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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 28 August 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 28 August 2018 at 6:00 p.m.

 

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 24 July 2018

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

GM19/18   Merging of Maroubra Beach and Maroubra Central Precincts........................ 1

GM20/18   Randwick City Council June Quarterly Report 2018..................................... 5

 

Director City Planning Reports

CP35/18    SECPP Report - 180-188 Maroubra Road, Maroubra (DA/813/2015/B)........... 7

CP36/18    SECPP Report - 1-47, 2-66A and 64R Eurimbla Avenue, 2-14 Magill Street, 49-101 Botany Street, Part Lot 1 DP 870720 Adjacent to Hospital Road, Randwick (DA/208/2018).................................................................................. 33

CP37/18    SECPP Report - 30-36 Dangar Street, Randwick (DA/132/2017C)................ 79

CP38/18    18 Boronia Street Kensington
Fire & Rescue NSW Referral............................................................... 115

CP39/18    34 Meeks Street, Kingsford Fire & Rescue NSW Referral......................... 119

CP40/18    Community Hub/ Foodbank at Lexington Place, Maroubra: Update on Progress 129

CP41/18    Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP NO.1 and Clause 4.6 - 14th July - 20th August 2018.............................................................. 133

Director City Services Reports

CS35/18    Kingsford to Centennial Park Walking and Cycling Streetscape Improvements - Results of Public Consultation............................................................. 137

CS36/18    Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee............................... 173

CS37/18    New Laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick - Naming Proposal.................. 197

CS38/18    Boat And Trailer Parking Legislation..................................................... 201

CS39/18    Coogee Bay Road Streetscape Upgrade - Proposed Waiver of Footway Dining Fees.................................................................................................... 211

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO42/18    Contingency Fund - status as at 31 July 2018........................................ 215

CO43/18    Code of Conduct.............................................................................. 217

CO44/18    Investment Report - July 2018............................................................ 231

CO45/18    Monthly Financial Report as at 31 July 2018........................................... 241

CO46/18    Draft 2017-18 Financial Statements..................................................... 251

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM62/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Weed Management Review................... 257

NM63/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Opposition to Passenger Cruise Ship Terminal 259

NM64/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Heritage Reports for 37-41 Dudley and 144-150 Brook Streets, Coogee...................................................................... 261

NM65/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Support for the Right to Peaceful Assembly and Protest in NSW and the Randwick LGA................................................. 263

NM66/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Improved Disability Access to La Perouse Museum ........................................................................................ 265

NM67/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Illuminating of Trees to Improve Amenity and Safety........................................................................................... 267

NM68/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - Recognition of Departing General Manager 269  

Closed Session

General Manager’s Report (record of voting NOT required)

GM21/18   Director Appointments

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (a) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).

 

Corporate Services Reports (record of voting required)

CO47/18    23-27 Adina Avenue, Phillip Bay - EOI campaign and Feasibility Study

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (c) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CO48/18    Tender for Claims Management Services - T2019-02

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

Director City Services Reports (record of voting required)

CS41/18    Tender for Mahon Pool Amenities Building Upgrade T2018-27

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS42/18    NSW EPA Clean-Up Action - Jack Vanny Reserve, Maroubra Beach - Request for Quotation - SSROC T2016-01

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

  

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Jorde Frangoples

Acting General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM19/18

 

Subject:             Merging of Maroubra Beach and Maroubra Central Precincts

Folder No:                   F2018/00317

Author:                   Amanda Mather, Precincts Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

The Maroubra Beach and Maroubra Central Precincts have undertaken a voluntary merger and are now known as the ‘Maroubra Precinct’. This report updates Councillors on the issue.

 

Issues

 

At their Annual General Meeting in December 2017 and again in February 2018, the Maroubra Central Precinct were unable to fill the positions of Precinct Chair and Secretary.  As a result, they voted to approach the Maroubra Beach Precinct and request the two precincts merge.

