BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

Meeting

 

 

 

Tuesday 27 November 2018        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Randwick City Council		1300 722 542
30 Frances Street			council@randwick.nsw.gov.au
Randwick NSW 2031			www.randwick.nsw.gov.au
 



Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council meeting of the Council of the City of

Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on

Tuesday, 27 November 2018 at 6:00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of Country

I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on the land of the Bidjigal and the Gadigal peoples who occupied the Sydney Coast, being the traditional owners.  On behalf of Randwick City Council, I acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders past and present, and to Aboriginal people in attendance today.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council - 16 October 2018

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

GM25/18      2017-18 Annual Report and Financial Statements.......................................................... 1

GM26/18      Randwick City Council September Quarterly Report...................................................... 5

Director City Planning Reports  (record of voting required)

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act, the General Manager is required to keep a register of Councillor voting on planning matters. Planning matters are any decisions made in the exercise of a function of a council under the EP&A Act and include decisions relating to a development application, an environmental planning instrument, a development control plan or a development contribution plan under that Act. In addition, Randwick City Council has resolved (22 July 2008) that its register of voting include the voting on all tender matters.

CP54/18       Planning Proposal: 819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra.................................................. 35

CP55/18       SECPP - 181-191 Maroubra Road, Maroubra (DA/773/2017)........................................ 53

 

Director City Planning Reports  (record of voting NOT required)

CP56/18       Post Exhibition Report: Planning Proposal Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area Boundary Extension and Inclusion of Local Heritage Items.......................................... 57

CP57/18       Heritage Study of properties in Dudley Street and Brook Street, Coogee..................... 85

CP58/18       Police Request for Temporary Alcohol Restrictions..................................................... 93

CP59/18       Post Exhibition Report: Smart City Strategy............................................................... 99

Director City Services Reports

CS52/18       Road Maintenance - Reporting................................................................................. 139

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO61/18      Code of Conduct Complaint Statistics...................................................................... 143

CO62/18      Operating hours Christmas and New Year 2018-19..................................................... 147

CO63/18      2019 Meetings Schedule and arrangements for decision making over the Christmas/New Year period..................................................................................................................... 151

CO64/18      Contingency Fund - status as at 31 October 2018..................................................... 155

CO65/18      Affixing of Council Seal - Purcell Park lease and licence for water pump.................... 159

CO67/18      Notice under Crown Lands Management Act 2016 to Minister Lands & Forestry of Native Title Manager................................................................................................................. 161

CO68/18      Quarterly Budget Review - September 2018.............................................................. 163

CO69/18      Monthly Financial Report as at 31 October 2018........................................................ 187

CO70/18      Investment Report - October 2018............................................................................ 197

CO71/18      Ongoing Engagement of Casual Daytime Caterers.................................................... 207

CO72/18      Continuation of Community Partnership with South Sydney Rugby League Football Club in 2019....................................................................................................................... 209

CO73/18      Investment Policy.................................................................................................... 213

CO74/18      Replacement of community vacancy on Wylies Baths Trust....................................... 239

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM82/18      Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Council Endorsement of National Apology.......... 241

NM83/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Said - acknowledgement of Todd Reid's tennis achievements 243

NM84/18      Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - acknowledge the passing of Ian Kiernan............. 245

NM85/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Da Rocha - Climate Change initiatives................................ 247

NM86/18      Notice of Motion from Crs Da Rocha and D'Souza - Acknowledgement by Council at Remembrance Day ceremonies................................................................................ 249

NM87/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Food waste collection trial..................................... 251

NM88/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed community Christmas tree................. 253

NM89/18      Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Current and proposed developments for Government owned land............................................................................................................. 255  

Closed Session

CS53/18       Quotation for the Replacement of Crew Cab Tippers - RFQ Q2019-06

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS54/18       Quotation for the Supply and Delivery of Four (4) x 20 cubic metre Rear Loading Compactors – RFQ No. Q2019-04

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS55/18       Quotation for the Supply and Delivery of Two (2) x 16 cubic metre Rear Loading Compactors - RFQ No Q2019-03

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS56/18       Tender for Compactus Shelving Replacement at Lionel Bowen Library - RFT No T2019-01

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS57/18       Tender for Malabar Offshore Rescue Boat Storage Shed – Alterations and Additions - RFT No. T2019-06

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS58/18       Tender for Fire Protection Equipment Renewal - RFT No.T2019-03

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CO66/18      Affixing of Council Seal – Variation of Contract JCDecaux – Provision and Maintenance of Street Furniture

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

  

Notice of Rescission Motions

NR8/18        Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Hamilton, Roberts and Seng - CSELR Construction Work in the Vicinity of Doncaster Ave, Randwick.................................. 257  

 

 

 

Therese Manns

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM25/18

 

Subject:                      2017-18 Annual Report and Financial Statements

Folder No:                      F2017/00406

 

Author:                          Caroline Foley, Manager Financial Planning & Performance; Cherie Muir, Coordinator Integrated Planning

 

Introduction

 

The 2017-18 Randwick City Council Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 and associated Regulations.

 

The 2017-18 Randwick City Council Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993, Australian Accounting Standards, and the NSW Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting.

 

Issues

 

2017-18 Annual Report

The Local Government Act 1993 requires Council to prepare and publish an annual report by     30 November each year which must include the audited financial statements and satisfy statutory reporting requirements.

 

The annual report is one of the key accountability mechanisms between Council and the community regarding the implementation of the 20-year Randwick City Plan. In alignment with the 20-year plan, the annual report is organised according to the Randwick City Plan themes:

 

    Responsible management

    A sense of community

    Places for people

    A prospering City

    Moving around

    Looking after our environment

 

The 2017-18 Randwick City Council Annual Report details the achievements of Council over the last financial year against the 2017-18 Operational Plan which was adopted in June 2017. It includes details of Council's financial and operational position for the year ending June 2018 and includes a supplementary State of the Environment report.

 

Some of the main achievements for the 2017-18 operating year have been:

 

    Completion and opening of the Malabar Headland Western Walking track,

    Completion of several upgrade projects, including: the Coogee Beach amenities buildings; the Kensington Community Centre; and stage one of the Randwick Town Hall remedial works,

    Commencement of Council’s Digital Strategy,

    Becoming custodian of the La Perouse Museum and Headland, and

    Recognition through a number of industry awards.

 

State of the Environment Report

In addition to required statutory reporting, Randwick City’s Annual Report includes a supplementary State of the Environment (SoE) report. This supplementary report will complement the comprehensive SoE report which must be prepared in an election year in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993.

 

The key element required of Council in the preparation of the supplementary SoE report, is to report against the environmental objectives identified in Council’s 20-year City Plan.

 

Council’s 2017-18 SoE report directly aligns with and provides accountability for the six environmental objectives (10a to 10f) adopted by Council within Outcome 10, A Healthy Environment.

 

City Plan Outcome

Direction

10. A Healthy Environment.

10a. Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes.

10b. Policies and programs are developed and implemented in response to environmental risks and their potential impacts.

10c. Bushland, open spaces and biodiversity are protected and enhanced for future generations.

10d. Waste is managed sustainably to ensure highest level of resource recovery.

10e. A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, re-use and water quality improvements is adopted.

10f. Energy conservation and efficiency programs are implemented.

 

The supplementary SoE intends to update changes across our environmental indicators over the 12 month period since the last report.

 

2017-18 Financial Statements – Audit and Public Notice

 

At the Council Meeting on 28 August 2018 the draft 2017-18 Financial Statements were submitted to Council. The Council resolved, in part, that:

 

…b) the financial statements be referred to the Council’s Auditor for audit.

c) arrangements be made to place copies of the audited Financial Statements on public exhibition and the necessary advertisements be published.

e) a copy of the audited Financial Statements be forwarded to the NSW Office of Local Government.

f) the audited Financial Statements be presented at a meeting of Council to be held in accordance with Section 418 of the Local Government Act 1993.

Following the 28 August 2018 Council Meeting, the Audit Office of NSW conducted an audit of the 2017-18 Financial Statements and provided their Audit Reports, which are now contained within the attached final 2017-18 Financial Statements.

 

A copy of the audited Financial Statements has been sent to the NSW Office of Local Government and public notice was given to the community that the Council meeting on 27 November 2018 will include the presentation of the Financial Statements and Auditor’s Reports. Submissions have been invited from the public, up to 4 December 2018, in accordance with section 420 of the Local Government Act. Any submission received will be referred to Council’s Auditor.

 

A representative from the auditors will be present to address Council concerning the conduct of the audit, and the audit result, at the meeting on 27 November 2018.

 

2017-18 Financial Statements – Result

The Council achieved an operating surplus of $8.592m, or $2.917m excluding grants and contributions received for capital projects. All performance measures set by both the Office of Local Government and the Council’s Long Term Financial Plan were met, with the exception of the Debt Service Ratio (as the Council has no debt to service). 

 

The following graphs outline the performance of the Council during the financial year. Further information is available within the attached 2017-18 Financial Statements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1 2017-18 Operating result

 

 

Figure 2 2017-18 Performance Measures

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1a:          Council has a long-term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:                    Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The Council achieved an operating surplus of $8.592 million for the 2017-18 financial year ($2.917m excluding grants and contributions provided for capital purposes). This headline result, combined with strong results against the financial and asset performance measures, illustrates a successful past year in terms of the management of Council's finances and its assets.

 

Conclusion

 

The 2017-18 Randwick City Council Annual Report highlights Council’s numerous achievements and positive financial performance over the previous year. The report provides an account to the community of our progress in meeting our objectives as set out in the 20-year Randwick City Plan.

 

The Council’s Financial Statements have been finalised for the 2017-18 financial year and the Council’s finance position remains strong.

 

 

Recommendation

 

a)       That the presentation of the 2017-18 General Purpose and Special Purpose Financial Statements and Auditor’s Report be received and noted; and

 

b)       that the Randwick City Council 2017-18 Annual Report be endorsed by Council; and

 

c)       the General Manager be authorised to make any minor administrative changes to the Annual Report if required; and

 

d)       a copy of the Annual Report be submitted to the Chief Executive, Office of Local Government, Department of Premier and Cabinet.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

2017-18 Annual Report

Included under separate cover

2.

2017-18 Financial Statements

Included under separate cover

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM26/18

 

 

Subject:                      Randwick City Council September Quarterly Report

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2017/03001

Author:                          Anne Warner, Manager Corporate Performance     

 

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2018-19 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on 26 June 2018. In this report, achievement and status comments are provided for each action in the 2018-19 Operational Plan.

 

Issues

 

This is the September 2018 Quarterly Report and the first review of the 2018-19 annual Operational Plan. This report demonstrates our commitment to meeting the actions in the 2018-19 annual Operational Plan. Projects have proceeded as planned and overall all services were delivered to agreed standards.

 

Some of the highlights during the quarter included: Council partnered with Souths Cares NAIDOC Festival in Matraville which included cultural workshops, dance performances, footy clinics, a BBQ and opportunities to meet members of the Rabbitohs NRL team.

 

Council also partnered with La Perouse United for the Indigenous Community Links NAIDOC Football Cup – Yarra Bay Recreational Reserve.

 

Beach Lifeguards delivered the Water Safety educational program to 20 local schools during the September quarter. The education program featured an interactive DVD presentation and a visit from Larry the Lifeguard.

 

The Eco Living Expo attracted between 9,000 and 10,000 residents, due in part to special presentations by Craig Reucassel (War on Waste) and Dr Karl (ABC and JJJ).

 

The bronze statue of renowned cellist Jacqueline du Pré, OBE, was unveiled at Kensington Park on Sunday 23 September.

 

The bronze statue of renowned cellist Jacqueline du Pré, OBE.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a: Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the September Quarterly Review is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2018-19 Annual Operational Plan. In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20-year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the September quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the September Quarterly Review of the 2018-19 annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Randwick City Council Quarterly Report September 2018

 

 

 

 


Randwick City Council Quarterly Report September 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP54/18

 

 

Subject:                      Planning Proposal: 819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      RZ/2/2017

Author:                          Asanthika Kappagoda, Senior Strategic Planner     

 

 

Introduction

 

This report assesses the merits of a Planning Proposal (spot rezoning) prepared by Urbis for land at 819-829 Anzac Parade Maroubra (immediately south of Maroubra Junction town centre). The subject site is currently zoned SP2 – Place of Worship under the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP 2012), and accommodates a church building (Hope Uniting Church), a single storey local heritage listed cottage ‘Corio House’, 2 x two storey buildings housing student accommodation, single storey offices/amenity buildings and a community garden.

 

The Planning Proposal seeks to amend the RLEP 2012 by:

 

    Including ‘boarding house’ and ‘restaurant/café’ as additional permissible uses with consent on the site

    Applying a maximum height limit of 22m across the site

    Applying a floor space ratio (FSR) of 1.6:1 across the site; and

    Removing the local heritage listing of ‘Corio House’ (Item No 1202) as identified in Schedule 5- Environmental Heritage.

 

The objective of the Planning Proposal is to facilitate the redevelopment of the site to allow for a new church building, a higher density of student housing (an increase from 8 to 51 beds), a café, office premises, open space and basement parking.

 

This report provides an overview of the Planning Proposal, summarises key issues identified by Council officers and consultants, and seeks advice from the Randwick Local Planning Panel (RLPP) on the merit of the proposal.

 

Background

 

Planning Process

The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act) and Regulations set out the process for amending the zoning or planning provisions (rezoning) relating to a parcel(s) of land in NSW. Changes to the zoning or planning provisions can only be made via a formal amendment to the LEP.

 

A Planning Proposal is the first step to commence changes to the zoning or planning provisions relating to a parcel of land. It is a formal application that sets out the objectives, intended outcomes, and justification for the proposed changes, and also details the community consultation to be undertaken.

 

Referral to the RLPP

On 23 February 2018, the Minister gave a direction (under s9.1 of the EP&A Act) to councils with a Local Planning Panel (LPP) set up (other than City of Sydney) that all Planning Proposals prepared after 1 June 2018 be referred to their LPPs for advice, unless the Planning Proposal relates to the correction of an obvious error in the LEP, matters of minor nature or matters that will not have any significant adverse impact. Accordingly, the subject Planning Proposal was referred to the RLPP on 8 November 2018 and advice from the Panel has been included in this report.

 


 

Gateway Determination

If Council resolves to proceed with the subject Planning Proposal, it will be forwarded to the Greater Sydney Commission for a ‘Gateway Determination’. The ‘Gateway Determination’ is essentially a checkpoint for Planning Proposals, and enables those proposals that are not well founded, or not in the public interest to be stopped early in the process, before significant resources are committed in carrying out technical studies or investigations.

 

The Commission’s ‘Gateway Determination’ will stipulate whether the subject Planning Proposal should proceed, whether it needs to be resubmitted, the timeframe for its completion (usually nine months from the date of the Determination), the community consultation and State/Commonwealth agency requirements and whether a public hearing is needed. 

 

Exhibition and Making of Amendments

Following the ‘Gateway Determination’, the Planning Proposal will be formally placed on public exhibition for comment. The final LEP and accompanying maps which amend the Council’s principal planning instrument (i.e. the RLEP 2012) are made by the Minister for Planning (and notified on the NSW legislation web site) in accordance with the EP&A Act.  Certain LEPs which are of local significance can be finalised by Council via delegation from the Minister (this is determined at the Gateway stage). 

 

Planning Proposals vs. Development Applications

The Planning Proposal is not seeking consent for development on the site.  It is seeking Council’s support to commence a planning process for an amendment to the RLEP 2012. Should the proponent wish to proceed with a development proposal (once the LEP is amended), a separate Development Application (DA) is still required to be lodged for assessment under relevant planning framework.

 

The Subject Site

The subject site has an area of 1,517m2 and comprises two adjoining land parcels (Lot A in DP321064 and Lot B in DP321064), located at the intersection of Wise Street and Anzac Parade on the south-western edge of the Maroubra Junction town centre (Figure 1).

 

The site is occupied by a two storey church building (Hope Uniting Church) (Figure 2), a single storey Edwardian cottage referred to as ‘Corio House’ (Figure 3), 2 x two storey buildings accommodating 8 beds of student housing fronting Wise Street (Figure 4), single level offices and a community garden.

 

The site has a 38m frontage to Anzac Parade and 42m frontage to Wise Street. Most buildings on the site are built to the boundary except for Corio House which has a setback of 11m to Anzac Parade. The site has a relatively flat topography and sparse vegetation. Vehicle access is provided via Wise Street. Pedestrian access points for the church and Corio House are provided off Anzac Parade.

 

Figure 1: Site location

Source: Randwick City Council

Figure 2: Church building viewed from Anzac Parade.   

Source: Randwick City Council                                    

Figure 3: Corio House viewed from Anzac Parade.

Source: Randwick City Council                                    

 

 

Figure 4: Student accommodation

Source: Randwick City Council

 

Surrounding Context

The site is located on the south-western edge of Maroubra Junction, just outside of the town centre boundary.

 

Development to the north of the site (within Maroubra Junction town centre) includes 817 Anzac Parade which is a heritage listed 2 storey walk up residential flat building (Figure 5). Further north are higher density residential flat buildings at 803, 805-813 Anzac Parade. To the rear of the site at 2 Wise Street is a single dwelling house (Figure 6).

 

The land use character to the south and south west of the site is generally low medium/medium density residential, featuring walk up residential flat buildings and some dwelling houses (Figure 7). To the east across Anzac Parade development is generally commercial in nature being part of the Maroubra Junction town centre (Figure 8).

 

The site has good access to frequent bus services to the Sydney CBD and the Randwick Strategic Centre comprising the University of NSW and Randwick Hospitals Campus. The site is in walkable proximity to regional open space including Heffron Park.

 

Figure 5: Buildings to the north including 817 (heritage item), 805-813 and 803 Anzac Parade.

Source:  Google Streetview

Figure 6: Buildings to the south west of the site including   2 and 4 Wise Street, Maroubra

Source: Google Streetview

 

 

Figure 7: Buildings to the south on Wise Street

Source:   Randwick City Council                                    

Figure 8: Buildings to the east on Anzac Parade

Source:   Randwick City Council                                    

 

Local Planning Framework

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The subject site is zoned SP2 Infrastructure- Place of Public Worship under the RLEP 2012, restricting its use to ‘places of worship’ and ancillary uses (Figure 9). This is further reinforced by the SP2 zone objectives which generally focus on protecting land for infrastructure and community uses.

 

The RLEP 2012 does not establish generalised development standards for the SP2 zone given the unique nature of such sites. Accordingly no heights or FSR are expressed for the subject site.

 

Corio House is listed as a Local Heritage Item under Schedule 5 of the RLEP 2012 (Item No 1202). The heritage inventory sheet associated with the property notes its significance as a ‘building of special architectural interest for its unusual construction….a rare early use of cement slabs for home building…and a positive contribution to the streetscape’.

