submissions were received.

 

Many of the submissions related to the gymnastics facility, in relation to meeting the requirements of the current local gymnastics community and Gymnastics NSW; whether there would be opportunity to expand student numbers within the facility; and questioning whether priority was being made to Souths rather than the community. There were also submissions relating to design and landscaping, and light spillage from the external lights.

 

4.       Relevant Environmental Planning Instruments

 

The subject site is zoned RE1 – Public Recreation under Randwick Local Environmental Plan (RLEP) 2012. The proposal is consistent with the zoning objectives in that it:

 

•     Provides for the continued use of land for recreational purposes;

•     Protects and enhances the natural environment for recreational uses;

•     Supports a range of recreational activities and compatible land uses; and

•     Is sited and designed to minimise environmental impacts.

 

The land uses proposed are defined as ‘recreation facility (indoor)’ and ‘café’ which are permissible uses in the zone. The additional land uses of community classrooms and meeting rooms, administration areas, change facilities, equipment storage, merchandise shop and general administration areas are ancillary to the main indoor recreation facility, however the zoning does also permit a ‘community facility’.

 

Due to the RE1 zoning and nature of the development there are no applicable development standards for the subject site.

 

Design Excellence and Built Form

 

Due to the size of the subject site being greater than 10,000m2, the site is subject to Clause 6.11 – Design Excellence of RLEP 2012 which requires the development to exhibit design excellence. As such, the application was referred to Randwick Design Excellence Panel (DEP) for review and recommendations prior to lodgement (on 7 August 2020) and post-lodgement (on 13 October 2020). The DEP raised concerns in relation to the proposal with particular regards to scale and built form, landscaping, amenity and aesthetics. In response to the DEP comments, the applicant made design changes to the proposal as part of an amended submission under DA/486/2020. The overall design concept, in terms of layout, footprint and building mass largely remained as submitted under the Concept DA (DA/480/2020).

 

The application was referred again to the DEP again on 7 December 2020 and the summary and recommendations are excerpted below:

 

“As previously noted, the proposal provides a rare opportunity to create a landmark in a visible place that serves the community, demonstrates Council’s ongoing commitment to sustainability and community, and houses an iconic sports team with all of the unique identity attributes that offers. The proposal provides an opportunity to realise exemplary sustainability outcomes, create a building that merges with its sweeping landscape while providing both public and private amenity.

 

The Panel believes the scheme needs to go further in attaining these aspirations. Art and materiality should be only one part of this further development.”

 

Of particular issue, the DEP considered that the building should read as a series of elements rather than a single large massing. The massing should be modulated and an overall approach to the landscape of the entrances and spine should be considered, with use of native landscape that once occupied the site. The internal legibility and connection with the landscape was raised.

 

The DEP noted that while the changes made to the proposal were positive, they did not go far enough to address the Panel’s concerns relating to the provision of public art linking with the landscaping of the site to improve the architectural outcome.

 

Noting the DEP comments, this planning assessment finds that the amended design improves the external modulation of the built form and provides a good level of amenity to the internal spaces. The intent of the Heffron Centre is that it operates as an integrated facility allowing a blending of uses and shared spaces. The end uses of the Centre also requires the built form to accommodate large open spaces. The front entrance and internal pedestrian link to the Showcase Field has been reduced in scale and the use of skylights compliment the clear vistas through the building. The landscape concept for the Centre details the use of landscape dunes and Australian native grasses, trees, shrubs and groundcovers to reflect the historical landscape setting of the site.

 

A Public Art Strategy has also been developed since the DEP meeting to support the holistic approach by Randwick Council to deliver public art across the LGA and specifically through the design and implementation of artwork as part of the Heffron Centre. It is recommended that the DEP continue to be engaged with the further development of this Public Art Strategy.

 

Other planning instruments

 

The proposal is also subject to the provisions of:

 

·      State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011

·      State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007

·      State Environmental Planning Policy No. 55 – Remediation of Land

·      State Environmental Planning Policy 64 – Advertising and Signage

·      Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013

 

The assessment report prepared for DA/486/2020 finds the proposal to be consistent with these policies.

 

3.       Conclusion

 

The Heffron Centre will deliver the upgraded community indoor recreation facilities which have been earmarked for the site for many years. It will also provide a new home for the South Sydney Rabbitohs Rugby League team and accommodate the team’s headquarters and training facilities through the Community and High Performance Centre in association with the approved Showcase NRL Field. In addition, it will provide a new base for Souths Cares to double their health, education and employment programs for communities across South Sydney and broader NSW.

 

The Heffron Centre will deliver more than 200 jobs during construction, and more than 60 ongoing jobs through the operation of the facility.

 

The project is a shared vision between Randwick City Council, its key project partner the South Sydney District Rugby League Football Club (Rabbitohs) and the NSW State Government (through the Office of Sport).

 

The project has been through extensive community consultation which has assisted the applicant and their design team in forming the proposal that is now before Council. This Stage 2 Detailed Development Application seeks consent for the following works:

 

·      Demolition of existing buildings and structures within the site.

·      Site preparation works, including termination or relocation of site services and infrastructure, remediation, tree removal and the erection of site protection fencing.

·      Construction of the new Heffron Centre, including:

− A Community and High-Performance Centre (CHPC).

− An indoor multi-purpose sporting facility.

− A local indoor gymnastics centre.

− Café.

− Installation of floodlighting to the approved Showcase Field.

·      Car parking for 143 spaces, including a combination of staff and visitor spaces, accessed via the existing signalised intersection of Bunnerong Road and Flint Street.

·      Building identification signage.

·      Public domain works within the site, including new landscaping and tree planting.

 

The proposal is consistent with the Concept Development Application submitted under DA/480/2020, which is consistent with the Heffron Park Plan of Management and the Landscape Masterplan. The proposal achieves the key objective of the Plan of Management, which is to ensure that Heffron Park retains its importance as a sporting park while providing increased opportunities and improvements in passive recreation.

 

It is recommended that the Stage 2 Detailed Development Application, DA/486/2020, be approved subject to a deferred commencement consent requiring the necessary authority under the Crown Land Management Act  2016 be obtained prior to the consent becoming operational. 

 

4.       Recommendation

 

That the recommendation in SECPP assessment report for DA/486/2020, 417-439R Bunnerong Road, Maroubra be endorsed.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel Report DA/486/2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      GAT & Associates, Town Planners     

 

File Reference:               DA/486/2020

 


Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel Report DA/486/2020

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP7/21

 

Subject:         Coogee Bay Road - Streets as Shared Spaces Project

 

 

Summary

 

·      At its meeting on 8 December 2020, Council resolved to undertake a survey of residents and to delegate the decision as to whether to extend the Coogee Bay Road Shared Village project past February 2021 to a committee made up with the Mayor and the Councillors from the East and North Wards.

 

·      The committee met on 4 February 2021 and resolved to defer this decision to the February Council meeting. 

 

·      In accordance with Council’s resolution of 8 December 2020, Council consulted with the local community to obtain feedback on the Coogee Bay Road Shared Village project and to determine community attitudes to extending the program.

