BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

Meeting

 

 

 

  Tuesday 26 March 2019   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Randwick City Council		1300 722 542
30 Frances Street			council@randwick.nsw.gov.au
Randwick NSW 2031			www.randwick.nsw.gov.au
 



Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council meeting of Randwick City Council will be held in the Council Chamber, 1st Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick on

Tuesday, 26 March 2019 at 6:00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of Country

I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on the land of the Bidjigal and the Gadigal peoples who occupied the Sydney Coast, being the traditional owners.  On behalf of Randwick City Council, I acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders past and present, and to Aboriginal people in attendance today.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council - 26 February 2019

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

GM3/19       Social Media Policy................................................................................................. 1

Director City Planning Reports

CP4/19        Planning proposal - new Heritage Conservation Area - 37-41 Dudley St,

                   142A-152 Brook St and 5 Edgecumbe Ave within Randwick LEP 2012 and new

                   Local Heritage Items - 39 and 41 Dudley St and 148 Brook St, Coogee................... 13

CP5/19        Parking Fine Reforms............................................................................................ 65

CP6/19        Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and

                   Clause 4.6 - 08 Feb to 12 Mar 2019........................................................................ 75

CP7/19        Cultural and Community Grant Program - Recommended Allocations –

                   March 2019........................................................................................................... 79

CP8/19        ClimateWatch initiative proposed by the EarthWatch Institute at 2 Randwick locations............................................................................................................... 87

CP9/19        Service NSW 'Easy to do Business' Program......................................................... 91

Director City Services Reports

CS7/19        Upcoming project - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club.................................................. 93

CS8/19        Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee........................... 105

CS9/19        Eurimbla Avenue, Randwick – Land Dedication for Public Road............................. 111

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO9/19        Investment Report - February 2019...................................................................... 115

CO10/19      Contingency Fund - status as at 28 February 2019............................................... 125

CO11/19      Proposed Pensioner Discount on Environment Levy.............................................. 129

CO12/19      Monthly Financial Report as at 28 February 2019.................................................. 131

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM13/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Andrews - Public clocks................................................. 141

NM14/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Footpath widening and lighting

                   improvements to create alfresco dining areas in town centres............................... 143

NM15/19      Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Review of Light Rail Development Agreement

                   between RCC and NSW Government................................................................... 145  

Closed Session  (record of voting NOT required)

CO13/19      Council Approval for Payment of Legal Expenses - Order for Councillors to Appear at Waverley Court

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (g) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

  

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

 

Therese Manns

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM3/19

 

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Subject:                  Social Media Policy

 

Folder No:                     F2011/00415

Author:                          Joshua Hay, Communications Manager     

 

 

Introduction

 

Council’s Social Media Policy was adopted by Council on 13 December 2011 and is now due for review.

 

Issues

 

Social media has transformed and fundamentally changed how people communicate with each other and with companies, organisations and public figures.

 

Council uses social media to communicate Council projects, services and events but we also use it to create a deeper, two-way connection with our community and help celebrate our area and build our vision of a sense of community.

 

Social media is an effective tool, but it can also be problematic as comments or posts made in private can quickly become public and private matters can escalate into workplace matters.

 

A Social Media Policy is a best practice approach to managing Council’s social media presence and providing guidelines to assist staff and Councillors manage their personal and professional social media profiles. 

 

In 2018, Randwick Council commenced a review of our Social Media Policy. This review included engaging an external lawyer with social media legal experience in commercial radio to review Council’s policy from a best practice and risk mitigation perspective.

 

An internal staff consultation process was conducted seeking feedback and submissions on a revised social media policy which included notification to all staff about the policy, discussion at Council’s internal Consultative Committee and consideration by Council’s Senior Leadership Team.

 

Following the consultation, key changes proposed to the Social Media Policy include:

   Identifying social media as one of Council’s customer service tools

   Providing guidelines, rules and a framework for staff authorised to manage Council’s social media accounts

   Providing staff with guidelines for their personal use of social media to minimise risk

   Outlining Councillor obligations and guidelines consistent with the Model Code of Conduct

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:    3. An informed and Engaged Community

Direction:     3a. Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide services.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Social Media Policy has been reviewed and updated following internal and external consultation and is now recommended to Council for adoption.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council adopts the revised Social Media Policy.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Social Media Policy 2011

 

2.

Social Media Policy 2019

 

 

 

 


Social Media Policy 2011

Attachment 1

 

 

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Social Media Policy 2019

Attachment 2

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP4/19

 

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Subject:                  Planning proposal - new Heritage Conservation Area - 37-41 Dudley St, 142A-152 Brook St and 5 Edgecumbe Ave within Randwick LEP 2012 and new Local Heritage Items - 39 and 41 Dudley St and 148 Brook St, Coogee

 

Folder No:                     F2016/00475

Author:                          Timothy Walsh, Environmental Planning Officer     

 

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council has prepared a Planning Proposal to recognise the heritage values of the properties located on the corner of Dudley Street and Brook Street, Coogee comprising 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, 142A, 144, 146A, 146B, 148, 150 & 152 Brook Street and 5 Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee (the subject area).

 

It should be noted that 142A and 152 Brook Street are existing heritage items within the Randwick Local Environment Plan 2012.

 

The proposed Planning Proposal is consistent with the recommendations outlined within the Heritage Study prepared by Council, dated November 2018 (refer to Attachment 1 of Planning Proposal) to investigate the potential heritage significance of the subject area as well as the independent peer review of this study, undertaken in March 2019. The Planning Proposal seeks to amend the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP 2012) by creating a new heritage conservation area to incorporate the subject area, and to list properties 39 & 41 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street as local heritage items.

 

This report provides an overview of the Planning Proposal, a summary of events leading to the planning proposal and a summary of key issues, and includes the advice received from the Randwick Local Planning Panel (RLPP) on the merit of the proposal.

 

Background

 

The following motion by Councillors Matson and Veitch was carried at the Ordinary Council meeting on 28 August 2018:

‘That Council commences a heritage study of the following dwellings in Coogee for the purpose of publically exhibiting a proposal to amend Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to include them as listed heritage items:

-     37 Dudley Street, Coogee

-     39 Dudley Street, Coogee

-     41 Dudley Street, Coogee

-     144 Brook Street, Coogee

-     146 Brook Street, Coogee

-     146A Brook Street, Coogee

-     148 Brook Street, Coogee

-     150 Brook Street, Coogee

 

Letters were sent by Council to the owners of the subject properties, dated 18 September 2018 in order to advise them of Council’s resolution to commence a heritage study of their properties, and to seek their consent to access the subject sites. Positive responses were received from 37 and 41 Dudley Street, and 144, 146A and 146B, 150 Brook Street, and 2/1 Edgecumbe Avenue. No responses were received from 148 Brook Street and access was denied from 39 Dudley Street, Coogee and 1/1 Edgecumbe Avenue.

 

Site inspections to 144 Brook Street and 41 Dudley Street were carried out on 2 October 2018. 146A and 146B Brook Street were viewed on 4 October. 37 Dudley was inspected on 17 October 2018 and 150 Brook Street was viewed on 25 October 2018.

 

On 8 October 2018, an Interim Heritage Order (IHO) was placed on 39 Dudley Street (Lot B DP 301 192) (refer to Attachment 3 of Planning Proposal). IHO was issued as Council received notice of two Complying Development Certificate (CDC) applications, dated 25 September 2018. The separate CDC applications involved the proposed demolition of the existing dwellings at 37 and 39 Dudley Streets.

 

A Class 1 application for appeal was lodged by Adam Touma (owner of 39 Dudley Street, Coogee) pursuant to 30(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 (Heritage Act) against the making of the IHO by Randwick City Council over the property at 39 Dudley Street, Coogee. This matter is set for hearing on the 10th and 11th of July 2019.

A heritage study of the properties entitled ‘Heritage Study of properties on corner of Brook Street and Dudley Street, Coogee’ dated November 2018 was prepared by Council. The study involved historical research, based on desktop investigations as well as site inspections carried out to a number of properties on 2, 4, 17 and 25 October 2018. It included site details on each property and a preliminary assessment of heritage significance, and an analysis of their contributory value.

The ‘Heritage study’ was reported to the Ordinary Council Meeting on 27 November 2018 (CP57/18) and the following was resolved by Councillors Matson and Shurey:

‘That

a)      Council endorse the Heritage Study dated 25 October 2018 which recommends that 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street and 144, 146A, 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street Coogee be considered for incorporation into a heritage conservation area, and that 39 and 41 Dudley Street, and 148 Brook Street, Coogee, be considered for local heritage listing.

 

b)      Council prepare a Planning Proposal to amend the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to list and create a Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 144, 146A, 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street Coogee, and to list 39 and  41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 148 Brook Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

c)      Council refer the Planning Proposal to the Randwick Local Planning Panel (RLPP) for advice prior to resolving that it be forwarded for “Gateway Determination”.’

 

A rescission motion on the item was submitted by Councillors Andrews, Roberts and Stavrinos and it was referred to the Ordinary Council meeting on 11 December 2018.

On 10 December 2018, an Interim Heritage Order (IHO) was placed on 148 Brook Street (Lot B DP 305284) in view of the current investigations (refer to Attachment 4 of Planning Proposal). Council received notice of a CDC application (dated 7 December 2018) for demolition of the existing dwelling. Council was made aware of internal demolition works being undertaken on the property on 8 December 2018.

 

An Ordinary Council meeting was held on 11 December 2018, and the resolution made at the Ordinary Council meeting (see above) on 27 November 2018 was upheld.

A development application (DA) was lodged with Council on 17 December 2018 (DA944/2018) for demolition of the dwelling at 148 Brook Street, Coogee and construction of a four-storey residential flat building on the site.

 

The owners of 39 Dudley Street commissioned a heritage assessment of their property which was prepared in November 2018 by John Oultram Heritage & Design. A peer review of this study was also commissioned by the owners of 39 Dudley Street. This peer review was prepared by Stephen Davies of Urbis. The findings from these reports are provided in the ‘Summary of Key Issues’ section.

 

On 14 February 2019, the subject Planning Proposal was referred to the Randwick Local Planning Panel for assessment. The Panel resolved to support the Planning Proposal in principle. The resolution is as follows:

 

That the Randwick Local Planning Panel advises Council that:

 

In principle the panel supports the planning proposal to amend Schedule 5 of the RLEP 2012 to include a new Heritage Conservation Area (HCA) ‘Edgecumbe Estate’. However, the planning panel considers that:

 

1.   Given there are conflicting expert heritage opinions regarding the listing of 39 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street as individual heritage items, an independent peer review should be undertaken.

Furthermore, this review should consider whether 5 Edgecumbe Avenue should also be included as part of the new Heritage Conservation Area; and any other recommended amendments to the new heritage conservation area.

 

2.   The planning proposal should address all strategic directions of the Eastern City District Plan, particularly in relation to housing supply in the Randwick LGA.