 

Any redevelopment of the site is thus subject to the RLEP 2012 heritage provisions (clause 5.10-Heritage Conservation) requiring the consent authority to consider the impacts of development on the heritage significance of Corio House, as well as the heritage listed Art Deco residential flat building at 817 Anzac Parade (1201). 

 

The surrounding context to the north and east (Maroubra Junction town centre) is zoned B2 Local Centre with a height limit ranging from 13m to 28m. The maximum height limit immediately north of the site is 13m. There is no FSR applicable to the Maroubra Junction town centre, with building envelope controls included in the DCP to control bulk and scale of development (e.g. setbacks, modulation etc).

 

The surrounding context to the south of the site is zoned R3 Medium Density Residential with an applicable maximum building height limit of 12m and FSR of 0.9:1. To the south west land is also zoned R3 Medium Density Residential with a maximum building height limit of 9.5m and FSR of 0.75:1.

 

Figure 9: Zoning under the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

Source:   Randwick City Council      

 

Randwick Development Control Plan 2013

The Randwick Development Control Plan 2013 (DCP) does not contain specific controls pertaining to the SP2 Zone given the unique nature of special use sites. Any proposal for student accommodation, cafes and office uses would be assessed in line other sections of the DCP which set out controls to maintain a high standard of amenity and quality of development for the site and surrounding locality, as well as in conjunction with any other relevant controls (e.g. traffic and parking).

 

The DCP contains a raft of controls for development of heritage items and for development within the vicinity of heritage items which would be considered during the Development Application (DA) stage.

 

The Planning Proposal

The subject Planning Proposal has been prepared by Urbis on behalf of the Uniting Church in Australia Synod of NSW and ACT (the applicant) and relates to 819-829 Anzac Parade (Lot A in DP321064 and Lot B in DP321064) (Attachment 1).

 

The Planning Proposal seeks to amend the RLEP 2012 by:

 

·           Including ‘boarding house’ and ‘restaurant/café’ as additional permissible uses with consent on the site

·           Applying a maximum height limit of 22m across the site

·           Applying a floor space ratio (FSR) of 1.6:1 across the site; and

·           Removing the local heritage listing of ‘Corio House’ (Item No 1202) as identified in Schedule

 

5- Environmental Heritage.

The objective of the Planning Proposal is to facilitate the redevelopment of the site to allow for a new church building, a higher density of student housing, a café, office space, open space and basement parking.

 

Existing and proposed RLEP 2012 controls that are applicable to the site are summarised as follows:

 

Table 1:    Summary of Proposed Changes

Component

Current RLEP 2012

Proposed

Zone

SP2 – Place of Public Worship

No change

Height of Buildings

N/A

22m

Floor Space Ratio

N/A

1:6

Schedule 1 Additional Permitted Uses

Nil

Boarding house

Restaurant/cafe

Schedule 5 Environmental Heritage

Listed as Heritage Item

Removal of Heritage Item

 

Supporting Documents

The Planning Proposal is supplemented by a number of supporting studies/documents to help justify the requested RLEP 2012 amendments. These are summarised as follows.

 

Development Concept Scheme (Preferred Option)

The Development Concept Scheme (Attachment 2) outlines the general intentions for the site with regards to building siting, mix of land uses and building height (Figures 10, 11 and 12). The proponent has considered a number of options including the retention of Corio House, however these do not meet the future needs and objectives of the Church.

 

The preferred concept scheme proposes demolition of all existing buildings on the site, together with the construction of the following:

 

·           A new church building on the north-eastern corner of the site fronting Anzac Parade with capacity of 300 seats

·           A 5 storey building envelope with a double height lobby on the south-eastern corner, two levels of church facilities fronting Wise Street containing offices, kitchen and meeting room facilities, and student housing accommodating 51 beds across the upper three levels

·           Open space and communal gardens on the north western corner of the site; and

·           One level of resident and visitor basement parking.

 

It should be noted that the concept drawings are indicative only at this stage. Should the Planning Proposal be approved resulting in amendments to the RLEP 2012, detailed plans submitted with any future DA may not necessarily be consistent with the concept drawings submitted with this application.

 

While the Planning Proposal is not seeking consent for the proposed development, the indicative building scale and massing as detailed in the concept drawings has been considered to assist with the assessment of the strategic merit and potential impact of the proposed rezoning.

 

Development Feasibility Statement

A Development Feasibility Statement (DFS) (Attachment 3) has been prepared by Integrated Design Group outlining a number of development options for the site. The DFS preferred option outlined above involving the demolition of Corio House has been chosen taking into account site constraints and development feasibility.

 

The DFS considers that a 5 storey built form would provide a clear visual marker and appropriate height transition between the higher scaled Maroubra Junction town centre and lower scaled surrounding residential zone to the south/south west, while minimising overshadowing impacts on surrounding residential properties. It contends that the design of the building, including the 2 storey lobby on the south-eastern corner of the site would reduce its perceived scale to Anzac Parade. Urban design issues with respect to the preferred option are discussed further on in this report. 

 

Figure 10: View from corner of Anzac Parade and Wise Street

Source: Urbis

 

Figure 11: Eastern elevation – Anzac Parade

Source: Urbis      

 

Figure 12:  South-Western elevation – Wise Street

Source: Urbis      

 

Heritage Impact Assessment

A Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) (Attachment 4) prepared by Urbis provides an assessment of the heritage significance of the site and the heritage impact of the proposed demolition of Corio House. It also considers the effect of site redevelopment on the heritage values and significance of 817 Anzac Parade.

 

The HIA claims that Corio House does not have a level of heritage significance warranting its heritage listing in the RLEP 2012. It asserts that the building is a poor example of its architectural style and construction type; the building been substantially altered resulting in loss of original fabric; and that the site does not contribute to the understanding of the local area nor has associations with a person, group or community of identified significance. The HIA further concludes that the proposed redevelopment of the site would not have an adverse effect on the heritage significance of other heritage items in the vicinity.

 

The HIA accordingly supports the removal of 829 Anzac Parade (Item 202 being Corio House) from Schedule 5 Environmental Heritage of the RLEP 2012.

 

An independent heritage assessment has been undertaken by City Plan Services of the Planning Proposal, including a peer review of the HIA. Further discussion on the City Plan heritage assessment findings is provided further on in this report. 

 

Traffic Impact Statement

A Traffic Impact Statement (TIS) provides a preliminary assessment of the design concept in line with the parking requirements of the DCP and the RMS Guide to Traffic Generating Developments. The TIS considers there is no fundamental impediment to the rezoning of the site on parking and traffic grounds and any such impacts are capable of being suitably resolved at the DA stage.

 

Noise Impact Assessment

The Planning Proposal includes a Noise Impact Assessment (NIA) by Acoustic Logic Consulting which assesses potential noise impacts associated with the proposed redevelopment of the site.

The assessment has been based on possible worst case assumptions given detail on operations are not known at the Planning Proposal stage. The NIA notes that provided a number of suggested construction treatments are employed, any future development on the site may be capable of achieving relevant Council, State and Australian standards relating to noise management and mitigation.

 

It recommends a detailed review be undertaken once information regarding definite operations are known at the DA stage. Comments on the NIA by Council’s Environmental Health Department are provided further on in this report.

 

Merit Assessment of the Planning Proposal

An assessment of the Planning Proposal has been undertaken in accordance with the NSW Government’s Guide to Preparing Planning Proposals and gives consideration to the proponent’s justification together with feedback from Council technical specialists on key issues. Professional/expert opinions have been obtained by City Plan Services on the heritage component of the proposal. Key issues and matters for consideration are provided as follows.

 

Proponent’s Justification

The proponent claims that the existing facilities on the site are at capacity and no longer able to accommodate the needs of the church. It is contended that the student housing component on the site is currently operating with existing use rights and its expansion/intensification can only occur by including ‘boarding house’ as an additional permitted use on the site under Schedule 1 of the RLEP 2012.

 

The proponent states that the proposed redevelopment of the site would increase the supply and diversity of housing in the locality, provide additional affordable housing opportunities and deliver a range of community services on the site.

 

The proponent justifies the proposed heritage de-listing of Corio House on the basis that the building has little/no heritage value and that its demolition is required to facilitate a feasible development and a better urban design outcome on the site.

 

The proponent claims that the proposed RLEP 2012 amendments are consistent with key directions and actions contained in the state and local strategic planning framework. In particular it is argued that the Planning Proposal is consistent with the key directions of the Metropolitan Plan and District Plan for accelerating housing supply, facilitating urban renewal and revitalisation along the Anzac Parade corridor (which is yet to be prioritised by the NSW Government), as well as within the wider East Gardens- Maroubra Junction Strategic Centre.

 

The Planning Proposal considers that the site is optimally located to support uplift given its proximity to retail/commercial and employment opportunities in Maroubra Junction and the education and health facilities of the University of NSW and Randwick Hospitals Campus. It identifies that the site is located within 30 minutes travel time to significant employment opportunities including the Sydney CBD and the Randwick Education and Health Strategic Centre, providing future residents with wider access to jobs and services.

 

The Planning Proposal acknowledges that the site is located within the Anzac Parade Corridor Priority Precinct, and while not situated on Government land, considers that future redevelopment would support growing demand for new housing, particularly student accommodation along this transport corridor.

 

The Planning Proposal considers that the proposed redevelopment would serve to increase the range and capacity of community services on site which is consistent with the Randwick City Plan’s key theme ‘sense of community’ and outcomes of providing community and cultural facilities and activities.

 

Consideration of the Proponents’ Case

 

Strategic Merit

The Guide to Preparing Planning Proposals requires that Planning Proposals meet the ‘strategic merit test’, that is, demonstrate consistency with the objectives and actions of relevant regional, sub-regional or district plan or strategy applicable to the site (including any exhibited draft plans or strategies). The strategic merit test is particularly pertinent in those cases where the applicable planning controls are less than 5 years old. It is noted that the RLEP 2012 controls are relatively contemporary having been in place since 2013, and are earmarked for a comprehensive review over the next three years.

 

Having regard to its overall strategic merit, it is agreed that the site benefits from being serviced by public transport and has good access to a variety of commercial and retail facilities in the Maroubra Junction town centre. The site’s access to larger employment hubs including the Randwick Health and Education Strategic Centre, Port Botany and Sydney CBD is consistent with state and district strategic directions for integrating land use and transport.

 

It is acknowledged that redevelopment of the site to facilitate additional student accommodation would contribute to the mix and diversity of housing in the locality. However notably, a higher density of student housing could be achieved in the Maroubra Junction town centre under the existing RLEP 2012 planning controls. This therefore indicates that there are alternative areas within the same locality to achieve the housing delivery objectives of the Greater Sydney Regional Plan and Eastern City District Plan.

 

Notwithstanding the site’s strategic location, the application is inconsistent with several key strategic directions on heritage conservation articulated in the state and local strategic planning framework. Firstly, the proposed heritage delisting of Corio House from Schedule 5 of the RLEP 2012 is not in keeping with the District Plan’s liveability priorities where a key objective/action is to conserve items of local heritage significance by applying adaptive re-use to heritage items (Objective 13/Action 20). Furthermore, the Planning Proposal conflicts with strategic directions/outcomes of the Randwick City Plan which focus on protecting and celebrating local heritage (Outcome 7, Direction 7a). 

 

The application is also inconsistent with the Minister for Planning’s section 117 Planning Direction 2.3 Heritage conservation which requires that Planning Proposals contain provisions to facilitate the conservation of heritage. The proposed delisting of Corio House would remove statutory protection of the building’s heritage values, and subsequently facilitate its demolition in the future. The overall effect of the Planning Proposal is to preclude rather than facilitate the conservation of a Heritage Item. This is clearly at odds with state and local planning directions for heritage conservation, making the scheme difficult to support. Further discussion on heritage matters is contained further in this report.

 

Housing Supply

As noted above, the proponent’s case for intensification of the site is to facilitate student accommodation, and considers this to be is consistent with the State Government’s plans of increasing housing supply within the proposed Anzac Parade Priority Precinct. It is important to note that the Anzac Parade Priority Precinct has been placed on hold by the NSW Government. The Planning Proposal is therefore pre-emptive as timeframes and future scenarios for housing and transport infrastructure delivery within the Anzac Parade Priority Precinct are presently unknown and not determined. 

 

Similarly, the Planning Proposal claims that increasing the amount of student housing on the site would be consistent with future directions for urban growth within the East Gardens-Maroubra Junction Strategic Centre. A future strategic review of this emerging centre has been earmarked in conjunction with Bayside Council for the long term. This strategic review will investigate, amongst other things, the current and future economic role of this centre, housing and employment floor space capacity and supply, affordable housing and transport infrastructure provision. The Planning Proposal pre-empts the proposed strategic review of the East Gardens-Maroubra Junction Strategic Centre by increasing housing density on the site prior to the outcomes of the study being known.

 

Council has commenced preliminary background work to help inform a new Housing Strategy that will identify existing and future housing needs for Randwick City within the framework of the District Plan’s priorities for our local area. The Housing Strategy will help guide how residential development in Randwick City will be planned and managed in the years to come, including the appropriate locations, type and densities of housing required to meet changing population needs. The Housing Strategy will inform the aforementioned comprehensive LEP review that Council is required to undertake over the next three years.

 

Given that significant strategic work is pending of the locality, a spot rezoning prior to aforementioned studies being undertaken is not considered to be the most efficient or effective means of reviewing the planning controls of the site. A spot rezoning is a premature approach and would undermine the comprehensive strategic planning process required for this area. Planning for additional housing for the locality would be better placed via the aforementioned Housing Strategy, informed by a sound evidence base enabling the consideration of a wide range of factors including infrastructure provision and urban design, together with a robust community engagement strategy. The Planning Proposal as it stands, is an ad hoc approach to planning for housing and community services within this strategically important area.  

 

Urban Design

As aforementioned, the plan, montages and elevations accompanying the Planning Proposal indicate a proposed 5 storey building envelope with a double storey ground to ceiling floor level on the subject site. The 5 storey component will extend along the perimeter of the subject site along Anzac Parade and Wise Street (see photo montage below). The rear north-western corner of the subject site will be a private open space as indicated in the plan below (Figure 13).

While noting that the subject Planning Proposal is not seeking development consent for proposed building, the concept plans have been broadly considered in line with the DCP provisions for the Maroubra town centre to assist with the assessment of the strategic merit and potential impact of an amendment to the RLEP 2012. More detailed assessment can only be undertaken at a future DA stage when sufficient information is available on building design and other amenity considerations such as visual and acoustic privacy, safety and security.

 

Figure 13: Concept drawings for subject site.

Source: Urbis

 

Section D4 of the DCP 2013 contains building envelope controls for the Maroubra Junction town centre on a block by block basis. Block 10 ends at the northern boundary of the heritage item at 817 Anzac Parade, aligning with the B2 Local Centre zoning of the town centre. The block by block controls set the future context of the site in relation to the town centre as indicated in the diagram below (Figure 14). 

 

Figure 14: Block 10 of Maroubra Junction Town Centre- Section D4 Randwick DCP

Block 10 provides for a gradual stepped decrease in building height, transitioning down from  7 storeys towards the centre of the town centre, to 5 and 3 storeys at the northern boundary of the heritage item at 817 Anzac Parade. This height transition aims to respect the adjoining heritage item at No. 817 Anzac Parade and arguably, the existing church and Corio House on the subject site as well. The existing built form along Anzac Parade broadly aligns with the Block 10 controls, with 805-813 Anzac Parade being a 7 storey building (approved under DA/349/1996) and the property at 815 Anzac Parade comprising a 3 storey walk up residential flat building (Figure 15).

Figure 15:  Streetscape along Anzac Parade showing building transition from 7 storeys (805-813 Anzac Parade), 3 storeys (815 Anzac Parade) and 2 storeys (817 Anzac Parade).

Source:       Google Streetview

 

The building envelope controls for Maroubra Junction town centre were developed after a comprehensive built form study, and it was not envisaged that Block 10, with its associated new urban edge envelope and massing, would extend to the corner of Wise Street for the following reasons:

·         It would in effect “sandwich” the existing historic building at 817 Anzac Parade between two modern built forms thus placing pressure on the lower built form of the heritage item

·         Corio House was never intended to be demolished as part of a whole scale redevelopment and intensification of use on the subject site; and

·         It would set an undesirable precedent for heritage items to be demolished to accommodate higher density development. In this regard, independent heritage advice has confirmed that Corio House is significant and should not be demolished (see discussion that follows).

 

The development concept incorporates a relatively strong massing, and projects forward on the south-east corner of the site and does not appear to respect the setback of the adjoining heritage item at 817 Anzac Parade. The bulk and scale of the proposed building together with high ridge lines and colourful panels would dominate the historic built form of 817 Anzac Parade. It is also noted that there is little articulation to the building design, which would otherwise break up perceived building bulk.  Only a narrow planting bed is proposed along the Anzac Parade frontage, which would have minimal impact in terms of softening the proposed development or enhancing public domain amenity adjacent to 817 Anzac Parade.

The proposed new building would extend along the whole length of the Wise Street frontage to the western boundary of the subject site which adjoins the R3 Medium Density zoned residential area. As Wise Street slopes down quite significantly west-bound (see Figure 16), concern is raised the proposal may have an overbearing impact on existing and future surrounding residential development.

 

Figure 16: Existing view down Wise Street looking west

Source: Google Streetview 

 

Heritage Conservation

City Plan Services (CPS) was engaged by Council in October 2017 to undertake an independent assessment of the Planning Proposal. The aim of the review was to identify the impacts of the Planning Proposal on the heritage values/significance of Corio House including its intended demolition resulting from redevelopment of the site; additional uses being introduced on the site (i.e. boarding house, restaurant, parking, and community garden); and proposed new development standards. The assessment included a site and internal inspection of Corio House, and review of all documentation submitted as part of the Planning Proposal (see Attachment 5).

 

The CPS review findings have confirmed that Corio House has local heritage significance and that its heritage listing in the RLEP 2012 should be retained for the following reasons:

 

·      Association with the Glanfields family who were prominent at the time in the local area

·      The building is one of the first (possibly even the first) residences developed in Maroubra

·      Social history, due to its continued use by the church since 1959 and former uses as a mail distribution point and maternity hospital

·      Concrete block construction – which appears to be the earliest for the Maroubra area; and

·      Aesthetic significance as a 'referential nineteenth century' style cottage.

 

The CPS review findings have found that the HIA has not provided sufficient evidence to justify the heritage delisting and subsequent demolition of Corio House.

 

In respect to the development concept preferred option, the CPS review has also agreed that the scheme would dominate the adjoining heritage item at 817 Anzac Parade in terms of visual bulk and scale and through the use of colourful panelling which is at odds with the face-brick primary construction of building.

