BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

Meeting

 

 

 

Tuesday 11 December 2018        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Randwick City Council		1300 722 542
30 Frances Street			council@randwick.nsw.gov.au
Randwick NSW 2031			www.randwick.nsw.gov.au
 



Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 11 December 2018 at 6:00 p.m.

 

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of Country

I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on the land of the Bidjigal and the Gadigal peoples who occupied the Sydney Coast, being the traditional owners.  On behalf of Randwick City Council, I acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders past and present, and to Aboriginal people in attendance today.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council - 27 November 2018

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Nil  

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Report

GM27/18      IPART Special Variation requirements – update of Integrated Planning and

                   Reporting documentation............................................................................................ 1

Director City Planning Reports

CP60/18       Grass Cutting for the Elderly....................................................................................... 5

CP61/18       Contamination issues in the Department of Defence site at Bundock Street................. 11

CP62/18       Proposed Transitional Housing Program and Procedures for Women and

                   Children Exiting DV Refuges..................................................................................... 25

CP63/18       Police Request for Temporary Alcohol Restrictions..................................................... 35

 

CP64/18       Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and

                   Clause 4.6 - 3 October - 30 November 2018................................................................ 39

Director City Services Report

CS59/18       Asset Management Policy - Review............................................................................ 45

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO75/18      Continuation of Community Partnership with Eastern Suburbs District

                   Rugby League Football Club..................................................................................... 53

CO76/18      Contingency Fund - status as at 30 November 2018.................................................... 57

CO77/18      Rating Policies - Pensioner Rates Policy and Debt Recovery and FInancial

                   Hardship Policy........................................................................................................ 61

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM90/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Investigation of alternate routes for

                   proposed Bundock Street Cycleway.......................................................................... 93

NM91/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Assess potential for transplanting

                   large trees from the proposed route of the South Coogee to

                   Kingsford Bike Path.................................................................................................. 95

NM92/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Proposed Parking restrictions to

                   discourage long-term parking by non-residents of trailers etc. in the

                   vicinity of the Randwick Community Centre and Randwick Environment Park............... 97

NM93/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Outdated or irrelevant live music conditions............. 99  

Closed Session (record of voting required)

CS60/18       Tender for Plant Trailers for Ride on Mowers - RFT No. T2019-09

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CO78/18      Tender for Intranet and Digital Workspace - RFT No T2019-13

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CO79/18      Tender for Real Estate Agents and Valuers - RFT No. T2019-11

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

Closed Session (record of voting NOT required)

CP65/18       Community Service Awards 2018/19

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (a) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).

 

 

 

 

 

  

Notice of Rescission Motions

NR9/18        Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Roberts and Stavrinos

                   - Post Exhibition Report - Planning Proposal Dudley Street Heritage Conservation

                   Area Boundary Extension and Inclusion of Local Heritage Items................................ 101

NR10/18       Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Roberts and Stavrinos - Heritage Study of properties in Dudley Street and Brook Street, Coogee.............................................. 103

NR11/18       Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Bowen, Matson and Roberts - Replacement of community vacancy on Wylies Baths Trust................................................................................. 105  

 

 

 

 

Therese Manns

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM27/18

 

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Subject:                      IPART Special Variation requirements – update of Integrated Planning and Reporting documentation

 

Folder No:                      F2013/00475

Author:                          Cherie Muir, Coordinator Integrated Planning     

 

 

Introduction

 

As part of the overall process in examining the possible continuation of the Environmental Levy, Council’s Integrated Planning documentation has been updated in accordance with the Office of Local Government (OLG) Guidelines and the requirements stipulated by the Independent Pricing & Regulatory Tribunal (IPART).

 

Randwick Council’s Integrated Planning documents have been updated to a minor extent to ensure they meet the requirements IPART follows in their assessment of special rate variation applications.

 

Issues

 

Expiring Environmental Levy

The current Environmental Levy is a temporary levy due to expire on 30 June 2019.  At the meeting of 16 October 2018, Council resolved to commence community consultation activities aimed at informing the community and gauging support for a continued Environmental Levy.

 

A comprehensive community engagement strategy is underway in-keeping with OLG and IPART guidelines, which includes the following consultative elements:

 

    A letter from the Mayor to all ratepayers, enclosing an eight-page information booklet and a reply paid survey;

    An online consultation web site, including ‘have your say’ functionality;

    Three evening community information sessions throughout November and December;

    Local media advertising, including full page ads in the Southern Courier and The Beast; and

    An externally facilitated telephone community survey.

 

Results of these community consultation activities will be evaluated early next year and reported back to Council for consideration in February 2019.

 

Update of the Long Term Financial Plan

In order to meet OLG and IPART submission requirements the LTFP has been updated to model the possible financial scenario of a continuing Environmental Levy.

 

The LTFP is a dynamic document, which is reviewed and updated twice yearly with the development of the Operational Plan which includes the budget and the completion of the annual Financial Reports.  It is created using a model that draws on information contained within the Council’s City Plan, Delivery Program, Financial Statements, current budget and costed short, medium and long term plans. The LTFP is integrated throughout the Asset Management Strategy, the Workforce Plan and ICT Digital Strategy.

 

The attached updated LTFP includes modelling for the following three scenarios:

 

    Option 1    Primary model – Continue Environmental Levy and Program

    Option 2    Discontinue Environmental Levy and Program

    Option 2A  Discontinue Environmental Levy and retain Program

 

Subsequent update of Integrated Planning documents

To satisfy OLG and IPART requirements the Randwick City Plan and the 2018-19 Operational Plan/Delivery Program have been updated to align with LTFP modelling and current community engagement materials.

 

The Randwick City Plan was last reviewed and adopted by Council in February 2018.   At that time, it was not appropriate to assume a continuing Environmental Levy when the Council had not yet had the opportunity to initiate a conversation with the community about the replacement of the levy.

 

The revision of the Randwick City Plan and 2018-19 Operational Plan is of a minor nature that does not detract from, or change the substance of, the original documents previously adopted by the Council on 13 February 2018 and 26 June 2018 respectively.

 

Public exhibition of updated plans

In the event of an updated LTFP and subsequent revision of integrated plans, it is industry best practice to publically exhibit the plans for a period of 28 days, with comments invited specifically around the possibility of continuing the Environmental Levy.

 

The exhibition period for these plans will overlap with the current community consultation period for the possible continuation of the Environmental Levy, closing on 18 December 2018.  In anticipation of the level of community interest surrounding the replacement of the levy, the period for the Environmental Levy consultation will be extended from four weeks to seven weeks.  This extension will allow for the concurrent exhibition of the revised Integrated Planning and Reporting plans.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in Sustainability

Direction 1a.2        Ensure sound long term financial strategies underpin the Council’s asset management policies and strategic vision.

Direction 1a.3        Review and incorporate the financial strategies, underpinning all short and medium term plans in the Long Term Financial Plan.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The Randwick City Plan and Operational Plan are supported by the updated Long Term Financial Plan (LTFP), with Option 1 meeting both industry benchmarks and Council’s own financial performance indicators in every year of the plan.

 

Conclusion

 

The OLG and IPART clearly communicates the guidelines and requirements needed for the adequate preparation of special rate variation applications.

 

The Council is currently engaging with the community about the possible continuation of the Environmental Levy which expires in June 2019. The LTFP has been updated to include a financial model for this possibility, Option 1 – Continuing the Environmental Levy.

 

The updated LTFP led to a subsequent update of our suite of Integrated Planning documents. The updated plans will be publically exhibited for 28 days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)    The Council acknowledge the updated LTFP, Randwick City Plan and 2018-19 Operational Plan/Delivery program and endorse the commencement of a 28 day public exhibition of these documents;

 

b)    The Council, in exhibition of these documents, contain any resulting comments specifically to the possible continuation of the Environmental Levy; and

 

c)    The General Manager be authorised to make any minor changes as requested by the Council or the NSW Office of Local Government.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Long Term Financial Plan

Included under separate cover

2.

