BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

Meeting

 

 

 

Tuesday 28 May 2019      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Randwick City Council		1300 722 542
30 Frances Street			council@randwick.nsw.gov.au
Randwick NSW 2031			www.randwick.nsw.gov.au
 



Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council meeting of Randwick City Council will be held in the Council Chamber, 1st Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick on Tuesday, 28 May 2019 at 6:00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of Country

I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on the land of the Bidjigal and the Gadigal peoples who occupied the Sydney Coast, being the traditional owners.  On behalf of Randwick City Council, I acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders past and present, and to Aboriginal people in attendance today.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council - 30 April 2019

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Report

GM6/19       Randwick City Council March 2019 Quarterly Report......................................... 1

Director City Planning Reports

CP13/19      Establishing a strategy to achieving greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water sustainability, and tree canopy coverage targets for Randwick............... 29

CP14/19      Kingsford and Kensington Planning Proposal - Public Exhibition...................... 37

CP15/19      Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 9 April - 13 May 2019..................................................................................... 45

CP16/19      Implementation update on Council's single use plastics ban............................. 49

Director City Services Reports

CS14/19      Tree Removal – Outside 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick..................................... 53

CS15/19      Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee - February 2019............ 65

 

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO21/19      Contingency Fund - status as at 30 April 2019................................................. 91

CO22/19      Investment Report - April 2019....................................................................... 95

CO23/19      Quarterly Budget Review - March 2019......................................................... 105

CO24/19      Monthly Financial Report as at 30 April 2019................................................. 123

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM32/19      Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Sidewalk Talks....................................... 133

NM33/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Comprehensive Study of Anzac Pde – South.. 135

NM34/19      Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Glyphosate based products used by Council........................................................................................................ 137

NM35/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Community Infrastructure Grants Program.... 139

NM36/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Celebrating 50 years of Randwick Netball Association.................................................................................................. 141

NM37/19      Notice of Motion from Crs Stavrinos & Luxford - Noise/Vibration concerns raised by Wansey Road residents in relation to Light Rail Testing............................ 143

NM38/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - Increasing habitat for small native birds..... 145

NM39/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Andrews - Electric Scooter Trial.............................. 147  

Closed Session  (record of voting required)

CS16/19      Tender for Bushland Regeneration Services - No.T2019-12

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Notice of Rescission Motion

NR4/19        Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Stavrinos, Bowen and Luxford - South Coogee to Kingsford - Cycling and Streetscape Improvements - Route Options Analysis................................................................................ 149  

 

 

 

 

Therese Manns

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM6/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Randwick City Council March 2019 Quarterly Report

 

Folder No:                     F2018/03002

Author:                          Cherie Muir, Coordinator Integrated Planning     

 

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2018-19 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on

26 June 2018. In this report, achievement and status comments are provided for each action in the 2018-19 Operational Plan.

 

Issues

 

This is the March 2019 Quarterly Report and the third review of the 2018-19 annual Operational Plan. This report demonstrates our commitment to meeting the actions in the 2018-19 annual Operational Plan. Overall projects are proceeding as planned and services were delivered to agreed standards.

 

Some of the highlights from the quarter include:

 

·        Highest ever number of group fitness attendances at DRLC – 18,200 for the quarter.

·        Our application to continue the Environmental Levy was lodged with IPART in February.

·        Another vibrant and successful Spot Festival was held in March.

·        The Home Maintenance and Modification Program was extended for a further two years.

·        A five-year MOU was signed for provision of Domestic Violence outreach services.

·        500 participants attended the summer Marine and Coastal Program.

·        Stage 2 of new irrigation works completed at Jack Vanny Reserve.

·        Over 1.2 million online searches of our library database for the quarter.

 

 Crowd entertainment – The Spot Festival, 10 March 2019.


 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:                   Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the March Quarterly Review is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2018-19 Annual Operational Plan. In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20-year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the March quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick.

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the March Quarterly Review of the 2018-19 annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

March Quarterly Report

 

 

 

 


March Quarterly Report

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP13/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Establishing a strategy to achieving greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water sustainability, and tree canopy coverage targets for Randwick.

 

Folder No:                     F2005/00230

Author:                          Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability; Sam Kelley, Sustainability Projects and Reporting Officer     

 

 

Introduction

 

At its March 27, 2018 Ordinary Council resolved (Veitch / Neilson) that:

 

1.       Council notes that, as a recognised leader in environmental sustainability, it has committed in its 2018 Randwick City Plan to an in-principle objective of achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

 

2.       Council notes that through Outcome 10 of the 2018 Randwick City Plan, Council continues to establish strategies and pathways for the implementation of water conservation and stormwater harvesting projects; energy conservation, efficiency and renewable programs; major community education initiatives; and bushland restoration and conservation efforts aimed at increasing tree canopy.

 

3.       a report be brought to Council detailing the measures and associated costs of meeting the targets listed below, in order to continue our leadership in sustainability and plan the roadmap to achieve our energy, greenhouse and water conservation goals;

 

i.    Greenhouse gas emissions from Council’s operations – net zero greenhouse gas emissions by, including but not limited to the following measures:

-     Council’s total energy consumption – 100% replacement by renewable sources (generated on site or off-site for Council’s purposes) by 2030.

-     Council’s vehicle fleet – net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

 

ii.  total water consumed by the Council’s operations– at least 50% replacement by non-mains/non-potable water sources by 2030.

 

iii. 50% increase in total tree canopy coverage by 2030 from current 2018 baseline.

 

This report recommends preparation of an overarching strategic framework and action plan to enable delivery of the above targets within the designated timeframe.

 

Issues

 

Energy consumption (electricity and gas)

Energy consumption for Council’s sites and operations have been monitored for more than a decade through a third party provider, Planet Footprint, who has been delivering this service specifically for the local government sector across Australia and more recently in parts of the USA.

 

In addition to the monitoring of Council’s energy consumption, regular energy audits have been carried out across Council’s sites as part of our efforts to better understand and respond to energy consumption issues.

The key learning and improved understanding of this energy consumption for Randwick Council is that there are 5 key areas of Council operations that are the primary consumers of energy (see Figure 1 below). In order of consumption these areas are:

 

1.   Streetlighting

2.   Des Renford Leisure Centre (DRLC)

3.   Administration Building

4.   Bowen Library and Community Centre

5.   Works Depot

 

Energy used in streetlighting is often considered by local government as a separate energy management issue as local Councils across Australia have previously had very little control over energy consumption from their streetlights and which incorporates both energy and infrastructure charges applied by the energy retailers for this service.

 

As shown in Figure 1 below, streetlighting represents approximately 50 percent of most Local Councils’ electricity costs. For the purposes of this analysis, streetlighting will be discussed separately (see below). In a recent win for local government – and after many years of lobbying from Councils - energy providers have commenced a process where Councils can opt in on a fee-paying basis to a roll-out of higher-efficiency (LED) streetlighting technology in their respective local government areas (LGAs) (see under Streetlighting below).

 

Excluding streetlighting, the four main Council sites listed above consume approximately 65 percent of Council’s direct electricity usage, leaving approximately 35 percent of electricity consumed across Council’s other 120 energy-metered sites. While this latter level of consumption of more than a third of Council’s energy consumption remains significant, the higher priority for Randwick’s energy saving investment and response for many years has been primarily on these top 4 sites.

 

Unlike electricity, gas is only consumed within 4 Council sites. As seen in Figure 1 below, 95 percent of this consumption occurs at DRLC, particularly for heating of the two indoor swimming pools. High-efficiency electric heat pumps were installed at DRLC in 2017 to heat the outdoor pools enabling the very popular swim centre to remain open for longer over the swimming season. Investigations are currently underway to utilise roofspace to install additional rooftop solar (there is currently 30 kilowatts of solar PV on the roof area) as well as considering supplementary heating for the swimming pools.

 

        

Figure 1 - Randwick Council Energy Consumption by Site (2017/18)

 

Greenhouse gas emissions

Greenhouse gas emissions, conventionally measured in the form of carbon dioxide–equivalent (CO2-e) - have been fairly static across Council in an historic context. However, over recent years, a number of significant energy saving measures and changes to the NSW energy mix are contributing to a decreasing trend in Council’s greenhouse gas emissions (see Figure 2 below). Such energy saving measures – funded primarily through Council’s environmental levy program – include:

·        installation of almost 200 kilowatts of photovoltaic (PV) solar panels on the rooftops of 11 Council buildings;

·        installation of energy saving technologies including voltage optimisation technology (VoT), sensors, building management systems and LED lighting upgrades;

·        adoption of energy efficient equipment i.e. computers and printers with attention on energy saving functionality;

·        increased education and changed staff and general consumer behaviours and practices as they relate to energy and greenhouse emission sources, e.g.  the use of electric bikes, hybrid and electric vehicles by staff, printer default changes, less printing of business reports etc.