As a result of the Local Planning Panel advice, Sue Rosen Associates was engaged by Council to undertake the peer review of the draft Heritage Study (Nov 2018) that recommended the proposed heritage listing of sites at 39 and 41 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street, Coogee, and the creation of the new ‘Edgecumbe Estate’ Heritage Conservation Area. The peer review also reviewed the heritage study by John Oultram Heritage & Design and the peer review of that heritage study that was prepared by Stephen Davies of Urbis. Sue Rosen Associates’ peer review also included an assessment of the merit in including 5 Edgecumbe Avenue into the proposed heritage conservation area. As a result, 5 Edgecumbe Avenue has been included in the proposed heritage conservation area.

 

Planning Process

A planning proposal is the first step to commence changes to the planning provisions relating to land. It is a formal application that sets out the objectives, intended outcomes, and justification for the proposed changes, and also details the community consultation to be undertaken.

 

The NSW Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act) and Regulations set out the process for amending the planning provisions (heritage) relating to land in NSW. Changes to the planning provisions can only be made via a formal amendment to the Randwick LEP.

 

Referral to the RLPP

On 23 February 2018, the Minister gave a direction (under s9.1 of the EP&A Act) to councils with a Local Planning Panel (LPP) set up (other than City of Sydney) that all planning proposals prepared after 1 June 2018 be referred to their LPPs for advice, unless the planning proposal relates to the correction of an obvious error in the LEP, matters of minor nature or matters that will not have any significant adverse impact. Accordingly, the subject Planning Proposal was referred to the RLPP on 14/02/2019 and advice from the Panel has been included in this report.

 

Gateway Determination

If Council resolves to proceed with the subject Planning Proposal, it will be forwarded to the Minister for Planning for a ‘Gateway Determination’. The ‘Gateway Determination’ is essentially a checkpoint for planning proposals, and enables those proposals that are not well founded, or not in the public interest to be stopped early in the process, before significant resources are committed in carrying out technical studies or investigations.

 

The Minister’s ‘Gateway Determination’ will stipulate whether the subject Planning Proposal should proceed, whether it needs to be resubmitted, the timeframe for its completion (usually nine months from the date of the Determination), the community consultation requirements and State/Commonwealth agency requirements and whether a public hearing is needed. 

 

Exhibition and Making of Amendments

Following the ‘Gateway Determination’, the Planning Proposal will be formally placed on public exhibition for comment. The final LEP and accompanying maps which amend the Council’s principal planning instrument (i.e. the RLEP 2012) are made by the Minister for Planning (and notified on the NSW legislation web site) in accordance with the EP&A Act.  Certain LEPs which are of local significance can be finalised by Council via delegation from the Minister (this is determined at the Gateway stage). 

 

Site description and context

 

The properties subject to the heritage study are located on the northern frontage of Dudley Street and western frontage of Brook Street, within the block bounded by Mount Street, Dudley Street, Brook Street and Carr Street Coogee (see Image 1 below). As a result of the findings of the Randwick Local Planning Panel and the Heritage Peer Review Study prepared by Sue Rosen & Associates, 5 Edgecumbe Avenue has also been included in the proposed heritage conservation area due to its heritage significance.

The three sites located fronting Dudley Street contain a continuous grouping of Inter-War bungalows, one to two storeys in height. The subject sites fronting Brook Street comprise a mix of two to three storey Inter-War residential flat buildings and single storey bungalows. 5 Edgecumbe Avenue is a two-storey apartment block which demonstrates characteristics of the Inter War Art Deco style and 1930s bungalow style.

 

Image 1: Aerial photograph of the subject properties (37, 39, 41 Dudley Street and 142A, 144, 146A, 146B, 148, 150, 152 Brook Street, Coogee) outlined in ‘red’.

 

The surrounding context is characterised by a variety of lot and building sizes, featuring a mix of Federation and Inter-War buildings comprising single and multi-dwelling residences, and some contemporary infill development fronting Edgecumbe Avenue and further east along Dudley Street.

 

Local Planning Framework

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The properties proposed as items of local heritage significance are 39 & 41 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street, and the properties proposed for inclusion within a new heritage conservation area are 37, 39 & 41 Dudley Street, 142A, 144, 146, 146A, 150 & 152 Brook Street and 5 Edgecumbe Avenue. The properties are currently zoned R3  Medium Density Residential under RLEP 2012 with a maximum height limit of 12 metres and FSR of 0.9:1 (note dwelling houses have an alternative applicable FSR based on a sliding scale under the RLEP 2012).

 

The existing zoning and development standards currently applying to the sites are not proposed to change as a result of the Planning Proposal.

 

The properties are not located within a heritage conservation area, however, as mentioned above 142A and 152 Brook Street are existing local heritage items and listed within Schedule 5 of the RLEP 2012 and described as follows:

 

   142A Brook Street, Coogee, ‘3 storey Art Deco residential flat building’ (SP 13844) Heritage item No.I71;

   152 Brook Street, Coogee ‘Brooklyn Flats’ (Lot 1, DP 195960) Heritage item No.I72

Image 2: Extract of RLEP 2012 Heritage Map 007 showing existing local heritage items 142A and 152 Brook Street, Coogee.

 

The Planning Proposal

 

The Planning Proposal has been prepared by Randwick Council. The purpose of the Planning Proposal is to amend the RLEP 2012 to include the following sites as heritage items:

 

-     39 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 301192)

-     41 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot C DP 301192)

-     148 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 305284)

The planning proposal also seeks to create a new Heritage Conservation Area (HCA) ‘Edgecumbe Estate’ to include the following properties:

-     37 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot A DP 301192)

-     39 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 301192)

-     41 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot C DP 301192)

-     142A Brook Street, Coogee (SP 13844)

-     144 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot 1 DP 536759)

-     146 and 146 A Brook Street, Coogee (Lot 2 DP 388326)

-     148 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 305284)

-     150 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot A DP 305284)

-     152 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot 1, DP 195960)

-     5 Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee (SP 12306)

Summary of Key Issues

Proposed Heritage Conservation Area: ‘Edgecumbe Estate’

Early ownership and subdivision history

The Surveyor General’s map of Randwick Waverley and Coogee dated 1856 shows James Hart as the owner of the site comprising lots 5 and 6, Section 11, which formed part of the Crown grant originally laid out in 1838. The land was further purchased in 1909 by Mrs. Olive Alice Little and sale posters for Edgecumbe Estate indicate that the properties were listed for sale in 1915, along with the formation of Edgecumbe Avenue.

 

The subdivision history of the area is further outlined within the ‘Heritage Study of properties on corner of Brook Street and Dudley Street, Coogee’ dated November 2018, prepared by Council. It identified that the subject area comprised of lots which were formed as part of the Edgecumbe Estate subdivision sales in both 1915 and 1920 comprising lots 1-13. The properties located along Brook Street (1-7) formed as part of the Edgecumbe Estate Subdivision Auction in 1915, and comprised dual frontages to Brook Street and Edgecumbe Avenue at the rear while the remaining lots (8-13) formed part of a second auction for the Edgecumbe Estate in 1920.

 

The dwellings at 37 - 41 Dudley Street were further subdivided in 1921 to form lots A, B and C with a north-south orientation and primary frontages to Dudley Street. Detached single storey Inter-War bungalows were constructed on the properties c.1921 and comprised similar architectural characteristics including double fronted battened gables, consistent landscaped front setbacks, brick construction and timber framed casement bay windows to the front elevation. Although, 41 Dudley Street varied slightly due to its prominent corner position, stone front fence and additional roof and side elevation detail which presents to Edgecumbe Avenue.

 

Historical research indicated that the lots fronting Brook Street were primarily formed following the first sales of Edgecumbe Estate in 1915. However, the original lots were subject to further change during the mid-twentieth century.

 

In summary, development along Brook Street involved construction of a range of residential development within the early twentieth century. Three storey residential flat buildings were constructed at 142A and 152 Brook Street (existing heritage items). A two storey residential flat building was constructed at 144 Brook Street prior to 1920 with frontage Brook Street, and a second building constructed on the site with frontage to Edgecumbe Avenue (1-3 Edgecumbe) during the mid-Twentieth century. A two storey duplex known as ‘Rosalie Flats’ was constructed (c.1928) at 146 Brook Street, and the land further subdivided (in a north-south direction) in 1954. The lot fronting Brook Street known as 146 Brook Street ‘Rosalie Flats’, and the lot to the rear known as 5 Edgecumbe Avenue and occupied by a two storey Art Deco residential flat building ‘Roberta Flats’. The properties known as 148 and 150 Brook Street were formed in 1922 as part of a subdivision of Lot 2 of the Edgecumbe Estate (sale in 1915). The single storey Inter-War bungalows were constructed c.1925 and were originally known as 150 and 152 respectively until renumbering occurred within the street in 1927.

 


 

Contribution and character

The Heritage Study identified that the buildings which occupied the lots within the subject area were all constructed by the mid-1920s and it identified that six of the eight buildings (with the exception of 144 Brook Street and 37 Dudley Street) provided aesthetic and historical contribution to the Inter-War character of the area. While it was noted that 144 Brook Street, and 37 Dudley Street had been significantly altered overtime and were of neutral value, it was also recognised that the these buildings are able to retain their original scale and form and are evidently part of the early twentieth century construction period and visually cohesive with the adjacent neighboring contributing buildings. Furthermore, the existing local heritage items at 142A and 152 Brook Street provide significant visual anchor points for the Brook Street properties.

 

Local heritage items

The Heritage Study, identified that the dwellings at 39 and 41 Dudley Street were relatively intact examples of Inter-War bungalows and retained a significant proportion of original fabric. While it was noted that 41 Dudley Street was in fair condition, it was also recognised that the dwelling provided substantial aesthetic and historic value with the potential for restoration. Similarly, 148 Brook Street was observed as being intact and in excellent condition and providing a very good example of Inter-War bungalow, having undergone only minor internal upgrade alterations.

 

The heritage significance of the properties at 39, 41 Dudley Street, and 148 Brook Street have been further detailed within the Draft Heritage Data Forms (refer to Attachment 8 of Planning Proposal), prepared by Council’s Heritage Planner, January 2019. The inventory sheets were prepared in accordance with the Heritage Branch State Heritage Register guidelines. It was identified that the properties were able to meet the relevant criteria for historical, aesthetic and representative significance.

 

Provided below (Image 3) is a map illustrating the new Heritage Conservation Area boundary and identified existing local heritage items and proposed items of local heritage significance.

 

 

Image 3: Proposed new Heritage Conservation Area showing existing and proposed heritage items.

 

Consultation with Owners

Letters were sent by Council to the owners of the subject properties, dated 18 September 2018, in order to advise them of Council’s resolution to commence a heritage study of their properties, and to seek their consent to access the subject sites.

 

Positive responses were received from 37 and 41 Dudley Street, and 144, 146A and 146B and 150 Brook Street. No responses were received from 148 Brook Street and access was denied from the owners of 39 Dudley Street, Coogee. Access was also denied by the owners of 5 Edgecumbe Street when they were approached for a site visit in February 2019.