Randwick City Plan

Included under separate cover

3.

2018-19 Operational Plan/Delivery Program

Included under separate cover

 

 

  


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP60/18

 

Subject:                      Grass Cutting for the Elderly

Folder No:                      F2006/00216

Author:                          Gary Ella, Coordinator Community Programs & Partnerships     

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 27 November 2017 resolved:

 

(Stavrinos/Parker) that;

 

a)   Bring back a report, with costings, investigating the feasibility of operating a grass-cutting program for disabled residents and elderly residents who are unable to maintain their verges and garden maintenance due to unforeseen circumstances.

b)   As part of this report, contact local community groups, clubs and other organisations to determine if they are interested in volunteering their time to be part of such a program; and

c)   Set out criteria for the program and investigate what legalities may arise by having a grass-cutting program in place.

 

This report addresses the feasibility of Council operating a grass cutting program for disabled residents and elderly residents unable to undertake the tasks.

 

 

Current situation

 

Description of Council’s current nature strip lawn-mowing service program

Randwick City Council’s standard policy, as practiced by a majority of local councils, is for residents to mow and maintain the nature strip/verge located adjacent to their house as a logical extension to their gardens. However, Council assumes this maintenance role if the nature strip will pose a significant public risk or is situated in a steep embankment or levee.

 

The Council also provides a targeted and free nature strip/verge lawn mowing service to assist frail, elderly or disabled home owners who have no access to family support or financial means to pay someone to perform this task.  As part of this program, Council engages a community and disability service called House with No Steps (HWNS) to mow the nature strip on a fee for service basis, which allows HWNS to run a social enterprise employment for people with a disability.  HWNS sub-contracts a proportion of their work load to Windgap Foundation to assist with the mowing of nature strip lawns in the Randwick LGA. Both House With No Steps and Windgap provide people with intellectual disabilities the opportunity to develop skills and earn an income through their lawn mowing programs. 

 

Mowing occurs at least 4 times per year for each property, and up to 8 times per year depending on the lawn’s growing conditions.  The Council pays HWNS $25 per property, regardless of size and length of the nature strip.  Council currently has a list of 82 approved properties in the local government area and an annual budget of $40,000.

For residents to be eligible for the Council’s nature strip/verge mowing service they need to meet all criteria listed below:

    Must be an owner-occupier of the property that adjoins the nature strip (excludes multiple occupancy dwellings e.g. duplex, town houses and apartment blocks)

    Receive a Centrelink Age Pension or an equivalent;

    Do not have the financial resources or other forms of support to assist with lawn mowing e.g. family member;

    Have a medical condition or a disability or are too frail to undertake this activity.

 

Council’s nature strip lawn mowing service excludes grass cutting or garden maintenance on land not owned or managed by Council.  Local residents have on separate occasions have been known to directly negotiate with and engage HWNS to undertake gardening maintenance work within their properties.

 

Disabled residents and elderly residents receiving a statutory pension can already access garden maintenance services through government accredited programs, while small businesses providing mowing and garden maintenance services on a competitive basis to the community in general.  Council’s program addresses a service gap while co-existing with the following service providers:

 

1.   Government subsidised community organisations that provide property maintenance and gardening services to eligible residents (e.g. recipients of NDIS, Veteran’s Affairs, Disability and Aged pensions), and

2.   Small gardening maintenance businesses operating on a competitive and for profit basis

 

 

Government funded or subsidised garden maintenance services available to local residents

 

Garden maintenance services on private properties owned by disabled or elderly eligible residents are carried out by accredited community organisations (at a subsidised rate) via government funded programs outlined in the next two sub-headings.  It should be noted that the Council’s provides free and nature strip/verge lawn mowing services for eligible residents who are not already connected to NDIS or My Age Care packages. 

 

Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP) via My Age Care packages:

CHSP is part of the Commonwealth Government’s My Aged Care program to support older Australians to remain living independently and safely at home.  Under this program older Australians who are having trouble doing everyday activities and need support at home, can apply for a home care package that includes subsidised garden maintenance and lawn mowing. To be eligible for this program, Australian residents need to be 65 years or older (50 years or older for persons who identify as being an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander) or 50 years or older for those that are on a low income. Additional information can be found on the My Aged Care website: www.myagedcare.gov.au

 

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS):

NDIS funds reasonable and necessary support services to participants with a disability to help reach their goals, objectives and aspirations in a range of areas.  These areas may include education, employment, social participation, independence, home support and living arrangements, and health and wellbeing. Example of support areas that NDIS packages can provide for are home modifications and assistance with household tasks (including gardening maintenance) to allow the participant to maintain their home environment. Additional information can be found on the NDIS website: www.ndis.gov.au

 

Identification and contact with local community groups

 

Council staff held discussions with representatives from a number of organisations that have access to volunteers.  Conversations were held to ascertain interest volunteer interest in provision of gardening maintenance services.  The issue was also raised with representatives from charities and not for profit organisations present at the Volunteers Expo held in the Randwick Town Hall in June 2018.

 

From this feedback, council officers concluded that there is minimal interest as the activity is considered to be too labour intensive, and has high operating costs associated with maintaining motor vehicles, lawn mowers and equipment.  In addition, work health safety issues for outdoor workers operating machinery is an obstacle for not for profit and volunteer community groups.  Also, a high proportion of volunteers working in the disability and aged care sector tended to be retirees and female.

 

Feasibility of operating a garden maintenance and grass-cutting program within private properties

 

As Council already offers a verge/nature strip grass cutting service to eligible elderly and disabled residents, this section of the report discusses the feasibility of providing grass cutting and garden maintenance service within private properties, as an extension to the Council’s own existing program.

 

It is difficult to estimate the cost of operating a garden maintenance and grass-cutting program for disabled and elderly residents unable to maintain their own gardens due to varying lot sizes.  Nonetheless officers made an attempt to estimate a financial cost using the following method:

 

       According to the latest Population and Housing Census (2016), 25% or 3,673 dwellings fall within the definition of a ‘Separate house’

       As of 1 July 2018, 4,437 residents receive a pensioner rebate on their annual rates bill but not all of these rebate recipients live in separate house

       Assuming that 25% of 4,437 residents live in separate houses, we estimate, at most, 1,109 dwellings may potentially require garden maintenance services 

       If Council were to fund this program since there is little interest by community groups, it will have to employ a gardening service contractor to undertake this task within private gardens.  Assuming that 1,109 dwellings will be serviced by external contractor at a fee for service rate of, say, $240 per 2 visits per annum, the cost will be $266,160 for direct gardening services

       Council will need to employ additional staff to coordinate contractors, raise customer invoices, manage and pay mowing contractors, and coordinate the expanded service.  This will increase the program cost to around the $350,000 mark.  As it will still be necessary to continue to pay HWNS to maintain the budget for Council’s nature strip/verge lawn mowing program, the total program cost is estimated to be around the $400,000 mark.  To recoup program outgoings, the Council will need to charge a user service fee, which is the standard practice of all government subsidised service providers.

Other implications or considerations

 

There are no legal impediments or barriers for local and government organisations wishing to provide a mowing and garden maintenance service provided that all state legislation and work health safety requirements are fully met.  However if the Council were to provide a gardening service within residential properties, it will be duplicating services that elderly and disabled residents can already access through My Aged Care and NDIS pathways on a subsidised fee basis.  Council will also be competing against and taking away job opportunities from other small business operators, including lawn mowing services provided by NDIS accredited contractors. 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:  A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a:          Meet the needs of our diverse community and provide equitable access to social services and infrastructure.

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

The financial impact is estimated to be in the vicinity of $400,000, as detailed in the body of the report.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

The Council already has in place a free nature strip/verge lawn mowing program for its eligible elderly, disabled and financially disadvantaged residents.  It balances well with the other home-based government subsidised programs delivered by not-for-profit organisations to the elderly and people with a disability.

 

Elderly and disabled residents can also access gardening maintenance and lawn mowing services under the NDIS or My Age Care Assistance programs.  All government registered service providers or contractors are required to undergo an accreditation process.  