 

·      The survey of 3,029 respondents indicated general support for the project with 79% saying it should be extended and 86% wanted it to be made permanent.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

1.   Extend the Coogee Bay Road Shared Village project until the end of August 2021.

 

2.   Install festoon lighting on a permanent basis in Coogee Bay Rd.

3.   Continue the music program as part of the village project.

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Community Consultation Report Coogee Bay Road Shared Village survey

 

2.

Community Consultation Report CBR APPENDICES

 

3.

Attachment - Before and After photos

 

 

 


 

Background

 

The Coogee Bay Streets as Shared Spaces project was launched in November 2020 for an initial period of three months.

 

The project received grant funding from the NSW Government as a community and business support initiative, and this funding was matched by Council. The purpose of the project was to support local businesses and residents during the pandemic with additional space as well as outdoor dining.

 

An update on the project was provided to Council at its meeting on 8 December 2020 and to determine whether it wanted to extend the project beyond the 3 months given that Council would be in recess and would not be able to determine the matter before the end of the project.

 

At its meeting on 8 December 2020 Council resolved:

 

RESOLUTION: (Matson/Neilson) That:

 

a.   Council delegates to the Mayor and the Councillors from the East and North Wards the authority to decide on whether to extend the Coogee Bay Road Shared Village project beyond the 3 month timeframe;

 

b.   there should be a survey of Coogee residents as to whether the Coogee Bay Rd Shared Village project should be removed on 2 February 2021 or extended; and

 

c.   the General Manager is authorised to advise Councillors on the option of discontinuing the project should a time be reached when the wide spread availability of a COVID-19 vaccine clearly ameliorates the economic impact of the pandemic on Coogee Bay Road associated businesses.

 

Community consultation was undertaken between 15 and 29 January 2021. The ccommunity  engagement activities undertaken included:

 

·      Dedicated consultation website to complete an online survey

·      Letter to all households in Coogee with a link and QR code to complete survey. Residents without internet access could phone Council to complete the survey.
(7,812 letters were via Australia Post to every household in Coogee)

·      Poster and flyers distributed to businesses on Coogee Bay Road

·      Email to Your Say subscribers (5,898 subscribers): 15 January 2020

·      Randwick News (weekly email 50,000+ subscribers): 20 and 27 January 2021 

·      Facebook post: 15 January 2021 (8,272 people reached & 2,583 engagements)

·      Listing on Randwick City Council’s Current Consultations webpage

·      Email to all precincts

 

On 4 February 2021, the delegated group of Councillors from East and North Wards along with the Mayor met as per Council’s resolution.

 

The meeting was presented with the results of the survey undertaken as part of the community consultation and resolved as follows:

 

RESOLUTION: That:

 

The Mayor and the Councillors from the East and North Wards agree to refer the decision back to the full Council meeting in 23rd February 2021, with the possibility of extending the Coogee Bay Road Shared Village project to the end of April 2021.

 

FOR

AGAINST

Councillor Roberts

Councillor Bowen

Councillor Matson

Councillor Neilson

Councillor Said

 

Councillor Shurey

 

 

 

This report provides the outcome of the community consultation for Council’s consideration as to whether to continue the project.  

 

Community consultation

 

Between 15 and 29 January 2021, Council consulted with the local community to obtain feedback on the Coogee Bay Road Shared Village project and to determine community attitudes to extending the program.

 

An online survey was created and a letter sent to all 7,800 households in Coogee with a link and QR code encouraging residents to share their views.

 

Council received 3,029 completed surveys. 95% of respondents identify as local residents and 66% or 1,988 are from Coogee. This represents a sample size of 16% of the adult population of Coogee which provides a confidence interval or margin of error of 2.02% at 95% confidence level. This provides a very good level of confidence in the reliability of the data.

Key survey results:

·      79% of respondents rate the overall success of the project as good or excellent.

·      78% of respondents think the project should be extended.

·      Of those who support extending it, 86% want it permanently extended, 6% for three months and 5% for six months.

·      When asked to name three things they like most about the project, the top responses are:

 

Outdoor dining (1,585 responses)

Enhanced town vibrancy (1,363 responses)

More space (1,175 responses)

Support for local businesses (839 responses)

Calmer traffic (765 responses)

·      When asked what respondents like least about the project:

 

Negative impact on traffic congestion on the street and surrounding areas (535 responses)

Poor quality of the street furniture and general look of the area (335 responses)

Pedestrian crowding / too many people (189 responses)

 

The following excerpts from the consultation report respond to the key questions put to the community in relation to the overall success of the project and whether it should be extended beyond February 2021.

 

 

 

 


 

 

The graph above shows that of the 1,987 responses from Coogee residents, 77% think the project should be extended past February 2021. There is general support from workers, business owners and operators and a slightly higher level of support from visitors.

 

A full report on the survey outcomes and full free text comments from respondents can be found in the attachments to this report.

 

Other feedback

In addition to the formal consultation that was undertaken, Council received 19 emails in relation to the project which were both complimentary and critical.

The complaints of which there were 12, raised issues about bus diversions, parking and traffic congestion, emergency access and the festoon lights. These issues are in line with the comments outlined in the consultation report. There was also a concern raised from one of the businesses that they had experienced a significant reduction in their turnover due to the changed traffic and parking arrangements. Comments were also received about having an alternate direction of the traffic flow.

The compliments included positive comments about the vibrancy of the area and enjoying the al fresco dining as well as support of businesses and the festoon lights. These issues are also in line with the comments outlined in the consultation report.

 

Bike groups have also made comment about inclusion of a cycle path.

 

Agency feedback

 

The relevant Emergency Services organisations (Police, Ambulance, Fire) have been contacted and have raised no issues with the trial being extended. They advised that there were no issues encountered to-date.

 

The STA have raised no issues in relation to the existing format or extension of the trial.

Should the trial be extended the traffic team would look at implementing a temporary bus stop on Dolphin Street to address some of the concerns about the bus stop.

 

 

Project options

 

Following the results of the community consultation, Council Officers have scoped options for Council’s consideration.

 

 

Option

Timeframe

Details

Cost

A

Not extend the project, remove the project by the end of March 2021 to allow adequate notice to businesses.

Tidy up existing grass beds and astroturf; notice provided to businesses that the outdoor area will be removed and the two-way road re-installed.

$20, 000

The extension cost for 1 month (from February to March for decision)

B

Extend the project for 3 months until the end of May 2021.

Existing furniture remains in place with maintenance for 3 months.

$60,000

Cost is for hire only.

C

Extend the project for 6 months until the end of August 2021.

Existing furniture remains in place with maintenance for 6 months.

$99,415
Cost is for hire only.

D

Purchasing of items.

If council was to consider a longer term option, it would be more cost effective to purchase the infrastructure.

In this case the sections of grass would be replaced with timber decking and picket fencing, extending the footpath and dining areas. Large planter boxes installed along the decking. Existing chairs and tables remain.

The decking is moveable and once purchased can be re located to other areas where required. This option would take about 1 week so transfer the grass beds out and install the decking and fencing.

$300,000 + $8,000pa ongoing maintenance

 

Cost is for purchase of outdoor dining platforms and parklet. Annual maintenance as required.

E

Festoon lights

The installation of permanent festoon lights. Existing lights removed with permanent outdoor lighting installed.