 

The CPS review considers that the additional uses proposed (i.e. boarding house, restaurant etc) would not have an adverse impact on the heritage significance of the site and adjacent heritage item at 817 Anzac Parade, provided an appropriate design response for future new buildings is prepared and Corio House retained.

 

Alternative Option

The CPS Review has identified a potential alternative option for consideration and further design development (Figure 17). This option involves the adaptive re-use of Corio House and retention of the front façade of the church building, in conjunction with increasing the height of any new structure and extending its setback to improve visual access to these historical buildings from Anzac Parade.

The review considers that the bulk and scale of a higher density development could be mitigated through increasing the articulation of the facades, using glass and materials that directly reflect those used in 'Corio House', the church and adjacent heritage item. It should be noted that the CPS review has not provided diagrams, renders or 3D modelling to illustrate the proposed alternative option, which in any case would be subject to further refinement as part of a comprehensive design approach.

 

The following aerial view provided by CPS identifies the developable area, should this alternative option be further explored by the proponent. The suggested setback is also outlined in blue.

 

Figure 17: Alternative Option for Corio House site

Source: City Plan Services 

 

Proponent’s Response to CPS Peer Review

A meeting was held in October 2017 with the proponent, City Plan Services and Council staff to discuss the CPS peer review findings.  The proponent was requested to undertake further research and investigations to substantiate the requested delisting. These included: 

 

·         An investigation of the fabric of Corio House to ascertain rarity of the concrete block construction

·         Further research to establish the full contribution and significance of the Glanfield family in the local area's development history

·         Historical evidence to clarify the anecdotal statement that Corio House is possibly the oldest surviving house in Maroubra

·         Identification of the heritage values of other structures on the site including the church which has aesthetic values visible above the awning potentially relating to the adjacent heritage listed Inter-War residential flat building at 817 Anzac parade; and

·         Identification of the significance of previous uses including as a mail distribution centre and maternity hospital.

 

The proponent submitted subsequent findings from their investigations in July 2018, with key comments summarised as follows (see Attachment 6 for full response):

 

·         Physical investigation of the building fabric of Corio House has identified that it is unlikely to have been made out of camerated concrete construction, and rather is built of coke breeze or cinder concrete, and is apparently monolithic

·         Historical research has determined that Corio House was constructed between 1912-1914 and is unlikely to be the oldest surviving house in Maroubra. The response concludes that the previous HIA claims that the building could be the oldest house in the locality was anecdotal and unsubstantiated

·         The church was found to not have heritage significance as the building has been modified by the addition of the vestibule, which has compromised its character and integrity

·         There is no further evidence of significant connection to the Glanfield family and their contribution to the Maroubra area and the community. On this basis, there is no evidence to substantiate a significant historical association

·         The Church and Hall do not demonstrate social significance to the congregation; and

·         The church building does not have a stylistic association with heritage listed 817 Anzac Parade.  While both are decorative brick buildings of comparable scale, they are of different architectural typologies.

 

City Plan Services have reviewed the proponent’s submission and have reaffirmed that the local heritage listing of Corio House is warranted and should be retained. Investigations undertaken by Urbis have only served to further confirm the building’s heritage significance stemming from its unusual coke breeze construction, which is one of the main reasons for its listing under Schedule 5 of the RLEP 2012.  This is substantiated by the statement of significance for the building which clearly states that it is a "building of special architectural interest for its unusual construction. A rare early use of cement slabs for home building."

 

The CPS review have also noted that demolition and replacement of the church and hall are considered acceptable provided that the new building is compatible and sympathetic to the adjoining heritage item at 817 Anzac Parade and Corio House.

 

Transport and Parking

The traffic report accompanying the proposal has been referred to Council’s Integrated Transport Department and no objections have been raised on traffic or parking grounds.

 

Acoustic Issues

Council’s Environmental Health Department has provided preliminary feedback on the Acoustic Report, acknowledging that intensification of student housing on the site from 6 to 51 beds may create additional noise impacts on surrounding residents. As with other supporting documentation, the Acoustic Report is a preliminary analysis of potential impacts based on the concept plan and may not necessarily be a reflection of the actual proposal submitted at the DA stage, should the Planning Proposal be approved. 

 

Council’s Environmental Health Department raises concerns that the Acoustic Report has not sufficiently addressed impacts arising from an increase in student numbers on site. For instance, noise generation in the internal common area has been assessed using 8 students as the baseline, which is substantially less than the intended 51 students to be accommodated on site. Similarly, the Acoustic Report fails to address noise generation impacts of students utilising the external common area on level 3 of the proposed design scheme.

 

Should the Planning Proposal proceed, a comprehensive Acoustic Report will be required at the DA stage addressing the potential noise generated from 51 students using the internal and external communal areas at all times of the day including the night period as specified in the NSW EPA Industrial Noise Policy. The Acoustic Report would also need to address impacts from roof top/carpark equipment etc. A DA proposal would also require a Noise Plan of Management outlining noise impacts within the student and community facilities, as well as open space areas together with appropriate mitigation and management measures.

 

Randwick Local Planning Panel Advice

 

The Planning Proposal and Council report was referred to the Randwick Local Planning Panel for independent advice on 8 November 2018. The Panel has unanimously concurred with Council’s recommendation that the Planning Proposal not be forwarded to the Sydney Greater Commission for a Gateway Determination under Section 3.34 of the EP&A Act 1979, on the basis of heritage conservation, urban design and strategic merit implications. The Panel’s recommendation is attached to this report (Attachment 7).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:  Excellence in urban design and development

Direction 4b:          New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

Outcome 7:  Heritage that is protected and celebrated

Direction 7a: Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Planning Proposal is seeking to amend the RLEP 2012 to delist Corio House as an item of local heritage significance to facilitate its demolition as part of a future redevelopment proposal.  The Planning Proposal also seeks to introduce a maximum height limit of 22m across the site, a FSR of 1.6:1 and include ‘boarding house’ and ‘restaurant/café’ as additional permissible uses with consent on the site.

 

The Planning Proposal is generally consistent with the Metropolis of Three Cities – the Greater Sydney Region Plan and District Plan directions for providing new housing close to transport and employment. Notwithstanding this, the Planning Proposal is not supported on the following basis:

 

·      The proposal provides insufficient justification on heritage conservation grounds to support the heritage delisting and subsequent demolition of Corio House. Comprehensive research and investigations undertaken over the past 12 months have provided a strong evidence base to support the retention of the property as a local heritage item.

 

·         The proposal does not meet the strategic merit test as it is inconsistent with the state and local strategic planning framework directions with regards to heritage conservation.

 

·         The costs to the community associated with the loss of an item of local heritage significance have not been adequately considered or addressed.

 

·         Approval of the Planning Proposal would create a precedent for other heritage items across the LGA.

 

·         A spot rezoning is not the best, most efficient or effective means of achieving a review of the planning controls applicable to the site. Council has commenced initial background work into a comprehensive Housing Strategy for the LGA and increased housing capacity, locations and densities are better identified and managed through this strategic planning process.

 

·         The indicated design concept would create a poor urban design outcome for Anzac Parade through increased building bulk and scale, overbearing of the adjoining heritage item at 817 Anzac Parade and potential amenity impacts to neighboring residential properties.

 

It is therefore recommended that the Planning Proposal not proceed to Gateway Determination.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Planning Proposal not be forwarded to the Greater Sydney Commission under Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Planning Proposal (819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra)

Included under separate cover

2.

Development Concept Scheme (819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra)

Included under separate cover

3.

Development Feasibility Study (819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra)

Included under separate cover

4.

Heritage Impact Assessment  (819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra)

Included under separate cover

5.

City Plan Services Peer Review

Included under separate cover

6.

Urbis Response to Heritage Peer Review (819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra)

Included under separate cover

7.

Randwick Local Planning Panel Advice (819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra)

 

 

 

 


Randwick Local Planning Panel Advice (819-829 Anzac Parade, Maroubra)

Attachment 7

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP55/18

 

Subject:                      SECPP - 181-191 Maroubra Road, Maroubra (DA/773/2017)

Folder No:                      DA/773/2017

 

Author:                          William Jones, Senior Environmental Planning Officer

 

Proposal:                       Demolition of the existing buildings and construction of a part 6, part 7 storey shop top housing development in two built forms, comprising 9 retail shops at the ground floor level with 65 residential units above, and 3 levels of basement parking for 136 cars.

Ward:                             Central Ward

Applicant:                      Sgammotta Architects

Owner:                           The Owners - Strata Plan No. 11011

Summary

Recommendation:          Approval

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

Ù

North

Locality Plan


 

1.         Introduction

 

The subject Development Application (“DA”) seeks consent for demolition of the existing buildings and construction of a part 6, part 7 storey shop top housing development in two built forms, comprising 9 retail shops at the ground floor level with 65 residential units above, and 3 levels of basement parking for 136 cars.

 

The DA is referred to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel for determination as it constitutes regionally significant development pursuant to Part 4 of State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011 (“SEPP: State and Regional Development”).

 

2.         Public Notification / Advertising

 

The DA was publicly notified to surrounding properties and advertised within the local newspaper, with site notification attached to the subject premises as per the public notification requirements of the Randwick Development Control Plan 2013 (“RDCP”). One (1) submission was received as part of the initial notification and advertising process raising issues with the building height and the potential for view loss. Following receipt of amended drawings in response to Council’s request for additional information, the DA was publically re-notified to surrounding properties and no new submissions were received.

 

3.         Key Issues

 

Building Height

The proposal contravenes the height of buildings standard (maximum 25m permitted and 27.76m proposed) under Clause 4.3 of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP) by 11.04%, measured to the top of lift overrun of Block A, and 6.04% measured to top of the mezzanine level at the eastern end of Block A. The applicant’s written request pursuant to Clause 4.6 of the RLEP has adequately addressed that compliance with the development standard is unreasonable or unnecessary in the circumstances of the case and that there are sufficient environmental planning grounds to justify contravening the development standard. The proposed variation is supported given it will not result in view loss impacts with regards to key iconic views or views with a clear land and water interface, will not result in adverse amenity impacts on adjoining properties and the non-compliant portion of the building is setback from the building edges and will not be readily visible from the street. The development is in accordance with the objectives of Clause 4.3 Height of buildings standard and the objectives of the B2 Local Centre zone pursuant to the RLEP.

 

Building Envelope

The proposal is not in accordance with the Block 9 building envelope controls pursuant to Part D4 of the RDCP, proposing 7 storeys fronting Maroubra Road (maximum 6 storeys permitted) and 6 storeys fronting Ferguson Street (maximum 5 permitted), with a 25m building depth for Block B (Maximum 18m permitted). The building envelope is supported as the resulting built form will not compromise residential amenity and will not result in adverse amenity impacts on surrounding properties. The development remains generally consistent with the envisaged building envelope, proposing two built forms that provide greater separation than required that will better relate to the adjoining development to the west while permitting better solar access and ventilation (refer to Figure 1 below). The number of storeys fronting Maroubra Road is consistent with the adjoining building to the west with the two built forms stepping down in height from Block A to Block B, which responds well to lower density residential development further to the south. The proposed development will reinforce Maroubra Road as the primary cross street, providing a distinctive built form that will reinforce the corner while supporting the primary business function of the zone.

 

Figure 1. Insert from Block 9 building envelope (left) and proposed layout (right).

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (“RLEP”)

The subject site is zoned B2 Local Centre pursuant to the RLEP. Shop top housing is permitted with consent in the zone.

 

The proposed development is in accordance with the objectives of the zone, providing 9 commercial premises’ at the ground floor that will serve the needs of people in the local area and that will encourage employment opportunities as part of the highly accessible Maroubra Junction Centre. The residential component is well integrated with the commercial component and will support the primary business function of the zone by accommodating additional residents in the business centre. A high standard of urban design will result, with the built form serving to enforce and activate the street edge at the ground floor. The two building blocks that rise above are appropriately separated and articulated to provide good visual amenity when viewed from the street and surrounding properties. The development steps down in height from the Maroubra Road frontage towards lower density residential development further to the south, responding well to the immediate and wider context that will contribute to achieving a sense of place while minimising the impact of the development.

 

Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013

In relation to the considerations that remain in the RDCP that are relevant to the subject DA, these are largely assessed as acceptable and where necessary have been the subject of technical officers’ comments and conditions recommended for inclusion in the determination.

 

Randwick City Council Development Contributions Plan.

A suitable condition is included requiring the payment of a section 7.12 contribution in accordance with the requirements of Council’s plan.

 

State Environmental Planning Policy No. 65 – Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development (“SEPP 65”)

The proposed development is in accordance with the design quality principles of SEPP 65, and is consistent with the relevant design criteria and design guidance of the Residential Apartment Design Guide.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:  Excellence in urban design.

Direction 4a: Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 


 

Conclusion

 

That the application for demolition of the existing buildings and construction of a part 6, part 7 storey shop top housing development in two built forms, comprising 9 retail shops at the ground floor level with 65 residential units above, and 3 levels of basement parking for 136 cars be supported for the following reasons:

 

·         The proposal satisfies the matters for consideration under Section 4.15 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended.

·         The proposal is consistent with the relevant requirements of the State Environmental Planning Policy No 65-Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development and the associated Residential Apartment Design Guide.

·         The proposal is consistent with the objectives contained within the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 and the relevant requirements of the Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013.

·         The proposal will not result in adverse amenity impacts to surrounding residential and non-residential land uses.

·         The proposal will afford a high level of residential amenity for occupants.

·         The proposal is consistent with the desired future character of the locality.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the SECPP assessment report for DA/773/2017 at 181-191 Maroubra Road, Maroubra be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA - SECPP Report - DA/773/2017 - 181-191 Maroubra Road, MAROUBRA  - Sgammotta Architects

Included under separate cover

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP56/18

 

Subject:                      Post Exhibition Report: Planning Proposal Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area Boundary Extension and Inclusion of Local Heritage Items

Folder No:                      F2017/00174

Author:                          Emese Wolf, Environmental Planning Officer       

 

Introduction

 

This report provides an overview of the outcomes of the public exhibition of the Planning Proposal for the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area boundary extension and inclusion of properties as local heritage items.

 

The Planning Proposal seeks to amend the Randwick Local Environmental Plan (RLEP) 2012 to extend the boundary of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street Coogee, and to list 38, 42, and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

The Planning Proposal was exhibited from 3 July 2018 to 31 July 2018 in accordance with the consultation requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulations.

 

During the exhibition period, 967 unique visitors visited the dedicated Your Say webpage and 137 submissions received. The majority of responses received were in support of the Planning Proposal. A list of all the submissions received and Council officer’s response is provided in Attachment A.

 

This report recommends that Council endorse the attached Planning Proposal, as exhibited, and exercise delegation under s59 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 to finalise the amendment to the RLEP 2012.

 

Background

 

Overview

The Planning Proposal is consistent with heritage reports commissioned to investigate the potential significance of properties adjacent to the existing Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area that have recommended extension of the conservation area and listing of certain properties as items of heritage significance.

 

Council Resolution

Council resolved at its Ordinary Council Meeting on 24 April 2018 to amend the Environmental Heritage Provisions in the RLEP 2012 by extending the boundary of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 38, 40, 42, 44, 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee. Further, it was resolved to list 38, 42, and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee as Heritage Items in the RLEP 2012.

 

The above resolution was subject to a rescission motion proposing that Council conduct a community forum in relation to the proposed amendments to RLEP 2012 and that the matter be bought back to Council after the community forum was held. The rescission motion was addressed and lost at an Ordinary Council Meeting on 22 May 2018. As a result, the previous Council Resolution of 24 April 2018 stands.

 

Interim Heritage Order – 38 Dudley Street, Coogee

On 26 June 2018, Council received information that 38 Dudley Street, Coogee was under threat of demolition based on notification received by Council that a Complying Development Certificate was to be issued. Accordingly, in view of this risk Council exercised its delegated authority to place an Interim Heritage Order (IHO) on the building and site at 38 Dudley Street, Coogee. On 28 June 2018 the IHO was gazetted for the property, applying for six months from this date. As a draft LEP (which has been exhibited) now applies to the site, the exempt and complying provisions will no longer apply. Therefore, a development application will be required for future development.

 

Heritage Reports for 37-41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 144-150 Brook Street, Coogee

Council resolved at its Ordinary Council Meeting on 28 August 2018 to commence a heritage study for the sites 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 144, 146, 146A, 148 and 150 Brook Street, Coogee for the purpose of publically exhibiting a proposal to amend the RLEP 2012 to include them as heritage items (Attachment B). Investigations are currently underway. This, however, is a matter for a separate report to Council.

 

The Planning Proposal

The Planning Proposal seeks to amend RLEP 2012 to extend the boundary of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street Coogee, and to list 38, 42, and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

The intended outcome of the planning proposal is to provide the statutory mechanism to protect the heritage significance of these properties. Once amended, the RLEP 2012 heritage conservation objectives and provisions contained under Clause 5.10 will apply to these sites.

Gateway Determination

 

At its Ordinary Council meeting on 24 April 2018 Council resolved (Neilson/Matson) to:

 

1.         amend the provisions under the Randwick LEP 2012 to include No 38, 42 and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee on the heritage schedule and that the associated heritage map of the RLEP be amended, and that the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area map boundary be extended to include 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee;

 

2.         prepare a draft planning proposal to be forwarded to the Greater Sydney Commission or it’s delegate requesting ‘Gateway Determination’ under section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979;

 

3.         following ‘Gateway Determination’ exhibit the draft Planning Proposal in accordance with the conditions of the gateway determination and bring back a report to Council detailing the results of the community consultation for final consideration by Council; and

 

4.         authorise the Director, City Planning to make typographical, grammatical or formatting changes to the documentation.

 

The Planning Proposal was referred to the NSW Department of Planning and Environment for a ‘Gateway Determination’ to allow it to proceed to public exhibition. The Gateway Determination (received on 27 June 2018) noted that the Planning Proposal should proceed to public exhibition subject to a number of conditions (See Attachment C). The conditions required:

 

·         The inclusion of a heritage map to clearly show the properties included in the Planning Proposal,

·         That the Planning Proposal to be exhibited for a minimum of 28 days,

·         To consult with the Office of Environment and Heritage, and

·         To complete the LEP within 6 months (from the date of the Gateway Determination being 27 December 2018).

 

All Gateway Determination conditions have been satisfied and Council officers are of the opinion that the LEP should be able to be made by 27 December 2018.

 

 


 

Public Exhibition Process and Consultation       

The Planning Proposal was amended in accordance with the Gateway Determination conditions and publically exhibited from 3 July 2018 to 31 July 2018. The public exhibition was undertaken in accordance with the consultation requirements stipulated in the Gateway Determination, the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulations.