 

Achieving cost and energy saving reductions generate corresponding reductions to Council’s overall greenhouse gas emissions. Activities which provide greater reductions in energy costs and therefore greenhouse gas emissions are prioritised for investment and implementation purposes via Council’s environmental levy funding.

 

 

Figure 2 - Randwick Council Energy Annual Emissions Forecast

 

Council’s participation in the SSROC-led Power Purchase Agreement (PPA)

The most significant achievement for Council in progressing toward a zero carbon target by 2030 is Randwick’s participation in the power purchase agreement (PPA), negotiated by SSROC for participating Councils. Following a two year process of gaining Council’s commitment and understanding to a PPA and negotiating with energy providers, SSROC’s electricity supply contract has enabled electricity for these participating Councils to be sourced in part from a solar farm in western NSW.

 

As highlighted previously, with the greatest source of Council’s greenhouse emissions stemming from electricity use, supply of electricity from a renewable power source diminishes Council’s emissions by 20 percent from July 1, 2019. A 20 percent proportion of renewable energy was agreed by most participating Councils for a number of reasons with the option to increase this proportion in two to three year timeframes over the eleven years of this power purchase agreement.

 

The recommendations in this report will be for Council to take these review timeframes and progressively increase the proportion of renewable energy purchased, potentially up to a maximum amount by 2030. This of course would be integrated with continuing energy conservation measures being taken to decrease Council’s overall energy consumption.

 

The role of carbon offsets

Randwick Council received notification in early 2019 that it had achieved carbon neutrality for 2017-18 under the accreditation provided via the Commonwealth Government’s NCOS program (National Carbon Offset Standard). Randwick Council is only the second local Council having achieved this status in NSW (the other is the City of Sydney) and the third local Council in Australia to be certified carbon neutral under NCOS outside of capital city Councils.

 

The rigorous process to calculate and audit Council’s greenhouse gas emissions under the national standard provides us with a much more focused and accurate understanding of our emissions and particularly, from which areas of our operation Council’s carbon emissions originate. Importantly these sources of emissions take into account both the direct and the less-direct operational greenhouse emissions. Randwick’s audited results indicates Council’s greenhouse gas emissions are slightly higher than those monitored over past years due to the requirement for Council to take responsibility for the relatively lower level of greenhouse emissions occurring as a result of expenditure on items that include: stationery; catering; flights taken where applicable, Council’s small volume of waste generated and other categories required for auditing purposes.

 

What this examination demonstrates is that while Council responds to the larger-scale basis of greenhouse gas emissions - electricity usage, fuel use in vehicles etc - there will always be a smaller (potentially decreasing) volume of carbon offsets required for Council to be fully carbon neutral (in the order of 3,000 tonnes annually).

 

Council’s aim and likely outcome should be to progressively lower the number of carbon offsets to be purchased (the current level of carbon offsets were purchased for the whole of Council’s direct and indirect greenhouse responsibilities for an amount around $27,000). As Council continues to invest in other energy saving measures the level of carbon offsets can be expected to decrease to the point explained above where a minimum level of offsets may be required. Figure 1 above also summarises this process.

 

In a broad summary of likely savings from current energy saving measures being investigated or implemented, the reductions in greenhouse emissions per annum over time are shown below (also 1 above):

 

·        renewable energy purchased via our PPA           ~ 1,800 tonnes

·        energy saving streetlight technology                           > 1,100 tonnes

·        lighting upgrades (Bowen / Admin)                     ~ 300 – 400 tonnes

·        transition of vehicle fleet to electric                    ~ 3,000 tonnes.

 

 

Streetlighting

Randwick Local Government Area’s (LGAs) street lighting infrastructure is not atypical of other LGAs. With approximately 10,000 streetlights, one for almost every lamppost across the City, there has been a huge opportunity to increase the efficiency of these lights or reduce their number. However, as the latter action of reducing street lighting generates a perception of reduced safety, most of the focus remains on changing existing lamps to a more efficient lighting standard.

 

As mentioned previously, street lighting charges represent approximately half of Council’s total electricity costs. Due to the nature of street lighting and split charges by energy providers for both the infrastructure itself as well as separate energy usage costs, Councils have often treated these as static energy costs.

 

Across Australia, network charges via power utilities almost match the electricity charges themselves via network payments required on lamp posts, fixtures and related infrastructure. This relatively static charge for Councils has been a steady earner for energy utilities over the years but represents a huge impost on Council energy budgets across the country.

 

SSROC has been coordinating a significant project on behalf of its member Councils on street lighting for many years now, with so much impact that Councils beyond the SSROC group have entered into this project as well. Ausgrid, our energy provider, has been providing increasing support over this time, with the remarkable result that the energy utility is now working constructively to deliver significant energy savings for the participating Councils.

 

This ‘Lighting the Way’ project is now at a stage of enabling Randwick Council to upgrade just over 4,000 of its low-efficiency streetlights with energy-efficient, LED replacements. These LED replacements have significantly greater, environmentally-friendly features including:

 

·        a 78 percent reduction in energy consumption and costs each year

·        a 78 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions each year

·        substantially lower maintenance costs

·        more effective and higher quality lighting of street and pavement areas

·        safer recycling and recovery of lights over the existing high-intensity, mercury-containing street lamps.

 

The total savings per year from the complete changeover of these existing streetlights to LED replacements can be summarised as:

 

·        energy cost savings in excess of $150,000 each year

·        energy consumption reductions of more than 1,200 megawatt hours (MWh) each year (equivalent to the power to run 92 typical Randwick homes)

·        greenhouse gas reductions of 1,100 tonnes (CO2-equivalent) per year;

·        maintenance cost savings in the order of $58,000 per annum.

 

SSROC and other participating Councils will have to consider their preferred method of paying Ausgrid to carry out this changeover.

 

Water consumption

Council’s current water consumption on an annual basis is approximately 175 megalitres of potable water. Potable water is the water provided at the very high drinking water quality standard, to all users via Sydney Water’s extensive network of dams, reservoirs, distribution pipes and related pumping stations.

 

Randwick Council’s use of water across its operations incorporates the typical drinking and washing water where the highest standard of potable water has been supplied for the numerous functions where less-than-drinking-water-quality-standard is not always essential. Most typically this usage is in the area of irrigating parks and reserves, toilet flushing in amenities blocks and in some cases for washing down areas like toilets, barbeques and similar recreational amenity areas e.g. lifesaving club washdown areas.

 

Over the many years of Council’s environmental levy program, there has been extensive investment in constructing and installing underground stormwater and other wastewater harvesting and treatment systems. Much of this treated water requires treatment to an almost drinking water quality standard. These efforts have continuously been recognised as leading the local government sector over more than a decade, with a net result that almost 50 to 60 percent of Council’s operational water requirements are met via alternative water sources in place of Sydney Water’s potable water supplies.

 

The level of storage capacity and water savings across Randwick’s operations as it relates to alternative water supplies is shown below (see Figure 3) and represents cost savings in the order of $1 million each year and the equivalent potable water supply taken up by approximately 187 Olympic-sized swimming pools annually.

 

 

Figure 3 - Randwick Council Water Consumption

 

Fleet and transport emissions

Council’s fleet of vehicles incorporates more than 100 passenger vehicles and an additional 100 plant vehicles operated from Council’s Works Depot in Maroubra. The annual emissions generated by this fleet is in the order of 2000 tonnes of CO2-equivalent to an annual consumption of over 700,000 L of fuel.

 

Achievement of a roadmap target for Council’s vehicle fleet is likely to be subject to a progressive transition to electric vehicles, potentially made possible through the availability of 17 new electric vehicle models into the Australian market in 2019 alone. While there will be a slightly higher level of investment for new vehicles until electric vehicle prices decrease as expected over time, organisations will need to choose for themselves whether to lead or lag in what is likely to be a gradual but drastic market change in a relatively short period of time.

 

Government fleet purchases are likely to contribute substantially in the early investment in and roll-out of electric vehicles in Australia. Randwick has already demonstrated substantial leadership in this area through its 3-Council environmental collaboration representing the first local government in metropolitan Sydney to roll-out a network of public electric vehicle charging stations across Sydney’s eastern suburbs. Establishment of this kind of public infrastructure is seen as critical in facilitating the transition to electric vehicle take-up by the driving public.

 

Urban tree canopy cover

Greater attention has been given over recent years to the range of positive impacts achievable across the spectrum of Climate Change implications through the retention and expansion i.e. restoration of urban tree canopy.

 

A very recent analysis of urban tree canopy cover for the Randwick LGA shows a fairly stable result over a four year timeframe.

 

The analysis being undertaken provides a stronger basis for Council and its community to better understand the extent of urban canopy across the LGA. The second stage of this analysis for Randwick is aimed at establishing a more detailed understanding of where new plantings should go to ameliorate issues that include ‘heat-island’ impacts of Climate Change, restoration for bushland and habitat purposes and similar.