 

Not many community organisations or groups are willing to volunteer or participate in a gardening and grass cutting service largely.   The key issues are the high maintenance costs of machinery and associated gardening equipment, work health safety and risk management issues associated with outdoor manual labour work. 

 

It is not advisable nor feasible for Council to expand its current nature strip lawn mowing program to include a subsidised garden maintenance and mowing service within private residential properties.  Council will be seen to be either competing unfairly against smaller operators or taking away jobs from those employed in the garden maintenance and lawn mowing businesses and other NDIS and My Age Care registered organisations.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council receive and note this report.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP61/18

 

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Subject:                         Contamination issues in the Department of Defence site at Bundock Street 

Folder No:                      F2004/06778

Author:                          David Ongkili, Coordinator Strategic Planning     

 

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council Meeting on 28 November 2017, Council resolved as follows: 

 

“(Matson/Said) that Council responds to the recent announcement from Department of Defence that it is seeking a complying development certificate to construct 26 dwellings on lots 1 to 36 Joongah Street, Randwick by:

 

1)    seeking clarification from Defence as to whether it also has further unannounced development plans for its land on the south side of Bundock Street stretching from opposite 101 Bundock Street to its intersection with Canberra Street;

 

2)    delegating the General Manager to bring back a report to Councillors assessing the full extent of possible contamination risks posed to residents as a result of past military waste disposal practices on land owned or previously owned by Defence at Randwick between Bundock and Holmes Streets, Randwick; and

 

3)    resolving not proceed with the planting of any fruit trees at the Randwick Community Centre at Munda Street, Randwick and reviews the use of bore water in the area.”

 

The following actions have been undertaken in relation to Council’s resolution (as detailed further in the Issues section below):

 

(a)  Letter to Defence sent on 14 February 2018 requesting information on any future unannounced plans for its land at Bundock Street.

 

(b)  Freedom of Information request sent to Defence in December 2017 as to the nature and extent of contamination within the overall Defence site and followed by on-line access request with the National Archives of Australia (NAA).

 

(c)  Water quality testing and review of use of bore water at the Randwick Community Centre undertaken by consultant expert in January 2018 and further review of water test results by EPA in September 2018

 

Issues

 

Background on Contamination Issues

 

In June 2017, the EPA wrote to Council requesting Council “to identify any information or records it holds that may indicate potential contaminating activities … or any contamination on the (Defence site) land” at Bundock Street. In response, Council prepared a comprehensive and detailed assessment as contained in a letter to the EPA dated 14 September 2017 (see Attachment 1). The letter essentially detailed the contamination and remediation history of the two main land components of the Defence site, that is, the surplus land that was rezoned, redeveloped and sold for private residential use and the remaining land that is still under Commonwealth ownership.

 

 

 

          Remediation of rezoned surplus Defence land

The letter to the EPA detailed the history of the release and rezoning of Defence land that was surplus to Defence purposes in 2002 for residential and community use. It advised the EPA that the rezoning and redevelopment of the site in 2002 required remediation to a standard appropriate for residential use resulting ultimately in site audit statements being issued for the land suitable for the intended residential and community uses as summarised in the Table 1 below, which should be read in conjunction with the map of remediation in Figure 1 below:

 

Table 1: Site Audit statements issued for the master plan development site.

 

Figure 1: Areas covered by Site Audit Statements in the Defence site at Bundock Street

 


 

          Remediation of the remaining land that is still under Commonwealth ownership

Council’s letter to the EPA advised that the remainder of the Defence site that has not been redeveloped remains Commonwealth land and therefore outside of Council’s jurisdiction. Council has no regulatory role in relation to this remaining land. Additionally, the EPA was advised at the time that Defence had no interest in divesting the remaining land and would be using this land for internal defence use. In response to Council queries on the soil and remediation condition of the remaining land, Defence also advised Council in the past that the assessment, management and subsequent removal of the contaminated soil (including asbestos materials) has been carried out in accordance with the relevant land contamination guidelines, national remediation standards, Environmental Management Plan and occupational health Codes of Practice relating to the safe removal of asbestos. These observations are purely based on the information supplied by the Commonwealth. Council suggested to the EPA that the EPA may wish to also contact Defence for further information on this matter.

 

Response to Council Resolution

 

Letter to Defence requesting information regarding development plans for the Bundock Street site

On 14 February 2018, a letter was sent to Defence requesting information on any future unannounced plans for its land at Bundock Street. In response, a letter from Defence to Council dated 23 March 2018, advised among other things that:

 

“… the Department of Defence is considering a number of options as part of the Randwick Barracks re-development project; however it is still in the early planning stage there are no confirmed plans or decision within Defence at this time”.

 

A follow-up email was sent to Defence on 26 October 2018 and Defence responded advising that there was no change to Defence’s earlier advice. To date, Defence have no information to provide regarding future development plans for its land at Bundock Street.

 

 

Freedom of Information request regarding contamination in the Defence Site

 

    Initial FOI request to Department of Defence

In December 2017, Council’s solicitor lodged a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to the Department of Defence pursuant to the (Commonwealth) Freedom of Information Act in the following terms:

 

“for access to all documents in the following terms held by or on behalf of the Department of Defence that provide information, detail or record as to how the subject land was used before, during and after the World Wars of last century and which use (particularly if it involved military waste disposal) may have resulted in the land being contaminated by contaminates that pose risk to human health (for example: asbestos, fuel and the like)”.

 

In December 2017, Council’s solicitors received an email response to the FOI Request from Defence advising that the Department of Defence was unable to assist in regards to the FOI Request. Defence further advised that the documents being sought by the FOI Request should be made under to the National Archives of Australia under the Archives Act as the documents being requested are in the open access period and will be held at the National Archives of Australia".

 

Following a request from Council officers, Council’s solicitor verified the Department of Defence’s advice and confirmed that the advice being sought would require an application to the NAA. Council’s solicitors also confirmed that the “open access period” refers to the 30 year period starting from the year a Commonwealth record is created that must past before which the document becomes publicly accessible.

 

    FOI request to National Archives of Australia

In accordance with the advice from the Department of Defence, Council’s solicitor directed Council’s request for information to the NAA which has involved a process of online searching via the NAA website. Council’s solicitors advised on 3 May 2018 that this search found only one record pertaining to the Bundock Street Defence site. That record had a creation date range of 1984 to 1997, which straddles the 30 year “open access” period. On 8 May 2018, Council solicitors lodged an on-line request for access to that document. The NAA advised that it must first view the document to decide if access will be given and this request joined a “queue” at the NAA with a response time of approximately 30 days.

 

On 21 June 2018, Council Solicitors received an email from the NAA with three attached documents containing lists of files available to access. Council officers proceed to review the lists of files and this revealed that most of the files had titles that did not mention or suggest any association with, “military waste disposal” or “site contamination”. Only one file appeared to relate to a building in the Bundock Street Defence site (designated as Box 650), that would potentially raise site contamination issues. This was listed as follows:

 

 

 

 

Council’s solicitors proceeded to request access to Box 650 from NAA and advised that access would take a further 30 days. On 13 August 2018, Council’s solicitors advised that, a digital copy of the document “Proposed naval store site – Avoca and Bendock (sic) Streets, Randwick NSW” in Box 650 had been ordered for purchase. On 14 September 2018, Council was provided with a digital copy of the document comprising a total of 168 pages. A review of the file was undertaken by Council officers and no information relating to site contamination was found in this collection of papers.

 

    Additional FOI request relating to site drilling/testing near Joongah Street

In the course of the NAA search, an additional FOI request was received on 30 April 2018 via email from Councillor Matson on behalf of a community member, requesting information on “what results are available from what appears to have been a second testing project conducted on the Joongah Street area sometime after they (Defence) gave evidence in the Land & Environment Court at which …they presented initial evidence from what … was an earlier test in 1996”. 