 

Site inspections of 144 Brook Street and 41 Dudley Street were carried out on 2 October 2018. 146A and 146B Brook Street were viewed on 4 October, 37 Dudley was inspected 17 October 2018 and No 150 Brook Street was viewed on 25 October 2018.

 

On Wednesday 21 November 2018, owners of affected properties were notified of the final Heritage Study and of the potential local heritage listing and/or inclusion in a heritage conservation area that was to be considered by Council at its meeting which was held on 27 November 2018.

 

The matter was considered at the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 11 December 2018, due to a rescission motion being submitted by Councillors Andrews, Roberts and Stavrinos. The rescission motion was lost and Council resolved to endorse the heritage study and Planning Proposal, with the Planning Proposal to be referred to the Randwick Local Planning Panel for advice prior to Gateway.

 

As a result of the recommendations from the Randwick Local Planning Panel and the peer review prepared by Sue Rosen and Associates, a letter was sent to the owner of 5 Edgecumbe Avenue on 13 March 2019 informing them that their property is to be included in the heritage conservation area and that the planning proposal will be going to Council on 26 March 2019. 

 

Owner’s Heritage Reports

The owner of 39 Dudley Street, in November last year, commissioned a heritage assessment which was prepared by John Oultram Heritage & Design. This assessment concluded that the subject property is a modest and typical example of a builder built, Californian style bungalow. The report found that the property does not meet the Heritage Manual criteria for identification as a place of local significance and that there are no heritage considerations that would preclude its demolition.

 

A peer review of this heritage assessment was also commissioned by the owner at 39 Dudley Street. The review prepared by Stephen Davies of Urbis is supportive of the report prepared by John Oultram Heritage & Design, stating that 39 Dudley Street is a modest and typical example of a builder built, Californian style bungalow and the property does not meet the Heritage Manual criteria for identification as a place of local significance.

 

Community petition

Randwick Heritage Action Group has established an online petition to Council on change.org to Save Coogee’s heritage buildings. This petition is calling for the immediate extension of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to include the iconic ’L’ shaped row of buildings scoping from Brook to Dudley Streets, including 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, as well as 144, 146A, 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street. This petition was started in January 2019 and has received 600 supporters to date. The petition has since been updated, calling on Council to also include 5 Edgecumbe Avenue as part of the proposed heritage conservation area.

 

Randwick Local Planning Panel Advice

 

On 14 February 2019, the subject Planning Proposal was referred to the Randwick Local Planning Panel for assessment. The Panel resolved to support the Planning Proposal in principle, with the resolution being carried unanimously. The resolution is as follows:

 

That the Randwick Local Planning Panel advises Council that:

 

In principle the panel supports the planning proposal to amend Schedule 5 of the RLEP 2012 to include a new Heritage Conservation Area (HCA) ‘Edgecumbe Estate’. However, the planning panel considers that:

 

1.   Given there are conflicting expert heritage opinions regarding the listing of 39 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street as individual heritage items, an independent peer review should be undertaken.

Furthermore, this review should consider whether 5 Edgecumbe Avenue should also be included as part of the new Heritage Conservation Area; and any other recommended amendments to the new heritage conservation area.

 

2.   The planning proposal should address all strategic directions of the Eastern City District Plan, particularly in relation to housing supply in the Randwick LGA.

As a result of this resolution from the Randwick Local Planning Panel, Sue Rosen Associates was engaged by Council to undertake the peer review of the draft Heritage Study (Nov 2018) that recommended the proposed heritage listing of sites at 39 and 41 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street, Coogee, and the creation of the new ‘Edgecumbe Estate’ Heritage Conservation Area. Sue Rosen Associates’ engagement also included a review of the inclusion of 5 Edgecumbe Avenue into the proposed heritage conservation area

 

Eastern City District Plan

The Eastern City District Plan is a guide for implementing the Greater Sydney Region Plan at a District level and is a bridge between regional and local planning in the Eastern City District, which includes the Randwick Local Government Area.

Planning Priority E5 – Priority housing supply, choice and affordability, with access to jobs, services and public transport

While the heritage listing of the proposed site may potentially limit the development potential of the site, given that the proposal only impacts 11 properties (the existing heritage items have not been included), the impact on Planning Priority E5 is considered to be negligible. This will be addressed in further detail in Randwick City’s Local Housing Strategy.

The Planning Proposal has the benefit of preserving these housing types and contributes to housing diversity within the LGA.

Planning Priority E6 – Creating and renewing great places and local centres, and respecting the District’s heritage, Action 20 – Identify, conserve and enhance environmental heritage by:

    engaging with the community early in the planning process to understand heritage values and how they contribute to the significance of the place,

    applying adaptive re-use interpreting heritage to foster distinctive local places, and

    managing and monitoring the cumulative impact of development of the heritage values and character of places.

The Planning Proposal is in keeping with the relevant actions of the Eastern City District Plan pertaining to heritage conservation. As noted above, the proposed amendments to the RLEP 2012 resulting from this planning proposal will afford statutory protection to buildings identified as having heritage significance. These buildings have been identified by a heritage study as having heritage significance and/or contributing to the heritage significance of the new heritage conservation area. Council has undertaken preliminary consultation with the property owners of 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 142A, 144, 146, 148, 150 and 152 Brook Street, Coogee (see Council Report Attachment 7). The Planning Proposal will further consult with land owners and undertake broader community engagement during the formal consultation period.

 

A full assessment of the proposal in regard to the strategic directions of the Eastern City District Plan is provided at Attachment 13 of the Planning Proposal.

 

Sue Rosen & Associates Heritage Peer Review

 

The peer review concludes in recommending that consideration be given to listing 39 Dudley Street, 41 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street as individual items in Schedule 5 of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan.

 

The peer review of the heritage report prepared by John Oultram Heritage & Design for 39 Dudley Street notes issues in its assessment such as:

·        the incorrect use of the exclusion criteria used in the assessment of 39 Dudley Street against Criterion A;

·        insufficient research being conducted as part of the assessment of Criterion B;

·        the lack of reference to a standard source used in the assessment of Criterion C;

·        no identification of any social significance assessment being undertaken in the assessment of criterion D;

·        the lack of assessment of archaeological potential of the site in assessing Criterion E; and

·        the lack of a comparative analysis provided in the assessment of Criterion F and G

 

In response to the John Oultram Heritage & Design report, Sue Rosen & Associates state:

 

The criterion for historical significance is fulfilled as the house was built during a key period of the locality’s development. The criterion for associative significance may be fulfilled because of associations with builder James Menary, who built a number of other houses in the area, but more research may be required to further assess his significance and contribution. The criterion for aesthetic significance is fulfilled because the house demonstrates convincingly the characteristics of the California Bungalow style, makes and important contribution to the streetscape and is one of a pair of intact, substantial and very representative California Bungalows.

 

In assessing Stephen Davies’ peer review of the heritage report prepared by John Oultram Heritage & Design, the Sue Rosen and Associates review states that the peer review “largely consists of unsupported assertions regarding heritage significance and is merely an endorsement of the Oultram report without noting its inadequacies”. The Sue Rosen and Associates review notes that Davies makes the ‘unsupported claim’ that 39 Dudley Street does not meet the criteria for significance. The Sue Rosen and Associates report goes on to state that 39 Dudley Street meets Criterion A, possibly meets Criterion G and more research is required to sufficiently determine whether it meets Criterion B or F. 

 

The peer review recommends including 37 Dudley Street, 142A, 144, 146-146A, 150 & 152 Brook Street and 5 Edgecumbe Avenue as Contributory Items in the proposed heritage conservation area.

 

In regard to 5 Edgecumbe Avenue, the review states that although there have been some modifications to its original form, sections of the building such as the central entrance bay demonstrates some of the characteristics of the Inter War Art Deco style, while the bays and oriels of the building are similar to those found on bungalows of the 1930s era. The building is largely intact, including original internal fabric and finishes in its southern section as well as original garages. While it does not fulfill the criteria for historical, associative, social, technical/research and rarity significance, the criteria for aesthetic significance is fulfilled to an extent. The building’s overall form and early character is still able to be interpreted and it contributes positively to the visual character of the locality. As such, it is recommended in the peer review that consideration is given to its inclusion as a Contributory item in the proposed heritage conservation area.

 

The peer review is found at Attachment 12 of the Planning Proposal.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 7:           Heritage that is protected and celebrated

Direction 7a:                 Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated

 

Financial impact statement

 

Costs are associated with legal fees to oppose the appeal against the interim heritage order for 39 Dudley Street. The costs associated with progressing the Planning Proposal would be accommodated within Council’s operational budget.

Conclusion

 

The Planning Proposal seeks to amend Schedule 5 of the RLEP 2012 to recognise 39 & 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 148 Brook Street, Coogee as local heritage items, and list 37, 39 & 41 Dudley Street, Coogee, 142A, 144, 146 and 146A, 148, 150 & 152 Brook Street, Coogee and 5 Edgecumbe Street, Coogee as a heritage conservation area. This proposal should be supported on the following basis:

 

·        The subject properties have been demonstrated to meet the NSW Heritage Council assessment criteria for local heritage listing based on their aesthetic, historical and representative significance. These properties collectively represent the Interwar Period and or retain features of the Interwar character which contribute to the heritage significance of the proposed new heritage conservation area.

·        The planning proposal is consistent with several key strategic directions on heritage conservation articulated in the state and local strategic planning framework including:

-     Eastern City District Plan Priority E5 – Providing housing supply, choice and affordability with access to jobs, services and public transport

-     Eastern City District Plan Planning Priority E6 – Creating and renewing great places and local centres, and respecting the District’s heritage

-     Randwick Local Environment Plan 2012 Clause 5.10 – Heritage Conservation objectives and controls which aim to conserve the environmental heritage of Randwick

-     Randwick City Plan Strategic directions/outcomes which focus on protecting and celebrating local heritage (Outcome 7, Direction 7a

-     Ministerial 117 Directions (2.3) which requires that Planning Proposals contain provisions to facilitate the conservation of heritage

·        The proposed new heritage items and heritage conservation area will have positive social effects for the local community through the retention and conservation of buildings with historical value and which represent the historical development of the area.

 

The assessment of the heritage significance of 39, 41 Dudley Street and 148 Brook Street prepared by Council’s Heritage Planner demonstrate that the properties meet the NSW Heritage Council’s criteria for heritage, aesthetic and representative significance and are worthy as items of local heritage significance. While the heritage significance of 39 Dudley Street is assessed as insignificant in the heritage reports prepared by John Oultram Heritage & Design and Stephen Davies of Urbis that were commissioned by the owner of 39 Dudley Street, the peer review prepared by Sue Rosen and Associates supports it’s listing as a local heritage item. The peer review prepared by Sue Rosen and Associates also supports the inclusion of 5 Edgecumbe Avenue in the heritage conservation area.