 

At the 28 May 2018 Maroubra Beach Precinct meeting, the Precinct voted to accept Maroubra Central’s proposal to merge and will be known as the Maroubra Precinct.  The following was agreed:

 

·      Precinct name will be “Maroubra Precinct”

·      The new precinct boundary will constitute the Maroubra Central and Maroubra Beach boundaries (see map attached)

·      Meetings will be held at the Maroubra Surf Life Saving Club

·      Meetings will be held bi-monthly in May, July, Sept and November at 7.30pm

·      Funding will be merged

·      Current Maroubra Beach Executives will serve as the new Maroubra Beach Executives; John Burgess as Chair and Therese Weiss as Secretary

·      Create a new email address: maroubraprecinct@gmail.com

·      Merge resident contact databases.

Furthermore, the new Maroubra Precinct has requested that their annual funding be increased to $800 (the equivalent of both the Maroubra Beach and Maroubra Central annual funding of $400 each) to cover the cost of running a larger precinct and communicating to a larger group of residents.

 

The Maroubra Beach Precinct has received $400 funding for 2018. Funding for the Maroubra Central Precinct was on hold until a decision was made on the precinct’s future.  Given the merge and the new Maroubra Precinct’s request, the funding for Maroubra Central could now be released to the new Maroubra Precinct.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community

Direction 2b:      Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

Outcome 3:       An informed and engaged community

 

Direction 3b:      The community has increased opportunities to participate in decision-making processes.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact to Council as the overall funding allocation to Precincts remains the same.

 

Conclusion

 

The Precinct system continues to be an important tool for engaging face to face with the community and Council is committed to helping the precincts remain viable and relevant.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council note the merge of the Maroubra Beach and Maroubra Central Precinct into the new Maroubra Precinct and approve that the funding for the former Maroubra Central Precinct be provided to the new Maroubra Precinct.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Maroubra Precinct boundary map A4

 

 

 

 


Maroubra Precinct boundary map A4

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM20/18

 

Subject:             Randwick City Council June Quarterly Report 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/03001

Author:                   Anne Warner, Manager Corporate Performance      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2017-18 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on 27 June 2017. In this report, achievement and status comments are provided for each action in the 2017-18 Operational Plan.

 

Issues

 

This is the June 2018 Quarterly Report and the fourth and final review of the 2017-18 annual Operational Plan. Projects have proceeded as planned and overall all services were delivered to agreed standards.

 

This report demonstrates our commitment to meeting the actions in the 2017-18 annual Operational Plan. It will be further complemented by the annual report which will be reported to Council in November.

 

Some of the highlights during the quarter included: Council held two major community events – the Anzac Day Dawn Service at Coogee Beach which attracted over 10,000 people making it one of the largest Dawn service events in NSW, and The Koojay Corroboree for Reconciliation Week which celebrated our Aboriginal heritage and had great participation; a range of heritage events and programs through our libraries, including Ancestory.com training for the public which was conducted by staff in partnership with the Cape Banks Family History Group; and the inaugural Switch your Thinking on Plastics event held at Coogee beach with over 1,500 participants.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the June Quarterly Review is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2017-18 Annual Operational Plan. In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20-year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the June quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick.

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the June Quarterly Review of the 2017-18 annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Randwick City Council June Quarterly Report 2018

Included under separate cover

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP35/18

 

Subject:             SECPP Report - 180-188 Maroubra Road, Maroubra (DA/813/2015/B)

Folder No:                   DA/813/2015/B

Author:                   William Jones, Senior Environmental Planning Officer     

 

Proposal:                    Section 4.55 modification for reconfiguration of the basement car park to accommodate 89 car parking spaces, increase the overall height of the southern lift overrun by 1.99m, modification to the entry retail steps and additional screening to approved condenser units on the roof.

Ward:                     Central Ward

Applicant:                Prime & Famous Pty Ltd

Owner:                        Prime & Famous Pty Ltd

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

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North

 

Locality Plan

 

1.         Introduction

 

Council is in receipt of a Section 4.55 (2) modification to DA/813/2015/B seeking consent for reconfiguration of the basement car park to accommodate 89 car parking spaces (resulting in an additional 3 spaces), increase the overall height of the southern lift overrun by 1.99m, modification to the entry retail steps and additional screening to approved condenser units on the roof. The proposed works have already been carried out and therefore retrospective approval is sought.

