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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 25 September 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 25 September 2018 at 6:00PM

 

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of Country

I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on the land of the Bidjigal and the Gadigal peoples who occupied the Sydney Coast, being the traditional owners.  On behalf of Randwick City Council, I acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders past and present, and to Aboriginal people in attendance today.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 28 August 2018

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

Nil.

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting required)

CP42/18    SECPP - 164-174 Barker Street, Randwick (DA/664/2016/A)....................... 1

 

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting NOT required)

CP43/18    Prince of Wales Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113) DA - Randwick City Council submission............................................................................. 19

CP44/18    Short-term Holiday Letting................................................................... 41

CP45/18    Smart City Strategy........................................................................... 53

CP46/18    Marine Park Proposal.......................................................................... 95

CP48/18    Cultural and Community Grant Program - Recommended Allocations - September 2018.............................................................................................. 107

CP49/18    Randwick City Council Compliance and Enforcement Policy....................... 115

CP50/18    Memorandum of Understanding with Department of Education for Randwick Boys and Girls High Schools Sites............................................................... 141

Director City Services Reports

CS42/18    Supporting "Sense of Community' Street Parties.................................... 145

CS43/18    Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study......................................... 147

CS44/18    Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee - August 2018........... 153

CS45/18    Randwick City Council Sports Committee - August 2018........................... 183

CS46/18    Newmarket Randwick - Proposed naming of park and new streets............ 205

CS47/18    Athletics Australia - Conquer Coogee Event........................................... 227

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO49/18    Investment Report - August 2018 ....................................................... 233

CO50/18    Contingency Fund - status as at 31 August 2018.................................... 243

CO51/18    Delegation to act on Council's behalf - Surf Life Saving Randwick Offshore Rescue Boat.............................................................................................. 245

CO52/18    Monthly Financial Report as at 31 August 2018....................................... 249

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM68/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - Recognition of Departing General Manager (Deferred)...................................................................................... 259

NM69/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Re-siting of 40k signs on eastern side of Avoca Street south of Barker intersection ..................................................... 261

NM70/18   Notice of Motion from Crs Luxford & Stavrinos - Maroubra Beach Hop Charity Car Show ............................................................................................ 263

NM71/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Smart Speed Bumps....................... 265

NM72/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch – CSELR breaches of consent conditions – Referral to the Minister and Secretary for Planning, the EPA and NSW Ombudsman. 267

NM73/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch – POW Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113) construction management plans................................................. 269

NM74/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson – Developing improved strategies for protecting native fauna in the city of Randwick.................................................... 271  

Closed Session (record of voting NOT required)

General Manager’s Report

GM22/18   Director Appointment

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (a) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).

 

City Planning Report

CP51/18    2018 Sports Awards

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (a) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors). (This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (a) of the Local Government Act, as it deals with personnel matters concerning particular individual. (Award winners to be kept confidential until the awards presentation ceremony on 25 October 2018 )

City Services Report

CS48/18    Eurimbla Avenue, Randwick - Proposed Acquisition

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Closed Session (record of voting required)

Corporate Services Reports

CO53/18    Tender for Colocation and Communication Services - T2019-07

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CO54/18    Tender for Server Infrastructure and Associated Maintenance Services - T2019-08

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Notice of Rescission Motion

NR5/18     Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Roberts, Hamilton and Stavrinos - Mayoral Minute - Coogee Beach BBQ - Wattle Day 2018 - National Day of Action - Waiver of Fee................................................................................. 273  

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP42/18

 

Subject:             SECPP - 164-174 Barker Street, Randwick (DA/664/2016/A)

Folder No:                   DA/664/2016/A

Author:                   Louis Coorey, Senior Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Introduction

 

The subject Section 4.55 (2) application seeks to modify the approved development through increase in finished floor level at level 1 by 100mm, increase in roof plant height by 400mm, and a 1m southward extension of Level 7 southern apartments in both Buildings E1.1 and E1.2 within the North-eastern precinct of the Newmarket Site.

 

The original development application (DA) was approved by the Sydney Central Planning Panel on 17 August 2017, for the demolition of the existing structures, construction of the two eight storey buildings including ground level retail/commercial tenancies, 128 residential apartments, 2 basement levels of parking with 137 car spaces, an urban plaza, associated site, remediation and landscape works. The approved scheme allowed an exceedance of the height at the northern end of the buildings fronting Barker Street.

 

Issues

 

The Section 4.55 (2) modification is referred to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel for determination as it was the consent authority for the original DA pursuant to Schedule 4A, of the (former) Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Part 4 of the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011, whereby the development had a capital investment value in excess of $20 million.

 

The Section 4.55 (2) modification was publicly notified to surrounding property owners and was advertised within the local newspaper with site notification attached to the subject site in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013 (RDCP). No submissions were received in response to the public exhibition.

 

The proposed increase in roof plant results in the buildings being increased in height to a maximum of 28.42m for building E1.1 and 28.87 for building E1.2, which is 400mm further beyond the approved height and the maximum height limit of 25m pursuant to RLEP 2012. The approved height for Building E1.1 in DA/664/2016 is RL71.40; this proposed modification increases it to RL71.80. The approved height for Building E1.2 in DA/664/2016 is RL71.85; this proposed modification increases it to RL72.25. The increase in the overall height of the buildings arises from replacing the air-conditioning plant and equipment from individual multi-head split units with a centralised heat recovery VRF system. The benefits include greater energy efficiency and reduced footprint at roof level which in turn allows for more room for photovoltaic cells across the unoccupied areas of the roof. These benefits are considered to sufficiently offset the adverse impacts such as overshadowing and added visual bulk.

 

The proposed increase in Level 1 floor level is minor and the resultant floor to ceiling height will continue to allow ongoing flexibility of building use should there be a demand for first floor commercial in the future

 

The proposed 1m southward extension of level 7 apartments and increase in floor area for both buildings will continue to comply with the maximum FSR approved on the Newmarket Site. The additional floor area within building E1.2 will also result in minimal additional visual bulk and is considered acceptable.  

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:               Excellence in urban design.

Direction 4a:                 Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed modifications relating to the roof height increase, reduction of floor to ceiling height at level 1 and increase in floor area for both buildings do not give rise to unacceptable amenity impacts and would generally maintain the physical massing of the approved development.

 

Having regard to the provisions of Section 4.55 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended, the proposed modifications are considered to result in a development that remains substantially the same as the development for which the consent was originally granted.

 

Approval of the modification will not result in any significant environmental impacts and will not detract from the integrity of the development nor its relationship with adjoining development.

 

Recommendation

 

That the assessment report for the Joint Regional Planning Panel in relation to DA/664/2016/A (164-174 Barker St, RANDWICK) be endorsed by Council.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SECPP Report - Section 96 - DA/664/2016/A - 150-174 Barker St & 181 Botany St & 1-7,18-21 Jane St & 8-20, 28-42 Young St, RANDWICK 

 

 

 

 


SECPP Report - Section 96 - DA/664/2016/A - 150-174 Barker St & 181 Botany St & 1-7,18-21 Jane St & 8-20, 28-42 Young St, RANDWICK

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP43/18

 

Subject:             Prince of Wales Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113) DA - Randwick City Council submission

Folder No:                   F2018/00420

Author:                   Ting Xu, Senior Strategic Planner; Elena  Sliogeris, Senior Environmental Planning Officer - Strategic Planning      

 

Introduction

 

The Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) is seeking comments on the Prince of Wales Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113), development application (DA) including the environmental impact statement (EIS) lodged by Health Infrastructure (HI) located at Avoca, Botany and Magill Streets and Eurimbla Avenue, Randwick.

 

Council officers have prepared a draft submission to the proposal for consideration and endorsement as Attachment 1.

 

The State Significant Development Application (SSDA) seeks development consent for the construction and operation of a 13 level Acute Services Building (ASB) that will provide facilities that include: an Adults' Emergency Department; Operating Theatres; Central Sterilising Service Department; Intensive Care Unit, Inpatient Units; Ambulance Bays and a Helipad.

 

The ASB (the proposed development) will be built to the west of the existing Randwick Hospital Campus and represents stage 1 of a multi-stage redevelopment program, known as the Randwick Hospitals Campus Redevelopment (the Project). The Project is part of the vision of the NSW Government and the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) for the creation of the Randwick Health and Education Precinct and Randwick Collaboration Area, as a world leading centre for health and wellbeing, research and education and teaching. The NSW Government has committed $720m to progress the Project to address the growing patient demand and need for upgrading aging infrastructure.

 

The following provides background information on the project delivery and timeline, a summary of the proposed development, relevant statutory planning framework and outline of the EIS and Council’s draft submission to the proposal.

 

Project delivery

The Project was previously identified in several key South Eastern Sydney Local Health District (SESLHD) strategic documents, including the Asset Strategic Plan 2012-2017, the Healthcare Services Plan 2012-2017 and the 10-year Capital Investment Strategic Plan, before the NSW Government committed $500 million to the Project in March 2015.

 

In June 2017, an additional $220m was announced in the NSW State Budget, resulting in a total funding commitment of $720m for the Project. This announcement confirmed the NSW Government’s commitment to expand the existing campus to the west, as the best way to integrate health, research and education partners and deliver high-quality co-located clinical services to grow Randwick as a centre for medical and academic excellence.

 

The delivery of the Randwick Hospitals Campus Redevelopment Project will occur through a multi-stage redevelopment program which will be realised as follows:

 

1.   Acquisition of the land to the immediate west of the existing Campus which is bordered by High, Botany and Magill Streets and Hospital Road and the land that constitutes the local road known as Eurimbla Avenue, Randwick. The acquisition of the land is the subject of an ongoing acquisition program by the Health Administration Corporation, of which majority of properties have been acquired to date. It is proposed that the land will ultimately be consolidated with the lands on which the existing Campus is located.

 

2.   Carrying out of early works (Precursor Works) is the subject of separate planning approvals including the recently approved DA (DA/208/2018) for the demolition of 92 dwellings and ancillary structures, removal of vegetation (including 11 trees), site remediation, demolition and site clearance activities which was approved by the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel on 4 September 2018; and Review of Environmental Factors (REF).

 

3.   Obtaining development consent for the construction and operation of an Acute Services Building (ASB), as a SSD, which represents Stage 1 of the multi-stage redevelopment program. This is where the project is up to.

 

4.   Construction of additional health education, training and research facilities and clinical service facilities necessary to meet the requirements of the Campus. These additional facilities will be the subject of future planning approvals.

 

The indicative construction program outlines (on page 33 of the EIS) that the precursor works are intended to commence in October 2018 and end in early 2019; and for the SSDA construction works (subject of this report) intended to commence in early 2019 and finish in 2022.

 

The following diagram summarises the project timeline.

 

Source: randwickcampusredevelopment.health.nsw.gov.au

 

The proposed development

The SSDA seeks development consent for bulk earthworks; construction and operation of a 13 level building, including providing the following facilities: an emergency department; operating theatres; central sterilising service department; intensive care unit, inpatient units; and ambulance bays; overhead pedestrian links to existing hospital buildings; a helipad on the uppermost roof of the building; Magill Street road works, Botany Street signalised intersection, internal roads and drop-off/pick-up areas; and utility, site infrastructure and landscaping works. A proposed site plan is shown below.