 

The ‘Heritage Study of Properties on the corner of Brook Street and Dudley Street, Coogee’ prepared by Randwick Council, dated November 2018 identified that all the properties were constructed around 1920 and although exhibit varying levels of modification, demonstrate similar characteristics and themes relating to the Inter-War period as those detailed within the existing Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area.

 

In view of the above, it is recommended that:

·        the Planning Proposal be supported;

·        the proposed items be placed on the heritage schedule (Schedule 5, Part 1) of the Randwick LEP; and

·        The subject area (with the inclusion of existing local heritage items at 142A and 152 Brook Street) form a new heritage conservation area and placed on the heritage schedule (Schedule 5, Part 2) of the Randwick LEP.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)      Each of the properties at 39 and 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 148 Brook Street, Coogee is an item of local heritage significance;

 

b)      Each item, referred to in 1. above, is to be placed on the heritage schedule (Schedule 5) of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 and to be subject to the provisions of Clause 5.10 Heritage Conservation pursuant to Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012;

 

c)      The Planning Proposal be forwarded to the Department of Planning and Environment as delegate to the Minister for Planning requesting ‘Gateway Determination’ under Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 to amend schedule 5 of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to include the following sites as heritage items:

 

·        39 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 301192)

·        41 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot C DP 301192)

·        148 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 305284)

           

and, to amend Schedule 5 to include a new Heritage Conservation Area (HCA) ‘Edgecumbe Estate’ which would encompass the following properties:

 

·        37 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot A DP 301192)

·        39 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 301192)

·        41 Dudley Street, Coogee (Lot C DP 301192)

·        142A Brook Street, Coogee (SP 13844)

·        144 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot 1 DP 536759)

·        146 and 146 A Brook Street, Coogee (Lot 2 DP 388326)

·        148 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot B DP 305284)

·        150 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot A DP 305284)

·        152 Brook Street, Coogee (Lot 1, DP 195960)

·        5 Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee (SP 12306)

 

d)      Following ‘Gateway Determination’ exhibit the Planning Proposal in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway Determination and bring back a report to Council detailing the results of the community consultation for final consideration by Council;

 

e)      Authorise the Director, City Planning to make typographical, grammatical or formatting changes to the documentation.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Planning Proposal - Dudley and Brook Street, Coogee Edgecumbe Estate Heritage Conservation Area and Local Heritage Items

Included under separate cover

2.

Heritage Report for 39 Dudley Street - Prepared by John Oultram Heritage & Design

 

3.

Peer Review of Heritage Report for 39 Dudley Street - Prepared by Stephen Davies of Urbis

 

4.

Heritage Peer Review - Prepared by Sue Rosen and Associates

 

 

 

 


Heritage Report for 39 Dudley Street - Prepared by John Oultram Heritage & Design

Attachment 2

 

 

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Peer Review of Heritage Report for 39 Dudley Street - Prepared by Stephen Davies of Urbis

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Heritage Peer Review - Prepared by Sue Rosen and Associates

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP5/19

 

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Subject:                  Parking Fine Reforms

 

Folder No:                     F2013/00140

Author:                          Roman Wereszczynski, Manager Health, Building & Regulatory Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting held on 26 February 2019, in consideration of a Notice of Motion from Councillor Roberts, it was resolved:

 

(Stavrinos/Said) that Council:

 

a)      Note the NSW Government commenced in June 2018 the first review and reform of parking and other fines in decades.

 

b)      Note the ongoing review has resulted in the NSW Government implementing the following reforms:

 

-    a reduction of 52 non-safety related parking fines issued by NSW Government authorities from $112 to $80; and

-    the option for councils and universities to also reduce the same 52 non-safety related parking fines from $112 to $80.

 

c)      Bring back a report to the March Ordinary meeting of Council on the financial impact to Council if Council elected to opt-in to the reforms already enacted by the NSW Government and other NSW Councils.”

 

Issues

 

·          Parking Fine Reforms

In 2018, the NSW government introduced a range of parking fine reforms, by lowering certain types of parking fines issued State government authorities by 25% (from $110 to $80) and by introducing legislation which enables a local Council to charge lower amounts for certain types of parking fines.

 

The intent of the provisions is to allow local Councils to introduce greater flexibility and reduce the impact of parking fines on the local community.

 

All parking fines are set by the NSW government and the same fines apply throughout the State. However, under the new framework, Councils can ‘opt-in’ to the new provisions to reduce certain types of parking fines from the current amount of $112 to $80.

 

The types of parking fines which these provisions apply to are identified as level 2 parking fines, which include:

 

   Park continuously for longer than permitted

   Stop/Park in a restricted parking area

   Park without paying meter fee

   Park longer than allowed by ticket

   Park outside parking bay

   Park contrary to angled parking sign

   Stand vehicle in area other than permitted

 

To implement these changes, Councils were initially requested to ‘opt-in’ by 1 January 2019, to be able to take effect from 1 March 2019. However, the NSW government have also advised that Councils will have the opportunity to ‘opt-in’ periodically in 2019 and onwards.

 

Councils can also seek to ‘opt-out’ of the provisions (if introduced) on an annual basis.

 

·        Parking enforcement in Randwick

Randwick City Council’s approach to parking enforcement is more subtle than many other Council’s approach and the income received from parking fines in Randwick is much less than many other Council’s  (including Waverley, Bayside, Woollahra, City of Sydney and others).

 

Randwick City Council also only has a very low number of ‘parking meters’ in the local government area, compared to many other Council areas.

 

The majority of the relevant types of penalty notices issued in Randwick relate to vehicles parked longer than permitted in our business areas, beachside locations and adjacent areas, which benefit from time-restricted parking to promote turn-over of vehicles and limit parking impacts on nearby residents.

 

As Council has a very low number of parking meters, the time-restricted parking areas and public car parks, are patrolled and enforced manually, by identifying parked vehicles and returning later to ascertain if the subject vehicle has over-stayed the nominated time-limited parking requirements. This manual process, in effect, results in a more flexible and generous parking enforcement approach compared to a ‘ticketed’ parking scheme.

 

Overall, it is considered that Council’s current approach is very reasonable and fair for residents and visitors to our area and penalty notices are only issued in respect of clear breaches of the relevant Road Rules.

 

Any reduction in these types of parking fines (which are much lower than other types of parking fines e.g. parking in a No Stopping area, Clearway, Bus Zone, School Zone etc) may reduce the ‘deterrent’ factor and result in a greater level of illegal parking, which would also have a greater impact on local residents and businesses.

 

Should Council consider opting into these provision, consideration should be given to the undertaking of a comprehensive traffic and parking strategy to fully ascertain the suitability of current and future parking restrictions and zones in the area, including the impacts and demands arising from the Light Rail system.

 

Greater flexibility could also be provided to Local Government in setting other fine amounts to ensure that there is demand responsive parking suitable to the needs of different parts of the City.

 

It is also noted that Council has committed to ta ‘Smart Cities’ project which will include the implementation of an Integrated Parking Management System.  This project will include a range of smart parking technologies aimed at improving parking efficiencies which should lead to less illegal parking given that motorists would be able to access live data to determine the availability of parking. The investment in this type of technology would complement the ‘deterrent’ factor associated with the current processes and fines.

 

·        Saving Grace Period

In January 2019, the NSW government also introduced provisions which provide motorists with a 10 minute ‘grace period’ (before a parking fine can be issued. However, the ‘grace period’ only applies to certain ‘ticketed or coupon’ parking schemes, for at least one-hour and the provisions do not apply to non-metered time-restricted parking areas or metered parking areas which do not involve the issue of a ticket.

 

Therefore, these changes have a minimal impact upon motorists within the City of Randwick, as Council only has one such ticketed parking area at Coogee beach.

 

The ‘grace period’ does not apply to other parking restricted areas such as No Stopping areas, Clearways, Loading Zones and Bus Zones etc.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9d:   Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management

Direction 9:     Integrated and accessible transport.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council resolve to opt-in to the parking reforms, it is estimated that it would result in a loss of revenue of approximately $525,000 per annum.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick City Council implements a parking enforcement program, which principally focuses on parking breaches in the busy commercial areas and beachside locations.

 

Council’s parking enforcement program is fair and reasonable and any reduction in the amount of these parking fines may increase the level of illegal parking and over-staying in our ‘time-restricted’ parking areas. Therefore, a reduction in these types of parking fines is not warranted.

 

Overall, it would be preferable if the NSW Government was to review the amount of all parking fines across-the-board, throughout NSW, rather than inconsistently in only the local government areas that opt into these provisions and only in relation to the lower-level parking fines. However, should Council decide to reduce the subject the parking fines within the area, Council has the opportunity to opt into the provisions periodically in 2019 or onwards.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council do not opt into the reduced parking fine arrangements at this point and that the matter be reviewed, if necessary, at a future date.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Correspondence from The Hon. Dominic Perrottet MP, Treasurer and Minister for Industrial Relations

 

 

 

 


Correspondence from The Hon. Dominic Perrottet MP, Treasurer and Minister for Industrial Relations

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP6/19

 

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Subject:                  Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 08 Feb to 12 Mar 2019 

 

Folder No:                     F2008/00122

Author:                          Terry Papaioannou, Environmental Planner Officer (Technical & Research)     

 

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)       Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6;

2)      Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

3)      Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

4)      Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all Clause

4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 08 February 2019 and 12 March 2019.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:           Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b:                   New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SEPP1 And Clause 4.6 Register between 8 February To 12 March 2019

 

  


SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 08 FEBRUARY TO 12 MARCH 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP7/19

 

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Subject:                  Cultural and Community Grant Program - Recommended Allocations - March 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2009/00182

Author:                          Warren Ambrose, Senior Social Planner     

 

 

Introduction

 

The Cultural and Community Grants Program was endorsed by Council on 28 April 2009 and commenced in June 2009.  The Cultural and Community Grants Program provides financial support to creative arts and cultural projects that encourage community participation and vibrancy within the City of Randwick. The Grants Program, assessed twice a year in March and September, is linked to actions and strategies identified within the Council’s Cultural Plan, A Cultural Randwick City.  This Program covers both in-kind and cash contribution requests from grant applications. 

 

This report recommends the allocation of funds from the Grants Program for the March 2019 Round. The March 2019 Round is the second of two funding rounds for the 2018/19 financial year. A total annual budget of $110,000 is available for distribution across the September 2018 and March 2019 Rounds. The remaining funds of $49,808.00 are available for allocation in this March 2019 Round.   The Council has received 25 applications seeking a grant total of $105,036.41 (cash and in-kind).

 

Details of the applications recommended for funding are listed in Attachment One. Applications not recommended for funding are listed in Attachment Two.  Of the 25 applications received, fourteen (14) applications fully met the funding criteria and have therefore recommended by the assessment panel to receive funds totalling $49,808.00.

 

All applicants will be advised about the outcomes of their grant application.

 

Issues

 

Cultural and Community Grants Program Background

The Cultural and Community Grants Program has an annual budget of $110,000. This amount covers both in-kind and cash contribution requests from grant applications. There are two funding rounds per financial year, in March and September.  The program is promoted in the local newspaper, on the Council’s website, and email through local community networks.