 

The Section 4.55 (2) modification is referred to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel for determination as the original DA was referred to the (former) Joint Regional Planning Panel (JRPP) for determination pursuant to former Schedule 4A, of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Part 4 of the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011, given the development had a capital investment value in excess of $20 million.

 

2.         Public Notification / Advertising

 

The application was publicly notified to surrounding property owners and was advertised within the local newspaper in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013 (RDCP). 4 submissions were received raising issues with the increased height of the lift overrun, additional visual bulk associated with changes to the roof, general overdevelopment and reduced number of parking spaces.

 

3.         Key Issues

 

Building Height

The key issue relate to the proposed height increase associated with the lift overrun and the addition of plant screening to the roof (the plant having been approved as part of the original DA). The increased building height does not comply with the height of buildings standard pursuant to Clause 4.3 of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP).

 

Summary of Building Height variation

Development Standard

25m

Proposed building height fronting Maroubra Road.

26.76m (measured to the top of the lift overrun).

25.02m (measured to the top of the access stair).

Exceedance of the Development Standard.

7% to the top of the lift overrun.

0.08% to the top of the access stair.

Proposed building height fronting Green Street.

26.16m (measured to the top of the plant screening).

Exceedance of the Development Standard.

4.6%

Proposed building height associated with plant screening in the middle of the building.

26.2m (measured to the top of the plant screening).

Exceedance of the Development Standard.

4.8%

 

Maroubra Road (southern frontage)

 

A 1.99m height increase of the lift overrun is proposed that will result in an increased maximum building height to 26.76m (25m permitted). A 0.2m height increase to the access stair to the rooftop terrace adjacent to the subject lift overrun is also proposed resulting in a non-compliance with the maximum 25m building height control (25.02m). This portion of the building originally complied with the maximum building height control, being 24.7m to the top of the approved lift overrun. The 1.45m high plant screening (which is not excluded from the definition of building height in the RLEP) complies with the maximum 25m building height control, being 23.85m above original natural ground level.

 

Green Street (northern frontage)

 

The JRPP supported a building height variation of 25.97m, which occurs to the top of the lift overrun fronting Green Street. Although no height increase is proposed to this lift overrun as part of the subject modifications, the proposed 1.8m plant screening will be 0.2m higher than the lift overrun at RL 52.69 (26.16 total height above original natural ground level). The plant screening proposed in the middle of the roof on the western side will also breach the maximum permitted building height being 26.2m above original natural ground level.

 

In summary, the proposed height increase is supported as there will be no adverse visual bulk when viewed from the street or amenity impacts to surrounding properties in terms of visual bulk, overshadowing or view loss. The proposed height increase is isolated to 3 different sections of the approved building and does not dominate the building, which will remain well articulated and appropriately scaled that will continue to be in accordance with the objectives of Clause 4.3 Height of buildings standard and objectives of the B2 Local Centre zone pursuant to the RLEP. Importantly, the proposed plant screening is not visible from either street frontage, and the lift overrun and stair is not prominent when viewed from Maroubra Road.

 

Figure 1. Maroubra Road frontage from standing height.

 

Figure 2. Maroubra Road frontage from standing height zoomed in showing lift overrun and stair.

 

Figure 3. Green Street frontage from standing height.

 

Basement Modifications

The proposed modifications to the basement will not alter the approved building envelope. The additional 3 car parking spaces and a decrease in bicycle parking from 54 spaces to 44 spaces is supported by Council’s Development Engineer, noting that only 35 bicycle parking spaces are required to comply with the RDCP.

Substantially the Same Development

The approved development will remain substantially the same development as a result of the proposed modifications in accordance with Section 4.55 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (as amended) that will not result in adverse impacts on the amenity of neighbouring properties or the character of the area.