 

A map of land around Joongah Street was provided with the email with a caption reading: “2009 – Drill mapping / Testing” showing white circles of soil disturbances. The email advised in respect of this map that the concerned community member “is of the opinion that the regular pattern of white areas indicate a test site”. The email and map was forwarded to Councils solicitor to ascertain the feasibility of lodging an FOI request for information relating to possible “site drill mapping and testing” in the Defence site. Council’s solicitor replied on 8 May 2018 as follows:

 

“I confirm that if we submit an (additional) FOI request to the Dept of Defence for access to all documents relating to tests carried out in the Department of Defence site at Randwick from World War 2 of the last Century to the present time we will again be referred to National Archives (NAA) as the time period extends back more than 30 years. As previously discussed with you, our searching of the NAA records – [via its website as required]– revealed  (only) one document pertaining to the Bundock St site. That document has a date range of 1984 to 1997, which straddles the 30 year  “open access” period.” 

 

In other words, Council’s solicitor advised that, as the alleged drilling and testing near Joongah Street purportedly occurred in 2009, any information relating to soil tests in this period, would fall outside of the open access period and, as such, would not be made available by Defence. If a request was made, Defence would again direct Council’s request to the NAA.

 

Notwithstanding, Council officer and Council solicitor assessed the “2009 – Drill mapping / Testing” map against 2018 Google satellite maps of Joongah Street and the site audit details in Figure 1 above. This analysis revealed that the alleged drill/testing sites are located partly in Stage 1B land (that is now the subject of defence housing on Lots 1 to 36 Joongah Street) and partly in the Randwick Environmental Park (REP). In this regard, Council’s solicitors advised that Council’s comprehensive letter to the EPA dated 14 September 2017, has largely addressed the matter in that the letter advised the EPA that there were community concerns raised in early 2009 regarding the site works and stockpiled soil on, among other locations, the Stage 1B and the Randwick Environmental Park sites (which would appear to coincide with the details shown in the 2009 – Drill mapping / Testing” map). At the time, Council officers requested Defence to provide a report in relation to these activities. Council subsequently received reports from Defence’s Environmental Consultants Occupational Hygienist and former Site Auditor, which advise that the additional remediation works have been undertaken in accordance with the EMP, relevant remediation standards and occupational health work practices. The Occupational Hygienist provided details of the management and removal of the additional asbestos fragments found on the site.  Air monitoring was also conducted during the period of the works, adjacent to the properties in Holmes Street, which did not identify any asbestos fibres in the air.

 

Additionally, in the case of the REP, Council’s letter to the EPA also advised that residual contamination exists in this site due to the existence of large areas of endangered threatened Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub. However, an Environmental Management plan to manage this risk exists as a requirement of the site audit statement prepared by site auditor James Davis in 2008.

 

Finally, it should be noted that Defence has advised Council in an email dated 26 April 2018 that whilst the Joongah Street site (ie., the Stage 1B site) was previously subject to a Site Audit Statement, “the site will not be redeveloped for residential use until a new audit report/statement independently confirming site suitability are issued” due in part to the time gap since the original audit was undertaken.”

 

In summary, the process of applying FOI requests to the NAA for Department of Defence documents is a long and protracted one. It involves first of all ascertaining if the information that is being sought from the NAA is in the “open access period”. Secondly, a request to the NAA will trigger an assessment by the NAA of the feasibility of releasing the requested documents/folders which will take a few weeks. The NAA will then provide a list of the titles of all folders that can be released. The person requesting undertakes a review of the titles (usually just a location or street name) of each folder to ascertain which one(s) are most likely to contain information relating to the subject matter being investigated. An application is then needed to be made to either inspect the folders at an NAA Reading Room (requiring 14 days’ notice) or purchase a digital copy of the information (requiring 30 days’ notice). Council’s investigation of documents made available by the NAA through this FOI process, have not shown any information regarding possible contamination risks resulting from past military waste disposal practices on the Bundock Street Defence site. Therefore, it is considered to be of no further value to make any further requests through this process.

 

Testing and review of bore water use at the Randwick Community centre

 

In January, Council engaged Douglas Partners Environmental Consultants to undertake water quality testing and a review of the use of the bore water at the Randwick Community Centre in view of issues about the possible contamination of the bore water.

 

The issues raised related to the possibility of contaminants from the neighbouring Defence land located at 33 Bundock Street contaminating the surrounding groundwater within the area and in particular the groundwater of the Randwick Community Centre.

 

The analysis was undertaken as it was, at the time, contemplated that the bore water may be used to irrigate proposed fruit trees.

 

Contaminants of concern included the following;

 

    Total recoverable hydrocarbons (TRH)

    Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylenes-  BTEX)

    Metals

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCP)

    Organophosphorus pesticides (OPP)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC)

    Poly – Fluroalkyl substances (PHAS)

    Asbestos

 

The results of the water testing were provided in a report from Douglas Partners in February 2017 and the results of the testing are summarised as follows;

 

    No asbestos fibres were detected in the groundwater.

 

    The concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons were all below the laboratory detection limits and therefore well below the adopted water quality criteria.

 

    Trace levels of heavy metals were detected in the groundwater however results were below the adopted drinking water quality guidelines. Although copper marginally exceeded the water quality guidelines for freshwater species, this is typical of groundwater quality in the urban environment and unlikely to be associated with a single point source.

 

    Organochlorine pesticides & organophosphorus pesticides where all below the laboratory detection limits.

 

    Volatile organic compounds were all below the laboratory detection limits with the exception of chloroform which was at trace level of 2µg/L. Chloroform is a common impurity in treated tap water which may be present from leaking services (may the reported copper levels). This chloroform concentration was well within the water quality guidelines (ANZECC 200 low reliability threshold).

 

    Trace levels of PFOS (0.01µg/L), Perfluorhexanesulfonic acid- PFHxS (0.02µg/L) and Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) (0.03µg/L) were detected in the groundwater sample. The concentrations were below the NSW EPA, 2017 draft screening levels for drinking water and the ecological screening levels for slightly- moderately disturbed systems (95% species protection) which is the adopted screening level for this site assessment.

 

It should be noted that PFAS/PFOS are chemicals that have been used in a number of different products in Australia and worldwide due to the unique heat and chemical resistance, most notably as an essential ingredient of certain fire-fighting foams. The chemicals have also been used in a range of common household products, including in the manufacture of food packaging, non-stick cookware, fabric, furniture and carpet stain protection applications, and some industrial processes.

 

In recent years, it has been identified that PFAS have a persistent, bio-accumulation and toxic nature and does not readily breakdown in the environment. As these chemicals have been used for many years, they are found widely in our environments around the world and people are exposed to small amounts of the chemicals in everyday life through exposure to dust, indoor and outdoor air, food, water and contact with consumer products that contain these chemicals.

 

There is currently no consistent evidence that exposure to PFOS and PFOA causes adverse human health effects however further studies are being conducted. The assessment of PFOS and PFOA has only recently been included in the assessment of land contamination and guidelines and levels are currently only in draft form.

 

It is possible that the trace levels of PFOS and PFOA identified in the bore water testing are from the use of the former Naval Stores Depot and rifle range, however as the construction materials used in the bore or the irrigation pumping infrastructure are unknown, it is also possible that the bore has been cross contaminated by these materials.

 

It is noted that the PFOA and PFHxS levels are above the ecological screening values for high conservation value systems (99% species protection, 0.0023µg/L). However, this screening criteria is not the adopted screening criteria for this site assessment and would generally be used for more sensitive ecological receivers or pristine natural environments.

 

 

 

 

NSW EPA review of PFAS results

 

As PFAS guidelines are draft guidelines and are currently under review, Council requested the NSW EPA to review the PFAS sampling results undertaken by Council’s environmental consultants.

 

After a review of the PFAS results, the NSW EPA advised Council on 11 May 2018 that they considered that there was a low likelihood of risk to human health and the environment due to PFAS concentrations detected in groundwater at the sampling location.   The EPA also advised they do not consider the PFAS concentrations detected in the bore water to restrict the use of bore water for irrigation of non-edible vegetation. As also mentioned above, concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were below the draft screening levels and requirements for drinking water.