 

The Cultural and Community Grants Program funding is awarded to locally based not-for-profit organisations or community groups. The applicants are required to demonstrate that their project promotes community participation and supports our Randwick cultural plan, A Cultural Randwick City, objectives.

 

The resulting activities or events must be held in the City of Randwick. Applicants may seek grants from Council as an in-kind contribution only (waiver of Council fees and charges), cash contribution only, or a combination of in-kind and cash contribution. 

 

Amendment to Cultural and Community Grant Guidelines.

At the March 26 2018 Ordinary Meeting, Council considered a report (CP6/18 Cultural and Community Grants Program – Recommended Allocations March 2018), and resolved as follows:

 

(Matson/Hamilton) That Council:

a)      approves the allocation of Cultural and Community Program funds totalling $36,898.92 to be allocated to the recommended grant applicants as listed in Attachment One.

 

b)      Delegate authority to the General Manager to make the necessary amendments to the grant’s guidelines, relating to in-kind only applications lodged by volunteer run and management community based organisations. 

 

A review was conducted to identify how Council could streamline the administration process of in-kind-only grant applications, from local community organisations that are run by volunteers; whilst maintaining Council’s rigorous acquittal obligations.

 

The review identified that each year Council receives regular applications from organisations to use either Coogee or Maroubra beach.  These volunteer community based organisations seek in-kind only funds to use the beach for the same surfing contest and similar surf and beach related activities the same projects every year. 

 

It was therefore recognised that by requiring these organisations to only submit applications every three years would streamline the process and reduce administration.

 

The Cultural and Community Grant Guidelines were subsequently amended to allow local volunteer community based organisations seeking to use ether Coogee or Maroubra beach to apply for three year grant funding.

 

March 2019 Round Three year funding requests

Council received, in the March 2019 Round, four applications requesting three year in-kind only funding.  These were from: Maroubra Bodyboarders, Maroubra Surfers Association, North Maroubra Surfers Association, and Southend Boardriders.

 

First year funding for these three year in-kind only grants would be allocated from the 2018/19 budget, with the second and third year funds allocated from the 2019/20 and 2021/22 budgets.

 

March Round 2018-19 Assessment

The assessment process was undertaken by a panel of Council officers, with expertise in community services, governance, and grants administration. The panel met to assess the 25 grant applications for compliance with the program’s funding priorities and guidelines, and the organisation’s capacity to deliver on the program outcomes. Each application was assigned a numerical score reflecting a priority ranking of A, B or C. Priority levels are detailed below:

 

·             Priority A: High priority for funding. The project is consistent with program funding priorities and has special weighting and compares well with other applicants.

·             Priority B: Possibly fund if sufficient funds are available. Application meets eligibility criteria but with lower scores than the Priority A applications.  Priority B applications may lack adequate detail or be poorly targeted.

·             Priority C: Does not meet the eligibility criteria.

The Program requires and expects a high level of accountability from grant recipients. As part of the funding acquittal process, all recipients who have received grants are required to provide evidence that the activity or event was held, and to complete an End of Project report.

 

Through this grant assessment process, a total of fourteen (14) of the 25 applications fully met the funding criteria.  As such, this report recommends the allocation of $49,808.00 ($15,260.00 in cash and $34,548.00 in-kind) to the fourteen (14) eligible applications under this funding round.

 

The recommended grant applicants and a brief description of their proposed projects/events are summarised below:

·        $410 to the Cape Banks Family History Society for project Cape Banks Family History Society, Education program 2019   Cash funds ($410.00) for printing, information folders, and guest speakers for six meetings on topics of family and local history.

·        $6,461.00 to the Holdsworth Community for project Kensington Community Centre – Programs and Activation   In-kind funds ($6,461.00) use Kensington Park Community Centre one day per week, between 1 April and 30 September 2019, to run community programs and activities.

·        $2,795.05 to the Holdsworth Community for project Navigating the Aged Care and NDIS Cash funds ($2,650.00) for promotion, staff and catering, and in-kind funds ($145.05) to use the Lionel Bowen Library Meeting Room, to hold an information session to discuss My Aged Care and the NDIS to the local community. 

·        $2,632.50 to the Indonesian Welfare Association for project IWA Maroubra Group   In-kind funds ($2,632.05) to use Maroubra Seniors Centre each Wednesday between April 2019 and 30 September 2019.

·        $645.45 to the Key Into Sydney for project Orientation Workshop for Migrant Women from Randwick.  Cash funds ($450.00) for guest speakers, and in-kind funds ($195.45) to use the Lionel Bowen Library Meeting Room to conduct 5 training workshops to encourage the social and economic participation of migrants.

·        $1,200.00 to the Kooloora Community Centre for the project Christmas at Kooloora Cash funds ($1,200.00) towards catering for a luncheon for residents of Bilga Crescent Estate and volunteers.  The luncheon’s aim is to celebrate their community, bring people together, improve social cohesion, and encourage inclusion.

·        $4,298.00 to Maroubra Bodyboarders for the project Maroubra Bodyboarders. In-kind funds ($4,298.00) to use Maroubra beach for their bodyboard competitions.  (Three year grant)

·        $4,298.00) to Maroubra Surfers Association for the project MSA Surfing Contests. In-kind funds ($4,298.00) to use Maroubra beach for their surfing competitions. (Three year grant)

·        $4,298.00 to North Maroubra Surf Riders Association for the project NMSR 2019 Season. In-kind funds ($4,298.00) to use Maroubra beach for their surfing competitions. (Three year grant)

·        $10,000.00 to the Randwick Arts Society for the project Randwick Art Society Annual Art and Craft Exhibition. Cash funds ($4,550.00) towards picture hanging printing advertising judges and staffing. In-kind funds ($5,450.00) to use Prince Henry Centre for the Exhibition.

·        ($462.00) to Randwick Botany Cycling Club for project NSW Elite Criterium Champs  In-kind funds ($462.00) to use Heffron Park Cycling Track to host the NSW Elite Criterium that attracts the best cyclists from around the State. 

·        ($1,444.00) to South Maroubra Surf Lifesavings Club for project Nippers Annual Pool Proficiency Tests In-kind funds ($1,444.00)  to use lanes at DRLC for their swimming proficiency tests.

·        $4,298.00 to Southend Boardriders for the project Monthly Surfing Competitions. In-kind funds ($4,298.00) to use Maroubra beach for their surfing competitions.  (Three year grant)

·        ($6,556.00) Souths Cares for project Souths Cares NAIDOC Festival Cash funds ($6,000.00) towards the cost of hiring staging and public address system for the NAIDOC Festival.  In-kind funds ($566.00) for the use of Heffron Park.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:    5:       Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction:    5b:     A range of cultural, sporting and leisure activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

No additional financial impact. The recommended for allocation of $49,808.00 the March 2019 funding round falls within the annual grants budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Cultural and Community Grants Program plays an important role in supporting cultural and community activities that contribute to the vibrancy of the City of Randwick.  It is an important program to help the Council achieve its vision of building a “sense of community.”

 

This March 2019 funding round applications have been exceptionally competitive. There were insufficient funds to give the full amount of funding applied.  As such the majority of the proposed successful organisations are recommended to receive partial funding.

 

The assessment panel has recommended the funding of fourteen (14) applications, totalling $49,808.00, in cash and in-kind contributions under the current funding round.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council approves the allocation of Cultural and Community Program funds totalling $49,808.00 to be allocated to the recommended grant applicants as listed in Attachment One.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment One - Cultural and Community Grant Program - March 2019 - applications recommended for funding

 

2.

Attachment Two - Cultural and Community Grant Program - March 2019 - applications not recommended for funding

 

 

 

 


Attachment One - Cultural and Community Grant Program - March 2019 - applications recommended for funding

Attachment 1

 

 

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Attachment Two - Cultural and Community Grant Program - March 2019 - applications not recommended for funding

Attachment 2

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP8/19

 

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Subject:                  ClimateWatch initiative proposed by the EarthWatch Institute at 2 Randwick locations

 

Folder No:                     F2010/00241

Author:                          Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting on Tuesday 25 September 2018 it was resolved (Mayoral Minute MM61/18) that:

 

a)    Council supports this citizen-science monitoring project with the Earthwatch Institute and works with them to establish two applicable trails, one along the coastal walkway and one around the Randwick Environment Park

 

b)    Council approve an amount of $15,000 (excluding GST) in year 1 and $5,000 (excluding GST) in year 2 for this project with Earthwatch, from the Biodiversity budget of the environmental levy program; and

 

c)    annual reporting be provided to Council on the progress of this initiative, relevant and useful sightings and additional information capable of informing Council on the involvement of the Randwick community and the application of ClimateWatch to our local flora and fauna.

 

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 16 October, 2018 a rescission motion was carried and the above proposal deferred to a subsequent briefing session.

 

On Tuesday, 12 March, 2019, a briefing was held for Council. This report follows this briefing provided.

 

Issues

 

Late in 2018, the EarthWatch Institute invited Council to support its ClimateWatch program aimed at establishing two trails in Randwick for community members, schools etc to participate in the ongoing monitoring and reporting of significant flora and fauna adjacent to each of these sites. These sites included an area of the coastal walkway from Coogee to South Coogee and an area comprising Randwick Environment Park.

 

The EarthWatch Institute is an internationally recognized, not-for-profit organization established in 1971. EarthWatch is one of the largest private funders of independent scientific field research and conservation. Currently there are more than 60 EarthWatch funded projects across the globe, with the Institute working closely with businesses, trusts and foundations, and governments.

 

EarthWatch has a priority around citizen-science based projects enabling community volunteers to contribute to data collection, where possible, and validated to scientific-based standards across 4 key project areas including:

 

·        protection of unique wildlife

·        keeping ahead of Climate Change

·        saving reefs and oceans and

·        restoring iconic landscapes.

 

In 2009, the EarthWatch Institute developed it ClimateWatch program, structured around an App which enables community members to record important plant and animal species and once data submitted is validated against scientific criteria, to be uploaded to the Australian Living Atlas. Details submitted over time become available to review policy or physical responses or changes to the flora and fauna being reported particularly regarding to predicted changes due to Climate Change. Being and App based program, ClimateWatch can be used by anyone, anywhere, allowing the collection of large scale data over both short and longer timeframes.

 

ClimateWatch in Australia is now monitoring more than 105 species across 60 trail sites.

 

The EarthWatch Institute’s proposal to Randwick included establishing two trails, one along the coastal walkway and the other at the Randwick Environment Park at a cost of $15,000 in the first year and $5,000 in the second year.

 

The costs associated with developing these trails includes site visits to confirm species for inclusion in community monitoring and reporting, setting up web pages for each of the sites, creation of specific trail guides for users and providing information for local signage. EarthWatch also provides tool-kits to activate the trails and to guide users collecting and reporting data to them over time.