 

State Environmental Planning Policy No. 65 – Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development

The proposal has not been considered by Council’s Design Excellence Panel given no changes to the residential apartments are proposed. The original DA was assessed in accordance with Part 3: Siting the Development and Part 4: Designing the Building of the Apartment Design Guide (ADG) against the design criteria requirements. As a result of the proposed modifications, no changes will be made to the approved apartments and therefore the development remains compliant with SEPP No. 65 and the ADG.

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The subject site is zoned B2 Local Centre pursuant to the RLEP. The proposed modifications are ancillary to the approved shop top housing development, which is permissible in the zone. The proposed modifications do not comply with Clause 4.3 height of buildings due to the increased height of the lift overrun fronting Maroubra Road and plant screening. The increased building height is supported however given there will be no adverse impacts to the character of the area or the amenity of adjoining properties. The proposed height increase will result in a development that will remain in accordance with the objectives of the height of buildings development control and the objectives of the B2 Local Centre zone.

 

Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013

In relation to the considerations that remain in the RDCP that are relevant to the subject modifications, these are largely assessed as acceptable and where necessary have been the subject of technical officers’ comments and conditions recommended for inclusion in the determination.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design.

Direction 4a:       Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

That the Section 4.55 (2) modification to DA/813/2015 seeking consent for reconfiguration of the basement car park to accommodate 89 car parking spaces (resulting in an additional 3 spaces), increase the overall height of the southern lift overrun by 1.99m, modification to entry retail steps and additional screening to approved condenser units on the roof at 180-188 Maroubra Road, Maroubra, be approved (subject to new and modified conditions) for the following reasons:

 

·      The proposal satisfies the matters for consideration under Section 4.15 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended.

·      The proposal remains substantially the same development in accordance with Section 4.55 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended.

·      The proposal remains compliant with the requirements of the State Environmental Planning Policy No. 65 – Design Quality of Residential Flat Development.

·      The proposal is consistent with the objectives contained within the RLEP 2012 and the relevant requirements of the RDCP 2013.

·      The proposal will not result in adverse amenity impacts to surrounding residential and non-residential land uses.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the SECPP assessment report for DA/813/2015/B at 180-188 Maroubra Road, Maroubra be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA - Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel - DA/813/2015/B - 180-188 Maroubra Road, MAROUBRA  NSW  2035 - Development - Randwick City Council

 

 

 

 


DA - Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel - DA/813/2015/B - 180-188 Maroubra Road, MAROUBRA  NSW  2035 - Development - Randwick City Council

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP36/18

 

Subject:             SECPP Report - 1-47, 2-66A and 64R Eurimbla Avenue, 2-14 Magill Street, 49-101 Botany Street, Part Lot 1 DP 870720 Adjacent to Hospital Road, Randwick (DA/208/2018)

Folder No:                   DA/208/2018

Author:                   William Jones, Senior Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Proposal:                    Demolition of 92 dwellings and ancillary structures, removal of vegetation and site remediation.

Ward:                     West Ward

Applicant:                NSW Health Infrastructure

Owner:                        University of NSW

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

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North

 

Locality Plan

 


 

1.         Introduction

 

Council is in receipt of a development application (DA) seeking consent for the demolition of 92 buildings including ancillary structures and removal of 11 trees on the subject site. The subject site is bordered by High Street to the north, Hospital Road to the east, Magill Street to the south and Botany Street to the west. According to the applicant, works are proposed to occur generally from December 2018 to February/March 2019.

 

The subject DA is referred to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel for determination as it is a Crown development application and constitutes regionally significant development as the capital investment value is greater than $5 million pursuant to Schedule 7 of the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011.

 

Owner’s consent was obtained in accordance with Clause 49 (2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, which notes that owner’s consent is not required in writing for a DA made by a public authority if notice of the application is made by advertisement published in a newspaper. An advertisement was placed in the Southern Courier on 2 May 2018 (a copy of which was provided to Council) and therefore, owner’s consent is obtained for the subject DA.