 

Notice of the public exhibition was provided in the Southern Courier during the exhibition period and on Council’s website. Copies of the Planning Proposal were also available on Council’s website and on display at Council’s Customer Service Centre and the Bowen, Randwick and Malabar libraries. Land owners and the adjoining neighbouring properties were advised in writing of the proposal.

 

Submissions

The following table outlines the breakdown of submissions received in response to the exhibited Planning Proposal.

 

Supportive (including one petition)

115

84%

Not supportive

7

5%

Position unclear

15

11%

Total

137

100%

 

The petition (containing 104 signatures) was in support of extending the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street Coogee.

 

Of the submissions received, two submissions were received from the landowners of 38 Dudley Street, Coogee objecting to the Planning Proposal.

 

Supportive of a Change to the LEP

Key points and issues raised in support of the Planning Proposal are summarised in the table below.

 

Summary of matters raised in submissions

Council Officer’s response

The properties should be preserved and protected as they:

o    Contribute significantly to the character and identity of the area,

o    Will enable the area to maintain its unique identity, and

o    Allow future generations to understand the area’s history.

The Planning Proposal seeks to protect and conserve these buildings through the heritage provisions of the RLEP 2012. The properties collectively provide visual evidence of early-twentieth century architecture and the proposed heritage items are significant based on a number of heritage criteria.

Additional properties on Dudley and Brook Streets should also be assessed for their heritage significance. In particular, many submissions identified the properties 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 144, 146, 146A, 148 and 150 Brook Street, Coogee as having heritage significance.

This matter is subject to a Council resolution on 28 August 2018 (Attachment B). Investigations are currently underway and these will be reported to Council.

Concerns about overdevelopment of the area and levels of change in the urban landscape. Low rise dwellings should not be replaced with apartment blocks. This will decrease neighbourhood amenity.

 

The Planning Proposal seeks to amend the Heritage Map (Sheet HER_007) and associated LEP provisions.

 

The Planning Proposal does not propose changes to the R2 Low Density Residential Zoning.

 

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage.

In accordance with the Gateway Determination, The Office of Environment and Heritage was notified about the Planning Proposal.  No objections to the Planning Proposal were raised (Attachment D). No other submissions were received from public authorities.

 

Not Supportive of a Change to the LEP

Key points and issues raised in objection to the Planning Proposal are summarised in the table overleaf. 

 

Summary of matters raised in submissions

Council Officer’s response

Properties identified as heritage significant are unable to undertake building works such as alterations and additions and this is taking away property rights.

Properties that are heritage listed or within a heritage conservation area are not prohibited from undertaking future works. Council’s objectives and controls for heritage items and conservation areas are specified in legislation (RLEP 2012 Clause 5.10) and Part B2 Heritage of the RDCP 2013). The controls are not intended to prevent change, only to manage it and ensure outcomes meet heritage conservation provisions and guidelines. Council recognises that owners need to adapt properties to meet current living standards (such as renovating bathrooms and kitchens, enlarging living areas and additional bedrooms etc.).

Properties identified as having heritage significance negatively impacts an individual property values.

Research undertaken in the past suggests that over time, heritage listing generally has a positive impact on property values and often this is reflected in real estate advertising as a potential benefit (Office of Environment and Heritage “Heritage Listing: A Positive for Owners” available at: https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/Heritage/listings/benefitowners.htm).

The proposal to list properties does not provide an overall community benefit.

Heritage studies (as included in the Planning Proposal – Attachment E) have identified the properties as having heritage significance.

Heritage assessments based on research and investigations have concluded that the extension of the conservation area is appropriate given that the houses collectively provide visual evidence of the early twentieth century residential development of this area of Coogee characterised by the popular Queen Anne and Arts and Crafts architectural styles. In relation to the proposed heritage listings of the four properties, these have also been assessed as meeting the NSW Heritage Assessment criteria for listing items of environmental heritage. The properties have been identified as exhibiting significance in relation to historical significance, aesthetic significance, social significance, representiveness and integrity.

 

Submission - 38 Dudley Street, Coogee (owner)

Council received a written submission from the property owner of 38 Dudley Street, Coogee. The owner objects to the Planning Proposal on the basis that:

 

·         The property does not qualify for listing as it is unremarkable and similar to many other homes in Coogee.

·         The proposed listing will create negative financial impacts.

·         Heritage listing will erode property rights.

 

These matters raised have been addressed in the table above.

 

The owner has stated that they intended to carry out development on the property and have purchased the property with this in mind prior to being informed of the proposed heritage listing. Council planning staff have offered to meet the owner of the property to provide advice on the proposed heritage listing. These meetings were offered on 21 March 2018 when Council staff were undertaking preliminary consultation, and also on 15/06/2018 in response to correspondence received by Matt Thistlewaite, Member for Kingsford Smith on behalf of the property owners. The owner has yet to contact planning staff to arrange such a meeting.

 

Submission from Lindsay Taylor Lawyers on behalf of 38 Dudley Street, Coogee

Council received a letter of objection from Lindsay Taylor Lawyers on behalf of the property owners of 38 Dudley Street, Coogee. The submission included a heritage assessment for 38 Dudley Street, Coogee prepared by Weir Phillips Heritage. The Heritage Assessment concludes that the property, when assessed against the NSW Heritage Division Criteria, does not meet the threshold for listing as a local heritage item under RLEP 2012. The assessment also states that the proposed listing is onerous due to the presence of structural issues within the premises.  The submission states that Council should give significant weight to this heritage report as it contains a complete assessment of the property. This submission also advises that there may be grounds to challenge the validity of the proposed listing of 38 Dudley Street, Coogee.

 

In response to the submission by Lindsay Taylor Lawyers Council engaged Colin Brady of Architecture + Planning to undertake a Peer Review of the Weir Phillips Heritage Assessment for 38 Dudley Street, Coogee (Attachment F). The review concludes that 38 Dudley Street, Coogee is considered to be of local heritage significance as the property satisfies Criterion (a) Historical Significance and (c) Aesthetic Significance under the NSW Heritage Division Criteria. The review disagrees with the Weir Phillips assessment for the following reasons:

 

·         The Weir Phillips Heritage Assessment does not address the important value of the subject property relative to the adjoining significant properties within the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area or its proposed extension. 

·         The heritage significance has not been sufficiently diminished by the recent removal of the high quality leadlight glazing and the replacement with unsympathetic metal framed glazing, the enclosure of the front veranda and changes to the internal finishes to nullify its significance. Council’s consultant states that the alterations are reversible.

·         The Weir Phillips assessment is contradictory in assessing the aesthetic character and quality of the residence. There is a substantial focus on altered fabric with little or no weighting given to the identified quality of other important elements such as the original moulded ceilings, timber joinery, flooring, fireplaces and overall building form.

 

Council’s Heritage Planner is in agreement with the peer review carried out by Colin Brady of Architecture + Planning that 38 Dudley Street, Coogee meets Criterion (a) and Criterion (c) of the NSW Heritage Assessment Criteria for an item to be of local heritage significance.

 

In relation to the process for preparation of the Planning Proposal, Council’s lawyers have advised that the NSW statutory requirements for notification and preparation of the Planning Proposal have been satisfied.

 

Merits of Planning Proposal

The properties at 38, 42 and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee have been assessed as satisfying the NSW Heritage Council’s Criteria for local heritage significance and therefore listed as local heritage items. The properties 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street Coogee have been identified as having heritage values that contribute to the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area, therefore warranting their inclusion in the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area. This has been supported by consultant heritage reports that have identified these properties as exhibiting significance in relation to historical significance, aesthetic significance, social significance, representativeness and integrity. However, one of the property owners in the proposed conservation area does not support the heritage listing. Notwithstanding the objections to the proposed conservation area, Council’s heritage assessment has concluded that it will be a valuable addition to Council’s list of areas, it is appropriate to proceed with its listing.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 7:  Heritage that is protected and celebrated.

Direction 7a: Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The costs to date associated with the heritage assessments has been approximately $6,000. The costs associated with processing the Planning Proposal have been accommodated within Council’s operational budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council has undertaken a comprehensive consultation on the Planning Proposal. The outcomes of this consultation have demonstrated that there is general support to amend RLEP 2012 to extend the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street Coogee, and to list 38, 42, and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

Heritage assessments based on research and investigations have concluded that the extension of the conservation area is appropriate given that the houses collectively provide visual evidence of the early twentieth century residential development of this area of Coogee characterised by the popular Queen Anne and Arts and Crafts architectural styles. In relation to 38 Dudley Street, Coogee, a more detailed assessment involving internal inspection has concluded that this property specifically qualifies as being significant in relation to historical significance (Criteria a) and aesthetic significance (criteria c) (despite recent modifications which are reversible). However, one of the owners of the properties in the proposed conservation area does not support its heritage listing. Notwithstanding the objections to the proposed conservation area, as Council’s heritage assessments have concluded that it will be a valuable addition to Council’s list of heritage areas, it is appropriate to proceed with its listing.

 

It is accordingly recommended that Council exercise the functions of the Minister for Planning under section 3.36 (2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 in relation to making the new LEP.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Council endorse the Planning Proposal (Attachment E) as exhibited, which proposes to amend the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to extend the boundary of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street Coogee, and to list 38, 42, and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

b)       Council exercise the delegation of the Minister for Planning’s functions under s59 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 to make the Local Environmental Plan.

 

Attachment/s:

1.

Attachment A - Submissions Table

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

2.

Attachment B - Action Sheet NM64 18 Notice of Motion - Heritage Reports for 37-41 Dudley and 144-150 Brook Streets Coogee

 

3.

Attachment C - Gateway Determination

 

4.

Attachment D - Submission - Office of Environment and Heritage

 

5.

Attachment E - Planning Proposal

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

6.

Attachment F -  38 Dudley Street Coogee Peer Review - Colin Brady Architecture + Planning

 

 

 

 


Attachment B - Action Sheet NM64 18 Notice of Motion - Heritage Reports for 37-41 Dudley and 144-150 Brook Streets Coogee

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Attachment C - Gateway Determination

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Attachment D - Submission - Office of Environment and Heritage

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Attachment F -  38 Dudley Street Coogee Peer Review - Colin Brady Architecture + Planning

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP57/18

 

 

Subject:                      Heritage Study of properties in Dudley Street and Brook Street, Coogee

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2016/00475

Author:                          David Ongkili, Coordinator Strategic Planning     

 

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Ordinary Council Meeting of 28 August 2018 resolved the following:

 

“(Matson/Veitch) that:

 

a)       Council commences a heritage study of the following dwellings in Coogee for the purpose of publicly exhibiting a proposal to amend Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to include them as listed heritage items:

 

·      37 Dudley Street, Coogee

·      39 Dudley Street, Coogee

·      41 Dudley Street, Coogee

·      144 Brook Street, Coogee

·      146 Brook Street, Coogee

·      146A Brook Street, Coogee

·      148 Brook Street, Coogee

·      150 Brook Street, Coogee

 

b)       subsequently, Council, as part of its LEP review, undertake a Heritage Study to determine whether there should be any new heritage items or conservation areas in the LGA.”

 

The aerial map below illustrates the extent of the properties referred to in the Council resolution:

 

Figure 1: Aerial photograph of the subject sites (37, 39, 41 Dudley Street and 144, 146, 148, and 150 Brook Street, Coogee)

A heritage assessment of the above listed properties has been prepared by Council’s Heritage Planner for the dwellings at Nos. 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, and 144, 146A and 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street. The correct individual addresses of the properties referred to in the Council resolution as “146 and 146a Brook Street” are 146A and 146B Brook Street. 

 

Issues

 

Community Consultation

Letters were sent by Council to the owners of the subject properties, dated 18 September 2018, in order to advise them of Council’s resolution to commence a heritage study of their properties, and to seek their consent to access the subject sites.

 

Positive responses were received from 37 and 41 Dudley Street, and 144, 146A and 146B and 150 Brook Street. No responses were received from 148 Brook Street and access was denied from the owners of 39 Dudley Street, Coogee.

 

Site inspections of 144 Brook Street and 41 Dudley Street were carried out on 2 October 2018. Nos. 146A and 146B Brook Street were viewed on 4 October, No.37 Dudley was inspected 17 October 2018 and No 150 Brook Street was viewed on 25 October 2018.

 

Research and methodology

The heritage study is based on desktop research and investigations and has relied on Council’s historical records, publically available information and resources such as the Land Title, Sands Directory, NSW State Library subdivision maps, online maps, real estate photographs (2018), as well as street view observations and site inspections carried out to a number of properties on 2, 4, 17 and 25 October 2018. The heritage study is at Attachment 1.

 

The information collected is in Table 1, Appendix 1 of the Heritage Study as attached and includes a description of each individual site, its current condition, as well as any known subdivision, development history and photographs, accessed during site visits as well as any publicly available and recent internal images online.

 

For this heritage study each building has been categorised as being either ‘contributory’, ‘neutral’ or ‘uncharacteristic’ based on the information available and documented. As explained in the table below, a “contributory” rating essentially denotes that the study finds a property to be from the main development period of the investigation, in this case, the Interwar period, and that the property is highly/substantially intact or, if altered, still recognisable and reversible. A property with a “contributory” rating essentially meets a level of significance that would contribute to an area as a heritage item in its own right or as a contributing item in the overall character of a heritage conservation area. 

 

A “neutral” rating means that a property is from the main development period but heavily altered as to be irreversible or from a period outside the main development period but reflects the predominant scale and form of other buildings in a Heritage Conservation Area and does not detract from the character of a Heritage Conservation Area.

 

A property that is rated as “uncharacteristic” essentially would be from a period outside the main development period and have scale, form and materials that is not consistent with the key characteristics of the Heritage Conservation Area.

 

Summary of findings

Following investigations and site inspections of the properties listed in Council’s resolution, the properties were rated in terms of the three assessment categories in the following summary of findings:

 

Nos. 37, 39, 41 Dudley Street, Coogee

·      No. 37 Dudley Street was modified throughout during the latter part of the twentieth century. Although it retains its original layout within the front portion, along with internal timber joinery and fretwork, the dwelling comprises additions to its rear, upper floor level extension and rendered brick. The heritage study rates the heritage significance of the building as “neutral”.

 

·      No.39 Dudley Street has no development history available in Council’s records, however, publicly available internal photographs indicate that the dwelling is substantially intact and will provide a good example of an Inter-War bungalow. While access to the site was unable to be obtained, recent real-estate marketing images (listed April 2018) show that internally the dwelling retains many of the original significant features including timber floors, skirtings, architraves, decorative ceiling detail, decorative timber fretting to hallway arch and living room entrance,  leadlight windows to internal French doors features, timber fireplace mantel. It also shows these elements are in very good condition. Images indicate that there were some later fit-out alterations to the kitchen area. Real-estate floor plan images also show that the dwelling has retained a typical floor plan for an early twentieth century bungalow dwelling. Additionally, historical land titles records indicate that the site (Lot B) was one of three lots (A, B and C) formed in 1921 following the formation of lots 12 and 13 of the Edgecumbe Estate Subdivision in 1920. The site was originally owned by James Joseph Farell (May 1921), however by July the same year the property was owned by Elma Joseph Seaton. EJ Seaton appears within the Sands Directory in 1923 as the site’s first occupant in 1923. The site was then owned by Earnest Richard Walken until 1966.  There is no significant history recorded on the life of early owners or occupants of the site. The heritage study rates the heritage significance of the building as “contributory”. In view of this assessment, the property at No. 39 Dudley Street is determined to be significant in terms of the historical, aesthetic and representative criteria of the NSW Heritage Office guidelines for assessing heritage significance and therefore warrants local heritage listing. Historically, the property is associated with a significant historical phase being the Interwar period and expresses this through its association with an identifiable group comprising Nos. 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street (all likely to have been constructed between 1922 and 1923). With matching Interwar architectural characteristics including double fronted battened gables, consistent landscaped front setbacks, brick construction and timber framed casement bay windows to the font elevation, No 39 Dudley Street exemplifies outstanding continuity in this historical process. Aesthetically, the property shows distinctive aesthetic qualities in its form/composition including the retention of a characteristic floor plan of an early twentieth century Interwar bungalow and exemplifies this particular architectural style outstandingly well. Additionally, being part of a group of sub-divided properties at No 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, No. 39 Dudley Street is representative of suburban development in Coogee that was significantly driven by the extension of the tramline to Coogee.

 

·      No. 41 Dudley Street retains many of its original architectural features including timber paneling, joinery, flooring, electrical hardware and fireplaces. Some elements such as paint and plaster along the ceilings and walls are peeling and there is some evidence (internally and externally) of cracking within the brick work. The kitchen area has also been partially modified with the installation of a mid-twentieth century benchtop, however, overall, the dwelling represents a largely unaltered example of an Inter-War bungalow which demonstrates considerable aesthetic value to the Dudley Street streetscape.   Additionally, historical land titles records indicate that the site (Lot C) was one of three lots (A, B and C) formed in 1921 following the formation of lots 12 and 13 of the Edgecumbe Estate Subdivision in 1920. The site was originally owned by Peter Soulos 1921-1929. The name Peter Soulos first appears in the Sand Directory in 1923. The name appears below ‘Edgecumbe Street’ within the Dudley Street listing (which suggests that the property may have previously had an Edgecumbe Street address.  By 1928, the same name appears next to the No.41 (still identified as being east of Edgecumbe Street). However, by 1932/33 the Sands Directory shows that nos.37, 39 and 41 are all west of Edgecumbe Avenue, and that No.41 continued to be  The heritage study rates the heritage significance of the building as “contributory”. In view of this assessment, the property at No. 41 Dudley Street is determined to be significant in terms of the historical, aesthetic and representative criteria of the NSW Heritage Office guidelines for assessing heritage significance and therefore warrants local heritage listing. Historically, the property is associated with a significant historical phase being the Interwar period and expresses, through its fabric, exceptional continuity in this historical process as evidence from its largely unaltered presentation as an Inter-War bungalow. Aesthetically, the property shows distinctive aesthetic qualities through its original architectural features including timber paneling, joinery, flooring, electrical hardware and fireplaces. It exemplifies the Interwar architectural style exceptionally well. Furthermore, given its location in the group of sub-divided properties at Nos 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, the property is also representative of suburban development in Coogee that was significantly driven by the extension of the tramline to Coogee.

 

Nos. 144, 146 and 150 Brook Street, Coogee

·      No.144 Brook Street is occupied by two buildings. The first building is a two storey Inter-War residential flat building with frontage to Brook Street comprising four units, originally known as ‘Minmi Flats’, constructed between 1915 and 1920  The Sands Directory indicates that the building was known as ‘Kelvin Court’ from 1928. While some of the units had been modified in part, the two units at first floor level retained many original features including original internal layout, timber doors, joinery, electrical hardware and flooring (particularly in the primary living spaces). It was also evident that the building’s frontage had undergone substantial changes with the infill of the balconies, application of roughcast render and alterations to the entrance stairs. The heritage study rates the heritage significance of the building as “neutral”. The second building is a two storey mid-twentieth century duplex located at the rear of the site with frontage to Edgecumbe Avenue and known as 1-3 Edgecumbe Avenue. While access to No 1-3 Edgecumbe Avenue was not obtained, publically available photos show that the dwelling contains minimal original or significant fabric.