 

Importantly, the funding provided covers the costs of data hosting (for 3 years), technical support, data validation and submission and loading of data to the Atlas of Living Australia. From EarthWatch’s experience, the benefits to Council and the Randwick community include:

 

   engaging our local community in local monitoring and reporting activities

   increasing their understanding and participation in science-based projects around their local terrain

   enabling their contribution to improved biodiversity management including responses over time.

 

Each of these broad goals are reflected in Council’s 2015 approved Biodiversity Strategy and are reflected in various strategic directions of our City Plan.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 3:           An informed and engaged community.

Direction 3(b):       The community has increased opportunities to participate in decision-making processes.

Outcome 10:         A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a):     Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes and

Direction 10(c):     Bushland, open spaces and biodiversity are protected and enhanced for future generations.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The $15,000 for year 1 and $5,000 for year 2 would be payable from Council’s environmental levy budget, particularly from funds utilized for flora and fauna monitoring which has been postponed due to seasonally hot conditions.

 

Conclusion

 

The EarthWatch Institute identifies potential trails based on environmental values associated with potential flora and fauna likely to be available in the monitoring as well as expected success in community involvement in the citizen-science approach. This is broad recognition of the approach taken by Council in its conservation efforts of its natural resource areas.

 

 


 

Recommendation

 

That Council approves participation with the EarthWatch Institute on its development of 2 ClimateWatch trails in Randwick at a cost of $15,000 (year 1) and $5,000 (year 2), with funds payable from the Biodiversity budget of the environmental levy program.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP9/19

 

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Subject:                  Service NSW 'Easy to do Business' Program

 

Folder No:                     F2009/00243

Author:                          Suzanne Williamson, Economic Development Officer     

 

 

Introduction

 

Small businesses make a valuable contribution to the NSW economy and are key drivers of local economic growth, innovation and economic activity. Local government plays an important role in ensuring a friendly and supportive environment for small businesses to start up and grow in their communities. At June 2017 there were 12,667 (ABS) active small businesses registered for GST in Randwick City.

 

Council joined the Office of the Small Business Commissioner’s Small Business Friendly Councils (SBFC) program in November 2013. The SBFC initiative provides NSW Councils with information, initiatives and resources that build capabilities and assist them to support local businesses.

Further to SBFC initiative, the Small Business Commissioner and Service NSW have developed the “Easy to do Business” program. This free program provides a number of benefits for Council including:

 

·        Increased productivity with ‘decision ready’ applications that reduce internal processing costs,

·        Effective tools to help boost the local economy and enable more local jobs.

 

The Easy to do Business initiative currently provides a dedicated concierge as a single point of contact within Service NSW to assist with streamlining applications for people who wish to set up a café, restaurant or small bar as well as for tradesmen within the Housing and Construction Industry. The program helps to navigate all the approvals necessary to operate their new business and provides step-by-step assistance with the local, state and federal government requirements. Those people who access Easy to do Business assistance receive:

 

·        A unique digital profile that can help fast track the approval process across local, state and federal government

·        Step by step guidance through the application process by Service NSW

·        Support from a dedicated Business Concierge within Service NSW who can answer questions, liaise with council, and review applications to ensure they are ‘decision ready’

·        Know upfront the time, fees and effort involved.

 

Easy to do Business helps remove the duplication of dealing with multiple regulations and agencies to help businesses open their doors faster. This means customers will spend less time navigating the process and completing paperwork, and more time on their business. The Easy to do Business program is accessible outside of standard business hours and is looking to expand to include informed assistance for other types of businesses in the future.

 

Issues

 

Formal partnerships with Councils across NSW is an important element of the Easy to do Business program. This partnership allows the concierge team to provide a greater level of support in those local government areas, significantly reducing complexity for the business owner and providing more efficient future interactions with those business owners and their local government representatives. Formal partnerships between Easy to do Business and local councils result in reduced duplication and contact points for business owners and greater time saving efficiencies for both the businesses and their local councils. Of the 128 councils in NSW, 100 have now signed up to the program. As at January 2019 the Easy to do Business Concierge team have supported over 1400 businesses across NSW.

 

Once a formal partnership through a MoU between Service NSW and Randwick City Council is established, Service NSW Easy to do Business lead personnel will deliver a presentation to key council staff providing required information and skills for operational readiness. Once council staff are prepared, there will be an official launch and announcement to the public of Randwick City Council’s participation in the Service NSW Easy to do Business program.

 

The NSW Government has recently announced the establishment of a new Service NSW Service Centre in Randwick, however the location is yet to be determined. This will provide Council with the opportunity to integrate some council services within this new outlet.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2b:                   Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies: partner and implement joint projects with community groups and government agencies to achieve improved service coordination and value for money outcomes in the region.

Outcome 8:           A strong local economy.

Direction 8a:                   Vibrant business, commercial, and industrial sectors that provide ongoing and diverse employment opportunities and serve the community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Service NSW Easy to do Business program currently offers personalised assistance for new and existing small business owners who wish to open a café, restaurant or small bar, as well as assistance with regulation requirements for tradesmen within the Housing and Construction Industry. The program provides a single point of contact within Service NSW who will help navigate all the required approvals to operate the business, including the required Council approvals. This assistance can be accessed out of standard business hours if required and Service NSW is looking to expand the small business assistance categories in the future.
Formal partnerships between Service NSW Easy to do Business and local councils result in reduced duplication and contact points for business owners and greater time saving efficiencies for both the businesses and their local councils.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council enter into a MoU with Service NSW to participate in the Easy to do Business initiative.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Services Report No. CS7/19

 

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Subject:                  Upcoming project - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club

 

Folder No:                     PROJ/10564/2010/4

Author:                          Sarah Harmston, Project Manager Major Projects     

 

 

Introduction

 

The Coogee Surf Life Saving Club (Coogee SLSC) building is a Randwick City Council (RCC) asset, and is located in a beachfront location at the southern part of beach (135-143R Beach Street, Coogee).

 

The Coogee SLSC successfully sought Development Consent for alterations and additions to the building, with DA/897/2016 granted on 14 March 2017.  RCC has now received $2,580,000 under the Office of Local Government (OLG) Stronger Communities Fund towards the upgrade works, and the Club is in receipt of a further $300,000 from the NSW Department of Industry Office of Responsible Gambling. In discussion with the Club, RCC has assumed the project management role for the remaining stages of delivery, and associated reporting for the expenditure of these grants.

 

This report provides information regarding the Coogee SLSC upgrade project, including budget standing.

 

Issues

 

Background

The Coogee SLSC is one of Australia’s oldest, being established in 1907.  It is a very active community organisation, providing volunteer patrols of Coogee Beach, lifesaving education and surf sport activities.  The Club has a particularly strong youth base, boasting one of the highest number of ‘Nippers’ (5-13 year old members) in Australia.

 

The building provides a base for these activities, including fitness, skills training, storage and Club activities.  The building also provides a revenue-raising opportunity with its seafront location making it an attractive venue for hire.

 

Scope of works

The DA approved scope of works are as shown in Attachment A, and includes:

 

   New external balcony along the eastern façade at the ground floor level with protective sea wall;

   Internal reconfiguration of the first floor level to create an open floor plan, with the potential to be partitioned into three separate areas;

   Raising the internal floor level at the north end of the first floor to make it consistent with the rest of this floor level;

   New external east facing deck with glass balustrade and BBQ facilities at either end;

   New external entry stair;

   New concrete roof over the entry area extension, and new metal roof over infilled terrace area generally;

   New glazing to the eastern and northern façade, and new high level glazing to the western façade; and

   Reinstatement of the existing clock, external signage zones, relocation of existing flagpole and new flagpole.

 


 

Project Delivery

Representatives of the Coogee SLSC met with the Director of City Services and Council officers on 20 February 2019 to discuss the upcoming project. 

 

It was agreed with the Club that Randwick City Council would offer in-house project management services for the remaining stages of delivery for the upgrade works, in line with its status as a Council-owned asset.  This will be through the Major Projects Planning Group until finalisation of tender documentation, after which RCC’s Projects team will deliver the tender and construction stage services.

 

Randwick City Council intends to work closely with Coogee Surf Life Saving Club throughout the project delivery.  It is envisaged that this will be primarily through the already-established Club Building Committee.

 

Construction is proposed to commence in winter 2020 to limit the impact on peak summer activities at the Club as much as possible.

 

Budget standing

A cost estimate has been prepared on the Development Application drawings.  When measured against the grant funding allocated to the project, a budget shortfall of close to $720,000 has been identified.

 

Current total development estimate

 

$3,597,483

NSW Office of Local Government’s Stronger Communities Fund

 

$2,580,000

NSW Department of Industry Office of Responsible Gambling

 

$300,000

Budget shortfall

 

$717,483

 

It is therefore proposed that $720,000 be allocated towards the project in the 2020-21 Capital Works budget.     

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:              1.       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction:                       1b.     Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

Direction:                       1d.     Continuous improvement based on accountability, transparency, and good governance.

Outcome:              4.       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction:              4a.     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

Direction:              4b.     New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

Outcome:              6.       A liveable city.

Direction:                       6a.     Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Significant State Government funding has been granted towards the project, however further funding is required to make up the shortfall.  It is proposed that $720,000 be allocated towards the project in the 2020-21 Capital Works budget.

 

It is noted that the Coogee SLSC building had been flagged for a funding allocation of $1,500,000 under RCC’s Our Community Our Future program in a future year.

 


 

Conclusion

 

Although spectacular, the location of Coogee Surf Life Saving Club is one of the harshest environments in Sydney, being subjected to sea spray and high winds year round, as well as the occasional sea swell.  This proposed upgrade works will achieve substantial upgrades to the building, allowing the Club to more seamlessly provide services to its members and increase the available revenue-raising activities.  It is also anticipated to make the venue more attractive for use by the wider community, as well as bring it up to today’s expected levels of compliance and comfort.

 

The project has so far received $2,580,000 in funding from the Office of Local Government Stronger Communities Fund, and a further $300,000 from the NSW Department of Industry Office of Responsible Gambling.  These grants will go a long way towards realising significant upgrades to this aging RCC asset, with the funding shortfall of approximately $720,000 recommended to be contributed by Council.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That $720,000 be allocated  in the 2020 - 21 Capital Works Budget towards the Coogee Surf Life Saving Club upgrade works as approved under DA/897/2016.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Approved DA drawings

 

 

 

 



Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Approved DA drawings

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Services Report No. CS8/19

 

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Subject:                  Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee

 

Folder No:                     PROJ/10059/2014

Author:                          Sebastien Le Coustumer, Drainage Engineer     

 

 

Introduction

 

The prime responsibility for planning and management of flood issues in NSW rests with local government. Randwick City Council has committed to carrying out Flood Studies and preparing Floodplain Risk Management Studies and Plans. They are carried out in accordance with the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government) and will allow Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The first step in the floodplain management process is to complete a flood study. For the Kensington Centennial Park catchment, the study was adopted by Council on 11 June 2013. The next step is to complete a Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan (FRMS&P) which determines options to reduce the flood risk.

 

The draft FRMS&P was presented to the July 2018 Ordinary Council Meeting. It was resolved to place the document on public exhibition.