 

High St

Source: EIS (2018) Randwick Hospitals Campus Redevelopment – Stage 1, pg. 4

 

The subject site occupies a key position between the western boundary of the Campus and the eastern boundary of the University of New South Wales (UNSW); and is bound by Botany Street to the west, Hospital Road (including part of the Campus) to the east, Magill Street to the south and part Eurimbla Avenue to the north, as shown in the figure below. The site encompasses a total of 53 lots (either in whole or in part).

Source: EIS (2018) Randwick Hospitals Campus Redevelopment – Stage 1, pg.19

 

Statutory planning

The proposed development is declared to be a SSDA as a “hospital” in accordance with Clause 14 of Schedule 1 of the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011 (SRD SEPP) with a Capital Investment Value (CIV) of more than $30million. Section 4.12(8) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act) requires the SSDA to be accompanied by an EIS, which is assessed against the provisions of Section 4.15 of the Act.

 

The DPE is coordinating the assessment process with the Minister for Planning (the Minister) the consent authority, as Health Infrastructure (Health Administration Corporation) (the applicant) is a public authority. If Council objects and/or more than 25 submissions have been received objecting to the SSD, Departmental officers would not be able to exercise delegations and it would go to the Minister for determination.

 

The proposed development site is zoned part R2 Low Density Residential and SP2 Health Services Facility under Randwick LEP 2012, see figure below. Both zones are prescribed zones under the Infrastructure SEPP (ISEPP). The proposed development is made permissible under the ISEPP in accordance with Clause 57(1) “development for the purpose of health services facilities may be carried out by any person with consent on land in a prescribed zone.”

 

Source: EIS (2018) Randwick Hospitals Campus Redevelopment – Stage 1, pg.54

 

The EIS indicates that a Planning Proposal will be submitted separately by HI which is intended to “formalise” the zoning as SP2 ‘Health Services Facility’ and to provide consistency with the adjoining SP2 zone on the hospitals campus.

 

Further, it is noted that under the provisions of Clause 5.12 ‘Infrastructure development and use of existing buildings of the Crown’ of Randwick LEP 2012, the proposed development is not subject to compliance with any LEP development standard. In addition, under Clause 11 of the SRD SEPP, the provisions of a DCP do not apply to SSD.

 

The EIS responds to other key State Environmental Planning Policies (SEPPs) and other applicable legislations.

 

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)

The Secretary’s Environmental Assessment Requirements (SEARs) was issued on 12 March 2018 for future development of the site pursuant to Schedule 2 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, which provides environmental assessment requirements that must be addressed as part of the EIS.

 

The EIS responds to the environmental assessment requirements and investigations into: Transport and access; amenity and public domain; structural and civil engineering; air space considerations; building code and accessibility; noise, dust and vibration; construction management; other environmental considerations. It also includes a communications and engagement consultation report which responds to consultation requirements and activities including detailed information on HI’s strategy and approach for engaging stakeholders.

 

The EIS was referred to various departments within Council, including Transport Management, Development Engineering, Landscape Development, Environmental Health and Development Assessment for consideration and comment.  The attached draft submission provides an overview of the key aspects of the EIS, issues raised and recommendations by Council’s technical officers including recommendations.

 

Council’s draft submission

Council’s draft submission (attached) provides an overview of the key aspects of the EIS, issues raised in relation to Bulk and scale, Solar access and overshadowing, Transport, parking and accessibility and other environmental considerations such as flooding and makes recommendations by Council’s technical officers for the Department’s consideration in its assessment of the SSDA.

 

In particular, the draft submission raises concern with regards to the land use interface between the new ASB hospital’s development site and the residences along Magill Street. In response, the draft submission makes recommendations to modify the ASB design to improve the interface and amenity for those residences along Magill Street.

 

Council officers will prepare draft conditions of consent (once the submission is endorsed) for the Department’s consideration in its assessment of the SSDA to give effect to the key recommendations as outlined in the submission.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 8: A strong local economy.

Direction 8b: Support and strengthen the Hospital and University Precinct’s provision of specialised education and health services, and employment growth.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Prince of Wales Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113) DA represents Stage 1 of the multi-stage redevelopment program to realise the strategic objectives of the NSW Government and Greater Sydney Commission, for the Randwick Education and Health Precinct to be globally renowned for excellence in health, teaching and education. Notwithstanding these key strategic objectives, Council officers have prepared a draft submission which raises key concerns and makes recommendations in particular, to better consider the new hospitals interface with the adjoining residential uses along Magill Street.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the attached draft submission to forward to the Department of Planning and Environment for consideration;

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Prince of Wales Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113) DA - Randwick City Council draft submission

 

 


Prince of Wales Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113) DA - Randwick City Council draft submission

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP44/18

 

Subject:             Short-term Holiday Letting

Folder No:                   F2006/00158

Author:                   Roman Wereszczynski, Manager Health, Building & Regulatory Services        

 

Introduction

 

The NSW government has recently passed a Bill (Fair Trading Amendment (short-term rental accommodation) Bill 2018, which proposes to introduce new laws to govern and manager short-term holiday letting of homes and apartments in NSW.

 

The proposed legislation has not been assented to at the time of this report.

 

Background

 

The introduction of the Bill follows the release of a Discussion Paper on this issue in 2017 and consideration of submissions by the Department of Planning & Environment.

 

On 27 March 2018, Council also resolved (Stavrinos/Hamilton) “that Council bring back a report on the impacts of Airbnb rental accommodation and ways in which Council can tackle issues associated with this type of letting.”

 

Issues

 

The introduction and expansion of online platforms (such as Airbnb and Stayz) in recent years, has changed the way that short-term holiday letting is occurring in NSW.  And the NSW government and many local Councils have been grappling with this practice for some time.

 

The regulation of short-term holiday rental accommodation in NSW has been the subject of a great deal of debate and opposing views.  On one-hand, it has significant economic and tourism benefits.  As well as providing some supplementary income to help home-owners and residents manage their significant mortgage or rental commitments.  On the other-hand, short-term holiday letting of a dwelling may impact upon the neighbouring homes or apartments.

 

The exact number of homes and apartments being operated by these online platforms within the Randwick local government area is unknown.  However, it is estimated to be in the vicinity of 3000 houses or apartments, providing various forms or extent of accommodation.

 

Current Regulatory Framework

There are currently no specific provisions relating to this type of use of a dwelling that apply throughout the State.  Some NSW Councils (particularly those in areas that have a high number of rental accommodation for tourists and visitors) have introduced provision in their Local Environmental Plans (LEP’s), to define the scope and terms in which short-term holiday letting may apply in those areas, with or without consent. For example, some Council LEP’s contain provisions which allow for a dwelling to be used for tourist accommodation for up to 90 days (or other period) per year without requiring development consent.

 

Randwick City Council’s Local Environmental Plan 2012 does not contain any specific provisions which facilitate short-term holiday letting in the area under specified conditions.

 

In either case, from a regulatory perspective, the investigation of concerns or complaints about short-term holiday letting, would be undertaken under the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, Council’s Local Environmental Plan, other relevant planning instruments and Council’s Enforcement Policy. These types of investigations are complex and time-consuming, as evidence of the exact operation of a premises may not be available and the lack of any specific planning provisions or operational guidelines, does not assist.

 

The nature and scale in which a house or apartment is used for these purposes can also vary significantly.  Ranging from the allocation of one-room in a dwelling to visitors, with shared use of living rooms, kitchen and bathroom for a limited period; to the letting of an entire dwelling to visitors for 365 days of the year. Therefore, the specific nature and scale of the operation is of significant importance to be able to determine whether or not the use and operation of the dwelling is contrary to the approved use of the premises.  It is also necessary to determine and obtain evidence of any safety or amenity impacts to nearby residents, to take regulatory action in the event of a breach of the Act.

 

In this regard, in general terms, the partial use of a dwelling for a long-period or the full use of a dwelling for a limited period, may not require development consent, if the principal-use of the house or apartment remains as a dwelling.  On the other-hand, the use of an entire home or apartment for this type of accommodation on a permanent or long-term basis would generally be considered to require development consent.

 

Under the current regulatory framework and the operational capacity of Council, short-term holiday letting would generally need to be of a substantial, long-term nature and scale, with demonstrated safety or environmental amenity impacts, to take enforcement action.

 

In cases where Council officers obtain evidence of such a use without consent, Council would implement enforcement action in accordance with Council’s Enforcement Policy.

 

Proposed Regulatory Framework

The Fair Trading Amendment (Short-term Rental Accommodation) Bill 2018 includes a range of provisions which aim to regulate and manage short-term rental accommodation in NSW, by introducing:

 

·       A mandatory Code of Conduct for online booking platforms, letting agents, property managers, hosts and guests.

 

The Code will include a complaints management and adjudication process and a ‘two-strikes and you’re out’ policy.

 

·       Penalties up to $1.1 million if an online booking platform or property agent does not comply with the provisions.

 

·       Changes to relevant planning law – in the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and SEPP (Exempt & Complying Development) Code 2008.

 

These provisions will identify the nature and scale of the short-term rental accommodation use which may be carried out without requiring development consent.

 

In this regard, the government has foreshadowed new planning controls that will allow short-term holiday letting as exempt development for 365 days when the host is not present.  Otherwise development consent would be required.  However, these caps are only foreshadowed at this point.

 

By way of comparison, London has a 90 day cap, France a 180 day cap and Amsterdam a 30 day cap, without requiring planning approval.

 

·       Changes to the Strata Schemes Management Act 2015, to clarify the scope and application of ‘By-Laws’ which may be adopted to prohibit the use of lots for short-term rental accommodation, in certain cases (e.g. where the lot is not the principal residence of the person letting the lot).

 

·       Information and educational material to inform the community, agents and owners–corporations of the provisions and other available options (e.g. By-Laws) which may be introduced to manage and resolve any associated impacts.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6c:      The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The use and expansion of online booking platforms for short-term holiday rental accommodation has, like other online booking platforms (such as Uber), resulting in challenges for government, home-owners, nearby residents and businesses.

 

The current planning and regulatory framework does not contain provisions to effectively deal with these issues and challenges in a reasonable and consistent manner throughout the State.

 

This lack of common planning and regulatory controls results in the implementation of and inconsistent provisions between Councils, having little benefit to the parties involved.

 

The proposed regulatory framework, which is proposed to be introduced in 2019, is considered to be a step in the right direction, by introducing a range of provisions to better define, regulate and manage this industry.  However, many of the finer details of the provisions (including the mandatory Code of Conduct and planning provisions) have not been developed at this stage, which may have a substantial impact on the operation and success of the objectives in this Bill.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the report Short-term Holiday Letting be received and noted.

 

b)        the Councillors be advised of any further developments regarding the short-term holiday letting provisions.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Media Release - Short-term Holiday Letting Policy Given Green Light

 

2.

Fair Trading Amendment (Short-term Rental Accommodation) Bill 2018

 

 

 

 


Media Release - Short-term Holiday Letting Policy Given Green Light

Attachment 1

 

 

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Fair Trading Amendment (Short-term Rental Accommodation) Bill 2018

Attachment 2

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP45/18

 

Subject:             Smart City Strategy

Folder No:                   F2017/00299

Author:                   Rebecca Jacobs, Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Introduction

 

The Smart City Working Group has prepared a Draft Smart City Strategy (Attachment 1) which provides strategic direction to guide Council decision-making and investment in smart city initiatives and further strengthen Council’s leadership in local government innovation.