 

·      No 146A and 146B comprises two dwelling units in a two storey duplex building known as ‘Rosalie Flats’ and first appears within the Sands Directory at No.146 Brook Street in 1930, however Council’s records indicate that the flats were completed in 1928. The land was further subdivided in 1954 with the lot fronting Brook Street now  known as No. 146 Brook Street, and the lot to the rear known as 5 Edgecumbe Avenue (occupied by a two storey Art Deco residential flat building ‘Roberta Flats’). Site observations and development history indicates the duplex building fronting Brook Street has undergone a number of external changes including the installation of a garage at lower ground level, as well as internal contemporary updating to kitchen and bathrooms. Both dwellings within this duplex building retain a high proportion of significant internal fabric including decorative ceiling detail, joinery and flooring and are in good condition. The heritage study rates the heritage significance of the building as “contributory”. Access to units 1 and 2 of No.1 Edgecumbe Avenue was not obtained, however photos of unit 2 are publically available and show that the dwelling contains minimal original or significant fabric.

 

·      No. 148 is a single storey Inter-War bungalow, constructed c.1925 and due to the slope of the land have an elevated frontage to Brook Street. The original occupants first appear within the Sands Directory in 1925 and the dwellings were known as No.150 and No.152 respectively. The dwellings are later identified nos.148 and 152 respectively following renumbering within the street in 1927. Publicly available internal photographs for No.148 Brook Street indicate that the dwelling has retained its original architectural details, internal layout and is in very good condition. Historically, the land formed part of original subdivision sale of Edgecumbe Estate in 1915, the land was further subdivided in 1922 to form two lots (Lots A and B DP305284). No. 148 Brook Street first appears within the Sands Directory in 1928 occupied by A Crawley (Medical Practitioner). A Crawley’s name first appears in 1925 as the listed occupant of No.150 Brook Street which suggests that the dwelling was likely to have been built at this time. Lots A and B, DP 305284 were known as 150 and 152 until 1927. House numbers changed along Brook Street after this time and the dwellings became known as No. 148 Brook Street (Lot B) and No. 150 Brook Street (Lot A). Aubrey Joseph Clarence Crawley was a registered Medical Practitioner (1896) and represented Sydney University in the NSW Premier Cricket (formerly known as Electoral Cricket and Sydney Grade Cricket) since its first season in 1893-94.The heritage study rates the heritage significance of the building as “contributory”. In view of this assessment, the property at No. 148 Brook Street is determined to be significant in terms of the historical and aesthetic criteria of the NSW Heritage Office guidelines for assessing heritage significance and therefore warrants local heritage listing. Historically, the property is associated with a significant historical phase being the Interwar period and expresses through its fabric, continuity in this historical process. Aesthetically, the property shows distinctive aesthetic qualities in its form/composition including its original architectural detail and internal layout thus exemplifying the Interwar architectural style exceptionally well.

 

·      No. 150 Brook Street is single storey Inter-War bungalow with sandstone base, painted face brick construction with brick and rendered verandah posts and a terracotta hipped and gabled roof form.  The dwelling has undergone a number of alterations and additions including some removal of internal walls, contemporary timber French doors to front verandah, as well as rear kitchen and living area extensions and swimming pool within the rear garden. A number of rooms within the front portion of the dwelling retain their decorative features including plaster ceilings, picture rails and windows and fireplace however it was also evident that parts the newer rear additions incorporated non-original, yet replica historical architectural features such as plaster ceiling detail, wall vents, wide timber skirtings timber window and door frames. The site retains its original building form and many of its significant external features to the front façade. Additionally, historical land records The land formed part of original subdivision sale of Edgecumbe Estate in 1915, and was further subdivided in 1922 to form two lots (Lots A and B DP305284). No. 150 Brook Street first appears within the Sands Directory in 1928 occupied by Chris Soulos and Mrs M. Stewart. Chris Soulos’s name first appears in 1925 as the listed occupant of No.152 Brook Street which suggests that the dwelling was likely to have been built at this time. Lots A and B were known as 150 and 150 Brook Street until 1927. House numbers changed along Brook Street in 1927 and by 1928 the dwellings were known as 148 (Lot B) and 150 (Lot A). The heritage study rates the heritage significance of the building as “contributory”.

 

Interim Heritage Order - No. 39 Dudley Street

In the course of undertaking the heritage study, on 5 October 2018, Council became aware from local residents of two Complying Development Certificate applications involving the proposed demolition of the existing dwellings at Nos. 37 and 39 Dudley Streets and construction of single residential dwellings on each property. The heritage study indicated that Nos. 37, 39 and 41 Dudley were likely to have been constructed between 1922 and 1923. The dwellings represent a small group of Inter-War bungalows with similar architectural characteristics including double fronted battened gables, consistent landscaped front setbacks, brick construction and timber framed casement bay windows to the font elevation. Additionally, as indicated in the preceding section, the study found that:

 

·      No. 37 Dudley Street was modified throughout during the latter part of the twentieth century. Although it retains its original layout within the front portion, along with internal timber joinery and fretwork, the dwelling comprises additions to its rear, upper floor level extension and rendered brick. On this basis, the dwelling was assessed as having a “neutral” building contribution rating.

 

·      No. 39 Dudley Street is substantially intact and, on this basis, provides a good example of an Inter-War bungalow. Publically available internal photographs indicate that the dwelling retains a significant proportion of original fabric. The dwelling was assessed as having a “contributory” building contribution rating.

 

On the basis of this assessment, Council considered that there were significant grounds for requesting the issuing of an Interim Heritage Order on No. 39 Dudley Street given its relatively intact condition as reflected in its “contributory” rating. However, it was considered that there were weaker reasons for requesting a similar order on the dwelling at No. 37 Dudley Street given its compromised condition at the rear and, hence, its “neutral” rating.

 

On the 8 October 2018, an Interim Heritage Order (IHO) (refer to Attachment 2) was placed on 39 Dudley Street (Lot B DP 301 192). The IHO was published in the Government Gazette on 8 October 2018 and is consistent with the provisions of the Heritage Act 1977 and the Heritage Council Guidelines. In particular, Section 25 of the Heritage Act 1977 authorises a Council to make an Interim Heritage Order for a building and/or place that Council considers may, on further inquiry or investigation, be found to be of  local heritage significance, and that the council considers is being or is likely to be harmed.

 

After the IHO was gazetted, Council undertook the following actions:

 

·      Notified the affected owner or occupier of the IHO and the notice is to include a statement as to the effect of the order and the reasons for making the order.

 

·      Published in a newspaper circulating in the area in which the building item is situated a notice of the making of the order.

 

·      Informed the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) of the IHO so it can be included in the Office’s IHO inventory

An IHO lasts for 6 months unless Council resolves to add the item to its LEP schedule, in which case, 12 months applies. Council can also revoke an IHO at any time. Council is also required to make a decision about whether to take further action to list the building/place as a heritage item on a Local Environmental Plan (LEP). This decision must be based on a heritage assessment prepared by a person with appropriate heritage knowledge, skills and experience who can be an employee of, or a consultant expert engaged by Council. In this regard, the subject Heritage Study has been prepared by Council’s Heritage Planner and concludes that No. 39 Dudley Street, and another two identified properties (at No 41 Dudley Street and No. 148 Brook Street) warrant heritage listing in the Randwick LEP 2012 Schedule. Furthermore, the Study recommends that all properties studied in the Heritage Study warrant inclusion as part of a Heritage Conservation Area.  

It should be noted that on 31 October 2018, the owners of No. 39 Dudley Street filed a Class 1 Application Appeal in the Land and Environment Court against the making of the Interim Heritage Order. The matter is listed for a directions hearing on 28 November 2018.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 7:  Heritage that is protected and celebrated.

Direction 7a: Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

Eight properties were investigated as part of the heritage study in line with the Council resolution. Six buildings were identified as having “contributory” value to the Inter-War character of the area and, together with the properties identified as “neutral”, are therefore recommended to be incorporated into a heritage conservation area. Additionally, in the group of six “contributory” buildings, three properties at Nos. 39 and 41 Dudley Street and No. 148 Brook Street were identified as of such significance as to warrant local heritage listing.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Council endorse the Heritage Study dated 25 October 2018 which recommends that 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street and 144, 146A, 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street Coogee be considered for incorporation into a heritage conservation area, and that 39 and 41 Dudley Street, and 148 Brook Street, Coogee, be considered for local heritage listing.

 

b)       Council prepare a Planning Proposal to amend the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to list and create a Heritage Conservation Area to incorporate 37, 39 and 41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 144, 146A, 146B, 148 and 150 Brook Street Coogee, and to list 39 and  41 Dudley Street, Coogee and 148 Brook Street, Coogee as local heritage items.

 

c)       Council refer the Planning Proposal to the Randwick Local Planning Panel (RLPP) for advice prior to resolving that it be forwarded for “Gateway Determination”.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Heritage Study of properties on the corner of Brook Street and Dudley Street, Coogee

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Director City Planning Report No. CP58/18

 

Subject:                      Police Request for Temporary Alcohol Restrictions

Folder No:                      F2005/00853

 

Author:                          Allan Graham, Coordinator Regulatory Projects

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this Report is to inform the Council that, as was the case last year, the Eastern Beaches Police Area Commander, Superintendent Karen McCarthy has requested that Council again consider implementing a temporary prohibition on the consumption of alcohol at all of Council’s beachside parks and reserves on Christmas Day and Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day and on Australia Day.

 

In this regard, Randwick City Council, at its Ordinary Meeting held on the 28 November 2017, resolved (on the Motion of Councillors Parker and Matson) that:

 

“a)      Pursuant to s. 632A (4) of the Local Government Act 1993, the Randwick City Council hereby declares that each of the parks and reserves contained in the Schedule of Parks and Reserves that attaches to this Report to be an alcohol prohibited area at which no alcohol is to be consumed, and will operate this year from:

i)        Midnight on the 24 December, ceasing at 6.00am on the 27 December, and

ii)       From Midnight on the 30 December 2017, ceasing at 6.00am on the 2 January 2018, and

iii)      From 8.00pm on the 25 January, ceasing at 6.00am on the 27 January.

 

b)       Pursuant to s. 632A (7) of the Local Government Act 1993, the General Manager install temporary notices at each of the parks and reserves, contained in the Schedule of Parks and Reserves that attaches to this Report, sufficient to give effect to the declaration of the Council at “a).”

 

c)       A public awareness advertising campaign be implemented to advise that the consumption of alcohol at all beachside parks and reserves is prohibited as provided for by the declaration contained at “a).”

 

d)       a report to come back to Council on the operation of 2017/18 measures considering the merits of this approach compared to previous approaches undertaken to the issue. This report would be prepared in close consultation with police.”

 

As a result of the above resolution, Council ‘declared’ an alcohol free footprint at the City’s beachside parks and reserves and in doing so provides Police with the “seizure and tip-out” powers conferred by s. 632A(1) of the Local Government Act 1993, which are exercisable within the ‘declared’ Alcohol Prohibited Area.

 

Essentially, Eastern Beaches Police have requested that the Council ‘declare’ the same areas to operate as temporary Alcohol Prohibited Areas over the up-coming Christmas and New Year period as it did so in November last year.  

 

Alcohol Prohibited Areas

Pursuant to s. 632A (4) of the Local Government Act 1993 (“LG Act”), a council may declare any public place (or any part of a public place) in the council’s area to be an alcohol prohibited area. However, an alcohol prohibited area cannot be established in relation to a public place that is a public road (or part of a public road) or car park.

 

A council may establish an alcohol free zone to operate over roads, public carparks and other road related areas under discrete provisions contained at Part 4 (Street drinking) of Chapter 16 of the LG Act. Randwick City Council has already a well-established network of roads and streets that are designated alcohol free zones. As was the case last year no changes to the current streets and roads designated as alcohol free zones are required as a result of the current Police request.

 

Alcohol Related Anti-social Behaviour

Randwick City Council has, for a number of years, imposed temporary alcohol restrictions at Coogee on specific dates to minimise the potential for alcohol related anti-social behaviour. Coogee’s popularity has always seen large crowds congregate at the beach and adjoining public spaces, particularly during the Festive Season and on Australia Day.

 

The implementation of these restrictions has always been conducted in consultation with our Police with the overarching objective being to ensure that access to our popular public spaces is equitable, enjoyable and safe. Measures put in place by Council, such as restricting alcohol consumption, assist Police in managing large gatherings in public places which in turn promotes equitable access and the safe use of these areas.  

 

The Temporary Ban Approach

The 2017/2018 Festive Season was the first occasion that Randwick City Council implemented a City-wide temporary alcohol ban at all of its beachside parks and reserves. As mentioned earlier in this Report these initiatives are not entirely novel as Council had put in place, for a number of years prior to the current total ban at Coogee, a temporary alcohol ban at Coogee and Clovelly during the Christmas/New Year period as these areas were historically the most prominent public areas that attracted large numbers of people.

 

However, with the total ban on alcohol at Coogee being now well-known the City’s other beachside areas have become popular destinations for people to congregate in large numbers and consume alcohol. The rationale for the requested City-wide temporary alcohol ban is that this greatly assists Police in controlling problematic drinking in public areas.

 

As such, it is the recommendation of Council officers’ that the Council agrees to the Police request and put in place a “temporary” alcohol prohibition by extending the time that the existing alcohol restrictions operate at all beach side parks and reserves by utilising the alcohol prohibited area provisions contained at Part 2 of Chapter 16 of the LG Act. It is proposed that should Council make the declaration sought by Police that establishes the temporary alcohol prohibited areas that these restrictions operate in perpetuity each year. Should the Council wish to modify or revoke the operation of an alcohol prohibited area at a future date, the Council may do so by a subsequent resolution. 

 

A Schedule to this Report has been created which identifies all of the City’s beachside parks and reserves (save for those areas which have a total prohibition on the consumption of alcohol currently in place) to which the proposed declaration, if made, would apply and covers the beachside parks and reserves from the suburbs of Clovelly to Yarra Bay. These parks and reserves are as follows:

 

·         Burrows Park – Clovelly

·         Bundock Park – Clovelly

·         Gordons Bay Reserve - Clovelly and Coogee

·         Jack Vanny Reserve – Maroubra

·         Arthur Byrne Reserve – Maroubra

·         Cromwell Park – Malabar

·         Yarra Recreation Reserve - La Perouse

 

Should the Council declare the above parks and reserves to be temporary alcohol prohibited areas as requested by police, this declaration will work in unison with the current ‘permanent’ alcohol prohibition that operates at all of Council’s beaches and the beachside reserves at Coogee and Yarra Bay.

 

It follows that should the Council declare to make all of the City’s beachside parks and reserves as requested by Police, sufficient signs that comply with s. 632A (7) of the LG Act must be erected at each park of reserve as Council did last year. It is also recommended that Council implement a public awareness strategy so that the community and broader public are informed that the proposed restrictions apply to all of Council’s beaches and adjacent parks and reserves.

 

Rangers and Waste Services

Police have also requested that Council provide additional waste and Ranger Services to assist Police during the Christmas/New Year Period. In this regard, Council’s Manager – Health Building and Regulatory Services will consult with Police to make suitable arrangements to accommodate this request. Council’s Manager – Waste and Cleaning Services has advised that there will be an increase in staff and bins to address any waste concerns during this period.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

The cost for Council to erect (install) temporary signs at all of the beachside parks and reserves will be approximately $20,000. No funding for this purpose has been allocated within Council’s existing budget.

 

The costs associated with the allocation of addition Waste and Rangers resources will be provided within the relevant existing budgets.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:                  A Liveable City.

Direction 6c:                 The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programmes and strategies.

Key Actions:                 Implement actions identified in the Council’s crime prevention and community safety plan (A Safer Randwick City) to reduce anti-social behaviour and foster a safer city.

 

Conclusion

 

Eastern Beaches Local Area Command Police have requested that Council impose a temporary prohibition on the consumption of alcohol at all of the City’s beachside parks and reserves to operate over the 2018/2019 Christmas Day and Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day and Australia Day period. The proposed temporary alcohol ban sought by Police is a replication of the same alcohol controls that Council put in place over the 2017/2018 Festive and New Year period.

 

The proposed temporary alcohol prohibition at the City’s beachside parks and reserves will provide Police with the seizure and tip-out powers conferred by s. 632A(1) of the Local Government Act 1993. This in turn will provide Police with the ability to address problematic public drinking and thereby proactively reduce the likelihood for instances of alcohol related anti-social behaviour occurring in these public spaces.

 

It is proposed that should Council make the declaration sought by Police that establishes the temporary alcohol prohibited areas that these restrictions operate in perpetuity each year until such time as Council resolves otherwise.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Pursuant to s. 632A (4) of the Local Government Act 1993, the Randwick City Council hereby declares that each of the parks and reserves contained in the Schedule of Parks and Reserves that attaches to this Report is to be an alcohol prohibited area at which no alcohol is to be consumed, and will operate each and every year on the following dates, from:

 

i)        Midnight on the 24 December 2018, ceasing at 6.00am on the 27 December 2018, and

ii)       From Midnight on the 30 December 2018, ceasing at 6.00am on the 2 January 2019, and

iii)      From 8.00pm on the 25 January 2019, ceasing at 6.00am on the 27 January 2019.

 

b)       Pursuant to s. 632A (7) of the Local Government Act 1993, the General Manager shall install temporary notices at each of the parks and reserves, contained in the Schedule of Parks and Reserves that attaches to this Report, sufficient to give effect to the declaration of the Council.

 

c)       A public awareness advertising campaign be carried out to inform the public that the consumption of alcohol at all beaches as well as beachside parks and reserves is prohibited as provided for by the declaration contained at “a).”

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Schedule of Parks & Reserves Declared as Alcohol Prohibited Areas - OMC 27 November 2018

 

 

 

 


Schedule of Parks & Reserves Declared as Alcohol Prohibited Areas - OMC 27 November 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP59/18

 

 

Subject:                      Post Exhibition Report: Smart City Strategy

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2017/00299

Author:                          Rebecca Jacobs, Environmental Planning Officer     

 

 

Introduction

 

This report provides an overview of the outcomes of the public exhibition of the Draft Smart City Strategy and presents a final Smart City Strategy (Attachment 1) for Council’s endorsement. Council undertook two periods of community engagement (March-May 2018 and September-October 2018) to inform the preparation of the Strategy.