 

The Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee met on 13 February 2019 to consider the final report of the Kensington Centennial Park FRMS&P. The report incorporated amendments to the draft resulting from the public exhibition. A copy of the minutes, which reflects discussions and outcomes, is attached to this report.

 

The Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Committee recommended as follows:

 

·        That Council adopt the Kensington Centennial Park FRMS&P, Final Report;

·        That the options outlined in the plan be implemented.

 

Issues

 

Public Exhibition

The community was invited to comment on the draft Kensington Centennial Park FRMS&P via public exhibition of the document. The report was placed on public exhibition between 20 August 2018 and 16 September 2018. The public exhibition was advertised via the following methods:

 

·        On line via YoursayRandwick (including the draft FRMS&P, flood affected area map, frequently asked questions and online submission option);

·        An information letter including frequently asked questions was sent to all residents within the flood planning area (4,656 letters sent);

·        Advertisement in the Southern Courier (21 August 2018) and in Randwick News (weekly bulletin sent to 22,000 subscribers);

·        All documents were made available in the reception area of the Council Administration Centre and at Council’s three libraries.

 

A community information session was held on Wednesday 5 September 2018 between 6-8pm at the Kensington Park Community Centre. The purpose of the drop-in session was to enable the public to ask questions directly to the study team including Randwick Council staff and consultant.

 


 

The following summarises the key outcomes of the public exhibition and the responses received:

 

·        729 persons visited the Kensington Centennial Park FRMS&P page on YoursayRandwick;

·        239 persons downloaded the Draft FRMS&P Report, 346 downloaded the flood affected area map, and 26 people downloaded the FAQ sheet;

·        Residents from a total of 30 properties attended the drop-in session;

·        A total of 10 queries were lodged on the public exhibition website and Council received numerous telephone enquiries from residents regarding the FRMS&P.

 

Study Finalisation

Following review of submissions from the public during the exhibition period, amendments have been made to the FRMS&P Report. The most significant change to the FRMS&P as a result of public comment was an update of the modeling beneath the Light Rail Stabling Yard at the corner of Alison Road and Doncaster Avenue. However, this extra modeling did not have any impact on the property tagging and the mitigation options.

 

Implementation Program

The options to be implemented are presented in Attachment 1. Each option is presented based on priority with indicative costs, responsible stakeholder and performance timeframe.

 

Structural Options

Three high priority mitigations options are identified in the plan:

 

·        Option J: Management of Blockage at Gardeners Road Culverts;

·        Option I(1): Feasibility Study to Upgrade Main Culverts at Gardeners Road;

·        Option I(2): Feasibility Study to Upgrade Culverts at Aboud Avenue at Gardeners Road.

 

Further structural works will be included in the implementation plan following the feasibility studies.

 

Non-Structural Options

Ten non-structural options have been identified in the plan and are presented in Appendix 1. They include response modification options such as community awareness programs, flood warning and evacuation and flood emergency management. It also includes planning and developing control measures such as flood tagging of properties, modification to planning certificates (10.7 certificates) and enforcement of flood planning levels. Note that the planning controls have already been implemented since July 2018 to comply with our Policy to disclose flooding information when we have reliable data.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:           A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:                   Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                                              community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The capital cost to commence feasibility planning of identified structural options is estimated at $220,000. The work can be funded through the Stormwater Service Charge. For more expensive implementation options, they may potentially be funded through grants from government agencies such as the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. Options within the plan may also be carried out and funded by the SES or Sydney Water.

 

Where necessary, any additional funding of projects can be sourced through Council’s general revenue and budgeted accordingly in future capital works programs.

 


 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan has been placed on public exhibition and has now been finalised to the satisfaction of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee.

 

Options are proposed to be implemented on a priority basis as funds become available.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)      Council adopts the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

b)      Options outlined in the plan be implemented in accordance with priorities and available funding.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Proposed Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Implementation Program

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Minutes of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 13 February 2019

 

3.

Attachment 3 - Presentation of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 13 February 2019

Included under separate cover

4.

Attachment 4 - Kensington Centennial Park Flood Plain Risk Management Study and Plan - Final

Included under separate cover

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Proposed Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Implementation Program

Attachment 1

 

 

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Attachment 2 - Minutes of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 13 February 2019

Attachment 2

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director City Services Report No. CS9/19

 

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Subject:                  Eurimbla Avenue, Randwick – Land Dedication for Public Road

 

Folder No:                     F2017/00300

Author:                          Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

Council at its meeting held on 25 September 2018, resolved to enter into a section 30 agreement (Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991) with the Health Administration Corporation for the acquisition of Eurimbla Avenue, Randwick.  The acquisition is being sought as part of the Randwick Campus Redevelopment.

 

The section 30 Agreement was executed in December 2018. 

 

In preparation for gazettal of the acquisition of Eurimbla Avenue and subsequent proposed closure of the road, it was discovered that there is no formal record at the NSW Land Registry Services of Eurimbla Avenue having ever been dedicated as a public road.

 

Without first completing the dedication of the land as a road, it is not possible to close Eurimbla Avenue as per the executed agreement.

 

This report outlines the process to formally dedicate the land, known as Eurimbla Avenue, as public road.

 

Issues

 

Eurimbla Avenue has been used as a road since the early 1900s.  There are circumstances where land that was set aside for the purposes of a road may not have been dedicated as a public road if it was set aside prior to the Local Government Acts of 1906 or 1919.

 

The NSW Land Registry Services has advised that the land may be dedicated as road under s16 of the Roads Act, 1993.  The requirements involve:

 

1.   Registration of the Plan of Eurimbla Avenue with NSW Land Registry Services

2.   Publishing a notice in the NSW Government Gazette

 

Health Infrastructure’s surveyor has prepared and submitted the Plan of Eurimbla Avenue with the NSW Land Registry Services and the Plan has been registered.

 

To complete the dedication of the land as public road, it is required that a notice be published in the NSW Government Gazette.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:           A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:                   Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no financial impact to Council.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick Council has endorsed the acquisition of Eurimbla Avenue, via agreement, with Health Administration Corporation to facilitate redevelopment of the Randwick Campus (Prince of Wales Hospital).

 

The acquisition process for Eurimbla Avenue revealed that Eurimbla Avenue was never formally registered as a public road. 

 

A Plan of Eurimbla Avenue has been submitted and has now been registered with NSW Land Registry Services. 

 

To complete the process to dedicate the land as public road, it is required that a notice be published in the NSW Government Gazette.

 

This will permit the acquisition of Eurimbla Avenue to proceed as per the Agreement between Randwick Council and Health Administration Corporation.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That a notice be published in the NSW Government Gazette detailing the dedication of land as a public road as per the Plan of Eurimbla Avenue.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Plan of Eurimbla Avenue

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Plan of Eurimbla Avenue

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO9/19

 

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Subject:                  Investment Report - February 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2015/06527

Author:                          Gail Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – February 2019” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of February 2019. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 28 February 2019, Council held investments with a market value of $76.420 million. The portfolio value increased during February by ~$8.704 million. The increase is representative of a positive cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from February 2018 to February 2019. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance

 

Asset Allocation

 

The majority of the portfolio is spread between term deposits (45.80%) and senior floating rate notes (41.33%). The remainder of the portfolio is held in the overnight cash accounts with CBA (12.87%). The FRN’s add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

Term to Maturity

 

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 37% of the total investment portfolio.

 

 

All minimum and maximum limits comply with Council’s investment policy:

 

Compliant

Horizon

Invested
$

Invested
%

Min Limit
%

Max Limit
%

0-90 days

$21,338,944.00

27.92%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$19,502,110.00

25.52%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$7,009,744.00

9.17%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$28,569,647.00

37.39%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0.00

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

The investment portfolio is entirely directed to assets rated “A” or higher, consistent with the adopted investment policy. That is, there are currently no assets rated “BBB” or below.

 

Compliant

Credit Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

AA Category

$48,389,259

63.32%

100%

$28,031,186

A Category

$28,031,186

36.25%

80%

$33,105,170

BBB Category

$0.00

0.00%

 

 

Unrated ADIs

$0.00

0.00%

 

 

 Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy based on long term S&P ratings.

 

Compliant

 

Issuer

Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

CBA

AA-

$22,362,490

29.26%

40%

$10,429,675

NAB

AA-

$16,005,417

20.94%

40%

$15,088,491

Westpac

AA-

$10,021,352

13.11%

40%

$14,045,903

Rabobank

A+

 $1,016,790

1.33%

25%

$15,897,324

Suncorp

A+

$14,016,064

18.34%

25%

$6,400,491

AMP Bank

A

$6,998,332

9.16%

25%

$9,916,285

ING Bank

A

$6,000,000

7.85%

25%

$10,911,777

 

 

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period February 2016 to February 2019.

 

 

 

The total portfolio (T/D’s and FRNs) provided a solid return of +0.24% (actual), outperforming the benchmark AusBond Bank Index return by +0.07% (actual). The outperformance continues to be driven by a combination of deposits that were originally invested longer than 6 months, as well as the higher yielding FRNs locked in at attractive margins and sold prior to maturity, realising small capital gains and boosting returns. The FRN portfolio (on an accrual basis) continues to outperform the deposit portfolio, as evidenced by the returns over the past 12 months. This has partially been attributed to the strategic sales undertaken, realising capital gains and then switching proceeds into higher yielding (new) FRNs.

 

Over the past year, the combined deposit and FRN portfolio returned +2.81% p.a., outperforming bank bills by 0.82% p.a. The overall return remains solid given deposit rates reached their all-time lows in August 2016 after the RBA’s last interest rate cut. The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remains at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

 

Performance

1 month

3 months

6 months

FYTD

1 year

Official Cash Rate

0.11%

0.37%

0.74%

1.00%

1.50%

AusBond Bank Bill Index

0.17%

0.51%

0.99%

1.35%

1.99%

Council’s T/D Portfolio

0.23%

0.69%

1.37%

1.80%

2.68%

Council’s FRN Portfolio

0.25%

0.74%

1.47%

1.96 %

2.94%

Council’s Portfolio^

0.24%

0.72%

1.42%

1.88 %

2.81 %

Outperformance

0.07%

0.21%

0.43%

0.53 %

0.82%

^Total portfolio performance excludes Council's cash account holdings. Overall returns would be lower if cash was included

 

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits totalled $35.0 million, accounting for 45.80% of the total investment portfolio. Two deposits totalling $2.0 million matured and were withdrawn in February.  Three new term deposits totalling $4.50 million were placed in February. As at the end of February, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.78%, down 1 basis points from the previous month.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $31.581 million in floating rate notes. During February the following FRN’s were sold:

·        $2.00m Westpac (AA-) FRN maturing 28/10/2020 (ISIN: AU000WBCHBL4) – trading margin at +53bp or capital price of $100.927 (capital gain $18,540);

·        $1.50m ANZ (AA-) FRN maturing 07/04/2021 (ISIN: AU3FN0030748) – trading margin at +63bp or capital price of $101.150 (capital gain $17,250).