$75 000.00

F

Music program

Pop-up music program on weekends

3 months

6 months

 

$14 400.00

$28 000.00

 

The reason that option D has been included is that 86% of survey respondents who supported extending the project indicated that they would support the one-way change and extended area on Coogee Bay Road on a more permanent basis. 

 

A long-term solution for Coogee Bay Road could be to further extend the footpaths to provide the additional space, making the road one-way in a permanent way and design for outdoor dining as part of a long-term project. However given the recent upgrade to the road and the inconvenience/disruption that residents and businesses were put through it is not proposed that a permanent project is implemented that would involve digging up the road to extend the footpath and moving utilities.

 

If council was to consider a longer term option, it would be better to purchase more robust infrastructure rather than ongoing hire of the existing structures.

 




Mock-up of desking and fencing installed, available for purchase

 

FESTOON LIGHTING AND MUSIC PROGRAM

In addition to the shared spaces project, Council also incorporated festoon lighting along Coogee Bay Road and a music program.

 

The festoon lighting installation was only designed to be temporary so if this was to be extended new lighting would need to be installed to ensure the ongoing success of the lighting.

 

Some issues were experienced with the festoon lighting based on them being for temporary use. However, feedback from the businesses and community and through the survey shows that the lighting was well received and greatly assisted in making the area more pleasant, safe and improving the ambience.

 

We did have a resident indicate that the lighting was impacting them so should Council proceed with the permanent lights the timing on the lighting would need to be looked at. 

 

The music program in Coogee was also well received particularly by the businesses who reported that the atmosphere in the evenings was boosted through the live music performances.

 

It was also a great way to support local musicians after what has been a tough year. It is proposed that should the music program continue past 2021 then businesses would be asked to contribute to cover the cost of this.

 

  

Festoon lighting along Coogee Bay Road

 

                  

Images of pop-up music program                                         

The cost for the permanent festoon lighting is $75,000 and the cost to run a music program for the next 6 months is $28 800. It is recommended that Council proceed with both of these additions regardless of whether the project is extended.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

6. A liveable city.

Direction

6b. Our centres, beaches, streets and other public places are safe, inviting, clean and support a recognisable image of our City.

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

2. A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction

6c. The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and stategies.

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

8. A strong local economy.

Direction

8a. Vibrant business, commercial and industrial sectors that provide ongoing and diverse employment opportunities and serve the community.

         

Resourcing Strategy implications

Option

Cost

Funded

Not extend the project, remove the project by the end of March

$20,000

Through the Economic Development & Placemaking budget

Extend the project for 3 months until the end of May

$60,000

Through the Economic Development & Placemaking budget

Extend the project for 6  months until the end of August

$99,415

Through the Economic Development & Placemaking budget

Purchase the infrastructure items for ongoing use.

$300,000 + $8,000pa annual maintenance

Through the Capital Works budget as an infrastructure project

Festoon lights

$75,000

Through the Capital Works budget as an infrastructure project

Music program extended for

3 months

6 months

 

$14,400

$28,800


Through the Economic Development & Placemaking budget

 

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

The funding from DPIE has been allocated and no additional funding is available at this stage. An acquittal report will be provided to DPIE with the outcomes of the grant.

 

Conclusion

 

The Coogee Bay Road Shared Village project has helped improve the ambience and attractiveness of the streetscape while also providing more space for shoppers, walkers and for outdoor dining. There has been support for the project and to extend it further with a majority of respondents wanting it made permanent. People have reported the area feeling safer and more inviting and this has helped attract more people back to Coogee in a COVID safe manner. Extending the project further would continue to provide benefits to locals, visitors and businesses who have been hard hit by the economic impacts of COVID-19.

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Joshua Hay, Communications Manager; Katie Anderson, Manager Cultural Events and Venues     

 

File Reference:               F2020/00555

 


Community Consultation Report Coogee Bay Road Shared Village survey

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Community Consultation Report CBR APPENDICES

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Attachment - Before and After photos

Attachment 3

 

 

Before and after photos, Coogee Bay Road

 

 

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP8/21

 

Subject:         La Perouse Ferry Wharf Project Update

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·      Transport for NSW (TfNSW) has issued a Project update information sheet (February 2021) in relation to the Kamay Ferry Wharves project which is being distributed to the local community.

 

·      This latest project update (Attachment 1) invites the community and other stakeholders to provide input on the wharves project prior to the release and public exhibition of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) later in the middle of 2021. 

 

·    The Project update information sheet is to be distributed to property letterboxes in La Perouse and Kurnell and a Your Say Kamay Ferry Wharves website has been created for community feedback.

 

·      Onsite information sessions about the proposed reinstatement of the ferry wharves will be held at La Perouse on Wednesday 24 February (5pm-7pm) and Saturday 27 February (10am -12pm).

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council receive and note the La Perouse Ferry Wharf Project update.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

La Perouse Ferry Wharf Project Update

 

2.

SEARS - Kamay Ferry Wharves

 

 

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the latest update on the Kamay Ferry Wharves project that was issued by Transport for NSW (TfNSW) in February 2021. The update essentially contains an invitation to the community and stakeholders to contribute comments on the project to inform the preparation of the EIS.

 

Background

 

In 2016, TfNSW completed a feasibility study into the viability of reinstating the wharves and ferry service between La Perouse and Kurnell which have been closed since 1974 when severe storms damaged the wharves. The study concluded that reinstating the wharves would provide numerous benefits for La Perouse, Kurnell and wider Sydney. 

 

In May 2020, a State Significant Infrastructure application was made under section 5.15 of the EP&A Act for the reinstatement of ferry wharves at La Perouse and Kurnell. The proposal includes the following key features:

 

•     The reconstruction of maritime infrastructure at La Perouse and Kurnell suitable for the berthing of passenger ferries, tourism-related commercial vessels and recreational vessels.

•     The construction of amenities that are specifically needed to allow the safe and efficient operation of the maritime infrastructure.

 

Secretary’s Environmental Assessment Requirement (SEARS)

 

In June 2020, the DPIE requested comments from a number of key stakeholders to the Secretary’s Environmental Assessment Requirement (SEARS) as part of the process for the preparation of the EIS. Randwick Council made a submission to the SEARS request (Attachment 2) raising the following issues that need to be addressed in any future EIS for the project:

 

·      Heritage Significance and Impacts - including the preparation of a detailed Aboriginal heritage assessment in line with the NSW Code of Practice for Archaeological Investigation of Aboriginal Objects; comprehensive assessment of the potential impact of the proposal on surrounding heritage items and conservation areas; and recognition of the unique Aboriginal and European  historical and heritage significance of the La Perouse area.

 

·      Traffic, Parking and Transport - including the preparation of a transport strategy that considers the existing limited parking and vehicle movements, public transport, pedestrian access and cycle infrastructure within the vicinity of the site and the adequacy of these transport modes to cater for the proposed development; analysis and review of the existing La Perouse precinct traffic and parking issues and constraints; and mitigation measures to address any future traffic congestion and parking shortfall and to promote active transport, (ie., walking and cycling)

 

·      Environmental Impacts – including the impacts of the tidal flow of waters and currents in and out of Yarra Bay and its impact on the proposed ferry wharf; potential dredging, channelling and scouring of the seabed in Frenchmans Bay to accommodate the wharf structure;  potential loss of seagrass and other protected marine life in Frenchmans Bay and Yarra Bay from dredging to accommodate the proposed Perouse Wharf and ferry lanes.