 

The analysis so far will establish a benchmark for Randwick and highlights a likely higher level of response, investment and understanding in order for Randwick to achieve a practical or aspirational target for urban tree canopy for our City. The methodology being applied for Randwick via UTS is a first for local government in Australia.

 

Consideration of targets

Delivery of zero carbon emissions for Council by 2030 is best achieved through development of an overarching sustainability strategy and corresponding action plan. The strategy and action plan will take into consideration the range of issues raised above as well as the following likely responses which can be applied. The strategy and its resultant action plan will establish priorities and how the necessary responses can be resourced over the short to medium timeframe. This is particularly more relevant with the recently advised approval by IPART of Randwick’s next 5-year environmental levy program.

 

The main responses and requirements for consideration to deliver the proposed targets within this strategic framework can be summarised as:

 

·        Progressively increasing the proportion of renewable energy for Council’s internal electricity purposes from the current level of 20 percent to 100 percent (this is likely to represent a cost neutral position from the current situation as pricing fluctuates over the 11-year, power supply contract term);

 

·        Continuing investment in energy saving and renewable initiatives for Council with priorities set for the top energy consuming sites, namely Administration Building, Des Renford Leisure Centre, Bowen Library and the Works Depot;

 

·        Transitioning investment in electric vehicles for Council’s pool and fleet vehicles with a set number of electric vehicles being purchased as replacement vehicles for combustion engine vehicles over an agreed timeframe.

 

·        Continuing investment in water saving and alternative water supply initiatives for Council with the main priority being the Maroubra beach stormwater harvesting and re-use project (project costing is in the order of $4.5 million);

 

·        Completion of Randwick’s stage 2 urban canopy analysis expected to identify priority areas across Randwick for the staged planting, protection or restoration of new native or indigenous plants as well continued revegetation and restoration efforts through Council’s existing Bushcare, Parkcare and Native Havens programs;

 

·        Approval to continue and invest in reliable and accurate systems for the monitoring, reporting and presenting of Council’s energy and water consumption, renewable energy generation, greenhouse gas emissions and urban canopy coverage for Randwick City.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in sustainability

Direction 1(a):       Council has a long-term vision based on sustainability

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2(b):       Strong partnerships between the Council, community and government                                    agencies

Outcome 4:           Excellence in urban design and development

Direction 4(a):       Improved design and sustainability across all development

Outcome 5:           A liveable city

Direction 5(a):       Our public infrastructure and assets are funded to meet community                                         expectations and defined levels of service

Outcome 10:         A healthy environment

Direction 1(a):       Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes.


 

Financial impact statement

 

There is considerable financial and resource investment required by Council to facilitate progression toward and achievement of these aspirational targets for Council.  Preparation of a sustainability strategy and action plan ensures a robust approach to decisions around resourcing the measures outlined in this report and their staged delivery within a 2030 timeframe.

 

Conclusion

 

Local government is often recognised as the leader in delivering the full range of community expectations as they relate to social, environmental or financial sustainability. Randwick Council has long been recognised across the sector as one of those local government leaders perhaps in part through its significant investment enabled through 15 years of environmental levy expenditure and its focus on dedicated sustainability achievements.

 

Delivery of a roadmap toward zero carbon by 2030 represents a challenge for this Council as it would for any large or small organization. However, Council’s has made substantial progress already in tangible reductions to enable delivery of the proposed targets across energy, transport, greenhouse gas emissions and water. A robust strategic framework and corresponding action plan will enable greater transparency and accountability going forward.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council develops an overarching sustainability strategy and corresponding action plan outlining the timeframe, the process and level of resourcing required to achieve zero carbon emissions by 2030.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP14/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Kingsford and Kensington Planning Proposal - Public Exhibition

 

Folder No:                     F2015/00419

Author:                          Stella Agagiotis, Coordinator Strategic Planning     

 

 

Introduction

 

This report seeks Council’s endorsement for public exhibition of the draft Planning Proposal, Planning Strategy and supporting technical studies for the Kingsford and Kensington town centres. It also gives a brief background to the preparation of the draft Strategy and the revised gateway determination issued by the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE).  It is proposed that the Planning Proposal be exhibited for a six week period as part of a comprehensive engagement program that will seek the views of the broader community.

 

Following public exhibition, a further report will be prepared for Council which includes consideration of submissions raised by the community. Council will then decide whether to refer the Planning Proposal to the DPE and the Parliamentary Counsel for finalisation and legal drafting of the planning controls and the new infrastructure contributions scheme.

 

Council has successfully resolved all outstanding matters with the Department in relation to dwelling numbers, affordable housing levy and community infrastructure contributions. Placing the Planning Proposal on public exhibition now provides the opportunity for the community to consider and respond to the proposed planning amendments through the formal public exhibition process.

 

Background

 

In December 2016, Council endorsed the draft planning Strategy and Planning Proposal for public exhibition and resolved that the matter be exhibited for a minimum period of six weeks. The resolution of Council is provided in Attachment 1.

 

Since submitting the Planning Proposal to the DPE in January 2017, Council officers have written to and met with the DPE and the Minister in order to progress the matter and respond to the Department’s requests for further information in relation to the proposed dwelling yield and infrastructure contributions. The first gateway Determination (issued in December 2017), contained two key matters – that Council investigate an increase in the dwelling capacity by a minimum of 600 dwellings across the two centres and to remove the Community Infrastructure (CIC) clause.  Council sought a formal review from the Department of these conditions and obtained legal advice on the proposed CIC clause. The matter was referred to and subsequently heard by the Independent Planning Commission (IPC). In October 2018, the IPC advised the Department that it supports Council’s legal right to levy developers for local infrastructure and noted that Council and the DPE had resolved the dwelling capacity issue. Following a period of further discussions and correspondence, an amended Gateway Determination was issued by the Department in December 2018. Council has now successfully resolved all matters with the Department.

 

In relation to the request for an increase in the s.7.12 developer contribution levy (previously s.94A contribution) from 1% to 3%, the DPE has provided in principle support for the increase.

 

The Planning Proposal is now being supported by the DPE essentially as originally submitted in January 2017 and is a significant milestone for achieving the vision contained in the Strategy to revitalise the centres, create vibrancy, incorporate community spaces, improve liveability, encourage sustainability, community facilities and provide a high quality public domain.

 

 


 

Kingsford and Kensington Planning Strategy

 

The planning review process for the two centres commenced in late 2015 with background investigations and baseline information gathering. In early 2016 Council officers ran the international urban design competition for the two centres with prize money of $300,000. The competition was professionally run with a strong governance framework that was endorsed by the Australian Institute of Architects and Institute of Landscape Architects. It involved community input into the competition brief and feedback on the four shortlisted entries selected by a competition jury of five experts. Overall feedback from the community was positive with 4,800 visitors to Council’s dedicated web site page. The competition process stimulated community conversation and creative thinking about the potential benefits and opportunities for the future of the two centres.

 

The competition outcomes helped define the urban design principles and vision for the two centres as well as the themes and actions in the Strategy. The key drivers of the Strategy were to:

 

·        Develop appropriate planning controls that are fair and equitable rather than ad hoc planning proposals determining the future character of the centres

·        Ensure Council takes the lead in developing a planning strategy informed by planning best practice including an international design competition, expert advice and community input

·        Provide for a range of essential community benefits for the centres

·        Create sustainable, planned and coordinated growth that facilitates the long term rejuvenation of the Centres

·        Respond to a changing environment created by the introduction of light rail

·        Address population projections and employment needs

 

A number of background technical reports have been prepared with the assistance of consultants and UNSW to inform the strategy including an urban design review, liveability/walkability indicators, heritage review, transport study and traffic study.

 

Review of the planning controls for the two centres has taken a comprehensive place-based approach to guide future planning controls/built form by integrating design excellence, infrastructure provision, environmental improvements and community benefits.

 

Draft Kensington and Kingsford Planning Proposal

 

The Planning Proposal explains the intended effect of the planning changes to Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP). The key changes are:

 

·        Introduce a Community Infrastructure Contribution Scheme (CIC) to apply to additional floor space that is proposed above existing height controls (guidelines will be prepared outlining the operation of the scheme);

·        Increase heights to 31m (9 storeys) for the majority of the town centres; to 60m (18 storeys with demonstrated design excellence) at Todman Square and Kingsford Mid-Town; and 56m (17 storeys with demonstrated design excellence) at Kingsford Junction and Rainbow St;

·        Increase FSR to 4:1 along the majority of the town centres and up to 5:1 FSR at Kingsford Mid-Town and Kingsford Junction;

·        Minor zoning changes to three strategic sites (containing retail/commercial uses) to include them within the B2 Local Town Centre zone to achieve consistency in zoning across blocks;

·        Introduce new development controls for design excellence to require best practice high quality, sustainable design at the key nodes; and

·        Introduce an affordable housing levy providing up to 200 affordable housing units

 

The Planning Proposal applies only to the areas zoned B2 Local Centres within the two town centres (including three small areas at the edge of the Kingsford town centre proposed to be rezoned from residential to B2 Local Centre) as shown in Figure 1.