 

Preliminary Consultation

 

Council’s internal Smart City Working Group (SCWG), established in 2017, has been driving, developing and fostering collaboration and communication on smart city initiatives across the organisation. The SCWG has been building the smart city capacity of the organisation and will continue to collaborate, expand partnerships and provide guidance on implementation of the Strategy.

 

Initial consultation was carried out between March and May 2018 with staff, the community, businesses and key stakeholders to inform the Draft Smart City Strategy. Engagement sessions with stakeholders were facilitated by Delos Delta, a prominent Australian smart city consultant with experience working with local government on smart city strategies and implementation.

 

The following activities were carried out as part of the preliminary engagement:

 

·       Establishment of a dedicated web page (yoursayrandwick.com.au);

·       Mayor’s message in the local media;

·       Workshops with Council’s staff and community;

·       Online survey for the community and a separate one for staff; and

·       Roundtable hosted by the Mayor with key stakeholders, agencies and major institutions.

 

Overall, the community and staff were very supportive of Council’s initiative to develop a smart city strategy and use smart technology to improve the way our community interacts with the urban environment.

 

The top three areas identified in the community survey for the application of smart technology were:

 

1.   Environmental sustainability

2.   Better social outcomes

3.   Better local services

 

A detailed summary of the consultation undertaken is contained in the Delos Delta report dated June 2018 at Attachment 2.

 

 

 

 

Draft Smart City Strategy

 

The SCWG has prepared the Draft Smart City Strategy to provide a roadmap for how Council will respond to and take advantage of technological changes to address local challenges and improve service delivery. The Strategy recognises Council’s strengths and sets the direction for smart city action for the next ten years. 

 

In 2018, Council adopted the Digital Strategy, which provides the resourcing framework for adopting new technologies and work practices to enhance the way we

do business and provide services to our customers. The Smart City Strategy builds on the objectives and projects identified in the Digital Strategy and looks beyond Council’s technological capabilities and infrastructure needs to address the wide range of priorities identified in the Randwick City Plan.

 

An assessment methodology has been developed by the Smart City Working Group for prioritising smart city projects, consisting of a preliminary criteria and an assessment criteria. The preliminary criteria eliminates project ideas that do not comply with existing legislation and policy and are inconsistent with the principles of the Strategy. The assessment criteria will be used to rate and categorise ideas based on their cost, benefits and capacity for Council to deliver the project.

 

Smart city ideas identified during the preliminary consultation include:

 

·       Monitoring of Randwick City’s tree canopy;

·       Online booking for sportsfields, parks and venues;

·       Integrated data platform to utilise, manage and visualise information;

·       Smart parking at key locations; and

·       Sensors placed on our assets to improve servicing e.g. gross pollutant traps, bins, BBQs and parks.

 

With the support of relevant staff and consideration of financial resources, an implementation plan will be prepared which identifies projects to be pursued and the timeframe for delivery.

 

The vision, principles, objectives and ideas contained within the Strategy have been shaped by a two month consultation program which ran between March and May 2018. A formal exhibition period later in 2018 will provide further feedback to refine and finalise the Strategy.

 

Formal exhibition

 

Following Council’s endorsement, the Draft Smart City Strategy will be placed on public exhibition for a period of 4 weeks to enable the community to provide feedback on the Draft Strategy. The final Smart City Strategy incorporating community feedback can be reported back to Council by the end of 2018.

 

The planned exhibition activities include:

 

·       Updated web page (yoursayrandwick.com.au);

·       News item on the website and in the E-news;

·       Direct email inviting submissions on the draft Strategy;

·       Social media promotion; and

·       Media release

 

Implementation

 

The SCWG will continue operating to coordinate the implementation of the Strategy and liaise with the Digital Strategy staff steering group on matters such as governance, resourcing and specific projects.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter at this stage. The Smart City Working Group, with the support of relevant staff, will use the assessment criteria above and consideration of financial impacts to prioritise projects to be progressed in the short-term. An implementation plan will be prepared which identifies projects to be pursued and the time frame for delivery.

 

Conclusion

 

The Smart City Working Group, coordinated by Strategic Planning, has prepared the Draft Smart City Strategy. The pace of technological change is accelerating, and this strategy prepares Randwick for the significant opportunities and challenges we will face. This Smart City Strategy identifies how Council can embrace change and leverage our existing programs, partnerships and assets to plan, enhance, improve, monitor and report within a quickly changing digital landscape.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the Draft Smart City Strategy for public exhibition.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Draft Smart City Strategy

Included under separate cover

2.

Smart City Engagement Report - June 2018 - Delos Delta

 

 

 

 


Smart City Engagement Report - June 2018 - Delos Delta

Attachment 2

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP46/18

 

Subject:             Marine Park Proposal

Folder No:                   F2005/00036

Author:                   Bronwyn Englaro, Senior Sustainability Officer      

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Government recently announced a new Marine Park proposal within the Hawkesbury shelf Bioregion, an area extending from Newcastle to Wollongong.

Comprising a total of 25 sites, the Marine Park proposal includes 10 existing Aquatic Reserves, one extension and 14 new sites. There are three sites within the Randwick LGA, Bronte Coogee, Long Bay and Cape Banks.

 

The Marine Park proposal is designed to reduce site-based threats; provide additional protection for some of the best examples of the bioregion’s marine biodiversity and to conserve marine biodiversity for current and future generations.

 

The NSW Marine Estate Management Authority (MEMA) is seeking comments until 27 September 2018 on the Marine Park proposal and the associated management changes.

 

A draft submission on this Marine Park Proposal is attached to this report (Attachment 5).

 

Overall, the Marine Park Proposal will enhance the conservation of marine biodiversity and maximise environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits to the NSW community, however a number of issues are raised which are summarised in this report.

 

Marine Park Proposal

 

Under the proposal for the bioregion, the Marine Park proposal introduces three new zones:

 

·       Sanctuary Zones to enhance biodiversity and allow a range of activities such as snorkelling, diving and boating. These no-take sanctuary zones are areas where line fishing, spearfishing, hand gathering and commercial fishing are prohibited.

·       Conservation Zones to provide a high level of environmental benefit and allow abalone and lobster fishing; and

·       Special Purpose Zones to address a specific threat or allow a certain activity such as recreational fishing on an artificial reef (this zone does not apply to Randwick).

 

In this proposal Council’s two existing Aquatic Reserves and an Intertidal Protection Area at Long Bay have been retained.

 

Proposed Changes to the Bronte Coogee Aquatic Reserve

 

The Bronte Coogee Aquatic Reserve has been expanded from a coverage 40 hectares and a distance of 100m offshore distance (Attachment 1) to an area of 2028 hectares and 3 nautical miles (5.56 km) off shore (Attachment 2). This is proposed to include a near shore no take sanctuary zone extending to a 50 metre water depth (~2km from the shoreline) and a conservation zone from which lobster and abalone fishing will be permitted. No line fishing or boat fishing is proposed to be permitted within the Aquatic reserve.

 

Proposed changes to the Cape Banks Aquatic Reserve

 

The Cape Banks Aquatic Reserve off Henry Head and Cape Banks at La Perouse is proposed to be expanded seaward (up to ~650m offshore) to cover a total of 69 hectares from the current 18 hectare site (Attachment 4). The entire Aquatic Reserve area off the coast of the Kamay Botany Bay National Park is proposed as a no take sanctuary zone where all fishing would be prohibited.

 

Long Bay (no changes)

 

Long Bay is currently one of nine Intertidal Protection Areas (IPAs) in the Bioregion. These extend from the mean high water mark to 10 metres seaward of the mean low water mark. They protect all species of cunjevoi and invertebrates except abalone, eastern rock lobster and southern rock lobster. No changes to management rules or closure boundaries are proposed.

 

Background

 

Declaration

In June 2001 Council supported the Aquatic Reserve Consultation Paper and resolved to advise NSW Fisheries that Randwick City Council supports the declaration of both the Bronte-Coogee and the La Perouse candidate sites as Aquatic Reserves.

 

On 31 March 2002 the Bronte-Coogee Aquatic Reserve and the Cape Banks Aquatic Reserve were declared by the Minister.

 

This site was previously declared as an Intertidal Protected Area from 1993 to 2002 to protect the rocky habitats and intertidal species.

 

Operational Agreement

 

In February 2005 Council resolved that the Mayor seek to meet with NSW Fisheries to discuss, on behalf of Council, the management arrangements which are in place, enforcement issues and educational opportunities within the Aquatic Reserves and in particular Clovelly Bay.

 

In response a draft operational agreement between Council and Department of Primary Industries (DPI) Fisheries was developed for the Aquatic Reserve. This operational agreement was developed to define the responsibilities and associated communication arrangements between Council and DPI with regard to the management of the Bronte Coogee Aquatic Reserve.

 

A final version of the agreement was approved and signed by both parties in February 2006. A similar agreement was developed with Waverley Council for their portion of the Aquatic Reserve.

 

Hawkesbury Shelf Marine Bioregion Assessment

 

In 2014 a Marine Estate Community Survey was conducted to evaluate the values and attitudes of the NSW community towards the Marine Estate and this included a public online survey.

 

In 2016 Marine Estate Management Authority prepared the Hawkesbury Shelf Marine Bioregion Assessment Discussion Paper which incorporates community feedback, including a submission from Council. This paper assessed the adequacies of the current system of Aquatic Reserves and the marine components of National Parks in the Hawkesbury Shelf marine bioregion.

 

This Assessment was accompanied in 2017 by an evidence-based “Threat and Risk Assessment (TARA) for the NSW marine estate”.

 

This Discussion Paper and community survey have led to the development of the recently released a 10-year Marine Estate Management Strategy and associated Marine Park Proposal.

 

Current situation

 

Fishing Restrictions in the Bronte Coogee Aquatic Reserve

Spearfishing is currently prohibited in Clovelly Bay, Gordons Bay and surrounding waters. In this Reserve it is also prohibited to collect cunjevoi or any marine invertebrates except blacklip abalone, eastern rock lobster and southern rock lobster. Sea anemones, barnacles, chitons, cockles, crabs, mussels, octopus, oysters, pipis, sea urchins, sea stars, snails and worms cannot be collected. Moreover, empty shells cannot be collected in the Reserve because they provide homes for living organisms. Marine vegetation cannot be collected except for sea lettuce and bait weed.

 

The Blue Groper (Achoerodus viridis) has an iconic status within the eastern suburbs community, and in this Reserve recreational divers and snorkelers enjoy swimming with the local groper population. The Blue Groper has been afforded extra protection through a fishing closure in Clovelly and Gordon’s Bay sections of the Reserve.

 

Recreational user conflict

 

The 2016 Discussion Paper identified conflict between fishers and other groups as a threat to social and economic benefits of the marine bioregion. User conflict was raised as an ongoing management issue in Council’s submission to this discussion paper in 2016. Council receives numerous letters from residents and visitors regarding this recreational user conflict.

 

This conflict is predominantly associated with recreational fishing (line and spear gun) at popular swimming and snorkelling sites where overcrowding causes potential or perceived conflict and risks between these user groups.

 

The Bronte-Coogee Aquatic Reserve is a readily accessible high quality diving and snorkelling location and hence is very popular with a variety of user groups. Line fishing within the Reserve particularly from the breakwater at Clovelly is currently permissible under the Aquatic Reserve and continues to pose a significant safety risk to swimmers and is an ongoing management issue for Council lifeguards and Rangers.