 

·      Social and Economic Benefit – including the analysis of the potential social and economic impacts that may arise from a ferry wharf in La Perouse; the social benefits of the project to the La Perouse local indigenous community in terms of re-establishing this community’s strong connection with Kurnell and the consequent benefit of water access that has been missing since the termination of the ferry service after the 1974 storm event; the potential impacts on the existing recreational uses in Frenchmans Bay including swimming, snorkelling and sailing (the Yarra Bay Sailing Club) and beach users; and integration with the activities and programs of the La Perouse Museum and headland.

 

·      Urban Design – consideration of the local character qualities of La Perouse including the sensitive coastal environment of Frenchmans Bay, Yarra Bay, Bare Island and the La Perouse; the Aboriginal  history and heritage of La Perouse; the Kamay Botany Bay National Park; a design that caters to the needs of a variety of users including “non-ferry” users such as sight seers and fishers.

 

Request for community input

 

In the attached Project Update information sheet (February 2021), TfNSW is inviting community input in relation to the Kamay Ferry Wharves to inform the preparation of the EIS. TfNSW advises that it is continuing to work on the designs for the proposed wharves as a prelude to the EIS. As part of his process, TfNSW is inviting the community and other stakeholders to provide input prior to the release of an EIS proposed for the middle of the year. The project update information sheet is being distributed to property letterboxes on both sides of Botany Bay in the La Perouse and Kurnell areas.

 

There is also a Your Say Kamay Ferry Wharves website for community feedback at the following link: https://yoursay.transport.nsw.gov.au/kamay-ferry-wharves.

 

Onsite information sessions about the proposed reinstatement of the ferry wharves are to be held at La Perouse on the following dates:

 

•         Wednesday 24 February between 5pm-7pm and

•         Saturday 27 February between 10am - 12pm.

 

These will be held on the lawns in front of the La Perouse Museum, 1542 Anzac Parade, La Perouse.

 

Conclusion

 

The Project update information sheet seeks community consultation through letterbox drop of the information sheet; creation of a Your Say Kamay Ferry Wharves website and on-site information sessions in La Perouse. Feedback is sought by 5 March 2020.

 

The community consultation as detailed in the project update information sheet represents a supplementary layer of consultation undertaken by TfNSW prior to, and in addition to, the public exhibition of the EIS proposed in mid-2021.

 

Council officers will make a supplementary submission to the current community consultation reiterating the key issues raised in Council’s previous submission to the SEARS process. Council will have another opportunity to make a submission once the EIS is released for public exhibition.

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      David Ongkili, Coordinator Strategic Planning     

 

File Reference:               F2019/01408

 


La Perouse Ferry Wharf Project Update

Attachment 1

 

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SEARS - Kamay Ferry Wharves

Attachment 2

 

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Services Report No. CS1/21

 

Subject:         Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·       The Council’s Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meets quarterly to examine issues relating to bike riding and cycling facilities.

 

·       The November 2020 meeting of the Advisory Committee was attended by Councillors, representatives of BIKEast, members of the community, and Council staff.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the minutes of the Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meeting, held on 18 November 2020, be received, and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

MINUTES - November 2020 CABFAC (cycleways and bicycle facilities advisory committee meeting)

 

2.

FINAL REPORT - November 2020 IBR (Initiatives for Bicycle Riders, CABFAC)

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

The Advisory Committee considered numerous matters of importance to local bicycle riders and the Minutes from the Committee’s meeting, held on 18 November 2020, are attached.

 

Also included is the updated ‘Initiatives for Bicycle Riders’ list – which captures each matter proposed and/or completed regarding facilities for bicycle riders in Randwick City.

 

Discussion

 

Refer to attachment MINUTES – 18 November 2020 CABFAC – cycleways and bicycle advisory committee meeting.

 

The next meeting of this forum will be held on 17 February 2021 at 6.30pm, and those Minutes will be reported to Council once reviewed and approved by the attendees.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

9. Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction

9a. A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

Any proposals for expenditure arising from the Advisory Committee’s recommendations are either covered by existing funding allocations or would be the subject of separate reports to the Council for funding.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

The Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee is set up to advise on bicycle infrastructure related matters. It was established from a Council Resolution on 10 October 2017.

 

Terms of reference:

1.    Report to the Council;

2.    Enhance consultation between Council and the bike riding community;

3.    Advance implementation of the planned and funded cycleways in the Randwick local government area;

4.    Review and provide advice on proposed Council bike related capital works projects;

5.    Participate in the yearly draft budget process by recommending appropriate bike related projects;

6.    Be consulted by Council on cycleway and bike facility issues involving significant planning proposals and Development applications before Council;

7.    Regularly review and propose updating of the Randwick Council bike plan in line with the strategic direction of priority cycleways as detailed within “Sydney’s Cycling Future”; and

8.    Help advance a Regional Cycle Strategy with neighboring Councils.

 

Conclusion

 

The Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee is a positive forum for the consideration of matters important to bicycle riders. The Committee’s recommendations are supported, and it is considered that they should be endorsed by the Council.

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Jane Parker, Senior Sustainable Transport Officer     

 

File Reference:               F2018/00158

 


MINUTES - November 2020 CABFAC (cycleways and bicycle facilities advisory committee meeting)

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FINAL REPORT - November 2020 IBR (Initiatives for Bicycle Riders, CABFAC)

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Services Report No. CS2/21

 

Subject:         Fitzgerald Avenue / Robey Street Intersection Controls

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·           Council resolved in 2019 that investigations be undertaken into the installation of a roundabout at the intersection of Fitzgerald Avenue and Robey Street, Maroubra.

 

·           Parallel to this decision, Council officers had also been examining options to improve the ability for pedestrians to cross Fitzgerald Avenue, at Robey Street; following concerns raised by residents.

 

·           Given that the introduction of a roundabout at this intersection would, likely, significantly increase traffic flows along Robey Street it is recommended that a roundabout be not installed.

 

·           It is proposed to install a pedestrian refuge at the intersection, to meet the needs of pedestrians, to introduce better lane discipline for motorists and to reduce the speed of Fitzgerald Avenue vehicles.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)   not proceed with the design and installation of a roundabout at the Fitzgerald Avenue / Robey Street intersection at this time given the likely unintended consequences for Robey Street residents (increased traffic flows);

 

b)   proceed with the design and installation of a pedestrian refuge in Fitzgerald Avenue, just west of Robey Street, Maroubra, to reduce vehicle speeds along Fitzgerald Avenue and to meet the needs of pedestrians accessing Heffron Park; and

 

c)   note the funds are available to complete the project within the current 2020-21 Operational Plan and Budget – Traffic Committee Works.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 


 

Purpose

 

This report details concerns regarding the suggested installation of a roundabout at the Fitzgerald Avenue / Robey Street intersection and proposes alternate improvements for pedestrians at this location.