 

In September 2017, Council requested further clarification from the EPA as to whether the PFAS level in the water would be suitable for irrigating fruit trees and permaculture gardens in the Randwick Community Centre grounds. The EPA advised in October 2018 that a more definitive answer with regards to the suitability of bore water for irrigation of fruit trees (where the fruit is intended to be consumed), would need to be undertaken with a more detailed sampling program for PFASs and an appropriately qualified practitioner to undertake a risk assessment be engaged. However, as a precautionary measure, Council no longer utilises the bore-water to irrigate edible vegetation on the site.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:           Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:          Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

In regards to the Department of Defence’s plans for development of the Defence site at Bundock Street, Defence advises that it has no confirmed plans or decision within Defence as to future development of the Defence site.

 

In relation to the request for information on extent of possible contamination risks posed to residents as a result of past military waste disposal practices on the Defence site at Bundock Street, Council solicitors request to the NAA has uncovered only one record pertaining to the Bundock Street Defence site. A review of relevant documents obtained through the NAA search process has revealed that no information relating to site contamination was found in this collection of papers.

 

Remediation of the surplus land and the REP was undertaken in accordance with Council’s development consents and relevant environmental standards. Site Audit Statements were issued to confirm the satisfactory completion of the remediation work and suitability of the use of the land by EPA Accredited Site Auditors.

 

In relation to the quality of bore water and potential impact of contamination on the fruit trees in the Randwick Community Centre grounds, Council’s Environmental Consultants consider that there is no evidence of widespread or significant groundwater contamination in the bore water. In this regard, the exceedances for copper and the ecological screen levels for high conservation value ecosystems for PFOA are considered to be of a minimal nature and would not impact upon the current use of the water at the site for irrigation purposes. However, a review of PFAS sampling results by the EPA indicates that more sampling by an appropriate qualified expert would need to be undertaken with regards to the suitability of bore water should it be proposed to use the bore water for irrigation of fruit trees (where the fruit is intended to be consumed).

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That this report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

RCC Response re Defence Site Bundock Street (2017)

 

 

 

 


RCC Response re Defence Site Bundock Street (2017)

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP62/18

 

 

Subject:                      Proposed Transitional Housing Program and Procedures for Women and Children Exiting DV Refuges

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2004/07993

Author:                          Teresa Mok, Manager Community Planning & Development     

 

 

Introduction

 

The Council at its Ordinary Meeting held on 27 March 2018 resolved,

 

RESOLUTION: (Mayor, Cr L Shurey) that:

 

a)       Council, as part of its domestic violence support package, make available a proportion of affordable rental housing dwellings for use as medium term housing, targeting eligible women and their children exiting from women’s refuges;

b)       Council staff to identify suitably located affordable rental housing dwelling stock in support of this initiative, while preserving the on-going viability and key objectives of the Council’s Affordable Rental Housing Program; and

c)       A report be brought back to Council outlining the proposed amendments to Council’s Affordable Housing policy, incorporating the principles stated in clauses (a) and (b) above.”

 

This report has been prepared to specifically address resolution c) above.  It is not necessary to amend the Council’s Affordable Housing Policy in order to establish a transitional housing program for domestic violence survivors exiting refuges as it can be introduced as a stand-alone transitional housing program alongside the Council’s affordable rental housing program for key workers. 

 

Issues

 

The lack of affordable and social housing dwellings in Sydney is a significant hindrance for women seeking crisis accommodation or refuges after having escaped family or domestic violence.

 

Refuges (also referred to as emergency and crisis accommodation) are intended for a maximum stay of 3 months.  In practice many clients overstay indefinitely because of difficulties securing longer term and affordable housing in the private rental market, or are forced to wait longer for those who meet eligibility criteria for public housing.  Refuges have not been able to take in additional clients who are in crisis situations due to the lack of vacancies. 

 

Currently Randwick City Council has available appropriate resources to help free up rooms in women’s refuges by making available a proportion of its affordable rental housing dwellings as medium term housing option for women exiting refuges. 

 

Location of dwellings

 

There are at least 4 dwellings considered to be well located and suitable for DV transitional housing when they become vacant for allocation to eligible tenants.  The locations of these dwellings cannot be publicly disclosed to ensure tenant safety. 

 

Importantly, the identified dwellings are located close to where a range of support services are available if required, including DV counselling and case management. It is essential for the tenant to be connected to a DV support agency for the duration of her tenancy, to help the affected family’s recovery process.  The DV service is also well placed to provide special support to the tenant’s children, if required.

 

It is advisable for Council when implementing any supported accommodation programs to gradually introduce them in a staged manner. This will allow the tenancy manager to ensure that the needs of the client group and that the program procedures are properly executed.  This is why 4 dwellings are recommended for allocation at this initial stage.  Any changes to the number of dwellings can be made at a future point.

 

The provision of housing for tenants with complex needs or from disadvantaged background is a State and Commonwealth responsibility.  Council staff does not have practical involvement in specialist supported housing programs.  Starting out with 4 dwellings during the introductory phase was also recommended by a specialist housing program officer from Evolve Community Housing.  The same officer provided valuable guidance to council staff in the development of the attached document.  The Council’s transitional housing program and procedures for women exiting refuges was based on Evolve Community Housing’s own exit housing project for the same target group, called Safe Foundations.   At its trial phase, 2 dwellings from their thousand-strong social housing stock were used to evaluate the program’s effectiveness.

 

The details of the Transitional Housing Program and Procedures for Women and Children Exiting DV Refuges are presented in Attachment A. The key elements of the policy proposal are: 

 

    4 dwellings initially, to be designated as transitional affordable housing for women and children who are ready to exist housing and stabilise their lives after a traumatic time.  For tenant safety reasons, the locations shall not be made public

    Guaranteed 3 years non-renewable tenancy after which tenant will be required to transitioned to either private rental market or social housing

    Proven ability to pay a subsidised rent and a bond (may include government assisted grant)

    The allocation procedures are designed to assist DV affected families that have higher changes of recovery and stepping out of the social welfare system. 

    Tenants to be nominated by domestic violence service provider /crisis accommodation agencies via a simplified and fast track EOI process

    An allocation panel consists of representatives from the responsible community housing provider and a council officer is responsible for assessing and determining which referral will be eligible

    Priority status for women with children as there are not many DV refuges with capacity to provide for women and their children

    Eligible tenants to enter into a Residential Tenancy Agreement with community housing organisation as the property and tenancy manager appointed by Council

    A requirement that the client’s case manager work with the Council’s appointed property/tenancy manager to ensure that the client is adequately supported during the tenancy period and while transferring from refuge into the medium term dwelling

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

Outcome 1:  Leadership in sustainability

Direction1b: Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational

activities

Outcome 2:  A vibrant and diverse community

Direction 2a:          Meet the needs of our diverse community and provide equitable access to social services and infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

The impact on the program’s viability is considered minimal.  As it stands, the Council’s affordable rental housing portfolio is returning a moderate annual net profit of just under $200,000.  The tenants will be paying a weekly rent albeit at a subsidised rate, to go towards covering its share of the program’s annual costs.  In the event of rental income deficit, the annual net profit from the remaining affordable housing portfolio can be used to off-set any additional program cost.  Bearing in mind that this program was designed to provide transitional housing to families with a better chance of maintaining successful tenancies, the off-set amount is not expected to exceed $20,000 per year.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick Council has always been a leader in its community. It has the resources and infrastructure to assist in freeing up much needed refuge accommodation for clients in crisis situation.  It has available affordable rental housing stock that can be used as medium term transitional housing for domestic violence victims exiting crisis accommodation.  The proposed policy will free up emergency housing beds for those who really need them, and at the same time house women and their children so that they can rebuild their lives in a more ‘normal’ domestic environment

                                                      

Council has a well-established affordable rental housing program in place, with a current rental portfolio comprising of 20 dwellings in various locations.  The Council expects to receive a further 10 new dwellings as a result of the Newmarket development site.  This will increase its total affordable dwellings to 30.  The impact of dedicating 4 dwellings for its DV transitional housing support initiative is therefore considered minimal.  The Council’s affordable rental housing stock will continue to increase into the future as a result of its inclusion within SEPP 70 (developer affordable housing contribution scheme for identified precincts).