 

2.         Public Notification / Advertising

 

The application was publicly notified to surrounding property owners and was advertised within the local newspaper in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013 (RDCP). Two submissions were received from the owners of 40 Botany Street and 15 Magill Street raising issues with maintaining access to surrounding properties during works, noise and vibration impacts, reduced air quality and concerns with the future use of the site.

 

3.         Key Issues

 

Future Development of the Site

The proposed demolition will facilitate a future Acute Health Service Building to the west of the existing Randwick Hospital Campus that will be the subject of a separate DA. The future development will be subject to a State Significant DA pursuant to Schedule 1 of the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011 for development relating to hospitals, medical centres and health research facilities with a capital investment value of more than $30 million. Any future State Significant DA will be assessed by the Department of Planning and Environment whereby the Minister for Planning will be the consent authority (Randwick City Council will be afforded the opportunity to make a submission as part of the public participation process for State Significant Development).

 

According to the NSW Health website, the future Acute Services Building for the Prince of Wales Hospital is expected to open in 2022 and will be built to the west of the existing Randwick Hospital Campus that will include:

 

·      A new adult Emergency Department

·      An expanded Psychiatric Emergency Care Centre (PECC), adjacent to the Emergency Department

·      An expanded Intensive Care Unit

·      Ten inpatient units (IPUs) that will replace ageing infrastructure with contemporary facilities to support new models of care

·      New operating theatres for the Randwick Hospitals’ Campus

·      An expanded Central Sterilising Service Department

·      A Medical Assessment Unit, including a state-of-the-art Virtual Care Centre, providing for rapid assessment of patients directly referred from the community

·      A new helipad to support all campus partners

·      Education and research spaces that will support collaborative clinical research and innovation.

The Secretary’s Environmental Assessment Requirements (SEARs) have been issued for future development of the site pursuant to Schedule 2 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, which provides environmental assessment requirements that must be addressed as part of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The SEARs require the EIS to address compliance with:

 

·      State Environmental Planning Policy (State & Regional Development) 2011;

·      State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007;

·      State Environmental Planning Policy No 33 – Hazardous and Offensive Development;

·      State Environmental Planning Policy No. 55 – Remediation of Land;

·      State Environmental Planning Policy No. 64 – Advertising and Signage; and

·      Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012.

The above Environmental Planning Instruments will provide the relevant planning controls with which the future Acute Services Building will need to comply. It is also noted that the SEARS requires the applicant to consult with the following authorities in developing the EIS:

 

·      Randwick City Council;

·      Sydney Light Rail;

·      Roads and Maritime Services; and

·      Sydney Coordination Office within Transport for NSW.

Therefore, future development of the site will be carried out in accordance with the Secretary’s SEARS and Randwick City Council will be consulted as part of the EIS preparation. Randwick City Council will also be afforded the opportunity to make a submission on the future State significant DA as part of the public exhibition process that will occur after the DA is lodged with the Department of Planning and Environment for assessment.

 

Managing Amenity Impacts

The key issues with the subject development relate to the management of proposed demolition works and associated vehicular movements to protect the amenity of surrounding properties. Low density residential properties exist to the south, medium density residential properties to the north, the Randwick Hospital Campus to the east and the University of New South Wales to the west. It is considered that amenity impacts on surrounding land uses can be appropriately managed via conditions that restrict working hours and vehicle movements, and measures to control noise, vibration, air quality and dust.

The DA was referred to Council teams including Transport Management, Development Engineering, Landscape Development, Environmental Health and Building Regulation and Compliance. The respective officers did not raise concerns with the proposal and conditions have been recommended. The DA was also referred externally to Transport NSW for comment who provided conditions requiring final routes and work zones to be approved by Transport NSW and the NSW Roads and Maritime Services, and preparation of a Construction Pedestrian and Traffic Management Plan.

 

Vehicular Movements

With regards to maintaining access to surrounding properties, truck movements will not impede access and will be limited to the Construction Traffic Management Plan (CTMP). Construction traffic access routes are to be clearly defined as part of the finalised CTMP and are to minimise the use of local roads including Magill Street, Arthur Street, Belmore Road and Clara Street.