 

Discussion

 

At its meeting held on 22 October 2019, the Council resolved:

 

(Andrews/Stavrinos) That:

 

1.   Council investigate the installation of a roundabout at the intersection of Fitzgerald Avenue and Robey Street Maroubra; and

 

2.   the matter be referred to the Randwick Traffic Committee.

 

In parallel to this Council resolution, Council officers had also been examining this intersection from the perspective of pedestrian safety.  Residents had raised concerns that it was very difficult, from a pedestrian’s perspective, to cross Fitzgerald Avenue near this intersection.  Community members perceived that it was unsafe to cross the road at this location and that this limited their ability to access Heffron Park and all its facilities.

 

Council should be aware of the unintended consequences, with regard to the installation of a roundabout at this location.  Currently, as a Robey Street motorist, it is quite time consuming to cross from one side of Fitzgerald Avenue to the other.  Such a crossing relies on two gaps in the Fitzgerald Avenue traffic flow coinciding at the Robey Street intersection. In other words, there must be a gap in the eastbound traffic flow coinciding with a gap in the westbound traffic flow before Robey Street motorists can cross Fitzgerald Avenue. This induced delay upon Robey Street motorists likely acts as a significant constraint on the total traffic volumes travelling along the full length of Robey Street. Local motorists likely learn that they can be delayed for some time when travelling north or south along Robey Street, so they take alternate routes.

 

The introduction of a roundabout would, to a great extent, release the current constraint at the intersection.  A Robey Street motorist would have to yield only to any vehicle already in the roundabout and then could command priority as they continued through the roundabout.  There would be no delay waiting for two gaps in the Fitzgerald Avenue traffic flow to coincide at the intersection.  In simple terms, the Robey Street motorist would only have to await a single gap in traffic coming from their right – then they could proceed.

 

The Council is currently receiving expressions of concern from Robey Street residents about the volume and speed of motorists travelling along their street.  Currently there are some 3,900 vehicles per day travelling along Robey Street (to the south of Fitzgerald Avenue).  Removing the current constraint at the Fitzgerald Avenue intersection would likely induce significant increases in traffic flow along Robey Street.  This would be especially so as northbound Anzac Parade motorists could turn left at Beauchamp Road, or Murray Street, and utilize Robey Street to avoid the Anzac Parade traffic signals at Fitzgerald Avenue and at Maroubra Road. 

 

Given the above issues, it is recommended that the installation of a roundabout at the Fitzgerald Avenue / Robey Street intersection not be supported at this time.

 

Regarding the community concerns about the crossing of Fitzgerald Avenue, as a pedestrian, Council officers have completed designs for a pedestrian refuge at the Robey Street intersection:

 

 

Installation of this pedestrian refuge would greatly meet the needs of pedestrians wishing to cross Fitzgerald Avenue.  It would also introduce better lane discipline for Fitzgerald Avenue motorists, and it would induce a reduction in the speed of Fitzgerald Avenue vehicles.  With reduced speeds and better lane discipline the performance and safety of this intersection would likely improve.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

9. Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction

9d. Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

Funding for the construction of the proposed Fitzgerald Avenue pedestrian refuge, west of Robey Street, is available within the current budget 2020-21 Operational Plan and Budget allocation for Traffic Committee works.

 

Conclusion

 

Given the likely unintended negative consequences, for Robey Street residents, with the introduction of a roundabout at the Fitzgerald Avenue / Robey Street intersection, it is recommended that a roundabout not be installed.  However, given that the introduction of a pedestrian refuge near the subject intersection would improve safety and improve pedestrian connections to and from Heffron Park, it is recommended that such a facility be installed.

 

 

Responsible officer:      Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport     

 

File Reference:               F2004/07233

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director City Services Report No. CS3/21

 

Subject:         Fallen Lifesavers Memorial - Stage 2 Update

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·      The Fallen Lifesavers Memorial is a tribute to those Australian lifesavers who lost their lives at war and did not return home.

 

·      The project was broken into two (2) stages for delivery. Stage 1 of the memorial was official unveiled on Sunday 27 April 2014 and included major site and landscaping works with the installation of the centre piece bronze sculpture.

 

·       Stage 2 of the project completes the memorial through the recognition of names of those fallen lifesavers and associated landscaping works.

 

·       A meeting with the Trust of the Fallen Lifesavers Memorial occurred on 8 February 2021.

 

·       A review of the Stage 2 Design Concept was endorsed by Trust Members.

 

·       The report seeks Council’s approval to proceed with the design development and delivery phases within the allocated project budget.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the Concept Design for Stage 2 of the Fallen Live Savers Memorial and proceed with the delivery of the project.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Presentation Stage 2 - Memorial Fallen Lifesavers

 

2.

Fallen Lifesavers Memorial Trust_Minutes of Meeting 8 February 2021

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

To provide council with the proposed revised Concept Design of the “Stage 2 - Fallen Lifesavers Memorial” project and seek endorsement to proceed to the delivery of the proposed works.

 

Discussion

 

Background

 

Since the Surf Life Saving movement began in 1907, thousands of lifesavers have served our nation in active duty. The Fallen Lifesavers Memorial is a tribute to those Australian lifesavers who lost their lives at war and did not return home.

 

The Fallen Lifesavers Memorial project was broken into two (2) stages for delivery. Stage 1 of the memorial was official unveiled on Sunday 27 April 2014 by The Hon Marie Bashir, Governor of NSW, The Hon Mike Baird, Premier of NSW and Councillor Scott Nash, Mayor of Randwick. The first stage included major site and landscaping works with the installation of the centre piece bronze sculpture.

 

Stage 2 of the project completes the memorial through the recognition of names of those fallen lifesavers and associated landscaping works only a few metres west of the current memorial within Goldstein Reserve, Coogee. Since completion of Stage 1, the required names for remembrance have now been compiled and endorsed ready for the commencement of Stage 2.

 

The Fallen Lifesavers Memorial is a collaboration between Randwick City Council, the NSW Government, the Australian Government, Surf Life Saving Australia and the Returned and Services League (RSL) of Australia.

 

On 8 February 2021, a meeting with the Fallen Lifesavers Memorial Trust was held in the Randwick Room at Council offices, with the following attendees:

 

·      Cr Danny Said, RCC Mayor – Chair

·      Ms Therese Manns, RCC General Manager

·      Tony Waller, Deputy Chair, Governor Coogee SLSC

·      Pat Garcia, Life Member Coogee SLSC

·      George Shales, President Surf Life Saving NSW

·      Steve Pearce, CEO Surf Life Saving NSW

·      Mike Sterling, President Coogee/Randwick Sub-Branch RSL

·      Graeme Finney (Brigadier Ret’d) – attending by phone

·      Marjorie O’Neill, State Member for Coogee

·      Matt Thistlethwaite, Federal Member for Kingsford Smith

·      By Invitation: Joe Santangelo, Coordinator Projects, Infrastructure Services.

 

The Minutes of the meeting are attached.

 

Summary of meeting

 

1)    Concept Design

The Stage 2 Concept Design and incorporation of an interactive display screen was presented and endorsed by the Trust members. (Please see Attachment 2)

 

2)    Interactive screen content development and management

The Trust endorsed a format for the content and that SLSNSW would be responsible for developing and maintaining the content data.