Total realised capital gains amounted to $35,790. $3.0m (face value) of the sale proceeds were reinvested into the higher yielding new NAB FRN at +104bp.

 

The current financial year’s summary of FRN sales are as follows:

 

Issuer

Maturity Date

Month Sold

Face Value

Capital Price

Realised Capital Gains

ANZ (AA-)

17/04/2020

Aug 2018

$1,600,000

$100.503

$8,048.00

AMP (A)

11/06/2019

Sep 2018

$750,000

$100.329

$2,467.50

Suncorp (A+)

23/04/2019

Sep 2018

$3,000,000

$100.355

$10,650.00

NAB (AA-)

04/08/2020

Nov 2018

$1,000,000

$100.068

$680.00

Westpac (AA-)

28/07/2020

Nov 2018

$1,000,000

$100.524

$5,780.00

BoQ (BBB+)

05/05/2020

Nov 2018

$2,000,000

$100.274

$5,480.00

Westpac (AA-)

28/07/2020

Jan 2019

$2,000,000

$100.370

$7,400.00

Macquarie (A)

03/03/2020

Jan 2019

$1,500,000

$100.438

$6,570.00

Westpac (AA-)

28/10/2020

Feb 2019

$2,000,000

$100.927

$18,540.00

ANZ (AA-)

07/04/2021

Feb 2019

$1,500,000

$101.150

$17,250.00

Total Realised Capital Gains FY2018-2019

$82,865.50

 

 

The Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end. The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 28 February 2019 increased by ~$97k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

·        Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·        Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·        And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 


 


 


Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:    Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:    Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2018-19 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The original budget provision for investment income from this source was $1,200,934.00. An additional $350,000.00 was budgeted as part of the December 2018 budget review. The total revised budget is $1,550,934.00. Investment income to 28 February 2019 amounted to $1,353,397.19

 

All investments as at 28 February 2019 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for February 2019 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - February 2019

 

 

 

 


Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - February 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO10/19

 

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Subject:                  Contingency Fund - status as at 28 February 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2017/07396

Author:                          Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2018-19 financial year there have been 53 allocations totaling $242,977.15. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2018-19

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$27,000.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 27 June 2017

Sponsorship and in-kind support - Surfing NSW - Junior State Surfing Title

$16,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Annual contribution (3 years from 2018-19 to 2020-2021) - Renewal of Community Partnership Agreement with Westpac Helicopter Rescue Service

$20,000.00

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - St George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,323.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - Taste of Coogee 2018

$15,451.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Financial assistance - South Sydney Rabbitohs' - Commemorate John Sutton Historic Milestone

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Our Lady of the Rosary School, Kensington Community Fair

$9,488.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$4,518.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waivng of fees - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Take 3 for the Sea

$928.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Donation - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Coogee Dippers (Autism) Program

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival

$3,020.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - A National Act of Recognition

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial contribution - Commemorative Statue at the Cenotaph, Maroubra

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Financial assistance - La Perouse Public School

$2,780.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Expansion of Community Partnership - Sydney Roosters inaugural women’s NRL side

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Donation - Wee Waa Chamber of Commerce

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Annual Des Renford Chair of Hearts Research Family Gala and Charity Day - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre

$9,500.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Surf Life Saving and Pool Rescue Coaching Clinic - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre Pool

$6,102.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Donation - Humour Foundation Clown Doctors Program

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Waiving of fees - Maroubra Diggers Junior Swimming Club for two Swimming Carnivals at Des Renford Leisure

$1,268.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - Beach Ultimate Frisbee - Selection Camp

$1,044.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees and financial assistance - Surfing NSW - Carve Pro surfing event

$23,726.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Grant Application under the Stronger Communities Program – allocation of Council funds (if successful)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Earthquakes in Indonesia - Donation to Relief Fund

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - St Nicolas Anglican Church Carols by the Sea

$2,298.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Greek Epiphany Festival 2019

$15,537.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Surf Life Saving Sydney Inc

$2,270.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2019

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Financial assistance - Maroubra Surf Life Saving Club - 2018 Life Saving World Championships

$1,500.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Mission Australia

$180.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Waiving of fees - Eastern Suburbs Sub Branch of the Children's Book Council of Australia

$378.30

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Waiving of fees - Global Goodwill Day

$480.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Financial assistance - First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Financial assistance – St John’s Anglican Church

$300.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

 Financial assistance - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club

$1,280.00

Ord Council – 11 Dec 2018

Financial assistance – Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Donation – Temora Shire Council

$3,000.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Financial assistance – Sea Shepherd Marine Debris Campaign

$1,025.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Waiving of fees – The Coogee Owls

$759.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Financial assistance – Randwick City Football Club 2019 Gala Day

$100.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Donation – Friends of Malabar Headland

$300.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Financial assistance – Randwick and District Historical Society

$9,000.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Donation – St John’s Anglican Church, Maroubra

$300.00

Ord Council – 26 Feb 2019

Waiving of fees – St Margaret Mary’s Primary School

$182.00

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                                                            $242,977.15

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:             A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:           Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:           Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $221,317.00 in the 2018-19 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO11/19

 

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Subject:                  Proposed Pensioner Discount on Environment Levy

 

Folder No:                     F2008/00460

Author:                          Tracey Walker, Coordinator Revenue     

 

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting held on 26 February 2019, in consideration of a Notice of Motion from Cr Said and Cr Da Rocha, it was resolved:

 

(Said/Da Rocha) that the relevant council officer bring back a report on the costs and ramifications of an annual pensioner discount on the Environment Levy of $20, $25 and $30.

 

Issues

 

On the 12 February 2019, Council endorsed an application to IPART for a 5 year extension to the existing Environment Levy.  If Council is successful in this application, the cost of the Environment Levy to residential ratepayers is on average $91.49 per year over the five years.

 

Council currently has 4,440 pensioners receiving a total concession of $325 on their rates.  This is made up of $250 mandatory rebate (55% is funded by State Government and 45% funded by Council) plus an additional rebate of $75 that is fully funded by Council.

 

This report outlines the options of granting an additional pension rebate of $20, $25 and $30 on the proposed Environment Levy subject to IPART’s approval of Council’s SRV submission.

 

The impact of an additional pensioner rebate provided to all eligible pensioners and funded from the Environment Levy is outlined in the following table:

 

Number of pensioners

4,440

Proposed additional rebate

$20

$25

$30

Total cost

$88,800

$111,000

$133,200

 

To ensure equity across all eligible pensioners and to provide consistent communication and administration, it is suggested that any additional rebate be added to the existing rebate and be applied against the total rates with the cost of the additional rebate being funded from the Environment Levy.

 

The proposed Environment Levy is expected to generate approximately $4.6M in 2019/20. Any additional pensioner rates rebate will reduce the funds available from the Environment Levy to be spent on other programs.

 

If the Environment Levy is approved by IPART, to provide financial relief to eligible pensioners, it is proposed that the current additional rebate of $75 be increased by $25 to $100 with the additional component to be funded from the Environment Levy. This will take the total pensioner rates concession to $350.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:    1        Leadership in Sustainability

Direction:    1c      Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

An additional pensioner rebate of $25 will have a total cost of $111,000. This cost will be funded from the Environment Levy and will reduce the funds available from the levy for other programs.

 

Conclusion

 

Any increase in the pensioner rates rebate will reduce the financial burden on the Council’s 4,440 pensioner ratepayers.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the additional pensioner rebate of $75 be increased by $25 to $100 per annum for eligible pensioners.

b)     the additional $25 pensioner rebate be funded from the Environment Levy.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO12/19

 

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Subject:                  Monthly Financial Report as at 28 February 2019

 

Folder No:                     F2018/00380

Author:                          Oliver Guo, Coordinator Financial Planning and Analysis     

 

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

 

a)       establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the Council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

 

b)      if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the Council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 28 February 2019. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 28 February 2019. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 28 February 2019.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:         Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:       Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.  The Current Ratio as at 28 February 2019 is 2.43 compared to 2.12 as at 30 June 2018, indicating the Council’s liquidity remains strong with capacity to meet short term obligations as they fall due.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statement - February 2019

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet - February 2019

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements - Cashflow Statement - February 2019

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statement - February 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

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Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet - February 2019

Attachment 2

 

 

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Monthly Financial Statements - Cashflow Statement - February 2019

Attachment 3

 

 

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Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM13/19

 

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Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Andrews - Public clocks

 

Folder No:                     F2004/07512

Submitted by:               Councillor Andrews, Central Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That Council, at the request of the Maroubra Precinct, install at a prominent location a public clock at both Maroubra Beach and Maroubra Junction.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM14/19

 

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Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Footpath widening and lighting improvements to create alfresco dining areas in town centres

 

Folder No:                     F2018/01301

Submitted by:               Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That Council bring back a report with costings, identifying areas within our Town Centres where footpaths can be widened and lighting improved for the purposes of supporting initiatives currently being devised by the Night Time Economy Committee.

 

Source of funding:

If this motion were to be successful and Council was to agree to go ahead with widening and lighting, then these initiatives can be funded via section 94 contributions and Council’s Capital Works Programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council  26 March 2019

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM15/19

 

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Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Review of Light Rail Development Agreement between RCC and NSW Government

 

Folder No:                     F2013/00263

Submitted by:               Councillor Bowen, East Ward     

 

 

 

Motion:

That noting the Light Rail Development Agreement entered into between Council and Transport for NSW in September 2014 has resulted in a financial contribution of tens of millions of dollars by the Council to the light rail project in circumstances where the project has been altered and comprehensively delayed, and in order to protect council’s financial exposure to the light rail project, council immediately retain Senior Counsel to review the Light Rail Development agreement and seek advice as to:

 

1.       Council’s remedies pursuant to the agreement and at law generally, including any remedy of damages;

2.       Whether the agreement remains binding given alterations and delays to the light rail project and in terms of the agreement generally

 

and the advice be reported back to Council.

 

Background:

Pursuant to the development agreement entered into between the Randwick Council and TFNSW in September 2014 Randwick Council agreed to contribute up to $68M of funds to the SE Light Rail project and significant expenditure has been incurred by RCC to date. It is now a matter of record the SE Light Rail project has become chronically delayed and the subject of significant controversy in regards to adverse impact on local environment, residential amenity and businesses. Evidence at the recent Upper House inquiry indicated the completion date for the project remains unknown, notwithstanding at announcement the project was due for completion by March 2019.

 

The delay to completion of light rail has meant council’s contribution to the project has remained ongoing, with the proposed benefits of this contribution yet to be realised. In addition, substantial changes have been made to the project after the agreement was formed, which have also negatively impacted on the RCC community, most notably the route alteration at Alison Road in December 2014.It is also a matter of record a number of persons and businesses impacted by the South East light rail have resorted to legal remedies in order to protect their position and other entities have already received compensation for the light rail project.

 

The purpose of this motion is to ensure that RCC’s rights under the agreement are protected and all remedies available to the council, including a claim for compensatory damages, are prudently explored and reported to council.