 

Figure 1- Boundary extensions in Kingsford

 

The proposed amendments to Randwick LEP 2012 (which will be supported by detailed controls in a site specific development control plan) are considered robust and provide a good balance between the need for growth, achieving design excellence, protecting residential amenity and enhancing the public domain.

 

Exhibition of the Planning Proposal is an important phase in understanding the community’s ideas about growth and change in the two centres and in deterring the lodgment of further speculative ad hoc planning proposals seeking significant increases in development standards. Five significant planning proposals seeking tower buildings of up to 25 storeys in height along Anzac Parade have been refused in the last few years by Council and the former Joint Regional Planning Panel on the basis that they are too tall, with no public benefits and because Council was preparing a comprehensive planning strategy.

 

New Section 7.12 (former s.94A Plan)

 

An increase to the s.7.12 levy is a significant component of the K2K Planning Strategy required to fund essential local infrastructure and works. The levy of 3% in developer contributions has been recently endorsed by DPE subject to feasibility testing and community engagement. The levy is higher than Council’s existing S.94A Contributions Plan of 1% of capital cost of development for projects valued over $200,000 and will only apply to the Kensington and Kingsford town centres. Following public exhibition of the Planning Proposal and associated documents including the feasibility report, the Minister for Planning will be requested to endorse an amendment to the EP&A Regulation to apply the increased levy to the town centres.

 

This new s.7.12 plan will be prepared by Council outside of the Planning Proposal process (as a stand-alone document) to be finalised and adopted by Council. Whilst this does not need to be submitted to the Department of Planning for making, the Minister’s decision is needed to increase the levy. Council will need to demonstrate to the Department and the Minister that an increased levy is justified given the exceptional circumstances arising in this case brought about by the light rail project and need for the provision of public infrastructure.

 

Summary of Infrastructure benefits

 

The total community benefits that can be derived from the proposed infrastructure contributions scheme for the two centres is valued at $85m. In addition, the Proposal can provide for up to 200 affordable housing dwellings dedicated to Council, which brings the total potential public benefits package to approximately $300M.  The proposed improvements have been informed by the international design competition entries, the urban design review by Conybeare Morrison (Council’s urban design consultant) as well as through an analysis of future infrastructure needs of the town centres to support expected growth and change. The Strategy emphasises the importance of creativity, innovation and a green identity for the town centres with water sensitive urban design, ecologically sustainable development (with targets), high quality spaces, laneway activation, links to parks and sustainable modes of transport.

 

A review of the initial independent feasibility testing has been undertaken by HillPDA (May 2019) which concludes that Council’s proposed three-part infrastructure scheme (CIC, S.94A and affordable housing contribution) is generally viable on the sites tested within the town centres. Draft guidelines for implementing the CIC and the affordable housing levy will be placed on public exhibition with the Planning Proposal.

 

Revised Gateway Determination

 

In December 2018, the DPE issued a revised Gateway determination for the Kingsford and Kensington Planning Proposal. The conditions on this determination removed the previous requirement for further increased dwelling capacity within the two town centres (600 dwellings); specified the types of infrastructure works that could be included as community infrastructure; required the infrastructure to be linked to a development site; and required a revised feasibility analysis to be carried out. Council officers wrote to the DPE raising concerns about the linking of infrastructure to a specific development site as this was in direct contravention of the Independent Planning Commission’s recommendation which stated that infrastructure provision may be provided elsewhere within the Kingsford and Kensington town centres. Council officers met with the Department, legal representatives and the Parliamentary Counsel in relation to this condition and it has been agreed that a new clause in the Randwick LEP 2012 could be modelled on the Sydney LEP 2012 clause 6.14 Community Infrastructure floor space at Green Square.

 

Public Exhibition of draft Planning Proposal

It is intended that the draft planning proposal will be placed on pubic exhibition together with supporting documents for a period of 6 weeks. Documents relating to the proposal have been available on the Council and DPE web site since 2016. Supporting documents include:

 

·        Planning Strategy

·        Urban Design Report

·        Transport Study

·        Economic Impact of light rail

·        Heritage review

·        Updated feasibility study

·        Affordable Housing Plan

·        Affordable housing and community infrastructure plan

 

The proposed engagement activities including an extensive digital campaign providing on-line content, direct mail out, local newspaper adverts, random telephone survey, E-News and a fact sheet will aim to engage a wide cross section of the community in genuine and open dialogue.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome

4

Excellence in urban design and development.

Directions

4a

Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

4b

New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

Outcome

6

A Liveable City

 

6a

Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service

 

6c

The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies

 

6d

A strategic land use framework provides for our lifestyle changes and for a continuing, yet low rate of growth across our City

 

6e

Enhance housing diversity, accessibility and adaptability to support our diverse community.

Outcome

8

A strong Local Economy

 

8a

Vibrant business, commercial, and industrial sectors that provide ongoing and diverse employment opportunities and serve the community

Outcome

9

Integrated and accessible transport

 

9a

A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycle ways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities

 

9b

The community is informed, educated and encouraged to use

sustainable transport

 

9b.1

Plan for safe, accessible and attractive pathways and encourage increased use of walking, public transport and cycling networks

 

9c

Advocate and /or plan for integrated local and regional transport improvements, including high capacity transport such as light/standard rail

 

Financial impact statement

 

Preparation of the draft Planning Strategy has been developed following input from a number of studies and background research totaling approximately $400,000 and the International Urban Design Competition with $300,000 prize money. Further expenditure will be required for the next stage of formal public exhibition and engagement activities, estimated at $50,000.

 

Conclusion

 

The Planning Strategy and Proposal have been developed through an extensive strategic planning process informed by expert advice on urban design, traffic and transport, heritage, infrastructure funding mechanisms as well as an international urban design competition together with substantial community input. The Strategy has been recognised as best practice for integrated strategic planning and urban design and subsequently has received three industry awards (Greater Sydney Commission, Planning Industry Association and Australian Institute of Landscaped Architects).  Once finalised, it will enable Council to apply appropriate and necessary levies on new development to fund a range of identified public benefits. Such benefits can be progressively implemented, rolled out and staged as funds are collected to enable transformation of the centres in terms of liveability, sustainability and economic prosperity.

 

Importantly, over the last few years, a number of pertinent matters have been resolved with the DPE and this has paved the way for the Proposal to now be publicly exhibited to obtain feedback from a cross section of the community. Thus, Council will have the opportunity to consider informed comments and suggestions on specific elements of the proposal.

 

A Planning Proposal that is placed on public exhibition is an important step in the plan making process and confirms that Council is committed to managing the strategic direction and implementing a planning framework that will guide the future character and development of the two town centres. Furthermore, an exhibited Planning Proposal will give greater weight to the planning controls, urban design approach, provision of affordable housing, community and local infrastructure contributions. 

 

Given the development pressure within the corridor in recent years and the extensive planning work to date, it is important that the Planning Proposal now proceed without further delay.  The alternative of not supporting the Planning Proposal is that Council could potentially lose control of the strategic planning process.  This would likely result in the future character, density and built form of Kensington and Kingsford town centres being determined by ad hoc planning (rezoning) proposals which serve the private interests of developers and the missed opportunity for the delivery of substantial public benefits including green links, upgraded public domain areas, wider footpaths, affordable housing and community centres.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council commence a 6-week community engagement program for the Kingsford and Kensington Planning Proposal and supporting documents.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Council resolution (December 2016)

 

 

 

 


Council resolution (December 2016)

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP15/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 9 April - 13 May 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2008/00122

Author:                          Terry Papaioannou, Environmental Planner Officer (Technical & Research)     

 

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)      Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6;

 

2)      Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)      Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

4)      Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 9 April 2019 and 13 May 2019.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4: Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b: New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SEPP 1 and Clause 4.6 register between  09 April to 13 May 2019

 

 

 

 


SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN  09 APRIL TO 13 MAY 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP16/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Implementation update on Council's single use plastics ban

 

Folder No:                     F2019/00322

Author:                          Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability; Sam Kelley, Sustainability Projects and Reporting Officer     

 

 

Introduction

 

In July 2018, Council resolved (Matson/Roberts) that:

 

a)      Council takes all reasonable steps from July 1 this year to internally stop using single-use plastics across all Council operations, including plastic bags, single use drink bottles, helium balloons, plastic straws, plates and cutlery;

b)      Council takes all reasonable steps to advise all organisers of Council-supported external events, festivals and major activities that as of January 1, 2019, event permissions and booking forms will stipulate a ban on single-use plastics, single-use drink bottles, helium balloons, plastic straws, plates and cutlery, with the exception being for childcare or senior’s events where excessive temperatures or circumstances may require availability of single-use drink bottles;

c)      prior to the end of 2018 the General Manager brings back a report:

i.   providing feedback on how the internal Council ban of July 1 2018 proceeded; and

ii. an update on how preparations for the external ban from January 1 2019 are proceeding along with any emerging issues;

d)       Council investigate the implementation of a waste education program for Randwick LGA businesses and community groups to assist in the reduction of the use of Single Use Plastics such as straws, balloons, cups and bags;

e)       at Council run events, a program of reducing the use of these Single Use Plastics be implemented, and Council’s Event Waste Policy be amended;

f)       Council investigate possible incentive programs to promote the use of reusable cups and other items by customers and employees of local businesses and organisations, in order to reduce the use of Single Use Plastics; and

g)       a report be returned to Council with recommendations for taking action to reduce the use of Single Use Plastics in Randwick City Council.