 

3)    Application to become a National War Memorial

Upon completion of Stage 2, the Trust make an application to the Department of Veterans Affairs to become a Military Memorial of National Significance.

 

 

4)    Design Development to proceed

The Trust endorsed that the design development proceeds, and that discussed design related matters be considered. The project seeks Council approval to proceed with the design development and delivery phases, within the allocated project budget and timeframe.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

4. Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction

2b. Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

The Trust noted and agreed with the requirement to acquit the grant from Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) upon completion of the project.

 

The project has an allocation of $148,390 from DVA within the 2020-21 budget.

 

At its ordinary meeting on the 25 October 2016, Council resolved (GM18/16) to provide an additional $62,000 to the project.

 

This brings the total project budget to $210,390. The pre-tender estimate of works notes that stage 2 of the project falls within this budget.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

Discussion regarding the memorial being designated as a memorial of “National Significance” and the criteria for such qualification was reviewed.

 

Upon completion of Stage 2, the Trust will make an application to the Department of Veterans Affairs to become a Military Memorial of National Significance. 

 

Conclusion

 

Upon receiving the endorsement of the Trust for the proposed Stage 2 design concept, the project seeks Council approval to proceed with the design development and delivery phases within the allocated project budget.

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Joe Santangelo, Coordinator Projects     

 

File Reference:               F2012/00305

 


Presentation Stage 2 - Memorial Fallen Lifesavers

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Fallen Lifesavers Memorial Trust_Minutes of Meeting 8 February 2021

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO1/21

 

Subject:         Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·       The Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers is based on the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW – 2020 and now applies to the Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) and the Randwick Local Planning Panel (RLPP).

 

·       On 22 September 2015 Council resolved that the Code of Conduct be applied to members of Randwick City Council Advisory Committees which includes working groups, reference groups and Precinct Executive members.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers be endorsed.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Code of Conduct for Council committees members, delegates of Council and Council advisers

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

To advise Council of the Model Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers - 2020.

 

This Code will replace the current Code of Conduct for Advisory Committees (adopted in June 2019) and will also apply the ARIC.

 

Discussion

 

The Advisory Committees Code of Conduct (which was adopted in June 2019) applies to members of Randwick City Council Advisory Committees which includes working groups, reference groups and Precinct Executive members. It is shortened and adapted from the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW (“the Model Code of Conduct”), which has been prescribed under the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (the “Regulation).

 

The new Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW (the Code) and the Procedures came into effect on 11 September 2020 when the Local Government (General) Regulation was updated.

 

The new Model Code broadens the definition of “council committee” and “council committee member” to include the ARIC.

 

In addition to the ARIC, the Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers applies to:

 

·      The Randwick Local Planning Panel, and

·      members of Council Advisory Committees (including working groups, reference groups and Precinct Executive members).

 

The Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers is based on a template Code produced by the Office of Local Government based on the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils 2020 specifically for application to Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers and excludes provisions that relate only to Councillors and staff.

 

The Code of Conduct provides guidance to members on Council’s expectations of their behavior and conduct as well as a framework for dealing with conflicts of interest, personal benefits and the appropriate use of Council resources.

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

1. Leadership in sustainability

Direction

1c. Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

N/A.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

Model Code of Conduct for NSW Councils – 2020

Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct 2020

Local Government Act 1993

Local Government (General) Regulation.

 

Conclusion

 

Having a minimum set of standards for the behaviour and activities of Advisory Committees is designed to ensure integrity, accountability and transparency. It also provides the community and Advisory Committees members with confidence in the operation of the committees.

 

This report addresses the Code of Conduct for Council committee members, delegates of Council and Council advisers (incorporating the Model Code of Conduct 2020). This Code applies to the ARIC, the RLPP and Council advisory committees (including Precinct Executives).

 

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

File Reference:               F2004/06569

 


Code of Conduct for Council committees members, delegates of Council and Council advisers

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Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO2/21

 

Subject:         2021 National General Assembly of Local Government

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·       The 2021 National General Assembly (NGA) of Local Government will be held at the National Convention Centre in Canberra from 20th-23rd June 2021.

 

·       The NGA is the principal conference of the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) and the theme of this year’s conference is ‘Working Together for Our Communities’.

 

·       Any motions for the NGA must be submitted to the March 2021 Council meeting, at the latest, the allow for submission to the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) by the deadline of Friday 26th March 2021.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Council endorses the attendance of interested Councillors at the 2021 National General Assembly in Canberra.

 

b)       any Councillors interested in attending 2021 National General Assembly of Local Government advise the General Manager as soon as possible for registration purposes.

 

c)       Any motions for the 2021 National General Assembly be submitted to the March 2021 Council meeting for endorsement by Council and to enablement submission by the due date (26th March 2021).

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 


 

Purpose

 

This report seeks to endorse the attendance of interested Councillors at the 2021 National General Assembly (NGA) of Local Government and to advise Councillors of the deadline for the submission of motions to the NGA.

 

Discussion

 

The 2021 NGA will be held at the National Convention Centre in Canberra from 20-23 June. The NGA is the principal conference of the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) and the theme of this year’s conference is ‘Working Together for Our Communities’.

 

This conference provides Councillors with a unique opportunity to hear from the leaders in our sector and across government and also provides unparalleled one on one access to the most influential decision makers in the nation.

 

At this time it is unclear whether COVID-19 restrictions will still be in force in June 2021, but if this is the case the NGA may also include virtual participation and attendance.

 

Motions

Motions for the NGA require a clear national objective, a summary of the key arguments in support of the motion and endorsement by Council. Any motions must be submitted to the March 2021 Council meeting, at the latest, the allow for submission by the deadline of Friday 26th March 2021.

 

 

Motions should generally be in a form that seeks the NGA’s support for a particular action or policy change at the Federal level which will assist local governments to meet local community needs. Motion should commence as follows: “This National General Assembly calls on the Australian Government to ……..”.


 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

1. Leadership in sustainability

Direction

1a. Council has a long-term vision based on sustainability.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

Councillors’ attendance at conferences has been allowed for in the 2020-21 budget.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy.

 

Conclusion

 

This is an important conference for Local Government throughout Australia as it is the only conference where the States come together to discuss Local Government specific issues.

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

File Reference:               F2014/00272

 


Ordinary Council meeting23 February 2021

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO3/21

 

Subject:         Investment Report - November 2020

 

 

Executive Summary

 

·       This report outlines Council’s investment portfolio and performance as at 30 November 2020.

 

·       All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

·       For the month of November, the portfolio provided a return of +0.09% (monthly), outperforming the benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index return by +0.08%.

 

·       The overweight position to AMP Bank following their credit downgrade in August 2019, from A- to BBB+ and a further downgrade to BBB is now represented by a single FRN maturing 30/03/2022. This will be managed as favourable sell opportunities are presented.