 

While a line fishing ban in the highly popular sections of the Aquatic Reserve are supported in order to reduce user conflict with swimmers/divers, this would include embayment areas of Clovelly Bay and Gordon’s Bay. However it is also recognised that line fishing may be feasible in other areas of the Reserve, where there are no or a low number of swimmers/divers. This consideration has not been determined to date and requires further investigation. Subsequently it is recommended that this issue be addressed via the Management Planning process for the Marine Park.

 


 

Fishing Restrictions in the Cape Banks Aquatic Reserve

 

Currently in this reserve (Attachment 3) it is prohibited to collect marine invertebrates and marine vegetation with the exception of sea lettuce and bait weed and blacklip abalone, eastern rock lobster and southern rock lobster. Other forms of recreational fishing is currently permitted in this area i.e. line fishing and boat fishing.

Similar to the approach taken for the Bronte Coogee Aquatic Reserve, consideration should be given to allowing line and boat fishing in restricted locations as part of the Management Planning process.

 

Matters raised in draft submission

The following matters are contained in Council’s submission:

 

·       Review of the proposed conservation zone for the Bronte Coogee Aquatic Reserve to include additional fishing uses and to apply a distance from the shore as currently applies rather than proposed water depth which would be difficult to measure;

·       Preparation of a Management Plan for the marine park a priority to provide a  legislative instrument to define zone boundaries and address compliance enforcement implications;

·       Inclusion of the Grey Nurse shark critical habitat at Magic Point, South Maroubra in the marine park proposal as a key site to ensure its recognition and future protection;

·       The requested inclusion of additional  community consultation during the Management Plan preparation process;

·       The recommended inclusion of greater community awareness and education activities to promote the Marine Park during the implementation stage following the Management Plan completion; and

·       Support for the Cape Banks Sanctuary Zone given its proximity to the existing Kamay Botany Bay National Park and its long-term scientific research value.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  A Healthy Environment

Direction:  Direction 10c: Bushland, open spaces and biodiversity are protected and enhanced for future generations

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Marine Estate Management Authority after four years of assessments and community consultation activities have proposed a Marine Park for the Hawkesbury Shelf Bioregion. It is recommended that further adjustments and refinements to the park zoning boundaries are necessary and can be achieved through community consultation during the Management Plan development process. Clarification is also sought on a number of issues in the proposal from MEMA in its submission on this proposal.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the draft submission on the Marine Park proposal (Attachment 5).

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Map of Bronte-Coogee-Aquatic-Reserve

 

2.

Proposed  Bronte Coogee Management Zones and rules

 

3.

Current Cape Banks Aquatic Reserve

 

4.

Proposed Cape Banks  map and rules

 

5.

Draft Randwick submission on Hawkesbury Shelf Marine Park

 

 

 

 


Map of Bronte-Coogee-Aquatic-Reserve

Attachment 1

 

 

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Proposed  Bronte Coogee Management Zones and rules

Attachment 2

 

 

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Current Cape Banks Aquatic Reserve

Attachment 3

 

 

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Proposed Cape Banks  map and rules

Attachment 4

 

 

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Draft Randwick submission on Hawkesbury Shelf Marine Park

Attachment 5

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP48/18

 

Subject:             Cultural and Community Grant Program - Recommended Allocations - September 2018

Folder No:                   F2009/00182

Author:                   Warren Ambrose, Senior Social Planner      

 

Introduction

 

The Cultural and Community Grants Program was endorsed by Council on 28 April 2009 and commenced in June 2009.  The Cultural and Community Grants Program provides financial support to creative arts and cultural projects that encourage community participation and vibrancy within the City of Randwick. The Grants Program, assessed twice a year in March and September, is linked to actions and strategies identified within the Council’s Cultural Plan, A Cultural Randwick City.  This Program covers both in-kind and cash contribution requests from grant applications. 

 

This report recommends the allocation of funds from the Grants Program for the September 2018 Round. The September 2018 Round is the first of two funding rounds for the 2018/19 financial year. A total of $110,000 is available for distribution across the September 2018 and March 2019 Rounds.  The Council has received 21 applications seeking a grant total of $124,303.16 (in-kind and cash).

 

Details of the applications recommended for funding are listed in Attachment One. Applications not recommended for funding are listed in Attachment Two.

 

Of the 21 applications received, thirteen (13) applications fully met the funding criteria and therefore have been recommended by the assessment panel to receive funds totalling $55,926.25

 

All applicants will be advised about the outcomes of their grant application.

 

Issues

 

Cultural and Community Grants Program Background

The Cultural and Community Grants Program has an annual budget of $110,000. This amount covers both in-kind and cash contribution requests from grant applications. There are two funding rounds per financial year, in March and September.  The program is promoted in the local newspaper, on the Council’s website, and email through local community networks.

 

The Cultural and Community Grants Program funding is awarded to locally based not-for-profit organisations or community groups. The applicants are required to demonstrate that their project benefits a cross section of our diverse community, and that no entry fees are chargeable.

 

The resulting activities or events must be held in the City of Randwick. Applicants may seek grants from Council as an in-kind contribution only (waiver of Council fees and charges), cash contribution only, or a combination of in-kind and cash contribution. 

 


 

September Round 2018-19 Assessment

The assessment process was undertaken by a panel of Council officers, with expertise in community services, governance, grants administration, and Council’s Internal Auditor. The panel met to assess the 21 grant applications for compliance with the program’s funding priorities and guidelines, and the organisation’s capacity to deliver on the program outcomes. Each application was assigned a numerical score reflecting a priority ranking of A, B or C. Priority levels are detailed below:

 

·          Priority A: High priority for funding. The project is consistent with program funding priorities and has special weighting and compares well with other applicants.

·          Priority B: Possibly fund if sufficient funds are available. Application meets eligibility criteria but with lower scores than the Priority A applications.  Priority B applications may lack adequate detail or be poorly targeted.

·          Priority C: Does not meet the eligibility criteria.

The Program requires and expects a high level of accountability from grant recipients. As part of the funding acquittal process, all recipients who have received grants are required to provide evidence that the activity or event was held, and to complete an End of Project report.

 

Through this grant assessment process, a total of thirteen (13) of the twenty one (21) applications fully met the funding criteria.  As such, this report recommends the allocation of $55,926.25 ($20,638.98 in-kind and $35,287.27 in cash) to the thirteen (13) eligible applications under this funding round.

 

The recommended grant applicants and a brief description of their proposed projects/events are summarised below:

 

·          $11,707.82 to the Coogee Chamber of Commerce for project Coogee Family Fun Day 2018. Cash funds ($6,705.00) towards staging and a reptile education display. In-kind funds ($5,002.82) for the use of Goldstein Reserve for their annual Family Fun Day.

·          $1,113.64 to the Coogee Surf Life Savings Club for the project Coogee Surf Life Saving Club Carnival. In-kind funds ($1,113.64) for the use of Coogee Beach, parking spaces and waste collection, to hold the Club’s Carnival. 

·          $ 4,087.26 to the Coogee Surf Life Savings Club for the project Coogee Island Challenge.  In-kind funds ($4,087.26) for the use of Coogee Beach for the event. 

·          $ 3,900.00 to the Eurimbla Precinct History Association Inc. for their Eurimbla Precinct History Project. Cash funds ($3,900.00) towards the documentation and publication detailing the history of the precinct which will be demolished to make way for the expanded Randwick Hospital precinct.

·          $3,500.00 to the Guriwal Aboriginal Corporation for the project Breast Cancer 10 Year Anniversary. Cash funds ($3,500.00) towards catering for a 10th anniversary function to celebrate the lives of people who have suffered and those who the struggle got the better of them.

·          $5,086.36 to the Holdsworth Community for the project International Day of People with Disability Dinner Dance. Cash funds ($3,268.18) towards catering and entertainment.  In-kind funds ($1,818.18) for use of Prince Henry Centre for a dinner dance to celebrate International Day of People with a Disability for adults living with a disability and their family/cares living in Randwick LGA.

·          $2,197.27 to the Kooloora Community Centre for the project Christmas at Kooloora Cash funds ($2,197.27) towards a luncheon for residents of Bilga Crescent Estate and volunteers.  The luncheon’s aim is to celebrate their community, bring people together, reduce social cohesion, and encourage inclusion.

·          $3,590.90 to the Junction Neighbourhood Centre for the project Maroubra Creative Writers Cash funds ($3,500.00) towards a series of creative writing sessions and the production and printing of a book of their writing, In-kind funds ($90.91) to use the Bowen Library’s Vonnie Young Auditorium for a book launch.

·          $3,135.00    to the Old Friends Singers Group for the project  Social Activities and Entertainment for Seniors  In-kind funds ($3,135.00) for the use of the Maroubra Senior Citizens Centre for 37 days, for social activities.

·          $3,818.18   to the South Eastern Community Connect for the project Kensington Park Community Centre Supported Playgroup In-kind funds ($3,818.18) to use the Kensington Park Community Centre for their playgroup.

·          $2,816.82  to the St Andrew’s Catholic Church for the project Pere Receveur Commemoration Mass Cash funds ($2,816.82) towards costs associated with holding their annual Commemoration Mass

·          $5,973.00 to the Sydney Multicultural Community Services for the project Multicultural Seniors Carnivale Cash funds ($4,400.00) towards catering, accessible transport, and entertainment costs.  In-kind funds ($1,573.00) to use Prince Henry Centre to hold the Multicultural Seniors Carnivale.

·          $5,000.00 to The Junction Neighbourhood Centre for the project Matraville Family Fun Day 2018. This large community event celebrates local people their community and their stories at Memorial Park Duffy’s Corner. Cash funds ($5,000.00) towards infrastructure items such as a rockwall, marque, chairs, tables, generator, inflatable dragon slide, and porta loos.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  5:     Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction:  5b:   A range of cultural, sporting and leisure activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

No additional financial impact. The recommended for allocation of $55,926.25 the September 2018 funding round falls within the annual grants budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Cultural and Community Grants Program plays an important role in supporting cultural and community activities that contribute to the vibrancy of the City of Randwick.  It is an important program to help the Council achieve its vision of building a “sense of community”.

     

The assessment panel has recommended the funding of thirteen (13) applications, totalling $55,926.25 in cash and in-kind contributions under the current funding round.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council approves the allocation of Cultural and Community Program funds totalling $55,926.25 to be allocated to the recommended grant applicants as listed in Attachment One.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Cultural and Community Grant Program - September 2018 Round - applications recommended for funding

 

2.

Cultural and Community Grant Program - September 2018 Round - applications not recommended for funding

 

 

 

 


Cultural and Community Grant Program - September 2018 Round - applications recommended for funding

Attachment 1

 

 

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Cultural and Community Grant Program - September 2018 Round - applications not recommended for funding

Attachment 2

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP49/18

 

Subject:             Randwick City Council Compliance and Enforcement Policy

Folder No:                   F2004/06770

Author:                   Roman Wereszczynski, Manager Health, Building & Regulatory Services        

 

Introduction

 

Council’s current Enforcement Policy was adopted by Council on 22 March 2016 and it is proposed to update the policy to incorporate recent amendments to legislation and regulatory functions carried out by Council.

 

The purpose of Council’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy is to assist and guide Council’s regulatory officers and provide a framework which aims to ensure that Council’s regulatory, compliance and enforcement functions are implemented in an appropriate, consistent and effective manner.

 

The policy mainly applies to Council’s regulatory officers, but also provides information about Council’s compliance and enforcement activities, considerations and actions for the community. The policy may also be referenced in reviews and audits of Council’s processes and in Court proceedings.