 

In light of the above circumstances, transferring 4 dwelling units to the Council’s domestic violence support package will not undermine the financial viability of its established Affordable Rental Housing Program, and serves to demonstrate the Council’s commitment towards addressing domestic violence issues. At some point in the future, Council has the option to revise the number of dwellings for transitional housing purposes to one that it can afford to manage without affecting its core affordable rental housing program for key services workers.  

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the Transitional Housing Program and Procedures for Women and Children Exiting DV Refuges (Attachment 1), for inclusion as an addendum to the Council’s Affordable Housing Strategy document.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Transitional Housing Program and Procedures for Women and Children Exiting DV Refuges

 

 

 

 


Transitional Housing Program and Procedures for Women and Children Exiting DV Refuges

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP63/18

 

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Subject:                      Police Request for Temporary Alcohol Restrictions

 

Folder No:                      F2005/00853

Author:                          Allan Graham, Coordinator Regulatory Projects     

 

 

Introduction

 

Reference is made to the Director City Planning Report No. 58/18 in respect to the Police request for Council to declare the City’s beachside parks and reserves to operate as alcohol prohibited areas, pursuant to s. 632A of the Local Government Act 1993, on a temporary basis over the 2018 - 19 Christmas and New Year period.

 

In this regard, Council, at its Ordinary Meeting held on the 27 November 2018, resolved in the following terms:

 

RESOLUTION: (Parker/Hamilton) that this matter be deferred to the December Council meeting to enable further consultation with the NSW Police with regard to alternative measures, considering the merits of the 2017-18 approach compared to previous approaches undertaken to the issue and, with respect to part (a) of the recommendation, the Police be requested to provide justification for the ongoing measures.”

 

The purpose of this Report is to address the above resolution of the Council.

 

Issues

 

Council officers met with the Acting Eastern Beaches Police Area Commander - Superintendent Sam Crisafulli on the 29 November 2018 and discussed, in detail, the:

 

(a)  alternatives measures which may be engaged to regulate ‘drinking’ in public places, and

 

(b)  the merits of establishing the 2017 – 18 temporary alcohol prohibited areas, and

 

(c)  to provide justification as to why the Council should implement these measures.

 

As a result of these discussions the following information is provided to Council for consideration.

 

Alternative Measures

 

Importantly, in New South Wales it is not unlawful for a person (whether a minor or not) to consume alcohol in a public place, unless that place is declared to be an alcohol free zone or an alcohol prohibited area. The jurisdiction to ‘declare’ a public place an alcohol free zone or an alcohol prohibited area is conferred, solely, on the Council pursuant to s. 632A(4) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

It is Division 1 of Part 2 of the Summary Offences Act 1988,  that creates offences in public places for which Police may take action including, amongst other things, offences for the ‘continuation of intoxicated and disorderly behaviour following a move on direction’ and offences for unsupervised minors to be in possession of liquor in a public place.

 

Police also have powers to give directions to intoxicated persons in public places and powers to detain intoxicated persons under the Law Enforcement (Powers and Responsibilities) Act 2002. However, when one examines the circumstances that must exist to enliven the powers of Police to take action for being intoxicated in public, it could be argued, particularly where there may be large numbers of drinkers gathered in a public place, that the “horse has well and truly bolted”.

 

In the absence of a declared alcohol prohibited area being established, Police cannot prevent persons from drinking in public. The utility in Council establishing alcohol free zones ­and alcohol prohibited areas is that this provides Police with the ability to prevent persons becoming intoxicated in a public place in the first place and prevents the scenario that occurred in Coogee in 2016.

 

The only other alternative available to Council would be set aside a designated area of the City’s beachside public space to conduct a ‘licensed’ event to specifically cater for the large number of persons who are attracted to the area to ‘drink’ and celebrate the festive season in a beachside setting.  Such a ‘licenced’ event would provide a designated area of public space where the sale and supply of alcohol is regulated and subject to the responsible service of alcohol and harm minimisation requirements of NSW liquor licensing laws. However, the conduct of these types of dedicated events bring about access to public space equity issues as well as requiring significant time and resources in event planning and implementation. 

 

Merits of the 2017 – 18 Alcohol Prohibited Areas

 

Superintendent Crisafulli stated that whilst he was not present at Eastern Beaches during last year, his experience with alcohol bans in other parts of the State is that it provides Police with the preventative ability to take control of an area and engage with the public before there is an escalation to incidents that necessitate the use of the Police public order enforcement powers.

 

Superintendent Crisafulli also articulated that alcohol bans are an important component of the high visibility policing of these popular areas of the City which is focused on community safety.  Police have already established a pro-active team that have been specifically tasked for this purpose. Police will also have deployed at our beaches and popular City areas during the summer period a number of specialist police including officers on ‘dirt bikes’, Mounted Police and Highway Patrol.

 

In addition to the above, Police are already engaging with target groups that congregate in large numbers at our beaches and beachside parks and reserves through social media and attending tourist and visitor accommodation providers.

 

Justification

 

The focus for Police is community safety and for our beachside public areas to be safe and accessible for the whole community.  For these reasons and those outlined above, Police are of the view that the proposed temporary alcohol restrictions will play an important role in providing the ability of Police to ‘pro-actively’ police these areas. In the absence of the proposed temporary alcohol prohibited areas it will not be unlawful for large crowds to congregate at a number of the City’s beachside parks and reserves and consume alcohol ‘unchecked’ until such time as they become intoxicated and disorderly.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

The cost for Council to erect (install) temporary signs at all of the beachside parks and reserves to bring about the temporary alcohol prohibited areas will be approximately $20,000. No funding for this purpose has been allocated within Council’s existing budget.

 

The costs associated with the allocation of addition Waste and Rangers resources will be provided within the relevant existing budgets.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:                  A Liveable City.

Direction 6c:                 The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programmes and strategies.

 

Key Actions:                 Implement actions identified in the Council’s crime prevention and community safety plan (A Safer Randwick City) to reduce anti-social behaviour and foster a safer city.

 

Conclusion

 

Eastern Beaches Police Area Command Police have requested that Council impose a temporary prohibition on the consumption of alcohol at all of the City’s beachside parks and reserves to operate over the 2018/2019 Christmas Day and Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day and Australia Day period.

 

Police view that establishing the proposed temporary alcohol prohibited areas will play an important role in providing the ability to ‘pro-actively’ police these areas. This in turn will provide Police with the ability to address problematic public drinking and thereby proactively reduce the likelihood for instances of alcohol related anti-social behaviour occurring in these public spaces that impact public safety.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Pursuant to s. 632A (4) of the Local Government Act 1993, the Randwick City Council hereby declares that each of the parks and reserves contained in the Schedule of Parks and Reserves that attaches to this Report is to be an alcohol prohibited area at which no alcohol is to be consumed, and will operate each and every year on the following dates, from:

 

i)        8.00pm on the 24 December 2018, ceasing at 6.00am on the 27 December 2018, and

ii)       From 8:00pm on the 30 December 2018, ceasing at 6.00am on the 2 January 2019, and

iii)      From 8.00pm on the 25 January 2019, ceasing at 6.00am on the 27 January 2019.

 

b)       Pursuant to s. 632A (7) of the Local Government Act 1993, the General Manager shall install temporary notices at each of the parks and reserves, contained in the Schedule of Parks and Reserves that attaches to this Report, sufficient to give effect to the declaration of the Council.

 

c)       A public awareness advertising campaign be carried out to inform the public that the consumption of alcohol at all beaches as well as beachside parks and reserves is prohibited as provided for by the declaration contained at “a).”