 

·       Cashflow continues to be monitored daily in light of current COVID-19 pandemic revenue reductions. Investments will be managed to ensure liquidity to meet operational requirements.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for November 2020 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - November 2020

 

 

 


 

Purpose

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the Ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Discussion

 

As at 30 November 2020, Council held investments with a market value of $98.65 million. The portfolio value increased during November by ~$7.39 million. The increase is representative of a positive cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts, rates, grants and miscellaneous payments, offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month because of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

Official interest rates have fallen to all-time-lows, and Council will see a decline in interest income over the next 12 months and through to such time when interest rates increase.  The RBA at its meeting on 3 November elected to lower the cash rate by a further 15bp, taking it to a new low of 0.10%.  It is expected rates would be low “for a very long period of time” until there is sustainable recovery and the economic objectives of full employment (unemployment rate of 4.5- 5.0%) and target inflation (2-3%) are on track. Given the current outlook, the RBA is not expecting to increase the cash rate for at least three years.

 

While cashflow has reduced because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have not endured the level of reduction expected and have been able to maintain a strong cashflow position. The overall investment portfolio remained stable during November and is now $7.57 million more than the same time last year, although this increase is down ~$1.0 mill from the end of last month. Extra cash on call continues to be held as we ensure funds are available to cover additional expenses and reductions in revenue. Reduced cash inflows are expected until 31 December 2020 while interest on overdue rates and charges remains at 0% p.a., while it is anticipated that the level of cash inflows will improve from 1 January 2021 when interest on overdue rates and charges returns at the rate of 7% p.a. Cash inflows may not immediately increase to pre-pandemic levels in the short term while ratepayers enduring pandemic related financial hardship take extra time to catch up on payments deferred during the interest free period.

 

Cashflow continues to be closely monitored, ensuring that there is enough cash in the business to operate on a day to day basis and:

 

·      ensuring that council maintains a balanced operating result;

·      ensuring that payments are received on time to control debtors; and

·      managing and financing capital projects correctly.

 

On Call Funds

 

On call funds are held to meet Council’s immediate cash flow requirements. The balance of available on call funds was increased to cover the shortfall in income over the pandemic period. Currently making up 18.42% of the total portfolio these additional funds will be maintained over the next few months to ensure liquidity, given the uncertainty around the ability of ratepayers to pay. When the cash flow situation settles, the approach to how we mange on call funds will be revised, with excess funds being re-directed back into TDs and FRNs.

 

The Cash Expense Cover Ratio at 30 November 2020 of 6.53 months indicates that Council can continue to pay for its immediate expenses without additional cash inflow for this period. The OLG benchmark for this ratio is three months.

 

 

Investment

Rating

Balance

1 November 2020

Movement

Balance

30 November 2020

Interest Rate

CBA

AA-

$8,329,811

-$179,355

$8,150,456

0.30%

Macquarie Bank

A+

$10,005,066

$12,604

$10,017,670

0.50%

 

 

Term Deposits

 

·      At month end, the portfolio included $51.1 million in term deposits.

·      Term Deposits made up 51.80% of the total investment portfolio.

·      Two deposit totalling $2.5 million matured in November.

·      Eight new term deposits totaling $10.0 million were placed during November.

·      As at the end of November, the deposit portfolio was yielding 0.98% p.a.

 

 

Rating

Balance

1 November 2020

Movement

Balance

 30 November 2020

Date Invested

 

Maturity Date

 

Interest Rate

AMP

BBB

$1,000,000

-$1,000,000

$0

19/11/2018

17/11/2020

2.95%

Westpac

AA-

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

16/09/2019

09/12/2020

1.70%

ING Bank

A

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

19/11/2019

16/12/2020

1.57%

ING Bank

A

$1,600,000

0

$1,600,000

28/11/2019

30/12/2020

1.55%

ING Bank

A

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

2/12/2019

23/06/2021

1.55%

ING Bank

A

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

24/02/2020

06/10/2021

1.60%

ING Bank

A

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

27/02/2020

10/03/2021

1.60%

Macquarie Bank

A+

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

28/02/2020

06/01/2021

1.50%

NAB

AA-

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

28/02/2020

17/03/2021

1.40%

ING Bank

A

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

02/03/2020

31/03/2021

1.50%

Macquarie Bank

A+

$1,500,000

-$1,500,000

0

02/03/2020

04/11/2020

1.60%

Macquarie Bank

A+

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

04/03/2020

13/01/2021

1.55%

NAB

AA-

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

20/08/2020

20/01/2021

0.70%

NAB

AA-

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

20/08/2020

27/01/2021

0.70%

NAB

AA-

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

26/08/2020

24/02/2021

0.72%

NAB

AA-

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

26/08/2020

07/04/2021

0.72%

ICBC

A

$1,000,000

0

$1,000,000

21/09/2020

22/09/2021

0.80%

ICBC

A

$1,000,000

0

$1,000,000

21/0/9/2020

16/03/2022

0.83%

ICBC

A

$2,000,000

0

$2,000,000

21/09/2020

19/09/2022

0.85%

NAB

AA-

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

25/09/2020

14/04/2021

0.65%

Suncorp

A+

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

28/09/2020

21/04/2021

0.60%

CBA

AA-

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

30/09/2020

28/4/2021

0.65%

CBA

AA-

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

30/09/2020

29/6/2021

0.67%

ICBC

A

$1,500,000

0

$1,500,000

30/09/2020

15/9/2021

0.75%

ICBC

A

$1,000,000

0

$1,000,000

30/09/2020

12/1/2022

0.80%

CBA

A

0

$1,500,000

$1,500,000

1/10/2020

3/02/2021

0.62%

CBA

A

0

$2,000,000

$2,000,000

1/10/2020

16/06/2021

0.66%

ICBC

A

0

$1,500,000

$1,500,000

3/11/2020

8/12/2021

0.60%

ICBC

A

0

$1,500,000

$1,500,000

3/11/2020

27/04/2022

0.70%

Suncorp

A+

0

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

9/11/2020

12/05/2021

0.45%

ICBC

A

0

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

13/11/2020

09/11/2022

0.82%

CBA

AA-

0

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

13/11/2020

14/07/2021

0.50%

CBA

AA-

0

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

30/11/2020

07/07/2021

0.46%

NAB

AA-

0

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

30/11/2020

09/06/2021

0.45%

NAB

AA-

0

$2,000,000

$2,000,000

30/11/2020

13/10/2021

0.50%

Total

 

$43,600,000

$7,500,000

$51,100,000

 

 

 

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

·       The portfolio includes $29.380 million in floating rate notes;

·       FRNs are classified as “held for trading” and are required to be reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

·       The indicative market value of the FRNs as at the 30 November 2020 increased by ~$60 thousand. Physical credit securities tightened significantly again by around 7bp.

·       There was no trading of FRNs during November.

·       Minimal primary issuance from the domestic banks is expected in the immediate future as the RBAs $200bn term funding facility (TFF) to the ADIs at a rate of 0.10% has now been extended to June 2021.

·       The lack of supply from new (primary) issuances continues to play a major role with the rally in credit markets over recent months.

·       Credit margins continue to trade very tight on a historical level and look expensive.

·       Switches will be looked at as opportunities and new issuances become available, if viable.