 

The attached draft policy is principally the same as Council’s current Enforcement Policy, with a number of updated provisions and new sections to encompass abandoned vehicles and boat trailers.

 

Issues

 

Aims, objectives and purpose of Council’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy

The adoption and implementation of the proposed policy aims to satisfy Council’s obligations and charter under section 8 of the Local Government Act 1993, “…. to ensure that, in the exercise of its regulatory functions, it acts consistently and without bias, particularly where an activity of the council is affected…”.

 

The adoption and implementation of a Council Enforcement Policy is also highly recommended by the NSW Ombudsman and the proposed policy has been developed having regard to the NSW Ombudsman Enforcement Guidelines for Councils published in December 2015.

 

Councils are responsible for a diverse range of compliance and enforcement functions, with a wide range of regulatory options, ranging from taking no action (i.e. in relation a minor or technical breach), to the issue of a penalty notice (on-the-spot fine) to various types of Court proceedings. An Enforcement Policy provides assistance and guidance to Council’s regulatory officers who deal with these regulatory functions on a day-to-day basis.

 

The proposed policy includes details on relevant legislation; investigation processes and considerations; enforcement options; determining appropriate enforcement action; legal options; penalty notices; exempt and complying development abandoned vehicles, boat trailers, certification of development and neighbour disputes.

 

The adoption of an updated Compliance and Enforcement Policy will help ensure that Randwick City Council implements its regulatory functions consistently and effectively across the Council area.

 

New boat trailer provisions

Randwick City Council has recently resolved that the Randwick local government area be identified as a ‘declared area’ for the purposes of section 15A(1) of the Impounding Act 1993, which relates to the parking of boat trailers on roadways within the Randwick local government area.

 

The attached draft policy incorporates a new section (s. 20) to provide guidance to Council’s authorised officers when dealing with customer requests and concerns about boat trailers.

 

In addition to the implementation of these new requirements in accordance with the provisions of the Impounding Act 1993, Council’s authorised officers will take the following additional matters into consideration, when determining an appropriate course of action in a particular case:

 

§  the impact of boat trailer parking in the area;

§  the condition of the boat trailer (e.g. unsightly, state of disrepair or neglect);

§  vehicular, pedestrian safety and amenity impacts;

§  availability of any off-street parking for the boat trailer;

§  the location of the boat trailer in proximity to the owners residence;

§  the location and size of the boat trailer;

§  the number of boat trailers parked in the area; and

§  the ‘registration’ status of the boat trailer.

 

Council’s investigations will principally be ‘complaints-based’ and/or where it is identified by Council’s authorised officers that the parking of boat trailers is having an impact upon the locality.

 

Council will implement these provisions in an appropriate and reasonable manner having regard to its operational resources and the impact and circumstances of each particular case.  Council’s authorised officers are also able to exercise discretion to determine the appropriate course of action in particular cases and to determine not to take regulatory action (e.g. if the boat trailer is not having a material impact upon parking or residential amenity).

 

It is also intended to record and monitor the implementation of these new provisions over the next 12 months and to report back to Council accordingly.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6c:      The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 


 

Conclusion

 

The proposed Compliance and Enforcement Policy has been updated to incorporate a number of legislative changes and regulatory functions carried out by Council’s authorised officers.

 

The proposed policy also includes helpful information which explains the regulatory provisions and processes which apply to specific types of regulatory matters.

 

The proposed policy aims to fulfil Council’s regulatory obligations and charter under the Local Government Act 1993, as well as providing a framework for the implementation of Council’s regulatory functions and services in a consistent, appropriate and accountable manner.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Randwick City Council Compliance and Enforcement Policy be adopted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Draft - Compliance and Enforcement Policy - September 2018

 

 

 

 


Draft - Compliance and Enforcement Policy - September 2018

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Draft - Compliance and Enforcement Policy - September 2018

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP50/18

 

Subject:             Memorandum of Understanding with Department of Education for Randwick Boys and Girls High Schools Sites

Folder No:                   F2018/00416

Author:                   Emese Wolf, Environmental Planning Officer       

 

Introduction

 

The Department of Education (DE) has approached Council seeking its views on the potential for assets on the Randwick Boys and Randwick Girls High Schools sites being shared by the community under a formal arrangement. The Department is currently investigating capital improvements and redesign of both schools as many of the facilities are in need of repair. In June 2018, the NSW Government announced $6 billion funding for school building programs over the next four years including Randwick Boys and Girls High Schools as part of a package of 170 projects across the State.

 

The DE has requested Council enter into a MoU for one year to enable investigations to commence on potential future projects on the school sites.

 

Background

 

In June 2017, the DE released its School Assets Strategic Plan 2031 which outlined a new approach to schools planning. The Plan supports community use of schools as part of any upgrading plans and flexible and adaptable range of facilities which also aligns with objectives in the Greater Sydney Commission’s Regional Plan and actions in the Sydney Eastern District Plan.

 

Strategic Planning, Community Development and Technical Services staff have met with DE representatives to discuss local community needs and opportunities for future community use of the Randwick High Schools sites. Council staff have also provided preliminary advice on the types of uses/activities that would benefit the local community including those which align with Council’s Recreation Needs Study. The Randwick High Schools Sites is a current priority being progressed by the DE.

 

Issues

 

Joint Use Projects

There are around 20 joint use projects being progressed by the Department across the State. Examples of projects include shared sports fields, performing arts centres, community centres, hubs and halls and indoor sporting facilities. Ballina and Tweed Shire Councils have worked with the DE for indoor sports centre and outdoor playing fields and have signed formal agreements.

 

The methodology for progressing joint use projects is outlined in Attachment 1.

 

Joint use projects with councils are intended to provide mutually beneficial outcomes to the school and local community. Financing/investment options are an integral component of joint use projects and both parties would be contributing to the development of new facilities, upgrading existing facilities and maintaining facilities. By contrast the DE has described shared use of facilities as those which are used by other organisations and where the school asset remains in the full control of school facilities (leasing out spaces).

 

Key matters for consideration/negotiation in joint use arrangements are:

 

·      Funding options

·      Construction and maintenance

·      Duration of agreement

·      Hours of use

·      Legal matters

·      Practical matters

·      Security arrangements

·      Length of Tenure

·      Return on investment

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)

The DE has advised that the MoU is as a non-binding agreement which will enable investigations and discussions to commence for joint use opportunities. As shown in the attached process flow chart (Attachment 1), the MoU falls under the Strategic Planning Phase prior to undertaking the Project Planning Phase. Subsequent Project Planning will involve preliminary project feasibility, project design and formal agreements.

Planning Context

Possible opportunities for the Randwick High School Sites will be considered in the context of Council’s Recreation Needs Study, Community Facilities Plan and directions outlined in the Eastern District Plan include:

 

·      Playgrounds, exercise areas, community gardens

·      Community use of sports fields

·      Places for community events

·      Opportunities for creative arts

·      Opportunities for night time activities

·      Shared spectator facilities and amenities

·      Opportunities for social connections including cultural activities

·      Use of school halls for performances

·      Connecting areas of public open space (eg proposed Newmarket open space and Paine Reserve)

·      Improved connectivity with the Prince of Wales Hospitals Campus and adjoining proposed Newmarket site

·      Improved transport connectivity through the Hospitals site and High Street/ Belmore Road       

 

Advisory Group

To progress the investigations, a Joint Use Project Advisory Group, comprising Council and DE staff will be established. The group would be responsible for developing an ‘Investigation Program’ to guide investigation of agreed priority projects. The Group would be made up of 5 members from each organisation, with additional staff or consultants also invited to meetings as required. Responsibilities of the group are outlined in the attached MoU and essentially relate to the manner in which discussions will progress between the parties and working in an efficient and productive manner to assist with delivery of projects.

 

The advisory group would be making recommendations on joint use projects and operating on a consensus basis.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  2 A vibrant and diverse community

Direction:  2a Meet the needs of our diverse community and provide equitable access to social services and infrastructure

Direction: 2b Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies

Direction:  2c New and upgraded community facilities that are multi-purpose and in accessible locations

Outcome   5 Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities

Direction: 5a Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both passive and active open space uses

Direction: 5b Facilitate a range of sporting and leisure activities

Direction: 5c Create new open space opportunities arise

Outcome:  6 A Liveable City

Direction:  6a Our public Infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet community expectations and defined levels of service

Direction:  6d A strategic land use framework provides for our lifestyle changes and for a continuing, yet steady rate of growth across out City.

Direction:  10a Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council proceed with investigating joint use projects, both parties will need to undertake an opportunity analysis review, design consideration, feasibility and procurement options.

 

Conclusion

 

An MoU with the DE will be a non-binding agreement that will enable discussions between Council & DE staff to continue. Once priority projects are clarified and agreed, both parties can progress to the next stage of carrying out an ‘Investigation Program’ in accordance with the DE process. Council staff will need to further consider and review project opportunities on a needs basis and identify appropriate staff to be involved in the Advisory Group.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council agree to enter into an MoU with the Department of Education for a period of one year to enable investigations on agreed joint use projects on the Randwick Boys and Girls High Schools sites that deliver community benefits.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1- Overview process - Joint Use Projects - Department of Education

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1- Overview process - Joint Use Projects - Department of Education

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS42/18

 

Subject:             Supporting "Sense of Community' Street Parties

Folder No:                   F2009/00454

Author:                   Stephen Audet, Acting Manager Technical Services      

 

Introduction

 

Council receives a number of requests to temporarily close roads for street parties. Street parties can be a positive way of allowing residents and neighbours to interact, reinforcing community values and creating a true “Sense of Community”.

 

Under the Roads and Maritime Services guidelines, temporary road closures for such street parties are able to be approved by Council directly, provided that the applicants adhere to the guidelines. The standard conditions that Council imposes on event organisers are to keep the general public and the participants of the event safe, to direct traffic safely around the event, to inform the emergency services of the event and to reduce the impacts of the event on non-event users.

 

Issues

 

The usual way to manage traffic for temporary road closures, in order to comply with the relevant WHS act, is to create a Traffic Control Plan (TCP). A TCP describes the layout of traffic control devices such as barriers and signs. The layout should be designed by suitably qualified traffic control designers.

 

To further assist residents of Randwick in planning street parties, it is proposed that traffic control measures required for neighbourhood street parties be arranged by Council, on behalf of the event organiser.

 

Council’s insurers confirm that approved street party events may be able to be provided under Council’s Casual Hirers protection through Statewide Mutual.  This cover is for a public liability claim arising from an incident which occurs upon the street.  Event organisers will need to satisfy the requirements of Council’s insurer prior to the approval of the street party being granted.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:     A Vibrant and Diverse Community.

Direction 2c:    Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

Outcome 6:     A Liveable City.

Direction 6c:    the safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Depending on the dates and times of the proposed street party, the traffic control would be undertaken by Council staff or by external contractors.  In 2017, Council received eleven applications for street parties to be held during the months of November and December.

 

The cost to resource and support eleven (11) events would be $15,000.  It is proposed to use the funds from the Community Donations budget.

 

Conclusion

 

As part of Council’s commitment to building “a sense of community”, it is proposed to continue to support and encourage neighbourhood street parties. To safely close the road to facilitate street parties, appropriate traffic control needs to be implemented. Council has been assisting by arranging and funding, on behalf of the residents, all traffic control measures associated with street parties.