 

A draft CTMP has been reviewed by Council’s Transport Management and Development Engineering teams as well as Transport NSW. Council and Transport NSW have given in principle agreement on the draft CTMP and conditions are provided so that a final CTMP is submitted to and approved by Transport NSW and Council prior to works commencing.

 

Contamination

Standard conditions are recommended to ensure any asbestos uncovered as part of the demolition works is appropriately handled and discarded. Council’s Environmental Health Officer has assessed the proposal and has provided conditions so that a detailed site investigation report is carried out after demolition has occurred to determine whether site remediation of any contaminants is required. Should remediation be required, a condition is provided so that a Remediation Action Plan is submitted to and approved by Council prior to remediation work occurring.

 

Tree Removal

Council’s Landscape Officer has assessed the 11 trees proposed for removal and advises that they are not significant or included in Council’s Significance Register and are therefore approved for removal. According to the applicant, approximately 50 additional trees might be required for removal to facilitate the proposed demolition and future development. As these trees are located within individual allotments subject to the ongoing acquisition process, the applicant has not obtained access to assess their removal.

 

The submitted Flora and Fauna Assessment concluded that there are no threatened ecological communities present in the study area. Council’s Landscape Officer advises that individual inspection of all 92 homes and the vegetation contained therein was not possible, however a general inspection of the area was performed and it was confirmed that while there are numerous established specimens, none would be considered important to the local environment and none are included in Council’s Register of Significant Trees. As the Acute Services Building will be constructed on the southern half of the site, it may be possible for the trees to be retained on the northern half pending redevelopment of that part of the site and suitable condition is included in this regard.

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The subject site is zoned R2 Low Density Residential (to the south), R3 Medium Density Residential (to the north) and SP2 Health Services Facility (to the east). Demolition and tree removal is permitted with consent in the R2, R3 and SP2 zones pursuant to the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP).

 

Clause 2.7 of the RLEP requires the demolition of a building or work may be carried out with development consent. Development consent is being sought for the proposed demolition works as part of this DA.

 

Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013

In relation to the considerations that remain in the RDCP that are relevant to the subject modifications, these are largely assessed as acceptable and where necessary have been the subject of technical officers’ comments and conditions recommended for inclusion in the determination.

 

Randwick City S94A Development Contributions Plan 2015

The applicant submitted a comprehensive request for exemption to paying section 7.12 contribution fees in accordance with Council’s plan. The request has been reviewed by Council’s Strategic Planning team, and is accepted on the basis that the works proposed are necessary to allow for the future expansion of the Prince of Wales Hospital. In addition, Clause 13.2 of the Section 94A Plan specifically allows public hospitals to be exempted from the contribution levy as follows:

 

13.2      Other development exempted from the levy

 

Other exemptions form a levy under this Plan may be considered by the Council for the following development, or components of development:

 

13.2.1   Places of worship, public hospitals, police stations, fire stations, and other emergency services.   

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design.

Direction 4a:       Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

That the application for demolition of 92 dwellings and ancillary structures, removal of vegetation and site remediation be approved (subject to conditions) for the following reasons:

 

·      The proposal satisfies the matters for consideration under Section 4.15 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended.

·      The proposal is consistent with the objectives contained within the RLEP 2012 and the relevant requirements of the RDCP 2013.

·      The proposal will not result in adverse amenity impacts to surrounding residential and non-residential land uses.

 

Recommendation

 

That the SECPP assessment report for DA/208/2018 at 1-47, 2-66A and 64R Eurimbla Avenue, 2-14 Magill Street, 49-101 Botany Street, Part Lot 1 DP 870720 Adjacent to Hospital Road, RANDWICK NSW 2031 be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA - Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel - DA/208/2018 - 1-47, 2-66A & 64R Eurimbla Ave, 2-14 Magill St, 49-101 Botany St & Part Lot 1 DP 870720 Adjacent Hospital Rd, Randwick

 

 

 

 