 

The purpose of this report is to advise Council on the implementation of this resolution.

 

Issues

 

Current solutions applied to reduce single-use plastics items

Randwick’s resolution to ban single-use plastic items in July of last year, including plastic bags, single-use drink bottles, balloons, straws, plates and cutlery, attracted a high level of media and community attention.

 

Council’s Procurement team were quick to respond to the resolution by ensuring replacement items were identified and stocks of relevant items were changed over to more durable or recyclable items and alternative supplies were available particularly for catering or event purposes.

 

Notifications to staff were made and to relevant suppliers forewarning them of the implications of Council’s single-use plastics resolution. A stocktake was carried out of Council meeting rooms to remove existing stocks of single-use plastics items and ensure alternative items were in place for meetings with internal staff or external visitors.

Council’s Events team working with Sustainability, Strategic Waste and Procurement staff established a checklist for external events providers to maximize their understanding of the single-use plastics resolution on external events supported by Council. Fortunately, many of Council’s external and internal events comprised low-waste or no-waste criteria so the modified checklist was formalising Council’s practices which had been underway for some time.

 

Community feedback and responses were in the main very positive and following some representation from various community members, a new supply of biodegradable waste bags was installed in all Council off-leash parks for dogs. A community education campaign also highlighted the availability of drop-off and recovery facilities for thin plastics and plastic bags at Council’s Perry Street Recycling Centre which has since seen a lift in these type of items dropped off at Perry Street for recovery and re-use.

 

Council also worked with the Ritz cinema and community organisations to coordinate two showings of Blue – the movie, focusing on plastics in our oceans.

 

Future improved practices for single-use waste items

While Council has been a strong advocate of and supported the well-known Responsible Cafes program across Randwick cafes to reduce the number of disposable coffee cups used by residents there remains additional opportunities to facilitate and extend educational programs and campaigns to reduce single-use waste items across Randwick businesses as per section (d) of the Council resolution e.g. cups, straws, bottles and bags. A number of external campaigns developed by not-for-profit organisations have been successful in reducing single-use items such as straws and plastic bags being distributed from small businesses and could be applicable across Randwick City.

 

Further examination of potential solutions to single-use plastics waste has identified that increased provision of community water ‘bubblers’ in the public domain provides immediate reductions in drink bottles being disposed of in rubbish bins or as litter in our parks and waterways. These additional water ‘bubblers’ were considered and approved for our coastal walkway over 2 financial years. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:          Leadership in sustainability

Direction 1(a)        Council has a long term vision based on sustainability

Outcome 6:           A liveable city

Direction 6(a)        Our public infrastructure is planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service

Outcome 10:         A healthy environment

Direction 10(a):     Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural change and outcomes

Outcome 10(d):     Waste is managed sustainably to ensure the highest level of resource recovery.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The key financial implication from this matter is the purchase and supply of two Council branded portable water stations for use at Council’s internal and relevant external events at approximately $6,600 each, payable from Council’s environmental levy program (the cost benefit of Council having its own two portable systems would be realized within 12 to 24 months depending on the number of events they are utilised).

 

Conclusion

 

In summary, there has been a very successful and smooth implementation of Council’s single-use plastics resolution incorporating practical on-ground implementation actions and broader educational and communications programs both within and external to Council.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)      Notes the successful implementation and progress to date across Council’s internal operations and throughout the community in reducing litter and waste stemming         from single-use plastics.

 

b)      Investigate potential sites and costs for the installation of additional permanent water stations targeting Town Centres and parks in addition to those proposed along the coastal walkway. 

 

c)      Writes again to the NSW government and local MPs to request that single-use plastic bags, straws and cups be banned in NSW.

 

d)      Purchase Two Council branded portable water stations be purchased for Council’s internal and relevant externally-supported events (total cost for both branded water stations is approximately $13,200).

 

e)      Continue with its education program aimed at reducing the supply and distribution         of single-use plastic items including plastic bags, straws, bottles and disposable cups similar to programs operating as Plastic Free Wollongong, Plastic Free Noosa and Plastic Free Byron Bay.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

 

Director City Services Report No. CS14/19

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal – Outside 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick

Folder No:                     F2018/07359

Author:                          Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services     

 

Introduction

 

The owners of 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick, have requested the removal of the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ var. microcarpa (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree growing on the nature strip outside their property because of tree root damage to their property.

 

They have advised Council that the roots of the subject tree are causing sustained and increasing structural damage to their property. The owners claim the tree is posing a safety risk to their family that they are no longer prepared to endure the ongoing impacts.

 

Issues

 

The owners of 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick wrote to Council in September 2015 requesting that the two fig trees outside their properties be removed because of the significant and extensive damage to each residence and front yard areas that was being caused by the roots of the trees.

 

Council investigated this matter by removing the footpath and trenching adjacent to the front fence to expose the tree roots.  This investigation revealed tree root intrusion into the residents’ properties, underneath front fences and into sewerage pipes. At the time, Council undertook root pruning by severing tree roots that were entering these properties. The root pruning was undertaken to allow the fig tree outside the properties to be retained in the short term without any further structural damage to the properties. Unfortunately, since the investigation, some of the roots have regenerated.

 

Because of the seriousness and extent of alleged damage to the property at 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick Council’s Insurance Officer commissioned a structural engineer to provide a report on the type and extent of damage to the property including the cause of the damage. The engineer’s report concluded that cracks and misalignment to the porch pavers and the crack between the southern gate and dwelling at 4 Figtree Avenue were caused by a combination of long term differential ground movement and fig tree root intrusion. Since that report was written, the owner of 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick has detailed a number of matters that have become more serious.

 

These include the observed changes as outlined in the table below.

 

Structural Engineer’s report 2015

2018 Observations

Tree roots 20mm in diameter observed via test pits throughout the front yard.

 

The same roots increased to 50mm in diameter. This represents an increase of 150% in 30 months.

A 2mm crack in the masonry fence on the eastern boundary.

The crack measured 4mm, an increase of 100% in 30 months.

A crack of 0.75mm wide located between the southern gate post and southern elevation of residence.

 

The crack measured 7mm, an increase of 833% in 30 months (see attached photograph – Southern Elevation Crack).

Eastern porch pavers were undulating with a 3.5mm wide crack.

 

The crack measured 12mm, an increase of 242% in 30 months (see attached photograph – Eastern Porch Pavers).

The western yard pavers were misaligned with a vertical displacement of 10mm.

The vertical displacement increased to 24mm, an increase of 140% in 30 months.

 

A Plumber’s report submitted by Censeo and dated 13th April 2016 also confirmed there was tree root infiltration into the sewer pipes from the street tree to differing degrees. An on-site inspection confirmed that the structural damage being caused to the property had progressively increased since December 2015.

 

Viability of Root Pruning

It is stipulated in Australian Standard AS 4970 – 2009 – Protection of trees on development sites that wherever any proposed tree root cutting is greater than 10% of the Tree Protection Zone (TPZ) or is inside the Structural Root Zone (SRZ), it must be demonstrated that the tree will remain healthy and viable should any required root cutting take place.

 

The radius of the Tree Protection Zone is calculated by multiplying a tree’s diameter at breast height (DBH) x 12, where DBH is measured at 1.4 metres above ground.  For this tree, its DBH is 1.1m and therefore the radius of the TPZ is 13.2m from the base of the tree. 

 

In relation to the SRZ of a tree, a general rule is that no root cutting works can be undertaken within the following recommended radial distances from any Council owned tree on public land.

 

Trunk Diameter (D)

SRZ

Up to 0.15m

1.5

0.15 to 0.3m

2.0

0.3m to 0.5m

2.5

0.5m to 0.8m

3.0

0.8m to 1.2m

3.5

1.2m to 1.6m

4.0

 

The diameter of the trunk above the buttress roots is 1.1m, resulting in a SRZ radius of 3.5m.

 

The tree outside 4 Figtree Avenue is located 2.85m from the property boundary.  Pruning of roots at the property boundary would constitute an incursion into the Tree Protection Zone of 23-25% which is significantly higher than the recommended 10% that is allowed by the Australian Standard. Similarly, this would constitute root pruning within the measured Structural Root Zone.