 

Background

Preliminary Consultation

 

Council’s internal Smart City Working Group, established in 2017, has been driving, developing and fostering collaboration and communication on smart city initiatives across the organisation.

 

Initial consultation was carried out between March and May 2018 with staff, the community, businesses and key stakeholders (Mayor’s Roundtable, May 2018) to inform the Draft Smart City Strategy. Engagement sessions were facilitated by Delos Delta, a prominent Australian smart city consultant with experience working with local government on smart city strategies and implementation.

 

442 community members visited the dedicated Your Say web page, 137 community members completed an online survey and 7 community members attended a facilitated workshop. Overall, the community and staff were very supportive of Council’s initiative to develop a smart city strategy and use smart technology to improve Council’s business operation and the way our community interacts with the urban environment.

 

The insightful and intense two-month consultation program shaped and informed the vision, priorities, actions and objectives of the Draft Smart City Strategy.

 

Smart City Strategy Promotion

 

Council has run a series of other events to inform the community and to raise the profile of Council’s smart city work program. These events have included:

 

·      A seminar in July 2018, by visiting smart city expert from Copenhagen, Rasmus Bertlesen, hosted by Council, regarding implementing a collaborative living lab.

·      A spatial data and living lab forum at UNSW which was co-sponsored by Council and included a presentation by Council staff on Council’s use of data and mapping and the preparation of the Draft Smart City Strategy.

·      Presentation at the Randwick Eco Living Expo in September 2018 by smart city expert, Johanna Pitman, and a Council staff member, on the benefits of smart city projects and the preparation of the Draft Smart City Strategy.

 

Public Exhibition Process

 

On 25 September 2018, Council resolved the following:

 

RESOLUTION: (Andrews/Hamilton) that Council endorse the Draft Smart City Strategy for public exhibition.

 

The Draft Strategy was placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days, from Wednesday 26 September to Tuesday 23 October 2018. Consultation activities included:

·      Dedicated Your Say web page (yoursayrandwick.nsw.gov.au/smartcities) which received 659 visits and 572 unique visitors; the Draft Strategy was downloaded 227 times and the Engagement Report downloaded 78 times.

·      Advertising in The Southern Courier.

·      Presentations to the Youth Advisory Committee, the Elderly Advisory Committee and the Access Advisory Committee.

·      Randwick News email bulletin sent to 22,000 subscribers, with 88 unique clicks on the article.

·      Social media post with 1410 people reached and 14 engagements (clicked, shared or commented on).

·      Notification to all Resident Precinct Committees.

·      Targeted email to attendees of the preliminary consultation and to all Your Say Randwick subscribers (3040 recipients).

·      Hard copies of the Draft Strategy were available at the Council Administration Building and all libraries.

 

Submissions

 

There were 19 submissions received on the Draft Smart City Strategy, 12 from the Your Say Randwick webpage and 7 submissions received via email to the Council.

 

A number of submissions complimented the Strategy, and others made suggestions for additional matters to be addressed in the Strategy. Some submissions raised matters that have been referred to other Council departments, including suggestions regarding transport, sustainability and community facilities. One negative submission was received, which was critical of the light rail and of Council’s expenditure on road and streetscape upgrades. It did not directly address the Strategy.

 

The submissions received and the consultation undertaken has informed the following changes to the Strategy:

·      The addition of a new objective 26 under the theme ‘Moving around’ to improve access and mobility for a diverse community.

·      The addition of two new ideas, 26(a) to encourage the provision of charging facilities in public and private spaces for mobility aids, and 26(b) to produce a public map of accessible parking spaces and kerb ramps.

·      The addition of a new idea, 17(e) to support the gathering of relevant visitor information for Malabar Headland to improve community access and knowledge of the site.

 

Minor changes have been made to the Draft Strategy, to respond to submissions or to improve the clarity of the document. The detailed description of the consultation process has been reduced to reflect the finalized nature of the document.

 

Implementation

 

In 2018, Council adopted the Digital Strategy, which provides the resourcing framework for adopting new technologies and work practices to enhance the way we do business and provide services to our customers. The Smart City Strategy builds on the objectives and projects identified in the Digital Strategy and looks beyond Council’s technological capabilities and infrastructure needs to address the wide range of priorities identified in the Randwick City Plan.

 

An assessment methodology has been developed by the Smart City Working Group for prioritising smart city projects. The assessment criteria will be used to rate and categorise ideas based on their cost, benefits and capacity for Council to deliver the project. The progress of the Smart City Strategy will be documented through the integrated planning and reporting framework. 

 

The Smart City Working Group will continue operating to coordinate the implementation of the Strategy and liaise with the Digital Strategy staff steering group on matters such as governance, resourcing and specific projects.

 


 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:  A liveable City.

Direction 6a: Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

All smart city project ideas (Appendix A of the Strategy) will be assessed, including financial implications, to assist in prioritising. High priority projects will be included in the Delivery Program and one-year Operational Plan for funding.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council has undertaken a comprehensive consultation (preliminary consultation and formal exhibition) on the Smart City Strategy. The Strategy identifies how Council can embrace change and leverage our existing programs, partnerships and assets to plan, enhance, improve, monitor and report within a quickly changing digital landscape.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)       Endorse the final Smart City Strategy; and

 

b)       Agree that the Director City Planning may make minor modifications to rectify any numerical, typographical, interpretation and formatting errors if required, in the finalisation and printing of the Strategy.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Smart City Strategy

 

 

 

 


Smart City Strategy

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director City Services Report No. CS52/18

 

 

Subject:                      Road Maintenance - Reporting

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2004/08251

Author:                          Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

Council at its ordinary meeting held in May 2018, resolved as follows:

 

“(Stavrinos/Hamilton) that Council:

 

a)       bring back a report on ways in which Council can enhance communication with residents, in relation to road maintenance and footpath repairs, so that potholes, irregularities and rough surfaces can be addressed more efficiently;

 

b)       as part of this report consider conducting more surveys and greater consultation with the community, so that residents can report matters in a more timely manner.

 

c)       promote through its communication channels, contact details for RMS with a list of RMS Controlled Roads and Streets in our City, so that residents can lodge concerns directly with the appropriate government agency.”

 

This report outlines road pavement management responsibilities, Council practices, access to information and ways that the community can make requests.

 

Issues

 

Background

Randwick City has an extensive road network throughout the local government area.  The length and classification of the roads is:

 

·      Local roads                   271.1km

·      Regional Roads             26.4km

·      State Roads                  20.8km

·      Other                    3km (Housing NSW, Port Authority of NSW or NSW

Department of Industry – Crown Lands)

 

Council is responsible for the maintenance and upgrade of local and regional roads while other authorities are responsible for the other roads. The Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) is responsible for the road pavement along state roads whilst Council manages the footpaths.

 

This information including the list of State Roads and the NSW Roads and Maritime Services’ (RMS) contact details to allow direct reporting to RMS are provided on our website. The link is www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/services/roads/council-responsibilities. From experience and based on our current systems, we have found that the community prefer to report matters to Council and our officers refer the matter to the other authorities.

 

Road Management

Randwick Council has an Asset Management Strategy and a suite of Asset Management Plans that outline our approach to lifecycle management of our infrastructure assets.  The plans set out a proactive framework allowing us to deliver assets that are safe, functional and in a condition that meets the community’s expectation.  By implementing these plans, we minimise defects and maintenance requirements.

 

Generally, we inspect and assess 20% of the network each year for major asset classes.  This assessment identifies localised defects that are added to a planned maintenance program and provides the overall asset condition used to plan and fund renewals.

 

Damage and defects to our infrastructure assets is also reported by the community.  These requests are assessed and scheduled for repairs as part of our reactive maintenance programs.

 

Customer Requests

Randwick Council has a strong customer focus to ensure that we can deliver services that meet the community expectations.

 

We provide numerous ways in which the community can contact Council to report damage and make requests for road maintenance.  These include:

 

·      Councillors

·      Customer service centre

·      Call Centre

·      Written correspondence (letter, email, social media)

·      Website

·      Randwick Council app

 

The requests are entered into our Customer Request Management (CRM) system and distributed to the responsible officers to action.  Our mobility solution allows an effective and timely method of distributing Work Requests to work teams including the capturing of work completion.

 

For the 2017-18 financial year the maintenance requests statistics for roads are presented in the following table.

 

Request Type

Requests (No.)

Service Level Agreement (SLA) (Days)

Completed within SLA (%)

Pothole

599

3

90.82

Road Pavement

128

7

91.41

Footpath

942

15

94.48

Kerb and Gutter

129

20

91.47

Note: The request numbers include requests raised by council staff.

 

These statistics indicate that our existing system allows us to capture a significant number of requests and we are able to complete the requests at a rate of over 90% within our service levels.

 

Community Consultation and Community Awareness

Randwick Council conducts Community Research to determine community attitudes and perceptions towards current and future services.  The survey helps set our service levels and to prioritise areas that require improvement.  The report confirmed that maintaining local roads is important to the local community.  The report also indicated that the community satisfaction for maintenance of local roads is higher than the LGA Benchmark.

 

Each year, we place our capital works program on public exhibition and seek community feedback.  The number and types of submissions indicate that the community is generally satisfied with our road program

 

Other consultations with the community to seek feedback on our services includes the City Plan review including our Resourcing Plan. 

 

System and process improvement

There are plans to improve reporting of road maintenance requests by introducing an online form that will be available on our website.  The community will be able to access this online form from a personal computer or mobile device.  The form will have similar functionality to the existing online forms under our Rubbish and Recycling area of our website.

 

The development of the online forms will include functionality to identify roads that are managed by RMS and allow the requestor to contact RMS directly.  The online form will integrate with our existing CRM system.

 

This proposed process improvement will provide additional flexibility for our community on how they can report road maintenance issues.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:           A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:          Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no financial impact to Council.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick Council has effective policies, plans and work practices to maintain the quality of our roads at a high standard to meet the community’s expectation.

 

We have various communication channels to allow the community to contact us about any of our services including road maintenance. It is planned to provide additional flexibility for the community by introducing online forms for submission of requests.

 

The forms will integrate with our work delivery systems that are currently enabling council to complete over 90% of requests within our service levels.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO61/18

 

Subject:                      Code of Conduct Complaint Statistics

Folder No:                      F2004/06569

Author:                          David Kelly, Manager Administrative Services     

 

Introduction

 

Under part 11 of the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct (Reporting on Complaints Statistics), Council's complaints coordinator must arrange for the following statistics to be reported to the council within 3 months of the end of September of each year:

 

“11.1 The complaints coordinator must arrange for the following statistics to be reported to the council within 3 months of the end of September of each year:

 

a)   The total number of code of conduct complaints made about councillors and the general manager under the code of conduct in the year to September (the reporting period)

b)   The number of code of conduct complaints referred to a conduct reviewer during the reporting period

c)   The number of code of conduct complaints finalised by a conduct reviewer at the preliminary assessment stage during the reporting period and the outcome of those complaints

d)   The number of code of conduct complaints investigated by a conduct reviewer during the reporting period

e)   Without identifying particular matters, the outcome of investigations completed under these procedures during the reporting period

f)    The number of matters reviewed by the Office during the reporting period and, without identifying particular matters, the outcome of the reviews, and

g)   The total cost of dealing with code of conduct complaints made about councillors and the general manager during the reporting period, including staff costs.

 

11.2   The council is to provide the Office with a report containing the statistics referred to in clause 11.1 within 3 months of the end of September each year.”

 

The following is a summary of Code of Conduct complaint statistics for the period September 2017 to September 2018:

 

Part 11.1 - Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct (Reporting on Complaints Statistics)

Sept 2017 -

Sept 2018

 

Number of Complaints

 

 

1

a

The total number of complaints received in the period about councillors and the General Manager (GM) under the code of conduct

 

 

b

The total number of complaints finalised in the period about councillors and the GM under the code of conduct

 

Overview of Complaints and Cost

 

 

2

a

The number of complaints finalised at the outset by alternative means by the GM or Mayor

 

 

b

The number of complaints referred to the Office of Local Government under a special complaints management arrangement

 

 

c

The number of code of conduct complaints referred to a conduct reviewer

 

 

d

The number of code of conduct complaints finalised at preliminary assessment by conduct reviewer

 

 

e

The number of code of conduct complaints referred back to GM or Mayor for resolution after preliminary assessment by conduct reviewer

 

 

f

The number of finalised code of conduct complaints investigated by a conduct reviewer

 

 

g

The number of finalised code of conduct complaints investigated by a conduct review committee

 

 

h

The number of finalised complaints investigated where there was found to be no breach

 

 

i

The number of finalised complaints investigated where there was found to be a breach

 0

 

 

j

The number of complaints referred by the GM or Mayor to another agency or body such as the ICAC, the NSW Ombudsman, the Office or the Police

 

 

k

The number of complaints being investigated that are not yet finalised

 

 

l

The total cost of dealing with code of conduct complaints within the period made about councillors and the GM including staff costs

$2,000 

Preliminary Assessment Statistics

 

 

3

The number of  complaints determined by the conduct reviewer at the preliminary assessment stage by each of the following actions:

 

 

 

a

To take no action

 

 

b

To resolve the complaint by alternative and appropriate strategies

 

 

c

To refer the matter back to the GM or the Mayor, for resolution by alternative and appropriate strategies

 0

 

 

d

To refer the matter to another agency or body such as the ICAC, the NSW Ombudsman, the Office or the Police

 0

 

 

e

To investigate the matter

 0

 

 

f

To recommend that the complaints coordinator convene a conduct review committee to investigate the matter

 0

 

Investigation Statistics

 

 

4

The number of investigated complaints resulting in a determination that there was no breach, in which the following recommendations were made:

 

 

 

a

That the council revise its policies or procedures

 

 

b

That a person or persons undertake training or other education

 

5

The number of investigated complaints resulting in a determination that there was a breach in which the following recommendations were made:

 

 

 

a

That the council revise any of its policies or procedures

 

 

b

That the subject person undertake any training or other education relevant to the conduct giving rise to the breach

 

 

c

That the subject person be counselled for their conduct

 

 

d

That the subject person apologise to any person or organisation affected by the breach

 

 

e

That findings of inappropriate conduct be made public

 

 

f

In the case of a breach by the GM, that action be taken under the GM’s contract for the breach

 

 

g

In the case of a breach by a councillor, that the councillor be formally censured for the breach under section 440G of the Local Government Act 1993

 

 

h

In the case of a breach by a councillor, that the matter be referred to the Office for further action

 

6

 

Matter referred or resolved after commencement of an investigation under clause 8.20 of the Procedures

 

Categories of misconduct

 

 

7

The number of investigated complaints resulting in a determination that there was a breach with respect to each of the following categories of conduct:

 

 

 

a

General conduct (Part 3)

  0 

 

 

b

Conflict of interest  (Part 4)

 0

 

 

c

Personal benefit  (Part 5)

 0

 

 

d

Relationship between council officials  (Part 6)

 0

 

 

e

Access to information and resources  (Part 7)

 0

 

Outcome of determinations

 

 

8

The number of investigated complaints resulting in a determination that there was a breach in which the council failed to adopt the conduct reviewers recommendation

 

9

The number of investigated complaints resulting in a determination that there was a breach in which the council's decision was overturned following a review by the Office

0

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:         The Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of investigating Code of Conduct complaints has been allowed for in the legal expenses budget for Administrative Services.

 

Conclusion

 

The reporting of Code of Conduct complaints is a requirement under part 11 of the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Code of Conduct statistics for the period September 2017 to September 2018 be forwarded to the Office of Local Government (Department of Premier and Cabinet) in accordance with part 11.2 of the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO62/18

 

Subject:                      Operating hours Christmas and New Year 2018-19

Folder No:                      F2006/00304

Author:                          Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator

 

Introduction

 

For a number of years Randwick City Council has reduced opening hours during the Christmas/New Year period in line with community expectation and usage during this time of year. It is proposed to continue with this arrangement during the 2017-18 Christmas/New Year period similar to past years, while ensuring minimal impact on Council’s customer service levels.

 

Issues

 

The following arrangements are proposed for the Administration Building, Depot, Leisure Centre and libraries during the Christmas and New Year period this year:

 

 

Administration  Building and Depot

Friday 21 December (Xmas Eve operating hours)

Normal operations closing at 12pm

Monday 24 December (Xmas eve – MM59/18)

Closed

Tuesday 25 December (Xmas Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 26 December (Boxing Day - Public Holiday)

Closed

Thursday 27 – Friday 29 December

Normal operating hours

Monday 31 January (New Year’s Eve operating hours)

Normal operations closing at 3pm

Tuesday 1 January (New Year’s Day - Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 2 January

Normal operating hours resume

 

Des Renford Leisure Centre:

 

Friday 21 December

Normal operating hours

Saturday 22 – Sunday 23 December

7am - 6pm (normal operating hours)

Monday 24 December (Xmas Eve)

5:30am - 6pm

Tuesday 25 December (Xmas Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 26 December (Boxing Day – Public Holiday)

8am - 5pm

Thursday 27 – Sunday 30 December

Normal operating hours

Monday 31 December (New Year’s Eve)

5:30am - 6pm

Tuesday 1 January (New Year’s Day – Public Holiday)

8am - 5pm

Wednesday 2 January

Normal operating hours resume

 

Lionel Bowen Library and Community Centre:

 

Friday 21 December (Xmas Eve operating hours)

9am - 12pm

Saturday 22 December

9.30am – 4pm

Sunday 23 December

12pm – 4pm

Monday 24 December (Xmas Eve – MM59/18)

Closed

Tuesday 25 December (Xmas Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 26 December (Boxing Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Thursday 27 – Friday 28 December

9.30am – 5pm

Saturday 29 December

9.30am – 4pm

Sunday 30 December

12pm – 4pm

Monday 31 December (New Year’s Eve operating hours)

9:30pm - 3pm

Tuesday 1 January (New Year’s Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 2 January

Normal operating hours resume

 

Margaret Martin Library:

 

Friday 21 December (Xmas Eve operating hours)

9am - 12pm

Saturday 22 December

9.30am – 4pm

Sunday 23 December

12pm – 4pm

Monday 24 December (Xmas Eve – MM59/18)

Closed

Tuesday 25 December (Xmas Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 26 December (Boxing Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Thursday 27 – Friday 28 December

9.30am – 5pm

Saturday 29 December

9.30am – 4pm

Sunday 30 December

12pm – 4pm

Monday 31 December (New Year’s Eve operating hours)

9:30am – 3pm

Tuesday 1 January (New Year’s Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 2 January

Normal operating hours resume

 

Malabar Community Library:

 

Friday 21 December (Xmas Eve operating hours)

9am - 12pm

Saturday 22 December

9.30am – 12pm

Sunday 23 December

Closed

Monday 24 December (Xmas Eve – MM59/18)

Closed

Tuesday 25 December (Xmas Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 26 December (Boxing Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Thursday 27 – Friday 28 December

9.30am – 5pm

Saturday 29 December

9.30am – 12pm

Sunday 30 December

Closed

Monday 31 December (New Year’s Eve operating hours)

9:30am – 3pm

Tuesday 1 January (New Year’s Day – Public Holiday)

Closed

Wednesday 2 January

Normal operating hours resume

 

The days of reduced opening are relatively quiet in terms of contact with the community and a number of staff take annual leave over this period.  There will be a staff function at lunch time on 21 December 2018 to celebrate the Christmas season and thank the staff for their efforts during 2018.