 

It is recommended that this support be continued for 2018.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

1.     support “Sense of Community” street parties in 2018 by arranging, on behalf of residents:

 

a)   traffic control plans

b)   the preparation of traffic management plans and road occupancy licences for submission to the RMS (if necessary), and

c)   all traffic control measures associated with street parties including all signage and equipment as well as labour on the day of the event.

 

2.     vote $15,000 to cover the costs associated with the 2018 street party applications with funds being allocated from the Community Donations budget.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS43/18

 

Subject:             Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study

Folder No:                   F2016/00369

Author:                   Sebastien  Le Coustumer, Drainage Engineer      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council is responsible for local land use planning in its Local Government Area. Council is progressively studying flood behaviour within its catchments in accordance with the process presented in the Floodplain Development Manual. It allows Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The first step in the floodplain management process is to complete a flood study. The specialist consultant WMAWater was engaged by Council to undertake the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study.

 

The Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road catchment covers a total area of 9.9 km2 and is located both in Randwick City Council and City of Bayside Council. The study area encompasses the suburbs of Kingsford, South Coogee, Daceyville, Pagewood, Maroubra, Eastgardens, Hillsdale, Banksmeadow, Matraville and Port Botany.

 

The study components are to:

 

-    undertake a community consultation program and collate available historical flood related data;

-    prepare suitable hydraulic models and calibrate the models against historical events;

-    undertake design flood estimation and provide design flood levels, depths, velocities, flows and flood extents;

-    provide provisional hydraulic hazard and hydraulic category mapping;

-    assess sensitivity to potential climate change effects;

-    identify flooding “hotspots”;

-    identify properties that are flood affected.

 

The Draft Flood Study for the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road catchment was presented at the March 2018 Ordinary Council meeting. It was resolved to place the document on public exhibition.

 

Following the conclusion of the consultation period, the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Floodplain Management Committee met on 15 August 2018 to consider the final report of the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study. The report incorporated amendments to the draft resulting from the public exhibition. A copy of the Minutes, which reflect discussions and outcomes, is attached to this report.

 

The Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Floodplain Management Committee has recommended that Council adopt the final report of the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study.

 

 

 

 

Issues

 

Public Exhibition

The community was invited to comment on the Draft Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study via public exhibition of the document. The report was placed on public exhibition between 30 April and 27 May 2018. The public exhibition was advertised via the following methods:

 

·    Online via YoursayRandwick (including the Draft Flood Study, map of the flood affected properties, frequently asked questions);

·    An information letter including frequently asked questions, was sent to all residents within the flood planning area (5,200 letters sent);

·    Advertisement in the Southern Courier;

·    All documents were made available in the reception area of the Council Administration Centre and at Council’s three libraries.

 

A community information session was held on Tuesday 24 May 2018 between 6-8pm at the Lionel Bowen Library, Maroubra. The purpose of the drop-in session was to enable the public to ask questions directly to the study team including Randwick Council staff and the consultant.

 

The following summarises the key outcomes of the public exhibition period and the responses received:

 

·    321 persons visited the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study page on YoursayRandwick and 400 downloads occurred;

·    Residents from around 20 properties attended the drop-in session;

·    A total of 11 queries were lodged on the public exhibition website or during the drop in session.

 

Study Finalisation

Following review of the submissions received from the public during the exhibition period, minor amendments have been made to this Flood Study Report. A compilation of the submissions and responses can be found in Appendix F of the report. Generally, the community had concerns regarding the flooding issues within the catchment and how these are to be managed. These concerns are mainly related to drainage, including the blockage, maintenance and upgrade of the stormwater system. Consideration of potential mitigation of flood issues will be part of the next phase – the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study has been placed on public exhibition and has now been finalised to the satisfaction of the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Floodplain Management Committee.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council adopts the 2018 Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Flood Study.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Minutes of the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 15 August 2018

 

2.

Birds Gully Flood Study June 2018

Included under separate cover

3.

Floodplain Committee Presentation 15 August 2018- Birds Gully Flood Study

Included under separate cover

 

 

 


Minutes of the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 15 August 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS44/18

 

Subject:             Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee - August 2018

Folder No:                   F2018/00158

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

The Council’s Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meets quarterly to examine issues relating to bike riding and cyclist facilities.


The August 2018 meeting of the Advisory Committee was attended by Councillors, representatives of BIKEast, members of the community and Council staff.

 

Issues

 

The Advisory Committee considered numerous matters of importance to local bicycle riders and the Minutes from the Committee’s meeting, held on 15 August 2018, are attached.  Also attached is the updated ‘Initiatives for Bicycle Riders’ list – which captures each matter proposed and/or completed with regard to facilities for bicycle riders in Randwick.

 

The next meeting of this forum is scheduled for 7:30am on Wednesday, 21 November 2018.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport

Direction 9a:      A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Any proposals for expenditure arising from the Advisory Committee’s recommendations are either covered by existing funding allocations or would be the subject of a separate report to the Council.

 

Conclusion

 

The Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee is a positive forum for the consideration of matters important to bicycle riders. The Committee’s recommendations are supported and it is considered that they should be endorsed by the Council.

 

Recommendation

 

That the recommendations detailed within the Minutes of the Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meeting, held on 15 August 2018, be endorsed.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Minutes - Cycleways and Bicycles Facilities Advisory Committee 15 August 2018

 

2.

Report - Randwick City Council - Initiatives for Bicycle Riders - 15 August 2018

 

 

 

 


Minutes - Cycleways and Bicycles Facilities Advisory Committee 15 August 2018

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Report - Randwick City Council - Initiatives for Bicycle Riders - 15 August 2018

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS45/18

 

Subject:             Randwick City Council Sports Committee - August 2018

Folder No:                   F2005/00446

Author:                   Todd Clarke, Manager Infrastructure Services      

 

Introduction

 

The Randwick City Council Sports Committee met on 15 August 2018 in the Matraville Room, Randwick City Council Depot, 192 Storey Street, Maroubra.  The Minutes of the meeting are presented to Council for information and endorsement.

 

Issues

 

The Randwick City Council Sports Committee has met to discuss bookings and allocations, maintenance, capital works and sporting group requirements.  The Minutes of the meeting are included as Attachment 1.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities.

Direction 5a:      Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active and passive open space uses.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that Council acknowledges and accepts the Randwick City Council Sports Committee Minutes.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Minutes of the Randwick City Council Sports Committee Meeting held on 15 August 2018 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Minutes of the Randwick City Council Sports Committee Meeting held on 15 August 2018.

 

 

 

 


Minutes of the Randwick City Council Sports Committee Meeting held on 15 August 2018.

Attachment 1

 

 

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Minutes of the Randwick City Council Sports Committee Meeting held on 15 August 2018.

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS46/18

 

Subject:             Newmarket Randwick - Proposed naming of park and new streets

Folder No:                   DA/88/2016

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Acting Director City Services     

 

Introduction

 

Council at its meeting held in July 2018 considered a report that nominated names for a new public park and new streets within the Newmarket Randwick development.  Following consideration of the report, the Council resolved as follows:

 

“(Veitch/Matson) that Council seek input from the Local La Perouse Aboriginal Land Council on the proposed names for the public park and new public roads as part of the Newmarket Randwick Development and bring a report back listing all proposed names to Council for further consideration.”

 

Issues

 

A request was made to the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council (LALC) to nominate names that could be used for the naming of the public park and the new streets.

 

The LALC have provided one nomination for a street name.  The nomination is ‘Yarraman’ in recognition of the former use of the site.  Yarraman is pronounced [yarra-mun] and is the term/word for a horse.

 

In consultation with the developer, it is proposed that Yarraman Avenue be nominated instead of the previously nominated Shaftesbury Avenue.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:        A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:       Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There will be no financial impact to Council.

 

Conclusion

 

A Naming Strategy has been submitted for the public park and the new roads as part of the Newmarket Randwick development. The La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council were consulted and they nominated Yarraman as a suitable street name for the site. In consultation with the developer, it is proposed to replace the former nomination of Shaftesbury Avenue with Yarraman Avenue.

 


 

The proposed names for the entire site are denoted in the Masterplan in Figure 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Figure 2 – Masterplan with proposed park and street names

 

The proposed names reflect the historical uses and ownership of the site. They also include the aboriginal term for horse as nominated by the LALC. The revised proposed names for the Newmarket Randwick site are:

 

E2 Public Park

Inglis Park

ST1 Road

Yarraman Avenue

ST2 Road

Dillon Street

ST3 Road

Chiltern Street

ST4 Road

Jane Street (existing)

DV1 Road

Fennelly Street

RL1 Road

White Lane

 

The proposed names are in accordance with the Geographical Names Board NSW Addressing User Manual, 2016.

 

It is recommended that the proposed street and park names be endorsed for submission to the Geographical Names Board for final approval. 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)  Council endorse the proposed names for the public park and new public roads as part of the Newmarket Randwick Development.

 

b)  The proposed street names be submitted to the Geographical Names Board for approval.

 

c)  The administration costs associated with the approval be borne by the developer.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Council report of July 2018 meeting - Newmarket Randwick - Proposed Naming of new Streets and Public Park

 

2.

Newmarket Randwick - Street Naming Strategy

 

 

 

 


Council report of July 2018 meeting - Newmarket Randwick - Proposed Naming of new Streets and Public Park

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Newmarket Randwick - Street Naming Strategy

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS47/18

 

Subject:             Athletics Australia - Conquer Coogee Event

Folder No:                   F2018/00096

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Acting Director City Services      

 

Introduction

 

Council has been approached by Athletics Australia requesting approval and funding assistance for their event called Conquer Coogee Fitness Festival.  The inaugural event is planned to be held on 13 and 14 April 2019 at Coogee Beach, Trenerry Reserve and Blenheim Park.  “Conquer Coogee” is a working name only and a new name will be advised closer to the event.

 

Issues

 

Athletics Australia have partnered with the Coogee Surf Life Saving Club and The Royal Hospital for Women Foundation to host a weekend fitness festival.  The fitness festival will comprise of a running event, ‘Climb Rainbow 4 Royal’ on the Saturday and a Coogee Beach Ocean Swim on the Sunday.

 

Climb Rainbow 4 Royal

On Saturday 13 April, 2019 Athletics Australia propose to host Australia’s steepest hill challenge called “Climb Rainbow 4 The Royal”.  This event is an alcohol free event.

 

This race is a 500m course starting at Trenerry Reserve, running west along Neptune Street, left into Dundas Street and right into Rainbow Street, finishing in Blenheim Park.  See Attachment 1.

 

Athletics Australia would like to utilise part of Trenerry Reserve as their activation zone which will include registration, large screen, PA system, stage, live music and a chill zone.  This equipment will be set up on Friday 12 April 2019 with security being provided overnight.  They will bump out on Saturday afternoon after the race.  As this reserve is a leash free park, fencing will be provided by the applicant to ensure participant safety.  See Attachment 2. 

 

Part of Neptune Street, all of Dundas Street and part of Rainbow Street will be closed from 5.30 am on the morning of the event.  The first race will start at 8:00 am with the last race at 11:00 am.  The roads will re-open at 12.30 pm.  The races will be divided into smaller group starts at 5 to 10 minute intervals.  This event is an alcohol free event.

 

Participants will finish the race in Blenheim Park where they will collect their medal and enjoy some refreshments.  A PA system and background audio music will also be set up in this area from 7:45 am on race day. See Attachment 3.