 

On this basis, it is considered that severing roots that have entered the properties to prevent further property damage is not a viable option.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:         A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:       Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the fig tree outside 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick and its replacement with a super-advanced alternative species would cost in the vicinity of $5,500. The required funds are available in Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree growing outside 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick has significant aesthetic and historic importance. The tree has been assessed as having significant scenic and amenity value, and providing important habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Using Australian Standard ASDR99307 it has been calculated that the tree has an amenity value of approximately $20,000.

 

This avenue is one of only three streets containing numbers of this species which are listed on Council’s Register of Significant Trees. The subject tree is estimated to be more than sixty years old and up until this point, every effort has been made to retain it, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity. Because of the size and amount of root material that has been removed from the tree over the past decade to effectively deal with the damage being caused by its roots, root pruning is no longer a viable option.

 

For the reasons outlined above, it would be difficult to retain this Hill’s Weeping fig into the future because of the ongoing structural damage that is being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by its roots. The problems associated with this tree are typical of all the figs in Figtree Avenue, particularly those located on the western side of the street. These trees are situated much closer to properties than the figs on the eastern side of Figtree Avenue. Therefore, the damage caused is much more serious and retention options far fewer.

 

This particular tree has been regularly and severely pruned right back to the property alignment of 2 and 4 Figtree Avenue in an effort to minimise the amount of leaf litter, fruit and debris dropping into the front yard areas of those properties. This problem will persist for as long as the tree remains.

 

The removal of this Hill’s Weeping fig will have a detrimental impact on the visual amenity of the streetscape that will not easily be mitigated. However, a large number of Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) have been planted along both sides of Figtree Avenue either as replacement trees or as supplementary planting and this fast growing rainforest tree species has proved an ideal replacement for the Hill’s Weeping figs.

 

Council has resolved that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year. The proposed removal of this street tree asset will not contravene the resolution and removal is only being recommended because there are no viable management options available that would deal with the damage being caused by the roots of this tree.

 

The habitation of birdlife and other fauna within Council tree assets is a primary consideration of tree management staff whenever trees are inspected for pruning or removal works. In addition, it is a requirement for all tree contractors to inspect trees for fauna/wildlife habitation prior to any tree works being undertaken on Council trees.

 

This on-site inspection forms part of the site specific risk assessment all tree contractors undertake prior to works being undertaken and if any wildlife is encountered they ensure they contact WIRES to have any such fauna removed and relocated.

 

It should be noted that the properties of 2 and 4 Figtree Avenue were subject of public liability claims against Council to recover costs to repair damage to property caused by the Hill’s Weeping Fig tree roots.  It should be noted that in other instances where our insurer has paid a claim related to tree root damage following establishment of suitable grounds for payment, our insurers have advised that they will no longer indemnify Council against further property damage resulting from the same tree.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 4 Figtree Avenue, Randwick be removed and replaced with one advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Photographs

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Photographs

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director City Services Report No. CS15/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee - February 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2018/00158

Author:                          Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport; Ken Shepherd, Technical Officer     

 

 

Introduction

 

The Council’s Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meets quarterly to examine issues relating to bike riding and cyclist facilities.


The February 2019 meeting of the Advisory Committee was attended by Councillors, representatives of BIKEast, members of the community and Council staff.

 

Issues

 

The Advisory Committee considered numerous matters of importance to local bicycle riders and the Minutes from the Committee’s meeting, held on 20 February, 2019, are attached.

 

Also included is the updated ‘Initiatives for Bicycle Riders’ list – which captures each matter proposed and/or completed with regard to facilities for bicycle riders in Randwick.

 

The next meeting of this forum is scheduled for 7:30am on Wednesday 15 May, 2019.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:          Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction 9a:                  A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities.

Key action:           Integrated community transport, pedestrian and cycle links between town centres and key locations.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Any proposals for expenditure arising from the Advisory Committee’s recommendations are either covered by existing funding allocations or would be the subject of separate reports to the Council for funding.

 

Conclusion

 

The Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee is a positive forum for the consideration of matters important to bicycle riders. The Committee’s recommendations are supported and it is considered that they should be endorsed by the Council.

 

Recommendation

 

That the recommendations detailed within the minutes of the Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meeting, held on 20 February, 2019, be endorsed.

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

MINUTES - Cycleways & Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee - February 2019

 

2.

REPORT - Randwick Council - Initiatives for Bicycle Riders - February 2019 update

 

 

 

 


MINUTES - Cycleways & Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee - February 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


REPORT - Randwick Council - Initiatives for Bicycle Riders - February 2019 update

Attachment 2

 

 

PDF Creator

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO21/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Contingency Fund - status as at 30 April 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2017/07396

Author:                          Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2018-19 financial year there have been 62 allocations totaling $263,309.90. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2018-19

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$27,000.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 27 June 2017

Sponsorship and in-kind support - Surfing NSW - Junior State Surfing Title

$16,000.00

Ord Council -

28 Nov 2017

 Sydney Film Festival – sponsorship (3 years 2018–2020)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Annual contribution (3 years from 2018-19 to 2020-2021) - Renewal of Community Partnership Agreement with Westpac Helicopter Rescue Service

$20,000.00

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - St George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,323.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - Taste of Coogee 2018

$15,451.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Financial assistance - South Sydney Rabbitohs' - Commemorate John Sutton Historic Milestone

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Our Lady of the Rosary School, Kensington Community Fair

$9,488.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$4,518.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waivng of fees - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Take 3 for the Sea

$928.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Donation - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Coogee Dippers (Autism) Program

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival

$3,020.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - A National Act of Recognition

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial contribution - Commemorative Statue at the Cenotaph, Maroubra

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Financial assistance - La Perouse Public School

$2,780.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Expansion of Community Partnership - Sydney Roosters inaugural women’s NRL side

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Donation - Wee Waa Chamber of Commerce

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Annual Des Renford Chair of Hearts Research Family Gala and Charity Day - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre

$9,500.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Surf Life Saving and Pool Rescue Coaching Clinic - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre Pool

$6,102.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Donation - Humour Foundation Clown Doctors Program

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Waiving of fees - Maroubra Diggers Junior Swimming Club for two Swimming Carnivals at Des Renford Leisure

$1,268.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - Beach Ultimate Frisbee - Selection Camp

$1,044.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees and financial assistance - Surfing NSW - Carve Pro surfing event

$23,726.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Grant Application under the Stronger Communities Program – allocation of Council funds (if successful)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Earthquakes in Indonesia - Donation to Relief Fund

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - St Nicolas Anglican Church Carols by the Sea

$2,298.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Greek Epiphany Festival 2019

$15,537.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Surf Life Saving Sydney Inc

$2,270.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2019

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Financial assistance - Maroubra Surf Life Saving Club - 2018 Life Saving World Championships

$1,500.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Mission Australia

$180.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Waiving of fees - Eastern Suburbs Sub Branch of the Children's Book Council of Australia

$378.30

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Waiving of fees - Global Goodwill Day

$480.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Financial assistance - First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Financial assistance – St John’s Anglican Church

$300.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

 Financial assistance - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club

$1,280.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Financial assistance – Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Donation – Temora Shire Council

$3,000.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Financial assistance – Sea Shepherd Marine Debris Campaign

$1,025.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Waiving of fees – The Coogee Owls

$759.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Financial assistance – Randwick City Football Club 2019 Gala Day

$100.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Donation – Friends of Malabar Headland

$300.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Financial assistance – Randwick and District Historical Society

$9,000.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Donation – St John’s Anglican Church, Maroubra

$300.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Waiving of fees – St Margaret Mary’s Primary School

$182.00

Ord Council – 26 March 2019

Financial support - Windgap Foundation - Annual Ball

$2,400.00

Ord Council – 26 March 2019

Waiving of fees - Maroubra Swim Clubs - use of Des Renford Leisure Centre

$3,690.00

Ord Council – 26 March 2019

Financial assistance - Our Lady of the Rosary Parish Kensington

$2,850.00

Ord Council – 30 Apr 2019

Financial assistance - Autism MATES

$630.00

Ord Council – 30 Apr 2019

Waiving of fees - Superhero Walk

$182.00

Ord Council – 30 Apr 2019

Waiving of fees - Special Olympics Sydney East at the Des Renford Leisure Centre

$1,190.75

Ord Council – 30 Apr 2019

Ron Wood - Commemorative seat and plaque

$4,090.00

Ord Council – 30 Apr 2019

Donation - Royal Hospital for Women

$300.00

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                                                            $263,309.90

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:             A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:           Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:           Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $221,317.00 in the 2018-19 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO22/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Investment Report - April 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2015/06527

Author:                          Gail Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – April 2019” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of April 2019. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 30 April 2019, Council held investments with a market value of $68.431 million. The portfolio value decreased during April by ~$7.509 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from April 2018 to April 2019. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance

 

Asset Allocation

 

The majority of the portfolio is spread between term deposits (49.68%) and senior floating rate notes (46.35%). The remainder of the portfolio is held in the overnight cash accounts with CBA (3.96%). The FRN’s add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term to Maturity

 

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 40% of the total investment portfolio.