 

Essential operational services including Waste Service, Rangers, Storey Street Depot, Leisure Centre and the Beaches will be maintained through the Christmas/New Year period. Staff required to work during this period will be paid the appropriate penalty rates in accordance with our Award.

 

The early closing time on Friday 21 December and Monday 31 December will be advertised in the Randwick News column and notices will be displayed at council offices and the libraries to minimise any inconvenience for members of the public.

 

It should be noted that at the 25 September 2018 Council meeting it was resolved:

 

“That Randwick Council staff be given a day’s leave on Monday 24 December 2018.”

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:         The Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The financial impact for this matter has been allowed for in the 2018-19 budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed hours of Council operations are in line with community expectation for this time of year and have been in place for a number of years.  Given adequate publicity, it is felt that the reduced opening hours will create minimal impact on Council’s customer service levels.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the proposed 2018-19 Christmas and New Year opening hours for the Administration Building, Depot, Libraries and Leisure Centre, be endorsed.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO63/18

 

Subject:                      2019 Meetings Schedule and arrangements for decision making over the Christmas/New Year period

Folder No:                      F2004/06565

 

Author:                          Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator

 

Introduction

 

This report outlines a method for matters to continue to be processed during the Christmas/New Year meeting recess period and suggests a Council meetings schedule for the forthcoming calendar year.

 

Issues

 

This year the meetings recess will commence after the ordinary Council Meeting scheduled to be held on Tuesday 11 December 2018. A meeting schedule for the 2019 calendar year has been prepared (based on the practice of past years) and is attached for Council’s endorsement.

 

It should be noted that the September 2019 Council meeting has been scheduled for the 3rd Tuesday of the month (17 September 2019) to provide for an Extraordinary Council meeting (for the Mayoral election) to be held on the 4th Tuesday (being 24 September 2019).

 

It has been the practice for many years for the council to take a recess following the last ordinary meeting in December, to give Councillors and officers the opportunity to either take a break over the Christmas holiday period or to finalise the year’s activities and plan for the following twelve months.  During previous recess periods, Council policy ‘Council in Recess Procedure’ has prevailed.  This policy was used as a means of making decisions on urgent or important matters during the meeting recess and provides:

 

‘The Mayor, the Chairpersons of the Planning Committee, the Administration & Finance Committee, the Community Services Committee and the Works Committee or, in his/her absence (or if the Mayor is the Chairperson of the Committee) the Deputy Chairpersons, and the General Manager jointly be authorised to make decision which would otherwise be made by the Council and any such decision are to be unanimous and circulated to Councillors for their information.’

 

This policy is now out of date due to the Council Committees being discontinued in March 2018.

 

It is recommended that the Council in Recess policy be declared obsolete as part of the role of the Mayor, under section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993 is:

 

“(d) to exercise, in cases of necessity, the policy-making functions of the governing body of the council between meetings of the council.”

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:         The Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 


 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Urgent and important Council business can be dealt with during the Christmas/New Year period without the requirement for a formal Council meeting by utilising Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993.  Any matters that are unable to be dealt with under Section 226(d), due to extenuating circumstances, could be dealt with at an Extraordinary Council Meeting.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the:

 

a)       Council Meeting recess commence following the ordinary Council Meeting scheduled to be held on Tuesday 11 December 2018 and meetings be resumed, with an Extraordinary meeting, on Tuesday 12 February 2019.

 

b)       Meeting Schedule for the 2019 calendar year be adopted.

 

c)       ‘Council in Recess Procedure’ be affirmed as obsolete.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Draft Schedule of Council meeting dates for 2019

 

 

 

 


Draft Schedule of Council meeting dates for 2019

Attachment 1

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator 



Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO64/18

 

Subject:                      Contingency Fund - status as at 31 October 2018

Folder No:                      F2017/07396

 

Author:                          Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2018-19 financial year there have been 34 allocations totalling $193,885.85. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2018-19

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$27,000.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 27 June 2017

Sponsorship and in-kind support - Surfing NSW - Junior State Surfing Title

$16,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Annual contribution (3 years from 2018-19 to 2020-2021) - Renewal of Community Partnership Agreement with Westpac Helicopter Rescue Service

$20,000.00

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - St George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,323.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - Taste of Coogee 2018

$15,451.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Financial assistance - South Sydney Rabbitohs' - Commemorate John Sutton Historic Milestone

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Our Lady of the Rosary School, Kensington Community Fair

$9,488.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$4,518.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waivng of fees - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Take 3 for the Sea

$928.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Donation - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Coogee Dippers (Autism) Program

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival

$3,020.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - A National Act of Recognition

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial contribution - Commemorative Statue at the Cenotaph, Maroubra

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Financial assistance - La Perouse Public School

$2,780.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Expansion of Community Partnership - Sydney Roosters inaugural women’s NRL side

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Donation - Wee Waa Chamber of Commerce

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Annual Des Renford Chair of Hearts Research Family Gala and Charity Day - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre

$9,500.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Surf Life Saving and Pool Rescue Coaching Clinic - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre Pool

$6,102.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Donation - Humour Foundation Clown Doctors Program

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Sept 2018

Waiving of fees - Maroubra Diggers Junior Swimming Club for two Swimming Carnivals at Des Renford Leisure

$1,268.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - Beach Ultimate Frisbee - Selection Camp

$1,044.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees and financial assistance - Surfing NSW - Carve Pro surfing event

$23,726.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Grant Application under the Stronger Communities Program – allocation of Council funds (if successful)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Earthquakes in Indonesia - Donation to Relief Fund

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 16 Oct 2018

Waiving of fees - St Nicolas Anglican Church Carols by the Sea

$2,298.00

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                                                            $193,885.85

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:             A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:           Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:           Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 


 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $95,000.00 in the 2018-19 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO65/18

 

Subject:                      Affixing of Council Seal - Purcell Park lease and licence for water pump

Folder No:                      F2017/07367

 

Author:                          Sharon Plunkett, Property Coordinator

 

Introduction

 

At the ordinary Council meeting on 24 June 1986 Council resolved to affix the Council seal to a 20 + 20 year lease agreement with Amcor Limited (Amcor Packaging (Australia) Pty Ltd) for the lease of Purcell Park at 67R Australia Avenue, Matraville.  Amcor are now known as Orora Limited.  The lease has now expired and a new 20 + 20 year agreement has been negotiated along with a licence to draw water from Long Dam and use part of the property for water pumping. Both documents require execution under Seal.

 

Clause 400 (Part 13) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the seal of the Council must not be affixed to a document unless the document relates to business of the Council and the Council has resolved (by resolution referring to the document) that the Seal be so affixed.

 

Issues

 

Purcell Park is a highly valued asset of the local Matraville community.  The site has been formally leased to Council for use as a public park since 1986 with Council making improvements to the park over the years.  A significant issue is the lack of access to an affordable water source for irrigation of the park.

 

Access to an irrigation source will enable Council to progress plans to undertake works to enhance the quality of the public park.

 

The lease is based on the same terms and conditions as the previous lease.  The permitted use of the land is use as a public park.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

Outcome 6:            A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:          Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Upon signing the lease the annual rental payable to Orora Limited is $1.00 + GST per annum.  Upon signing the Long Dam licence the annual fee payable to Orora Limited is $1.00 + GST per annum.

 

Conclusion

 

As Clause 400 (part 13) of the Local Government (General) regulation requires that the Council pass a resolution authorising the Affixing of the Seal, it is necessary for this action to take place to facilitate legal formalities.

 

A copy of the lease and licence will be available for Councillors (from Council’s Manager Administrative Services) at the Council meeting.

 

Recommendation

 

That authority be granted to execute and affix the Common Seal of the Council to:

 

a)   the lease agreement with Orora Limited for the property known as Purcell Park located at 67R Australia Avenue, Matraville; and

 

b)   the licence agreement with Orora Limited for the property known as Long Dam to enable Council to draw and pump water for the irrigation of Purcell Park.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO67/18

 

 

Subject:                      Notice under Crown Lands Management Act 2016 to Minister Lands & Forestry of Native Title Manager

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2014/00326

Author:                          Sharon Plunkett, Property Coordinator     

 

 

Introduction

 

Section 8.8 of the Crown Land Management (CLM) Act 2016 requires council to give notice to the Minister Lands and Forestry of the name and contact details of any person the council has engaged or employed as a native title manager. The notice must be given as soon as practicable after 30 June (but not later than 31 October) of each year.

 

Such notices should be straightforward, addressing only the items required under the legislation (ie: the name and contact details of any person the council has engaged or employed as a native title manager). If no native title manager has been engaged by the council, the notification should indicate this.

 

Issues

 

Section 377(1)(s) of the Local Government Act 1993 states that the making of an application, or the giving of a notice, to the Governor or Minister is a non-delegable function meaning a resolution of council is required for such purposes.

 

Council has provided for the current year advice to the Minister Lands & Forestry of the name and contact details of the two Council employees engaged as native title managers who have undertaken the necessary training.

 

The requirement for the annual notice to the Minister is acknowledged.

 

 Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:                   Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The requirement of the annual notice to the Minister Lands and Forestry is noted and commitment is given to meet the annual reporting obligation.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council agrees to provide annual notice to the Minister Lands and Forestry of the name and contact details of any person Council has engaged or employed as a native title manager.

 

 


 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO68/18

 

 

Subject:                      Quarterly Budget Review - September 2018

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2018/00378

Author:                          Caroline Foley, Manager Financial Planning & Performance     

 

 

Introduction

 

Section 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that, at the end of each quarter, a Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) be prepared and submitted to Council that indicates the latest estimates of income and expenditure for the 2018-19 year.

 

The regulation (Section 203 (2)) also requires that the budget review statement must include, or be accompanied by:

 

I.        A report as to whether or not the Responsible Accounting Officer believes that the Statement indicates that the financial position of the Council is satisfactory, having regard to the original estimate of income and expenditure; and

II.       If that position is unsatisfactory, recommendations for remedial action.

 

Issues

 

The September Quarterly Budget Review Statement (attachment 1) provides an update on the Council’s financial performance and position as at 30 September 2018.

 

Included within this report are recommended variations to the Council’s budget that, if adopted, will result in an overall increase in the Council’s projected budget surplus at year end from $2,359 to $3,837.

 

Income and operating expenses

 

The net operating surplus is projected to reduce from $5.6m to $2.5m (excl capital grants and contributions). The main contributor to this is the advance payment of the 2018-19 Financial Assistance Grant in June 2018. As an untied grant, the $1.8m payment is recognised at the time it is paid. However the funds remain in Council’s reserves and are available for expenditure in the 2018-19 financial year as planned.

 

Other significant variations include:

·         Higher electricity costs ($517k)

·         Additional expenditure on new waste disposal contracts ($499k)

·         Additional income for construction work zones ($210k) and bus shelter advertising ($230k)

·         Grants for the Malabar Boat Rescue shed storage facility ($287k) and cycleway study and design works ($303k)

 

Capital budget

 

The projected expenditure on asset renewal, upgrade and new assets is projected to increase from $89.1m to $91.7m. This includes $1.97m for the remediation of Jack Vanny Reserve (funded from cash reserves).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:          Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:         Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial & operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The proposed variations listed in the attachment will result in a projected budget surplus on 30 June 2018 of $3,837.

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       the report in relation to the September 2018 Budget Review be received and noted; and

 

b)       the proposed September 2018 budget variations shown in the attachment to this report be adopted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Quarterly Budget Review Statements (QBRS) - September 2018

 

 

 

 


Quarterly Budget Review Statements (QBRS) - September 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO69/18

 

Subject:                      Monthly Financial Report as at 31 October 2018

Folder No:                      F2018/00380

Author:                          Oliver Guo, Coordinator Financial Planning and Analysis     

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

 

a)       establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the Council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

 

b)       if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the Council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 31 October 2018. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 31 October 2018. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 31 October 2018.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:         Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:       Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.  The Current Ratio as at 31 October 2018 is 2.44 compared to 2.12 as at 30 June 2018, indicating the Council’s liquidity remains strong with capacity to meet short term obligations as they fall due.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

 


 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements -Income Statement - October 2018

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements -Balance Sheet - October 2018

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements -Cashflow Statement - October 2018

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements -Income Statement - October 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Monthly Financial Statements -Balance Sheet - October 2018

Attachment 2

 

 

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Monthly Financial Statements -Cashflow Statement - October 2018

Attachment 3

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO70/18

 

Subject:                      Investment Report - October 2018

Folder No:                      F2015/06527

 

Author:                          Gail Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant

                     

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – October 2018” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of October 2018. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 October 2018, Council held investments with a market value of $73.425 million. The portfolio value decreased during October by ~$6.884 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from October 2017 to October 2018. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance 

 

Asset Allocation

 

The majority of the portfolio is spread between term deposits (47.67%) and senior floating rate notes (44.47%). The remainder of the portfolio is held in the overnight cash accounts with CBA (7.86%). The FRN’s add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 


 

Term to Maturity

 

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 27% of the total investment portfolio.

 

 

All minimum and maximum limits comply with Council’s investment policy:

Compliant

Horizon

Invested
$

Invested
%

Min Limit
%

Max Limit
%

0-90 days

$16,774,560.00

22.85%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$21,004,816.00

28.61%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$15,564,042.00

21.20%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$20,081,252.00

27.35%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0.00

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances. These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit ratings do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

 

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

$9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

$7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

$2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $17.0 million since the downgrade. The $2 million BOQ FRN is the only remaining BBB rated investment. Sell opportunities for this FRN are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

Compliant

Credit Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

AA Category

$45,867,918.00

62.47%

100%

$27,556,751.00

A Category

$25,550,975.00

34.80%

75%

$29,517,527.00

X

BBB Category

$2,005,776.00

2.73%

0%

-$2,005,776.00

Unrated ADIs

$0.00

0.00%

 

 

 Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on long term S&P ratings). The overweight position with BOQ results from the credit ratings downgrades and will be addressed when an opportunity arises. Suncorp overweight results from the drop in portfolio total.

 

Compliant

 

Issuer

Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

ANZ

AA-

$1,518,416

2.07%

30%

$20,508,985

CBA

AA-

$17,282,200

23.54%

30%

$4,745,201

NAB

AA-

$13,008,658

17.72%

30%

$9,018,743

Westpac

AA-

$14,058,645

19.15%

30%

$7,968,756

Rabobank

A+

$1,018,256

1.39%

15%

$9,995,444

X

Suncorp

A+

$11,024,467

15.01%

15%

-$10,767

AMP Bank

A

$5,998,296

8.17%

15%

$5,015,404

ING Bank

A

$6,000,000

8.17%

15%

$5,013,700

Macquarie Bank

A

$1,509,956

2.06%

15%

$9,503,745

X

BoQ

BBB+

$2,005,776

2.73%

0%

-$2,005,776

 

 

Performance

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period October 2015 to October 2018.

 

 

 

 

The total portfolio (T/D’s and FRNs) provided a solid return of +0.23% (actual), outperforming the benchmark AusBond Bank Index return by +0.06% (actual). The outperformance continues to be driven by a combination of deposits that were originally invested longer than 6 months, as well as the higher yielding FRNs locked in at attractive margins and sold prior to maturity, realising small capital gains and boosting returns. The FRN portfolio (on an accrual basis) has now started to outperform the deposit portfolio, as evidenced by the returns over the past 12 months.

 

Over the past year, the combined deposit and FRN portfolio returned +2.74% p.a., outperforming bank bills by 0.85% p.a. The overall return remains solid given deposit rates reached their all-time lows in August 2016 after the RBA’s last interest rate cut. The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remains at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Performance

1 month

3 months

6 months

FYTD

1 year

Official Cash Rate

0.12%

0.37%

0.75%

0.50%

1.50%

AusBond Bank Bill Index

0.17%

0.49%

1.01%

0.69%

1.89%

Council’s T/D Portfolio

0.22%

0.67%

1.33%

0.89%

2.62%

Council’s FRN Portfolio

0.24%

0.73%

1.48%

0.98%

2.87%

Council’s Portfolio^

0.23%

0.70%

1.40%

0.94%

2.74%

Outperformance

0.06%

0.20%

0.39%

0.25%

0.85%

^Total portfolio performance excludes Council's cash account holdings. Overall returns would be lower if cash was included

 

Term Deposits

At month end, term deposits accounted for 47.67% of the total investment portfolio.

Four deposits totalling $5 million matured and were withdrawn in October. No new term deposits were taken up. As at the end of October, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.74%, up 6 basis points (bp) from the previous month.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

The portfolio includes $32.650 million in floating rate notes. There was no trading of FRN’s during the month.

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end. The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 October 2018 increased by ~$1.2k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

·         Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·         Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·         And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:     Long term financial viability is achieved


 

 


 


Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2018-19 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,200,934.00. Investment income to 31 October 2018 amounted to $681,643.22

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 October 2018 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for October 2018 be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - October 2018

 

 

 

 


Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - October 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO71/18

 

 

Subject:                      Ongoing Engagement of Casual Daytime Caterers

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2013/00200

Author:                          David Kelly, Manager Administrative Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Council engages daytime caterers for a variety of reasons ranging from hosting receptions for charity groups or other non-profits, staff meetings with external parties, catering for offsite meetings to discuss important community issues and catering for interview panels. The aggregation of payments to caterers over a three year period in accordance with Council’s Procurement Policy and Procedures has led to a unique situation which requires Council approval to resolve.

 

Issues

 

In 2017/18 Council entered into six hundred and thirty eight engagements of casual daytime caterers at an average spend per engagement of $134.10. This means that whilst the aggregate three year spend in this area would normally require the conduct of a tender process, the reality is that it is not in the interest of the relevant suppliers to invest the time and effort in the preparation of a detailed tender submission for the typical engagement amount referred to above. There would also be no guarantee of work for the suppliers chosen which would lead to dissatisfaction in our local business community.

 

Council’s Manager Administrative Services, in consultation with the Procurement Section and relevant Managers, has suggested a purchasing arrangement whereby Council would approve the engagement of catering suppliers for a three year period without going through a formal tender or quotation process. On occasions where the expected cost of an individual engagement of a caterer will exceed $1,000.00, a minimum of two quotes will be need to be obtained or General Manager approval sought, before a supplier is engaged. Council’s Procurement Section will also produce spend reports on a monthly basis for analysis and Internal Audit will conduct random audits to ensure adherence to these requirements.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:           Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:                   Demonstrate best practice leadership in local government.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact in the approval of these suppliers. How much is spent with each supplier will depend on their level of engagement.