 

For the safety of participants, it is proposed to temporarily ban parking in the vicinity of the start and on one side of the street along the rest of the running course. The ban will commence on Friday night and be in place until 12.30pm Saturday.  The temporarily parking ban will be located as follows:

 

·       Neptune Street – Wolsely Road to Dundas Street – Both sides

·       Dundas Street – Neptune Street to Oberon Street – Western side

·       Dundas Street – Oberon Street to Rainbow Street – Eastern side

·       Rainbow Street – Dundas Street to Blenheim Park – Northern side

 

Traffic controllers will be located at key intersections along the running course for the duration of the event.  The controllers will permit local vehicular access during intervals between group starts.

 

There will be fundraising opportunities for the Royal Hospital for Women Foundation through registration, an official fundraising platform, donations and through corporate packages.  Any profit from the event will be distributed to the Coogee Surf Life Saving Club and Athletics Australia who are patrons of the event.

 

Coogee Beach Ocean Swim

On Sunday, 14 April 2019, the Coogee Surf Life Saving Club will be hosting their annual ocean swim at Coogee Beach around Wedding Cake Island.

 

Consultation

Athletics Australia, with support from Randwick Council, hosted an information session at Coogee Surf Club on Wednesday 29 August 2018.  A total of 16 people attended; 5 residents and 9 others representing Athletics Australia, The Royal Hospital for Women Foundation, Coogee Surf Life Saving Club and Randwick Council.  The following questions were raised:

 

·       How will the event be funded and where will the money raised go?

·       How will the organisers manage waste and reduce the impact on locals?

·       How will the hill climb impact parking/road closures along the run route?

 

Athletics Australia received six emails from residents unable to attend the information session.  The key issues included:

 

·       Types of running categories, ages and abilities;

·       Provision for cars being able to exit the area during the run in an emergency;

·       A few local trainers and runners offered their support for the event.

 

Council also received feedback on the following key issues:

 

·       That there be no alcohol funding or sponsorship – This event is an alcohol-free event.

·       That the trial period should be greater than 1 year – ‘In principle’ support is proposed for three (3) years.

·       Consideration be given to include Maroubra – At this stage, the organisers are planning events at Coogee only.

·       Consider a less aggressive event name – Conquer Coogee is a working name.  An event name will be nominated closer to the event.

 

Athletics Australia has requested support of the event for a three (3) year trial period in order to test and allow the event to be properly elevated.  The following support also has been requested from Athletics Australia towards staging the 2019 event:

 

 

 

 

 

Type

Type of Support

Amount

Application Fee

Fee Waiver

$627.00

Park Hire Fee  - Medium Impact

Fee Waiver

$2,456.00

Supply & removal of 10 sulo bins @ $91.00 per bin

Fee Waiver

$910.00

Food Stall x 3 @ $85.00 per stall

Fee Waiver

$255.00

Traffic Management Plan

One-off Grant

$12,000.00

 

TOTAL

$16,248.00

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows: lifestyle opportunities.

 

Outcome:  5:     Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities

Direction:  5b:   A range of cultural, sporting and leisure activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council accept the report recommendation, the direct financial implications to Council would be $16,248.00 including traffic management fees to be funded from the 2018-19 Contingency Fund.

 

Conclusion

 

The request from Athletics Australia is for Council’s assistance with funding to host the 2019 Conquer Coogee Fitness Festival. 

 

The festival includes a hill challenge run on Saturday and an ocean swim event on the Sunday.  The inaugural event is planned for the weekend of 14 and 15 April 2019.

 

The proposed traffic control will ensure the road race event is safe and complies with the requirements of the Traffic Management Plan and RMS regulations.

 

This festival is considered a non-for-profit community event. On this basis it is recommended that fees be waived to cover the in-kind costs, waste management and traffic management fees.  This event aims to showcase the Coogee area with a beautiful ocean backdrop where families and friends can participate.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)   The event receive “in principle” approval for a three year trial period;

 

b)   Council vote $16,248.00 to cover the in-kind fees and traffic management fees for the 2019 event to be charged to the 2018-19 Contingency Fund;

 

c)   The event organiser provide feedback on the number of registered participants;

 

d)   The organiser undertake to appropriately and prominently acknowledge and promote Council’s contribution prior to and during the activity; and

 

e)   The Mayor or the Mayor’s representative be given the opportunity to address the activity on behalf of Council.

 

Attachment/s:

1.

Conquer Coogee Attachment 1 - Overall Map

 

2.

Conquer Coogee Attachment 2 - Trenerry Reserve

 

3.

Conquer Coogee Attachment 3 - Blenheim Park

 

  


Conquer Coogee Attachment 1 - Overall Map

Attachment 1

 

 


Conquer Coogee Attachment 2 - Trenerry Reserve

Attachment 2

 

 


Conquer Coogee Attachment 3 - Blenheim Park

Attachment 3

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO49/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report - August 2018

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – August 2018” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of August 2018. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 August 2018, Council held investments with a market value of $81.749 million. The portfolio value increased during August by ~$21.587 million. The increase is representative of a positive cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from August 2017 to August 2018. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance

 

Asset Allocation

 

The majority of the portfolio is spread between term deposits (50.15%) and senior floating rate notes (38.48%). The remainder of the portfolio is held in the overnight cash accounts with CBA (11.37%). The FRN’s add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

 

Term to Maturity

 

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 22% of the total investment portfolio.

 

All minimum and maximum limits comply with Council’s investment policy:

Compliant

Horizon

Invested
$

Invested
%

Min Limit
%

Max Limit
%

0-90 days

$24,291,689.00

29.72%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$29,768,111.00

36.41%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$9,548,617.00

11.68%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$18,140,732.00

22.19%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0.00

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances. These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit ratings do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

$9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

$7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

$2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $15.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

Compliant

Credit Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

AA Category

$51,404,023.00

62.88%

100%

$30,345,126.00

A Category

$26,339,256.00

32.22%

75%

$34,972,606.00

X

BBB Category

$4,005,870.00

4.90%

0%

-$4,005,870.00

Unrated ADIs

$0.00

0.00%

 

 

 Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on long term S&P ratings). The overweight position to CBA (AA-) results from the influx of rates instalments due on the 31st August. The overweight position to Suncorp (A+) will be addressed by the disposal of a Suncorp FRN. Overweights with BOQ and Bendigo Bank resulting from the credit ratings downgrades will be addressed as opportunities arise.

 

 

Compliant

 

Issuer

Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

ANZ

AA-

$1,519,970

1.86%

30%

$23,004,775

X

CBA

AA-

$24,799,617

30.34%

30%

-$274,873

NAB

AA-

$11,002,815

13.46%

30%

$13,521,930

Westpac

AA-

$14,081,621

17.23%

30%

$10,443,124

Rabobank

A+

$1,028,164

1.26%

15%

$11,234,2018

X

Suncorp

A+

$14,035,429

17.17%

15%

-$1,773,057

AMP Bank

A

$7,752,606

9.48%

15%

$4,509,766

ING Bank

A

$2,000,000

2.45%

15%

$10,262,372

Macquarie Bank

A

$1,523,057

1.86%

15%

$10,739,316

X

BoQ

BBB+

$2,005,870

2.45%

0%

-$2,005,870

X

Bendigo-Adelaide

BBB+

$2,000,000

2.45%

0%

-$2,000,000

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period August 2015 to August 2018.

 

 

The total portfolio (T/D’s and FRNs) provided a solid return of +0.24% (actual), outperforming the benchmark AusBond Bank Index return by +0.07% (actual). The outperformance continues to be driven by a combination of deposits that were originally invested longer than 6 months, as well as the higher yielding FRNs locked in at attractive margins. The FRN portfolio (on an accrual basis) has now started to outperform the deposit portfolio, as evidenced by the returns over the past 12 months.

 

Over the past year, the combined deposit and FRN portfolio returned +2.72% p.a., outperforming bank bills by 0.87% p.a. The overall return remains solid given deposit rates reached their all-time lows in August 2016 after the RBA’s last interest rate cut. The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remains at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Performance

1 month

3 months

6 months

FYTD

1 year

Official Cash Rate

0.13%

0.38%

0.75%

0.25%

1.50%

AusBond Bank Bill Index

0.17%

0.51%

0.99%

0.36%

1.85%

Council’s T/D Portfolio

0.23%

0.66%

1.318%

0.45%

2.61%

Council’s FRN Portfolio

0.25%

0.75%

1.46%

0.50%

2.81%

Council’s Portfolio^

0.24%

0.71%

1.39%

0.48%

2.72%

Outperformance

0.07%

0.20%

0.40%

0.12%

0.87%

^Total portfolio performance excludes Council's cash account holdings. Overall returns would be lower if cash was included

 

Term Deposits

At month end, term deposits accounted for 50.15% of the total investment portfolio.

Three deposits totalling $3.5 million matured and were withdrawn in August. Sixteen new term deposits were taken up during August totalling $20.0 million. As at the end of August, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.69%, up 2 basis points (bp) from the previous month.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

The portfolio includes $31.46 million in floating rate notes.

During the month, Council sold out of the $1.6 million ANZ (AA-) FRN maturing 17/4/2020 for a trading margin of +52bp or a capital price of $100.503. The sale realised a capital gain of $8,048.00.  Proceeds from the sale were switched into the newly issued 5 year CBA (AA-) FRN at +93bp, resulting in an overall pick-up in yield of +41bp.

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end. The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 August 2018 increased by ~$54k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2018-19 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,200,934.00. Investment income to 31 August 2018 amounted to $348,921.05.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 August 2018 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for August 2018 be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - August 2018

 

 

 

 


Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - August 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO50/18

 

Subject:             Contingency Fund - status as at 31 August 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/07396

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2018-19 financial year there have been 25 allocations totalling $115,947.85. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2018-19

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$14,500.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 27 June 2017

Sponsorship and in-kind support - Surfing NSW - Junior State Surfing Title

$16,000.00

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - St George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,323.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - Taste of Coogee 2018

$15,451.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Financial assistance - South Sydney Rabbitohs' - Commemorate John Sutton Historic Milestone

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Our Lady of the Rosary School, Kensington Community Fair

$9,488.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$4,518.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waivng of fees - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Take 3 for the Sea

$928.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Donation - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Coogee Dippers (Autism) Program

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival

$3,020.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - A National Act of Recognition

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial contribution - Commemorative Statue at the Cenotaph, Maroubra

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Financial assistance - La Perouse Public School

$2,780.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Expansion of Community Partnership - Sydney Roosters inaugural women’s NRL side

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Donation - Wee Waa Chamber of Commerce

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Aug 2018

Annual Des Renford Chair of Hearts Research Family Gala and Charity Day - Use of Des Renford Leisure Centre

$9,500.00

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                              $115,947.85

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:         Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:         Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $95,000.00 in the 2018-19 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO51/18

 

Subject:             Delegation to act on Council's behalf - Surf Life Saving Randwick Offshore Rescue Boat

Folder No:                   F2004/06895

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The District Administrator and Treasurer for Surf Rescue 30 (surf Life Saving Randwick Offshore Rescue Boat) has written to Council (copy attached) requesting authority to act on Council’s behalf for matters pertaining to survey management of the Offshore Rescue Boat (City of Randwick III).

 

Issues

 

With recent changes to the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012, the survey management of marine vessels changed on 1 July 2018 from NSW Maritime to Australian Maritime Search and Rescue (AMSAR). This has brought with it an increased element of documentation for Rescue Management to be provided online for rescue vessels, such as vessel details, including registration, survey outcomes, equipment expiry dates etc. Although Randwick City Council is the owner of the Rescue Boat, Surf Rescue 30 is better placed to complete the online documentation.