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Schedule of Parks & Reserves Declared as Alcohol Prohibited Areas - OMC 11 December 2018

 

 

 

 


Schedule of Parks & Reserves Declared as Alcohol Prohibited Areas - OMC 11 December 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP64/18

 

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Subject:                      Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 3 October - 30 November 2018

 

Folder No:                      F2008/00122

Author:                          Terry Papaioannou, Environmental Planner Officer (Technical & Research)     

 

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)       Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6;

 

2)       Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)       Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

4)       Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 04 October and 30 November 2018.

 

Relationship with City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:  Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b: New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Report for Variation to Developmnet Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 4 October 2018 - 30 Novemberr 2018

 

 

 

 


Report for Variation to Developmnet Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 4 October 2018 - 30 Novemberr 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director City Services Report No. CS59/18

 

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Subject:                      Asset Management Policy - Review

 

Folder No:                      F2007/00043

Author:                          Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council is responsible for an infrastructure asset portfolio valued at $1.7 billion.  It is important that the management of infrastructure assets is undertaken in a structured and planned manner, using best practice to deliver and maintain high quality and sustainable assets for the community.

 

The proposed draft Infrastructure Asset Management Policy is a revision and update of the existing Asset Management Policy.

 

Issues

 

The draft Infrastructure Asset Management Policy is part of a suite of Asset Management Planning documents including the Asset Management Strategy and Asset Management Plans.

 

The draft Infrastructure Asset Management Policy outlines Randwick Council’s commitment to strategic asset management planning to deliver sustainable and high quality assets at levels of service that are accepted by the community.

 

The Policy sets out an undertaking of asset management practices and details responsibilities to ensure that assets are planned, created, operated, maintained, renewed and disposed in accordance with best practice.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:            A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:          Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no financial impact to Council.

 

Conclusion

 

Asset management planning is a key component of the Resourcing Strategy within the Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) framework.  The lifecycle analysis of infrastructure assets feeds into the long term financial plan and is used to determine capital and maintenance funding requirements.  The valuation and state of the assets is also used for the organisation’s financial statements.  In recognition of these dependencies, it is recommended that the attached draft Infrastructure Asset Management Policy be adopted to establish a commitment to this function.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the draft Infrastructure Asset Management Policy be adopted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Draft Infrastructure Asset Management Policy - 2018

 

 

 

 


Draft Infrastructure Asset Management Policy - 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO75/18

 

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Subject:                         Continuation of Community Partnership with Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club

Folder No:                      F2014/00414

Author:                          David Kelly, Manager Administrative Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

At the ordinary meeting held Tuesday 12 December 2017 Council resolved:

 

“(Stavrinos/Bowen) that:

 

a)       Council continues with the “Community Partnership” with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club with the $33,000.00 plus GST contribution to come from Council’s Community Development budget;

 

b)       the General Manager be delegated authority to enter into a Memorandum of     Understanding with Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club; and

 

c)       a report on the success of the 2018 Community Partnership to come back before Council.”

 

In accordance with clause (c) of the above resolution this report is submitted and recommends continuing with this community partnership after another successful year.

 

Issues

 

Council’s community partnership agreement with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club was established in 2014 and is again up for renewal. The partnership was established with the primary objective of encouraging a healthy lifestyle and positive behavior for students and disaffected youth in the central and northern suburbs in the Randwick City area. There is also a focus on rewarding our community volunteers who give their time freely in order to assist those less fortunate.

 

2018

As part of the partnership, a total of fifty tickets were made available to every Roosters’ home game for Council to distribute as it sees fit. These tickets were used by the schools as a reward for progress made by students and for group morale building events, as well as being used by our youth workers directly to encourage positive behavior by participants in various youth programs.

 

Throughout the year tickets were also used by Council as a reward for those community members identified as having made worthy contributions to our community in a voluntary capacity. Over forty volunteers received tickets to Sydney Roosters games during 2018.

 

Once again, under this community partnership, there was the annual coaching clinic held by the Sydney Roosters at Burrows Park, Clovelly. This year’s event was attended by over 100 students from schools across the Clovelly, Coogee, Randwick, Kensington and Maroubra areas, as well as the majority of the Roosters squad, in attendance.

 

Our partnership also has the objective of highlighting the importance of our indigenous culture and to facilitate the transition of our youth from school into the workforce. Our community partnership in 2018 again targeted our local primary school aged children who benefitted from the Clubs’ Wellbeing, NAIDOC, Tackle Bullying and Respect programs. Over the previous year we also expanded our partnership by adding a new program for our primary school students to celebrate NAIDOC Week. The Sydney Roosters NAIDOC presentation is targeted towards years 3 to 6 and involves a 45-minute session promoting the importance of NAIDOC week. The presentation provided an overview to students about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history and cultures.

 

The interactive presentation covered many topics, including interesting statistics on Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people, the history of Indigenous culture, Aboriginal language, the Dreamtime, and the design of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flag. Roosters’ Indigenous players also shared their story about their heritage, pathway to the NRL and what it means to be a role-model in the community. To support year ten students the Sydney Roosters worked in partnership with secondary schools and made available work experience opportunities across all departments of the business including but not limited to Commercial, Marketing, Digital and Community.

 

The School to Work Indigenous Program continued to be a success in 2018. The program, now based at Marcellin College and Randwick Girls High School, utilises the positive profile of the game of Rugby League to support and encourage young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to complete their schooling and successfully transition into further education or employment. School to Work Officers engage with program participants face-to-face on a fortnightly basis.

 

2019

Once again the community partnership is up for renewal by Council. The Roosters will be providing fifty tickets to every home game for Council to distribute as it sees fit to schools and community volunteers. The Roosters will also continue to provide high profile player(s) to certain Council events such as Coogee Family Fun Day, Randwick Spot Festival, Randwick Sports Awards and NAIDOC Week. It is again planned to hold the annual coaching clinic at Burrows Park, Clovelly and invite all the schools in the central and northern suburbs of our LGA.

 

The community partnership in 2019 will again target our local primary school aged children by presenting the Clubs’ Wellbeing, NAIDOC, Tackle Bullying and Respect programs. The School to Work Indigenous Program will again be rolled out at Marcellin College and Randwick Girls High School.

 

In addition to these programs there are a number of other opportunities that both organisations will be able to utilise to get our positive messages out into the community. These include, but are not limited to:

 

       Joint banners at strategic locations throughout Randwick and Clovelly promoting youth events;

       Youth project related stories from both organisations in our respective newsletters;

       Links between our websites with each other’s good news and/or important stories on our respective websites and other publications;

       Roosters school visits advising the kids about some of Council’s Programs and other youth programs available;

       The Roosters working with our local chambers of commerce to work together to create business and economic development opportunities; and

       The Roosters working with Randwick City Council Partner organisations, community groups and programmes in particular Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Programs and Multicultural Programs and Projects.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2c:          Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of this community partnership for 2018 will be $33,000.00 plus GST, which has been allowed for in Council’s Community Development budget.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s “Community Partnership” with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club has resulted in major benefits for both our organisations and, more importantly, our local community. These benefits have included:

 

       Both organisations raising their profile in the community through the local media and with mutual marketing and advertising opportunities;

       Better targeting of schools and particular disaffected youth using high profile footballers who can better connect with these traditionally difficult areas;

       Greater community awareness of the programs being run by both organisations; and

       Being able to reward our volunteers, school children and disadvantaged youth for their efforts.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Council continues with the “Community Partnership” with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club with the $33,000.00 plus GST contribution to come from Council’s Community Development budget;

 

b)       the General Manager be delegated authority to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding with Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club; and

 

c)       this Community Partnership continue under these same conditions into future seasons until resolved otherwise by Council.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO76/18

 

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Subject:                      Contingency Fund - status as at 30 November 2018

 

Folder No:                      F2017/07396

Author:                          Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2018-19 financial year there have been 39 allocations totalling $217,372.85. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2018-19

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$27,000.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 27 June 2017

Sponsorship and in-kind support - Surfing NSW - Junior State Surfing Title

$16,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Annual contribution (3 years from 2018-19 to 2020-2021) - Renewal of Community Partnership Agreement with Westpac Helicopter Rescue Service