 

 

All minimum and maximum limits comply with Council’s investment policy:

 

Compliant

Horizon

Invested
$

Invested
%

Min Limit
%

Max Limit
%

0-90 days

$15,711,005

22.96%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$15,503,216

22.66%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$9,529,073

13.93%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$27,688,141

40.46%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

As at the end of April, applying the long-term S&P ratings only, Council did not have an overweight position to any single authorised deposit-taking institution (ADI). The investment portfolio is entirely directed to assets rated “A” or higher, consistent with the adopted investment policy. That is, there are currently no assets rated “BBB” or below.

 

 

 

 

 

Compliant

Credit Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

AA Category

$42,898,115

62,69%

100%

$25,533,321

A Category

$25,533,320

37.31%

80%

$29,211,828

BBB Category

$0.00

0.00%

 

 

Unrated ADIs

$0.00

0.00%

 

 

 

Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy based on long term S&P ratings.

 

Compliant

Issuer

Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

CBA

AA-

$13,272,083

19.39%

40%

$14,100,491

NAB

AA-

$19,575,250

28.61%

40%

$7,797,324

Westpac

AA-

$10,050,782

14.69%

40%

$17,321,792

Rabobank

A+

$1,017,746

1.49%

25%

$16,090,113

Suncorp

A+

$10,528,617

15.39%

25%

$6,579,242

AMP Bank

A

$7,986,958

11.67%

25%

$9,120,901

ING Bank

A

$6,000,000

8.77%

25%

$11,107,859

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period April 2016 to April 2019.

 

 

 

The total portfolio of term deposits (T/D’s) and floating rate notes (FRNs) provided a solid return of +0.24% (actual), outperforming the benchmark AusBond Bank Index return by +0.07% (actual). The outperformance continues to be driven by a combination of deposits that were originally invested longer than 6 months, as well as the higher yielding FRNs locked in at attractive margins and sold prior to maturity, realising small capital gains and boosting returns. The FRN portfolio (on an accrual basis) continues to outperform the deposit portfolio, as evidenced by the returns over the past 12 months. This has partially been attributed to the strategic sales undertaken, realising capital gains and then switching proceeds into higher yielding (new) FRNs.

 

Over the past year, the combined term deposit and FRN portfolio returned +2.83% p.a., outperforming bank bills by 0.82% p.a. The overall return remains solid given deposit rates reached their all-time lows in August 2016 after the RBA’s last interest rate cut. The official RBA cash interest rate remains at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Performance

1 month

3 months

6 months

FYTD

1 year

Official Cash Rate

0.12%

0.36%

0.74%

1.25%

1.50%

AusBond Bank Bill Index

0.16%

0.50%

0.99%

1.69%

2.02%

Council’s T/D Portfolio

0.23%

0.68%

1.37%

2.27%

2.72%

Council’s FRN Portfolio

0.24%

0.72%

1.46%

2.46 %

2.96%

Council’s Portfolio^

0.24%

0.70%

1.41%

2.36 %

2.83 %

Outperformance

0.07%

0.19%

0.42%

0.68 %

0.82%

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits totalled $34.0 million, accounting for 49.68% of the total investment portfolio. Four deposits totalling $4.0 million matured and were withdrawn in April.  No new deposits were placed in April. As at the end of April, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.77%, up 1 basis points from the previous month.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $31.720 million in floating rate notes. During April there was no trading of FRN’s.

 

The FRN’s are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end. The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 30 April 2019 increased by ~$73k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·        Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·        Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·        And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 


Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:    Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:    Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

The original budget provision for investment income from this source was $1,200,934.00. An additional $350,000.00 was budgeted as part of the December 2018 budget review. The total revised budget is $1,550,934.00. Investment income to 30 April 2019 amounted to $1,665,434,43.

Further provision for additional income of $190,000.00 will be made as part of the March 2019 budget review.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2018-19 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period.

 

All investments as at 30 April 2019 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for April 2019 be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - April 2019

 

 

 

 


Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - April 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO23/19

 

 

Subject:                         Quarterly Budget Review - March 2019

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                     F2018/00378

Author:                          Oliver Guo, Acting Manager Financial Planning & Performance     

 

 

Introduction

 

Section 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that, at the end of each quarter, a Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) be prepared and submitted to Council that indicates the latest estimates of income and expenditure for the 2018-19 year.

 

The regulation (Section 203 (2)) also requires that the budget review statement must include, or be accompanied by:

 

I.       A report as to whether or not the Responsible Accounting Officer believes that the Statement indicates that the financial position of the Council is satisfactory, having regard to the original estimate of income and expenditure; and

II.      If that position is unsatisfactory, recommendations for remedial action.

 

Issues

 

The March Quarterly Budget Review Statement (attachment 1) provides an update on the Council’s financial performance and position as at 31 March 2019.

 

Included within this report are recommended variations to the Council’s budget that, if adopted, will result in an overall increase in the Council’s projected budget surplus at year end from $6,913 to $7,215.

 

Income and operating expenses

 

Major variations include:

·        Higher legal costs ($400k)

·        Higher interest on investment income ($185k)

·        Smart City Operating Grants (Smart Beach Coogee-$226k; Smart Parking - $210k)

 

Capital budget

 

The projected expenditure on asset renewal, upgrade and new assets is projected to increase from $91.9m to $92.9m. This includes $436k for the Smart Beach Coogee and Smart Parking projects (funded from grants); 336k for the NSW Golf Club Coastal Walkway project (funded by grants and infrastructure reserve).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:              Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:         Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:         Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial & operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The proposed variations listed in the attachment will result in a projected budget surplus on 30 June 2019 of $7,215.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)      the report in relation to the March 2019 Budget Review be received and noted; and

 

b)      the proposed March 2019 budget variations shown in the attachment to this report be adopted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Quarterly Budget Review Statements (QBRS) - March 2019

 

 

 

 


Quarterly Budget Review Statements (QBRS) - March 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO24/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Monthly Financial Report as at 30 April 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2018/00380

Author:                          Oliver Guo, Acting Manager Financial Planning & Performance     

 

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

 

a)       establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the Council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

 

b)      if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the Council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 30 April 2019. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 30 April 2019. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 30 April 2019.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:         Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:       Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.  The Current Ratio as at 30 April 2019 is 2.97 compared to 2.12 as at 30 June 2018, indicating the Council’s liquidity remains strong with capacity to meet short term obligations as they fall due.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statement -  April 2019

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet - April 2019

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements - Cashflow Statement - April 2019

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statement -  April 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet - April 2019

Attachment 2

 

 

PDF Creator


Monthly Financial Statements - Cashflow Statement - April 2019

Attachment 3

 

 

PDF Creator  


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM32/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Sidewalk Talks

 

Folder No:                     F2014/00593

Submitted by:               Councillor D'Souza, South Ward     

 

 

Motion:

That:

 

a)           in order to promote a sense of belonging and develop human connections through listening in public spaces, Council endorses the preparation of a report in relation to ‘Sidewalk Talks’.

 

b)           the report is to be modelled on the San Francisco experience and is to include Council and volunteer involvement, budgetary and resourcing considerations and strategic alignment to our City Plan.

 

Background:

It is intended that a ‘Sidewalk Talks’ project would involve Council and volunteers to help build a stronger healthier community that is more inclusive, compassionate and accepting. Sidewalk Talk originated in San Francisco in 2014 and held its first listening in 2015. Now there are 3200 volunteer listeners across 12 countries around the world.

 

It promotes a sense of belonging and developing human connections through listening in public spaces.

 

The benefits to community listening are numerous,

·        Builds a sense of community 

·        Fosters social cohesion

·        Develops human connection

·        Is good for mental health and overall being

·        Promotes a sense of belonging

·        Celebrates diversity 

·        Affirms difference 

·        Models inclusivity 

·        Enables people to meet in safe public places

·        Empowers community involvement 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM33/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Comprehensive Study of Anzac Pde – South

 

Folder No:                     F2011/00245

Submitted by:               Councillor Said, South Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That:

 

1.       Council Officers instruct the RMS to facilitate a Community Consultation Report, similar to the Botany Road and Bunnerong Road, Matraville Intersection Improvements Report, January 2016, in relation to Anzac Parade and Pozier Avenue, Matraville. (Note; specifically the report would focus on traffic lights at this intersection, pedestrian crossings and 40 zone speed limits on both the eastern and western sides of Anzac Parade).

 

2.       Council Officers bring back a comprehensive traffic study of Anzac Parade between Beauchamp Road and Little Bay Road, focusing on four main areas;

 

a)      School zone safety including pick up and drop off

b)      Speed limits

c)      Pedestrian Safety, pedestrian crossings, placement, signage and lack there of

d)      Parking especially along the Long Bay Gaol corridor.