 

Conclusion

 

Every effort has been made to come up with a solution that is not too onerous for Council staff and for our catering suppliers to abide by the relevant Tendering Regulations and Procurement Policy and Procedures. It is considered that for now, until a better option is discovered, that Council approval with strict internal controls is the most workable solution. Preference will always be given to local caterers in accordance with Council’s Shop Local policy.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Council approve the engagement of Casual Daytime Caterers for a three year period under the arrangements outlined in this report;

 

b)       these suppliers are only to be utilised strictly for Casual Daytime Catering with preference being given to local caterers; and

 

c)       on occasions where the expected cost of an individual engagement will exceed $1,000.00, a minimum of two standard quotes will be need to be obtained or General Manager approval sought, before a supplier is engaged.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO72/18

 

 

Subject:                      Continuation of Community Partnership with South Sydney Rugby League Football Club in 2019

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2010/00282

Author:                          David Kelly, Manager Administrative Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

At its ordinary Council meeting held 28 November, 2017 Council resolved that:

 

“a)      Council continue the “Community Partnership” with the South Sydney Football Club and Souths Cares with the $40,000.00 (incl GST) contribution to come from the Community Services budget;

 

b)       the General Manager be delegated authority to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding with the South Sydney Football Club and Souths Cares; and

 

c)       a report on the success of the 2018 Community Partnership to come back before Council.”

 

The purpose of this report is to advise Council, in accordance with clause (c) of the above resolution, of the continued outstanding success of this partnership throughout 2018 and to recommend extending this partnership into 2019 to continue with a number of wonderful community service initiatives.

 

Issues

 

As part of our 2018 partnership Council received ten tickets to all South Sydney home games. These tickets were distributed to targeted schools and youth service providers which were identified as being in the best position to take advantage of this new initiative. The schools and service providers identified were La Perouse Public School, South Sydney High School, Maroubra Bay Public School, Chifley Public School, Matraville Soldiers Settlement Public School, Matraville Sports High School, La Pa Youth Haven, The Shack Youth Services and Father Chris Riley’s Youth Off The Streets.

 

The feedback Council received from all groups has been outstanding. At each school the tickets were used as a reward to students for positive behaviour, attendance and participation at school and, according to the School Principals, the response from the kids was overwhelming. The youth service providers reported that they used the tickets to encourage attendance by targeted youth in order to keep them involved in the respective Centres.

 

In addition, two ambassador tickets to all home games were distributed to those community members identified as having made the most outstanding contribution to our community in a voluntary capacity. As part of the partnership tickets were distributed to volunteers from:

 

·           NSW/ACT Youth Cancer Services Youth Advisory Committee;

·           La Perouse Youth Haven / La Pa Bummers Programs;

·           La Perouse United Rugby League Club and the Pearlers Netball Club;

·           Kooloora Community Centres Veg Co-op Program;

·           Council’s Corroboree event at Coogee Beach for Reconciliation Week;

·           Youth Off The Streets;

·           Kool Kids Club;

·           Organiser of the Blak Markets at Bare Island;

·           Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council;

·           Soroptomist in La Perouse Public School Library;

·           Outreach Program (Jump Rope for Heart); and

·           La Perouse United Junior Rugby League Football Club.

 

Council also received 16 tickets for use throughout the year at The Legends Lounge. Council made the decision to provide them to all our junior rugby league clubs as a reward for long serving clubmen or women or to use as fundraisers. As part of the partnership these tickets were distributed to:

 

·           La Perouse United, who raffled the package as part of their annual fundraising night;

·           Maroubra Lions, who raffled the package as part of their annual fundraising night;

·           Matraville Tigers, who raffled the package as part of their annual fundraising night; and

·           South Eastern Seagulls, who raffled the tickets as a fundraiser for the club. The raffle proceeds were used to help fund the cost of trophies and end of season gear for the junior players.

 

A coaching clinic is being held at Pioneer Park, Malabar on 12th December 2018. Students have been invited from all our target schools, with 550 students having accepted the invitation thus far. The clinic will, as always, be attended by most of the first graders, a number of under 20’s players, reps from the ARL, James Sutton from Souths’ Cares and David Kelly from Randwick City Council. Coverage of the event will be again posted on the websites of both organisations and it always generates very positive feedback from the community.

 

Council also received a table for 10 at the South Sydney Football Club’s annual Rabbitohs Business Networking Breakfast. The 2018 event was held 7:00am - 9.30am on Wednesday 23 May at Royal Randwick. Tickets were given to representatives from the Kingsford Chamber of Commerce, Coogee Chamber of Commerce, Maroubra Chamber of Commerce and Randwick City Tourism.

 

A number of community service initiatives were conducted throughout 2018 by Souths Cares (the Community Services arm of the football club) in partnership with Council. These initiatives are summarised below and have been of immense benefit to the youth in our targeted schools.

 

Souths Cares delivers the ‘Rabbitohs KARI Wellbeing Program’ which is a health promotion initiative specifically designed for primary school students. This program has a number of health promotion workshops which teach students about important topics such as anti-bullying, using the internet and social media safely, oral health, nutrition and physical exercise.

 

Souths Cares also delivered two new programs called ‘The Rugby League Sporting Schools Program’ and ‘Breakfast Bootcamps’, both of which supported primary school students to get healthy and active. This year, over 2050 primary school students from Randwick LGA will have participated in a Souths Cares program, from schools including:

 

·      Chifley Primary School

·      La Perouse Primary School

·      Malabar Primary School

·      Matraville Primary School

·      Matraville Soldiers Settlement Primary School

·      Our Lady of the Annunciation

·      Rainbow Street Primary School

·      South Coogee Primary School

·      St Marys St Joseph Primary School

 

Souths Cares ‘School to Work Transition Program’ continues to achieve outstanding results for Aboriginal students in years 10, 11 and 12 at schools including Matraville Sports High School and South Sydney High School. This program supports Aboriginal high school students to gain their HSC and then successfully transition to employment and/or tertiary education.

 

In 2018, Souths Cares also launched a brand new initiative which is targeted towards Aboriginal youth at-risk of entering the Juvenile Justice system. This initiative has been well supported by Eastern Beaches Local Area Command, with the two agencies working collaboratively to achieve great outcomes for disadvantaged youth whilst also keeping the local community safe.

 

Souths Cares’ NAIDOC Festival was held on Wednesday 11th July at Heffron Park, Maroubra. This was their fourth annual NAIDOC Festival and the event continues to be popular with the local community. Souths Cares has supported other Randwick Council events, including the Randwick Council Junior Sports Awards and the Koojay Corroboree. Upcoming events which Souths Cares will be supporting before the end of the year include the Matraville Family Fun Day and the annual Souths Cares/Randwick Council Junior Rugby League clinic.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2c:          Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The current sponsorship amount of $40,000.00, including GST, has been allowed for in the 2018-19 budget.

 

Conclusion

 

This unique and exciting “Community Partnership” with the South Sydney Football Club continues to provide major benefits for both our organisations and, more importantly, our local community. These benefits include:

 

·           Both organisations raising their profile in the community through the local media and with mutual marketing and advertising opportunities;

·           Better targeting of particular disadvantaged groups using high profile footballers who can better connect with these traditionally difficult areas;

·           Greater community awareness of the programs being run by both organisations; and

·           Being able to reward our volunteers and disadvantaged youth for their efforts.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Council continue the “Community Partnership” with the South Sydney Football Club and Souths Cares with the $40,000.00 (including GST) contribution to come from the Community Services budget;

 

b)       the General Manager be delegated authority to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding with the South Sydney Football Club and Souths Cares; and

 

c)       this Community Partnership continue under these same conditions into future seasons until resolved otherwise by Council.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO73/18

 

 

Subject:                      Investment Policy

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2015/06527

Author:                          Greg Byrne, Manager Financial Operations     

 

 

Introduction

 

Council has an Investment Policy that outlines the investment objectives of Council. The Investment Policy provides the framework that safeguards the investment portfolio.

 

Issues

 

The Office for Local Government have published Investment Policy Guidelines that recommend that the Investment Policy be reviewed annually and be amended as required in the event of legislative change or as a result of significantly changed economic conditions.

 

The Investment Policy has been reviewed in conjunction with Council’s Investment Advisors, Imperium Markets, and is now presented with minor changes to the existing policy. The following updates have been incorporated into the policy:

 

·      Increase in the maximum holdings for A category ratings from 75% to 80% to safeguard the portfolio against major bank downgrades. Major Banks are currently rated at AA-, a one notch downgrade would see them fall into the A category.

·      Increase counterparty limits for A or higher credit ratings, given that such ratings are diminishing and some of the major banks are not competitive in the deposit market. This would prevent Council being forced to take a lower rate once limits have been reached with some of the major banks.

·      Remove short term ratings from the Policy to avoid conflict with long term ratings. If Council is confident to invest in a bank based on the long term rating then it should be confident to invest with the same bank regardless of the short term ratings.

·      Include a section on borrowings to outline the considerations for acquiring loans.

·       Add additional definitions into “Attachment G” of the policy.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  1.     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  1c.    Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The Investment Policy provides the framework under which all investments are made. The policy aims to minimise risk while allowing for appropriate returns in accordance with adopted budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The updated policy is attached for consideration/adoption.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Policy be adopted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Investment Policy

 

 

 

 


Investment Policy

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Director Corporate Services Report No. CO74/18

 

 

Subject:                      Replacement of community vacancy on Wylies Baths Trust

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2012/00407

Author:                          Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

 

Introduction

 

A vacancy currently exists for a community representative on the Wylie’s Baths Trust. A process is currently being followed to find a suitable community representative to serve on the Trust moving forward. The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the recommendation being made by the Trust for a suitable replacement and for Council to determine the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.

 

Issues

 

According to the Rules of the Trust the maximum number of members shall be eight persons being:

 

·       One member appointed by the Coogee Randwick RSL swimming club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·       One member appointed by the Coogee Amateur swimming club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·       One member appointed by the South Maroubra winter swimming club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·       One member appointed by the Coogee Surf Life Saving Club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·       The Mayor of Randwick City Council or another Councillor nominated by the Mayor;

·       Three members appointed by Randwick City Council who shall be residents within the boundaries of Randwick City Council who are regular users of the baths.

 

Janice Morris (the Honorary Secretary of the Trust) has written to Council advising that a selection process, following a structured recruitment approach, has been undertaken and that, as a result, the Trust would  like to recommend Annette Moran for the role of Community Member Wylies Baths Trust.

 

Ms Moran’s background and experience are summarise below:

 

-     Resides in the Randwick Council area and is a very regular user of Wylies Baths and has been for over 10 years.

-     Has a very good understanding of the Wylies environment and appreciates it is a significant heritage listed facility supporting our local community and bringing people together for the betterment of both the physical and mental wellbeing of the community.

-     Has a keen interest in the history of the Baths.

-     The Trust is confident that Annette will work as an effective member of the team. She has a strong relationship with Wylies Baths through the Randwick and Coogee Amateur Swimming Club (for which she has been Honorary Secretary for over 8 years).

-     Has a strong marketing background which will complement skills of other members of the Trust.

-     Has significant grant writing/submission writing experience in her professional role and this will be an integral part of the role as a member of Wylies Baths Trust.

-     Has extensive experience in fundraising having coordinated several fundraising events both locally and within schools her children have attended – these have included Art Exhibitions and ‘Pink ribbon day’ events.

-     Has an extensive legal background and will be able to assist the Trust in this area with her expertise.

-     Holds both a Commerce Degree from UNSW and a Law Degree from UTS.

-     Has also completed a Certificate in Governance for Not for profits with the Governance Institute.

-     Currently works as the National Governance and Compliance Officer for a major trade union.

-     Has committed to ensuring she has the time and energy required for the role of Community member – Wylies Baths Trust.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A Vibrant & Diverse Community.

Direction 2c:          Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Wylies Baths Trust recommends the appointment of Ms Annette Moran as the new Trust Member on the Wylies Baths Trust.

 

Recommendation

 

That, as recommended by the Wylies Baths Trust, Ms Annette Moran be appointed as the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

   


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM82/18

 

Subject:                      Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Council Endorsement of National Apology

Folder No:                      F2004/07652

Submitted by:                Councillor D'Souza, South Ward

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

a)       wholeheartedly endorses the national apology given by the Prime Minister to the victims   and survivors of institutional child abuse and their families who have also had to deal with      the consequences of this abuse; and

 

b)       fully supports the National Redress Scheme which recognises the impact of past abuse   and provides support and  justice for survivors.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM83/18

 

Subject:                      Notice of Motion from Cr Said - acknowledgement of Todd Reid's tennis achievements

Folder No:                      F2004/06876

Submitted by:                Councillor Said, South Ward

 

 

That Council acknowledge Todd Reid’s outstanding tennis achievements, as well as his contribution (and that of his parents) in coaching local tennis stars of the future at the Matraville Tennis Centre, by naming the new centre court at our new Heffron Park Tennis facility, “The Todd Reid Championship Court”.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM84/18

 

Subject:                      Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - acknowledge the passing of Ian Kiernan

Folder No:                      F2005/00266

Submitted by:                Councillor D'Souza, South Ward

 

 

That Randwick Council notes with sadness the recent passing of Ian Kiernan, founder of the Clean Up Australia Campaign which has been responsible for the removal of millions of tonnes of rubbish from our streets, parks, beaches, bushland and waterways and we express our deepest sympathies to his family and friends.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM85/18

 

 

Subject:                         Notice of Motion from Cr Da Rocha - Climate Change initiatives

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2013/00389

Submitted by:                Councillor Da Rocha, South Ward     

 

 

 

That, Randwick City Council:

 

1.    Notes our recent successes at the Cities Power Partnership Summit convened by the Climate Council of Australia in Kiama, winning the inaugural Renewable Energy award for our joint project with Waverley and Woollahra Councils.

 

2.    Strengthen its leadership position on Climate Change issues as demonstrated in our extensive range of sustainability initiatives; and

 

3.    Write to the NSW Premier and the Minister for the Environment, Local Government and Heritage, encouraging them to follow the lead of other Australian States and Territories in their support for climate change initiatives.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM86/18

 

 

Subject:                         Notice of Motion from Crs Da Rocha and D'Souza - Acknowledgement by Council at Remembrance Day ceremonies

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2004/08326

Submitted by:                Councillor Da Rocha, South Ward; Councillor D'Souza, South Ward     

 

 

 

That Council:

 

a)   officially acknowledge in its minutes the one hundred year anniversary of the end of World War 1 and pay its utmost respects to those soldiers who died or were wounded fighting to protect our Nation; and

 

b)   adopt a policy moving forward of laying a wreath at every official Remembrance Day ceremony being conducted throughout the Randwick City area.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM87/18

 

 

Subject:                         Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Food waste collection trial

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2013/00423

Submitted by:                Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

 

That Council:

 

a)       notes that council has committed through its 2017-2030 Waste Management Strategy to divert 75% of waste from landfill by 2022, divided into short term (1-5 years), medium term (5-10 years) and long term (10-15) year periods;

 

b)       notes that council has been operating a Food Waste collection trial for residents in multi-unit dwellings since 2013, initially with funding from the NSW EPA Waste Less Recycle More grant;

 

c)       notes that as 73.6% (43,056) of dwellings in the Randwick LGA are multi-unit dwellings, and approx. 40% of waste in council’s red lid bins is composed of food and garden organics, the diversion of food waste and garden organics has the potential to make a significant reduction in our waste going to landfill;

 

d)       bring back a report to council detailing the progress of council’s food waste collection since the commencement of the trial, along with recommendations regarding community education and awareness raising programs, targets, milestones and other relevant strategies to increase the uptake of participants in the trial;

 

e)       bring back quarterly reports to council for the duration of the Waste Strategy Action Plan (9.3) to detail changes over time in the uptake of new and previous participants in the trial, and the amount of food waste being diverted from landfill; and

 

f)       bring back a detailed report on the trial at the end of the current five-year period, with recommendations regarding appropriate strategies for increasing uptake in the Food Waste collection for both multi and single-unit dwellings for the medium term (5 -10) year period of the Waste Strategy Action Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM88/18

 

 

Subject:                         Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed community Christmas tree

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2015/00522

Submitted by:                Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

 

That Council:

 

a)       as part of its Christmas Festivities endorse the installation of a large community Christmas tree;

 

b)       the location of the Christmas tree be determined by the General Manager and Council Staff.

 

c)       monitor the success and benefit to the community that the Christmas tree offers as part of its consideration in erecting the Christmas tree every year.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM89/18

 

 

Subject:                         Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Current and proposed developments for Government owned land

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBFolder No:                      F2004/06324

Submitted by:                Councillor Bowen, East Ward     

 

 

 

That council prepare a report to update Randwick residents on all current and proposed developments for government owned land in the Randwick LGA or any neighbouring LGA.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council           27 November 2018

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR8/18

 

Subject:                       Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Hamilton, Roberts and Seng - CSELR Construction Work in the Vicinity of Doncaster Ave, Randwick

Folder No:                      F2015/00095

Submitted by:                Councillor Hamilton, North Ward; Councillor Roberts, East Ward; Councillor Seng, Central Ward

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 16 October 2018 in relation to Item NM80/18 and reading as follows:

 

“That Randwick City Council:

 

1.       Notes that residents on Doncaster Ave adjacent to the Light Rail Stabling Yard have been affected by noise and vibration from construction work on the CSELR since the beginning of 2016;

 

2.       Notes that there have been serious complaints made regarding structural damage caused to a number of homes, including substantial damage to one resident’s ceiling;

 

3.       Notes that construction work on and near the Light Rail Stabling Yard and Randwick Racecourse continues to take place late at night, in breach of (B89b(v) of the Approval. Notes further that as this work does not block or disrupt traffic, it should be scheduled to take place during the day;

 

4.       Write to the Minister for Planning and the Minister for Transport to request that:

 

·    An investigation of the complaints regarding structural damage to homes on Doncaster Ave be arranged as a matter of priority;

·    All CSELR construction work that does not disrupt traffic on public roads be scheduled to take place during ordinary business hours, as per the conditions of Infrastructure Approval; and

 

5.       the Mayor place a modestly priced advertisement in the Southern Courier noting the failure of the State Government to respond to Council’s numerous representations on this extremely important issue.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That Council obtains costs of possible advertisement and replaces the existing wording ‘noting the failure of the State Government to respond to Council’s numerous representations on this extremely important issue’ with ‘recommends residents write to the state government with concerns in relation to the work which is still ongoing’”.