 

 

The Randwick Surf Rescue Boat Service is a partnership between Randwick City Council and the four Randwick Surf Life Saving Club’s within Sydney Branch comprising; South Maroubra, Maroubra, Coogee and Clovelly. Overall administration of the Service is carried out on behalf of Sydney branch Surf Life Saving by the Randwick District Committee which comprises members of the four surf clubs and the Surf Rescue Boat Service.

 

The craft is jointly funded by Randwick City Council and the Randwick District Committee of Surf Life Saving Sydney Branch.

 

Randwick City Council also supplies a towing vehicle and provides additional funding to the Service by way of an annual financial grant.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:       Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Under section 377 of the Local Government Act 1993 a Council may, by resolution, delegate to the general manager or any other person or body (not including another employee of the council) any of the functions of the council under this or any other Act, other than the matters specified in section 377.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council approve the following delegation under section 377 of the Local Government Act 1993:

 

AU260 – Authorisation – Surf Rescue 30

The District Administrator and Treasurer of Surf Rescue 30 is delegated authority to act on Council’s behalf for matters pertaining to survey management of the Offshore Rescue Boat (City of Randwick III).

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Request for authority to act on behalf of Council - Surf Life Saving Randwick Offshore Rescue Boat

 

 

 

 


Request for authority to act on behalf of Council - Surf Life Saving Randwick Offshore Rescue Boat

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO52/18

 

Subject:             Monthly Financial Report as at 31 August 2018

Folder No:                   F2018/00380

Author:                   Zorica Whitby, Assistant Accountant     

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

 

a)     establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the Council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

 

b)     if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the Council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 31 August 2018. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 31 August 2018. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 31 August 2018.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:    Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.  The Current Ratio as at 31 August 2018 is 1.88 compared to 2.12 as at 30 June 2018. The Current Ratio is a financial indicator specific to local government and represents its ability to meet its debts and obligations as they fall due.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements -Income Statement - August 2018

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements -Balance Sheet - August 2018

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements -Cashflow Statement - August 2018

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements -Income Statement - August 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

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Monthly Financial Statements -Balance Sheet - August 2018

Attachment 2

 

 

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Monthly Financial Statements -Cashflow Statement - August 2018

Attachment 3

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM68/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - Recognition of Departing General Manager (Deferred)

Folder No:                   F2004/06240

Submitted by:          Councillor Seng, Central Ward      

 

 

a)     That in sincere appreciation and recognition of the enormous contribution made by our departing General Manager Ray Brownlee PSM, Council brings back a report advising on the options available to honour him, including but not limited to the following:

 

1.   an annual Ray Brownlee Award for Academic Excellence for most outstanding postgraduate student at UNSW in a relevant field;

2.   a Ray Brownlee Award for Most Outstanding Employee of the Year of Randwick City Council (not annually but only when it’s justified);

3.   in conjunction with the Australia Day ceremony, an annual special Ray Brownlee Award presented to a local resident for outstanding contribution to the local community in volunteerism or leadership;

4.   a building to be named after Ray Brownlee.

 

b)     That a Committee consisting of the Mayor, Cr Murray Matson, Cr Ted Seng, two other Councillors and senior management be established to assist with the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM69/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Re-siting of 40k signs on eastern side of Avoca Street south of Barker intersection

Folder No:                   F2004/07249

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

That Council requests the State Transit Authority to review the effectiveness of the signage and street markings controlling speeds by south bound traffic at the bus stop adjacent to 275 Avoca Street Randwick and opposite Randwick Girls High. The review is specifically requested to:

 

a)     Assess the option of placing an additional 40k zone sign on the north side of the stop that is more visible to drivers when the current sign on the south side of the stop is blocked by a parked bus; and

 

b)     Assess the option of more prominent street marking on the road surface highlighting the 40k zone in the approach to the bus stop.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM70/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Crs Luxford & Stavrinos - Maroubra Beach Hop Charity Car Show

Folder No:                   F2009/08302

Submitted by:          Councillor Luxford, West Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council: 

 

a)     acknowledge the success of the Maroubra Beach Hop Charity Car Show held on Sunday, 16 September 2018; and

       

b)     assist the organisers of the event so that the Car Show can be held on an annual basis.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM71/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Smart Speed Bumps

Folder No:                   F2004/06183

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council bring back a report investigating the possibility of implementing “Smart Speed Bumps” that use radar to track a cars speed creating a dip in the road to combat dangerous driving.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM72/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch – CSELR breaches of consent conditions – Referral to the Minister and Secretary for Planning, the EPA and NSW Ombudsman

Folder No:                   F2015/00095

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

1.     Acknowledges that many residents within the Randwick LGA have experienced adverse impacts from the construction of the CSELR, which has affected their health, wellbeing, property, and amenity.

 

2.     Notes that the conditions in the Infrastructure Approval (http://majorprojects.planning.nsw.gov.au/index.pl?action=view_job&job_id=6042require the Proponent to;

·           prevent, minimise, and/or offset adverse environmental impacts including economic and social impacts;

·           set standards and performance measures for acceptable environmental performance;

·           require regular monitoring and reporting; and

·           provide for the ongoing environmental management of the SSI

 

3.     Notes that residents, businesses and councillors have since 2016 made representations and complaints to Randwick City Council, TfNSW and the Department of Planning and Environment regarding the violations of the CSELR Infrastructure Approval listed below, with repeated complaints regarding;

a.     OOHW construction noise exceeding mandated levels (B6, 7,8,10)

b.     Notification of OOHW construction not provided within mandated 48 hour time frame (B4(e)

c.     OOHW construction occurring on more than two consecutive nights, and with less than two consecutive nights respite (B89b(v)

d.     Workers trespassing, urinating, using bins and water on private property (A11)

e.     Access to private property blocked without required notification (B25)

f.     Fire exits blocked (Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 Part 9, Div. 7, 185)

g.     Structural damage to property (B14, 15, 84)

h.     Impact on Aboriginal artefacts (B56, 57, 63)

i.      Removal of trees and vegetation (B45, 47)

j.      Business and economic Impacts (Economic Impact Assessment)

k.     Impact of flooding events (B70)

l.      Impacts of Light spill (B36m (i,ii)

m. Impact on Visual Amenity (B45, B36c)

 

4.     Notes that in addition to the above, conditions relating to the Light Rail Stabling Yard including: retention of the trees on the western boundary; specific measures to minimise noise, light spill and vibration have not had the anticipated effect (B36 b, c, d, e, , f, g, i, j, l, m)i,ii,n) i, iii, iv) and construction and initial operational noise have had an adverse impact on residents on Doncaster Ave who live next to the Stabling Yard. Notes that they will continue to suffer adverse impacts once the CSELR commences full operation.

 

5.     Request that the Minister for Planning and Environment mandate the provision of reasonable and feasible noise mitigation in the form of air-conditioning and double glazing to affected residents in accordance with B5(l), B10, B(13) and B89b(xv), as well as blinds for Doncaster Ave residents affected by light pollution from the stabling yard (B36m (I,ii). Notes that significant budget provisions have been made for alternative accommodation, which could cover the costs of the noise mitigation referred to.

 

6.     Request that the Secretary for Planning and Environment provide a report to council regarding the Aboriginal artefacts found during CSELR construction, as per B57 of the Approval.

 

7.     Request that the Minister for Planning and Environment, the Minister for Transport, the Environmental Representative and a representative from the Environmental Protection Authority attend a meeting with RCC, residents and business owners to discuss their concerns.

 

8.     Request that the Secretary for Planning and Environment provide RCC with a report detailing all complaints received regarding the CSELR within the Randwick LGA as per B92 of the Approval.

 

9.     Request that the Secretary for Planning and Environment provide RCC with a report detailing the compliance reviews as per B89b(xvi) and B94 of the Approval.

 

10.   Refer the breaches and complaints (including supporting resident submissions) regarding the CSELR Infrastructure Approval listed above to the Minister and Secretary for Planning, the Environmental Protection Authority and the NSW Ombudsman.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM73/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch – POW Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1 (SSD 9113) construction management plans

Folder No:                   F2018/00420

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

1.     Acknowledges that construction noise and vibration created by major infrastructure projects can have a profound impact on the physical and psychological health of residents who live in close proximity to these developments. Residents living near the subject site of Eurimbla Ave, Magill and Botany Streets will be significantly affected by demolition, construction and operational noise created by the POW Hospital Redevelopment Stage 1.

 

2.     Notes that many residents close to the POW Hospital development live in close proximity to the CSELR construction zone, and have been affected by noise since the beginning of 2016. In addition, many residents in this area work as nurses, doctors and in other employment roles at the POW Hospital that involve shift work.

 

3.     Arrange for public community information sessions with representatives from RCC, Health Infrastructure, POW Hospital and local residents to be held prior to a) the demolition of the subject site dwellings on Eurimbla Ave, Magill and Botany Streets and b) the commencement of Stage 1 construction.

 

4.     Propose the following conditions of consent to the Minister for Planning regarding SSD 9113

 

·       That the Applicant establish a community reference group to facilitate effective ongoing communication with local residents and other stakeholders affected by the demolition and construction works.

·       That the Applicant establish appropriate mechanisms with the CESLR to minimise the occurrence of concurrent construction work for the benefit of residents living within overlapping noise catchment zones.

·       That the Applicant consider alternative locations for the loading bay and car park access to protect the amenity of residents on Magill St.

·       That the Applicant offer at-receiver noise mitigation in the form of double glazing and air-conditioning to all residents affected by high levels of construction and operational noise.

·       That the Applicant liaise with residents from Eurimbla Ave, Magill and Botany Streets whose homes have been compulsorily acquired for the development, to discuss options for the creation of a memorial garden or plaque on the site.

·       That the Applicant retain existing trees where possible for the benefit of local residents, patients, visitors and hospital staff.

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM74/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson – Developing improved strategies for protecting native fauna in the city of Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/08272

Submitted by:          Councillor Neilson, North Ward      

 

 

That Council: 

 

1)     in the interest of protecting native habitat and fauna, set up a committee or working group to look into issues such as:

 

•      keeping cats inside and confined, especially at night 

•      higher registration fees

•      ways of curbing feral cats and foxes. 

•      applying the same penalties to owners for allowing their cats to run free or defecate in public places or neighbouring properties as already apply to dogs.

•      a study of the state of play with native fauna in our area

•      promoting WIRES so more people join in helping rescue and rehabilitate native fauna injured by dogs, cats and cars

 

2)     such a strategy might include setting up a committee or holding a workshop with for example Prof Mike Archer UNSW invited to participate.

 

3)     promote a more vigorous education campaign to protect native fauna.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                            25 September 2018

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR5/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Roberts, Hamilton and Stavrinos - Mayoral Minute - Coogee Beach BBQ - Wattle Day 2018 - National Day of Action - Waiver of Fee

Folder No:                   F2018/00096

Submitted by:          Councillor Roberts, East Ward; Councillor Hamilton, North Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 28 August 2018 and reading as follows:

 

“That Council vote $182.00 to cover the application fee associated with hosting a BBQ in Goldstein Reserve on Saturday 1 September 2018.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That Council reaffirms its commitment to the universal principle of sound governance whereby public funds are not used for party political purposes.”