 

Background:

Residents and school parents alike, are repeatedly expressing their frustration of the lack of Pedestrian Safety in the St Spyridon High School precinct between Beauchamp Road and Pozier Avenue.

 

On February 12 this year, tragically a pedestrian was knocked over and killed on the corner of Kenny Avenue and Anzac Parade, speed and the placement of the Pedestrian crossing may have been a factor.

 

Source of funding:

If the report recommends in favour of the Motion, the financial cost should be incurred by the RMS.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM34/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Glyphosate based products used by Council

 

Folder No:                     F2019/00544

Submitted by:               Councillor D'Souza, South Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That Council investigate and review the use of Roundup as the first choice in RCC as a weed killer.

 

Background:

Evidence Based - Is the Roundup Weed Killer (Glyphosate) Bad for You? -  https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/roundup-glyphosate-and-health - This article takes a detailed look at Roundup and its health effects.

 

Roundup is one of the most popular weed killers in the world. It is used by farmers and homeowners alike, in fields, lawns and gardens. Many studies claim that Roundup is safe and environmentally friendly. However, other studies have linked it to serious health issues like cancer.

 

The following is an extract from a letter from the United Services Union dated 15 May 2019 in relation to Glyphosate based products used by Council:

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM35/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Community Infrastructure Grants Program

 

Folder No:                     F2004/06618

Submitted by:               Councillor Said, South Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That Council officers investigate the criteria for obtaining funds from the Australian Government Department of Health’s Community Sport Infrastructure grants program to fund small to medium scale projects (maximum $500,000) and their findings should be brought back in the form of a report.

 

Background:

The grants program aims to ensure more Women have access to quality sporting facilities, encouraging greater community participation in sport and physical activity. The Funding will help ensure accessible, safe, inclusive and sustainable sporting and physical activity infrastructure, targeting poor lighting and inadequate facilities such as female change rooms and toilets.

 

The success of Women’s sport in our LGA such as AFLW, Football, Netball, Cricket, Rugby, Oztag, Touch Football and Rugby League, means we have an obligation to provide the appropriate facilities to ensure we meet this growth in Female participation. Sport plays an important role in connecting people, feeling part of a community and it is integral to the social wellbeing of individuals.

 

Thousands of women and girls have played and continue to play Netball at the Heffron Park facility, having access to only a few toilets in the clubhouse or the use of the “creepiest” toilets in Heffron! Female sport participation is growing at a rapid rate, however facilities are still male centric or totally inadequate.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM36/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Celebrating 50 years of Randwick Netball Association

 

Folder No:                     F2005/00266

Submitted by:               Councillor Said, South Ward     

 

 

Motion:

That:

 

a)      Council formally recognises and congratulates, through social media and a plaque to the Executive, the 50th Anniversary of the Randwick Netball Association.

 

b)      All clubs, players, umpires and officials should be thanked and congratulated on this wonderful milestone.

 

c)      Council discuss with the Executive the sponsorship of an Award in honour of Pat Martin.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM37/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Crs Stavrinos & Luxford - Noise/Vibration concerns raised by Wansey Road residents in relation to Light Rail Testing

 

Folder No:                     F2015/00095

Submitted by:               Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward; Councillor Luxford, West Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That Council:

 

a)      Request a Meeting between appropriate senior council staff, Wansey Road residents and TfNSW representatives to address Noise and Vibration concerns that have arisen due to Light Rail testing along Wansey Road.

 

b)      Obtain quotations to conduct its own independent Noise and Vibration tests inside affected houses and seek to obtain any test results conducted by TfNSW.

 

c)      Write to the NSW Minister for Transport and Roads, the Hon. Andrew Constance requesting that the Light Rail speed limit be limited to 30km/per hour during the hours of 9pm-7am on weekdays and 9pm-8am on weekends to help reduce noise levels and vibration concerns. As part of this letter council also request that simultaneous testing occur on both tramlines to determine maximum noise and vibration levels.

 

Background:

Both Councillor Luxford and myself were notified by a resident who lives on Wansey Road, in relation to noise and vibration concerns raised as a result of Light Rail testing. Both of us visited Wansey Road at night along with Council’s Senior Planner, Mr Alan Bright, to see first-hand what is happening. The purpose of this motion is to address the concerns raised by residents.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM38/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - Increasing habitat for small native birds

 

Folder No:                     F2005/00537

Submitted by:               Councillor Shurey, North Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That, to further encourage and support the protection and survival of our small native, local bird life, a report be prepared outlining the costs of extending the Native Havens Program to include native plant giveaways to local residents at our Quarterly Nursery Open days and Council events.

 

Background:

Much of the native bushland in the Randwick City area is in large reserves that aren’t connected to each other. Increasing urban development has broken up these areas. This creates small pockets of bushland and reduces the protective habitat for small native birds and they are increasingly threatened by the Indian Myrna and the Noisy Myrna.  Encouraging residents to plant native shrubs in their garden can provide the connectivity between our larger reserves to ensure the protection and survival of our treasured small native birds.

 

Council’s Native Havens Program provides information and support for our schools and residents to assist them in understanding how to create and maintain native habitat garden.  This is an excellent program and provides a high level of support to encourage native gardens.

 

Source of funding:

To be funded from the Environmental Levy.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM39/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Andrews - Electric Scooter Trial

 

Folder No:                     F2017/00474

Submitted by:               Councillor Andrews, Central Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That:

 

a)      Council calls on the NSW Government to urgently introduce a framework for electric scooter mobility trial in Randwick LGA as soon as possible.

 

b)      If the NSW Government is unwilling to urgently introduce such a framework, Randwick City Council calls on the NSW Government to only provide the relevant exemption order to the Road Transport Act 2013, so that councils such as Randwick can introduce their own trial or licensing arrangements with operators, in ways that meet the needs of their own communities.

 

c)      The Council acknowledges the Commonwealth Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities has already approved the use of safe and appropriate e-scooters under the new classification of Personal Mobility Devices (PMDs) as ‘non-road vehicles’ under the Motor Vehicle Standards Act 1989.

 

d)      The Council acknowledges that valid public safety concerns can be addressed through a combination of rider training and education, dynamic data monitoring and active policing instead of completely banning this legitimate technology.

 

e)      The Council acknowledges the early success of e-scooter mobility trials in other cities such as Brisbane and Adelaide, and many other global cities, where e-scooters are now a permanent option within the transport mix.

 

Background:

 E-scooter shared mobility platforms offer the possibility of a ‘first and last mile’ transport solution that achieves the following:

 

·        Alleviates traffic congestion by providing an alternative to vehicle travel for short-and-medium distances

·        Supports patronage of public transport by integrating patrons with bus, train and light rail transport nodes

·        Provides numerous full-time and contract employment opportunities for our local community

·        Supports revenue and patronage growth in outdoor shopping districts

·        Delivers a carbon neutral and pollution-free mode of transport

·        Comes at no cost to government, unlike other available modes of public transport

·        Provides a transport mode that is socially equitable by offering those without a private vehicle a cheap way to get around their communities.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council  28 May 2019

 

 

Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR4/19

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Subject:                  Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Stavrinos, Bowen and Luxford - South Coogee to Kingsford - Cycling and Streetscape Improvements - Route Options Analysis

 

Folder No:                     PROJ/10180/1527784/6

Submitted by:               Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward; Councillor Bowen, East Ward; Councillor Luxford, West Ward     

 

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 30 April 2019 in relation to Item CS10/19 and reading as follows:

 

“That:

1.    the Bundock Street, Avoca Street, Sturt Street route is adopted as the preferred east / west cycleway route between South Coogee and Kingsford, subject to

 

2.    a further report be brought back to the Council addressing all the community concerns raised regarding this route, including a traffic study,

 

3.    the further report also details proposed design improvements to further minimise the impact of the proposed cycleway upon trees – and include the independent arborist’s advice on each tree then proposed to be removed;

 

4.    the identified future strategic bicycle corridor along Anzac Parade be the subject of a briefing session for Councillors; and

 

5.    Council officers commence investigation on design and costings for the Anzac Parade Bikeway (mid A) (No 2) addition to Bundock Street Cycle (No 4).”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That Council:

 

1.    cease any further work relating to the East West cycleway route between South Coogee and Kingsford;

 

2.    acknowledge that within the Bicycle Route Construction Priority Map, Anzac Bikeway – North was listed as first priority, and Anzac Bikeway - Mid ‘A’ was listed as second priority;

 

3.    recommit to proceeding with Priority 1 Anzac Bikeway – North on the basis that no parking is lost; and

 

4.    seek funding for concept plan and detailed design for Priority 2 – Anzac Bikeway - Mid ‘A’ and Priority 6 – Anzac Bikeway – Mid ‘B’ to connect the south of the city.”