 

Investment

Rating

Purchase Price

Indicative Value

30 November 2020

Date Invested

Maturity Date

 

Interest Rate

Suncorp

A+

$2,000,000

$2,025,784

16/08/2017

16/08/2022

90D BBSW + 97 bpts

NAB

AA-

$2,000,000

$2,037,086

16/05/2018

16/05/2023

90D BBSW + 90 bpts

CBA

AA-

$1,500,000

$1,531,842

16/08/2018

16/08/2023

90D BBSW + 93 bpts

NAB

AA-

$3,000,000

$3,065,646

26/09/2018

26/09/2023

90D BBSW + 93 bpts

NAB

AA-

$2,000,000

$2,043,764

09/11/2018

26/09/2023

90D BBSW + 93 bpts

Westpac

AA-

$2,000,000

$2,046,832

16/11/2018

16/11/2023

90D BBSW + 95 bpts

CBA

AA-

$3,000,000

$3,089,451

11/01/2019

11/01/2024

90D BBSW + 113 bpts

NAB

AA-

$3,000,000

$3,082,539

26/02/2019

26/02/2024

90D BBSW + 104 bpts

AMP

BBB

$992,820

$1,000,310

21/03/2019

30/03/2022

90D BBSW + 129 bpts

Macquarie Bank

A+

$2,000,000

$2,031,856

07/08/2019

07/08/2024

90D BBSW + 80 bpts

Citibank

A+

$1,000,000

$1,014,075

14/11/2019

14/11/2024

90D BBSW + 88 bpts

NAB

AA-

$2,000,000

$2,043,246

21/01/2021

21/01/2025

90D BBSW + 77 bpts

Macquarie Bank

A+

$2,000,000

$2,036,434

12/02/2020

12/02/2025

90D BBSW + 84 bpts

UBS

A+

$1,300,000

$1,326,680

30/7/2020

30/07/2025

90D BBSW + 87 bpts

Bank of China

A

$1,000,000

$1,005,102

18/08/2020

18/08/2023

90D BBSW + 80 bpts

Total

 

$28,792,820

$29,380,647

 

 

 

 

Performance

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period November 2017 to November 2020.

 

 

For the month of November, the total portfolio of term deposits (T/Ds) and floating rate notes (FRNs) provided a solid return of +0.09% (actual), outperforming the benchmark AusBond Bank Index return by +0.08% (actual). The outperformance continues to be driven by a combination of deposits that were originally invested longer than 6 months, as well as the higher yielding FRNs locked in at attractive margins and sold prior to maturity, realising small capital gains and boosting returns.

 

With deposit rates plummeting, and in the current low interest rate environment future maturities are likely to be reinvested at lower prevailing rates. The FRN portfolio’s performance (on an accrual basis) has started to narrow the gap compared to the deposit portfolio, as evidenced by the returns over the past 12 months. This has partially been attributed to the strategic sales, realising capital gains and then switching proceeds into higher yielding (new) FRNs. This is likely to reverse following the multiple rate cuts delivered over the past year.

 

Over the past year, the combined term deposit and FRN portfolio returned 1.60% p.a., outperforming bank bills by 1.16% p.a. The overall return remains solid given deposit rates have again surpassed their all-time lows following the RBA’s recent successive interest rate cuts.

 

Performance

1 month

3 months

6 months

FYTD

1 year

2 year

Official Cash Rate

0.01%

0.05%

0.11%

0.09%

0.36%

0.85%

AusBond Bank Bill Index

0.01%

0.03%

0.05%

0.04%

0.44%

1.08%

Council’s T/D Portfolio

0.09%

0.31%

0.75%

0.60%

1.66%

2.12%

Council’s FRN Portfolio

0.08%

0.26%

0.62%

0.53%

1.53%

2.10%

Council’s Portfolio

0.09%

0.29%

0.69%

0.57%

1.60%

2.11%

Outperformance

0.08%

0.26%

0.64%

0.53%

1.16%

1.03%

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance       

 

Asset Allocation

The majority of the portfolio is spread between term deposits (51.80%) and senior floating rate notes (29.78%). The remainder of the portfolio is held in the overnight cash accounts with CBA & Macquarie Bank (18.42%). The FRNs add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days. FRNs are also dominated by the higher rated ADIs which allows Council to maintain a bias towards the higher rated banks.

 

 

Term to Maturity

 

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 27% of the total investment portfolio.

 

 

 

Compliant

Horizon

 

Invested

 

%

 

Min Limit

 

Max Limit

0-90 days

$32,768,126

33.22%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$28,500,000

28.89%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$11,026,094

11.18%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$26,354,553

26.72%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

As at the end of November, applying the long-term S&P ratings only, Council had an overweight position to AMP Bank following their credit downgrade on 27th August 2019, from A- to BBB+ and more recently a further one notch downgrade to BBB. S&P stated that the overall creditworthiness of the AMP group is weaker” and that “the group is exposed to challenges that may disrupt its overall strategic direction and its ability to effectively execute its strategy.

 

AMP Bank investments held at time of ratings downgrade August 2019:        $8,981,125

Balance of holdings as at 30 November 2020:                                              $1,000,310

 

Council’s investment advisors “have no issues with Council’s investments with AMP Bank, given they are senior ranked assets, extremely low risk and high up the bank capital structure. The bank continues to have a robust balance sheet with their level of capital remaining above the minimum regulatory requirement set by APRA.

 

 

Compliant

 Rating

Invested

Invested

Max. Limit

Available

AA Category

$50,590,862

51.28%

100%

$48,057,911

A Category

$47,057,601

47.70%

80%

$31,861,417

X

BBB Category

$1,000,310

1.01%

0.00%

-$1,000,310

Unrated ADIs

$0.00

0.00%

0.00%

$0

Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy based on long term S&P ratings.

 

Compliant

Issuer

Rating

Invested

%

Max. Limit

Available

CBA

AA-

$21,271,749

21.56%

40%

$18,187,760

        

NAB

AA-

$25,772,281

26,13%

40%

$13,687,228

Westpac

AA-

$3,546,832

3.60%

40%

$35,912,677

       

Citibank

A+

$1,014,075

1.03%

25%

$23,648,118

Suncorp

A+

$4,525,784

4.59%

25%

$20,136,409

UBS

A+

$1,326,680

1.34%

25%

$23,335,513

ING Bank

A

$11,600,000

11.76%

25%

$13,062,193

Bank of China

A

$1,005,102

1.02%

25%

$23,657,091

Macquarie Bank

A+

$17,085,960

17.32%

25%

$7,576,233

ICBC Sydney

A

$10,500,000

10.64%

25%

$14,162,193

X

AMP Bank

BBB

$1,000,310

1.01%

0%

-$1,000,310

 

 

 

Portfolio Balance

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from November 2019 to November 2020.

 

 

Strategic alignment

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome/Direction

Delivery Program actions

Outcome

1. Leadership in sustainability

Direction

1a. Council has a long-term vision based on sustainability.

 

Resourcing Strategy implications

 

The budget provision for investment income is $1,060,575.00. Income received to 30 November 2020 is $401,631.56. This represents a 3.80% shortfall for the budget year to date. Given the current historically low interest rate environment an adjustment to this budget will be included in the December budget review.

 

Policy and legislative requirements

 

Council is authorised by Section 625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2020-21 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12-month period.

 

All investments as at 30 November 2020 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

 

Responsible officer:      Gail Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

File Reference:               F2016/06527

 


Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - November 2020