$20,000.00

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - St George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,323.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - Taste of Coogee 2018

$15,451.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Financial assistance - South Sydney Rabbitohs' - Commemorate John Sutton Historic Milestone

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Our Lady of the Rosary School, Kensington Community Fair

$9,488.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$4,518.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waivng of fees - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Take 3 for the Sea

$928.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Donation - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Coogee Dippers (Autism) Program

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival

$3,020.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - A National Act of Recognition

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial contribution - Commemorative Statue at the Cenotaph, Maroubra

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Financial assistance - La Perouse Public School

$2,780.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Expansion of Community Partnership - Sydney Roosters inaugural women’s NRL side

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Donation - Wee Waa Chamber of Commerce

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Annual Des Renford Chair of Hearts Research Family Gala and Charity Day - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre

$9,500.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Surf Life Saving and Pool Rescue Coaching Clinic - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre Pool

$6,102.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Donation - Humour Foundation Clown Doctors Program

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Waiving of fees - Maroubra Diggers Junior Swimming Club for two Swimming Carnivals at Des Renford Leisure

$1,268.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - Beach Ultimate Frisbee - Selection Camp

$1,044.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees and financial assistance - Surfing NSW - Carve Pro surfing event

$23,726.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Grant Application under the Stronger Communities Program – allocation of Council funds (if successful)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Earthquakes in Indonesia - Donation to Relief Fund

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - St Nicolas Anglican Church Carols by the Sea

$2,298.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Greek Epiphany Festival 2019

$15,537.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Surf Life Saving Sydney Inc

$2,270.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2019

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Financial assistance - Maroubra Surf Life Saving Club - 2018 Life Saving World Championships

$1,500.00

Ord Council – 27 Nov 2018

Waiving of fees - Mission Australia

$180.00

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                                                            $217,372.85

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:             A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:           Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:           Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $124,317.00 in the 2018-19 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO77/18

 

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Subject:                      Rating Policies - Pensioner Rates Policy and Debt Recovery and FInancial Hardship Policy

 

Folder No:                      F2004/07049

Author:                          Greg Byrne, Manager Financial Operations     

 

 

Introduction

 

A review has been carried out of Council’s rating policies. There are a number of existing rating policies that it is now recommended be consolidated into two new policies. The consolidation of the rating policies keeps together like issues and follows the recommended practice guidelines issued by the Office of Local Government.,

 

Issues

 

In November 2018, the Office of Local Government (OLG) issued Debt Management and Hardship Guidelines for councils to follow when developing and implementing debt management policies.

 

The proposed new policy follows the OLG guidelines and endorses the practice already adopted by Randwick Financial Operations staff, of working with customers to manage outstanding debt by negotiating payment arrangements, as opposed to taking legal action that results in additional costs to the customer.

 

The proposed consolidation of rating policies sees the creation of:

 

    Pensioner Rates Policy that will replace the existing Pensioner Concession Policy and the Pensioner Accruing Rates and Charges Policy.

 

    Debt Recovery and Financial Hardship Policy that will replace the existing Debt Recovery Policy and the Financial Hardship Policy.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:     1.       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:     1c.     Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed updated rating policies will a framework for providing assistance to eligible pensioners as well managing the level of outstanding debt to Council.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the proposed Pensioner Rates Policy and the Debt Recovery and Financial Hardship Policy be adopted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Pensioner Rates Policy

 

2.

Debt Recovery and Hardship Policy

 

 

 

 


Pensioner Rates Policy

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Debt Recovery and Hardship Policy

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Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM90/18

 

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Subject:                      Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Investigation of alternate routes for proposed Bundock Street Cycleway

 

Folder No:                      F2013/00218

Submitted by:                Councillor Bowen, East Ward     

 

 

 

That, in response to community concern about the proposed Bundock Street Cycleway, Randwick Council investigate alternative East- West cycle routes to connect with existing cyclepath network.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM91/18

 

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Subject:                      Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Assess potential for transplanting large trees from the proposed route of the South Coogee to Kingsford Bike Path

 

Folder No:                      F2013/00218

Submitted by:                Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

 

That a report be brought back assessing the likely success and cost effectiveness of transplanting each significantly sized tree identified for removal in the Avoca Street intersection section of the proposed South Coogee to Kingsford Bike Path.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM92/18

 

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Subject:                      Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Proposed Parking restrictions to discourage long-term parking by non-residents of trailers etc. in the vicinity of the Randwick Community Centre and Randwick Environment Park

 

Folder No:                      F2011/00455

Submitted by:                Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

 

That a report is brought back recommending the best method for preventing the overnight parking by non-residents of inactive commercial vehicles, backpacker vans and both boat and haulage trailers in the square of streets north of the Randwick Community Centre and the Randwick Environment Park. The report should take into account the parking requirements of residents and their visitors. The report will also assess the anticipated need to protect resident and legitimate tradie parking in other streets in the wider area between Anzac Parade, Rainbow Street, Holmes Street, Moverly Road, Elphinstone Road and Rainbow Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM93/18

 

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Subject:                      Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Outdated or irrelevant live music conditions

 

Folder No:                      F2018/00229

Submitted by:                Councillor Parker, Central Ward     

 

 

 

That Randwick City Council write to venues within the Randwick LGA present on the list provided to the NSW Parliamentary Inquiry into music and arts economy of venues subject to entertainment conditions informing them of the Liquor & Gaming NSW three-month free and streamlined assessment review for licensees to request the removal or variation of outdated or irrelevant licence conditions for live music and entertainment.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR9/18

 

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Subject:                      Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Roberts and Stavrinos - Post Exhibition Report - Planning Proposal Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area Boundary Extension and Inclusion of Local Heritage Items

 

Folder No:                      F2017/00174

Submitted by:                Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor Roberts, East Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 27 November 2018 in relation to Item CP56/18 and reading as follows:

 

“That:

 

a)       Council endorse the Planning Proposal (Attachment E) as exhibited, which proposes to amend the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to extend the boundary of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street Coogee, and to list 38, 42, and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

b)       Council exercise the delegation of the Minister for Planning’s functions under s59 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 to make the Local Environmental Plan.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That the matter be deferred and Council conduct greater consultation with all residents and ratepayers of Randwick City Council not just surrounding area of proposed heritage area.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR10/18

 

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Subject:                      Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Roberts and Stavrinos - Heritage Study of properties in Dudley Street and Brook Street, Coogee

 

Folder No:                      F2016/00475

Submitted by:                Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor Roberts, East Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 27 November 2018 in relation to Item CP57/18 and reading as follows:

 

“That:

 

a)    Council endorse the Heritage Study dated 25 October 2018 which recommends that 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street and 144, 146A, 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street Coogee be considered for incorporation into a heritage conservation area, and that 39 and 41 Dudley Street, and 148 Brook Street, Coogee, be considered for local heritage listing.

 

b)    Council prepare a Planning Proposal to amend the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to list and create a Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 144, 146A, 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street Coogee, and to list 39 and  41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 148 Brook Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

c)    Council refer the Planning Proposal to the Randwick Local Planning Panel (RLPP) for advice prior to resolving that it be forwarded for “Gateway Determination”.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That the matter be deferred and Council conduct greater consultation with all residents and ratepayers of Randwick City Council not just surrounding area of proposed heritage area.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           11 December 2018

 

 

Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR11/18

 

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Subject:                      Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Bowen, Matson and Roberts - Replacement of community vacancy on Wylies Baths Trust

 

Folder No:                      F2012/00407

Submitted by:                Councillor Bowen, East Ward; Councillor Matson, East Ward; Councillor Roberts, East Ward     

 

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 27 November 2018 in relation to Item CO74/18 and reading as follows:

 

“That this matter be deferred pending a report on a review of the operation of the Trust rules to include transparency measures, better governance and encouraging greater community involvement and that a position paper presented to Council by the Trust be considered as part of that review.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That, as recommended by the Wylies Baths Trust, Ms Annette Moran be appointed as the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.”