DA - Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel - DA/208/2018 - 1-47, 2-66A & 64R Eurimbla Ave, 2-14 Magill St, 49-101 Botany St & Part Lot 1 DP 870720 Adjacent Hospital Rd, Randwick

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP37/18

 

Subject:             SECPP Report - 30-36 Dangar Street, Randwick (DA/132/2017C)

Folder No:                   DA/132/2017/C

Author:                   William Jones, Senior Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Proposal:                    Section 4.55 (2) modification for reduction in car parking, changes to balconies in Buildings E and F, internal changes, external changes to facades, alterations to landscaping and letterbox, changes to external stairs, alteration to communal area in Building E, alteration to awnings, revised Building C level 1 courtyard, and addition of plant on the roof of Buildings E and F.

Ward:                     North Ward

Applicant:                Equity Development Management

Owner:                        Sir Moses Montefiore Jewish Home

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

Note - Location of approved buildings C, E and F (orange)

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 


 

1.         Introduction

Council is in receipt of a Section 4.55 (2) modification to DA/132/2017 seeking consent for reduction in car parking, changes to balconies in Buildings E and F, internal changes, external changes to facades, alterations to landscaping and letterbox, changes to external stairs, alteration to communal area in Building E, alteration to awnings, revised Building C level 1 courtyard, and addition of plant on the roof of Buildings E and F at the Montefiore Seniors Housing site.

 

The proposal seeks to modify Buildings E, F and a portion of Building C, which were approved by DA/132/2017 for expansion of the Sir Moses Montefiore Jewish Home aged care facility on 7 September 2017 by the Sydney Central Planning Panel. The original DA was prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Concept Plan approval MP09_0188 (as modified) that applies to the site for expansion of the existing aged care facilities approved on 19 July 2011 under Part 3A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 by the Planning Assessment Commission.

 

Figure 1. Orientation of buildings as approved in Modification 2 of Concept Approval (MP09_0188 MOD 2).

 

The subject Section 4.55 (2) modification application must be referred to the Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel for determination as the original DA was determined by the Joint Regional Planning Panel (JRPP) pursuant to Schedule 4A, of the (former) Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Part 4 of the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011, as the capital investment value of the development is greater than $20 million.

 

2.         Public Notification / Advertising

 

The application was publicly notified to surrounding property owners and was advertised within the local newspaper in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013 (RDCP). One submission was received from 26 Dangar Street, Randwick, raising issues with the reduced number of parking spaces and lack of parking restrictions along Govett Lane.

 

 

 

3.         Key Issues

 

Car Parking

A reduction in car parking spaces is proposed from 97 spaces as approved to 95 spaces. Despite the reduced car spaces, the development remains compliant with the parking requirements stipulated by the State Environmental Planning Policy (Housing for Seniors and People with a Disability) 2004 (i.e. 77 parking spaces required). The proposed reduction is also supported by Council’s Development Engineer, who notes that a surplus of parking will remain.

 

Building Envelopes

The proposed modifications involve minor changes to the building envelope specified by the Concept Plan approval with regards to the increased balcony sizes (by 300mm and 550mm). The increased balcony sizes will improve the amenity for occupants and will not perceivably change the approved bulk of the development outside of that envisaged by the approved building envelope. The proposed modifications to the balconies were also supported by Council’s Design Excellence Panel.

 

Importantly, the approved development consent for the Concept Plan approval requires development to be “generally in accordance with” the approved building envelopes. The proposed modifications will result in a building that is considered to be generally in accordance with the approved building envelopes as specified by the development consent, therefore a modification to the Concept Plan approval MP09_0188 is not considered necessary.

 

Substantially the Same Development

The approved development will remain substantially the same development as a result of the proposed modifications in accordance with Section 4.55 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (as amended) that will not result in adverse impacts on the amenity of neighbouring properties or the character of the area.

 

State Environmental Planning Policy No. 65 – Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development

SEPP No. 65 aims to promote quality design of Residential Flat Buildings. The proposal is subject to the policy as it involves the modification to a residential flat building being 3 storeys and more in height. The proposal was supported by Council’s Design Excellence Panel. As a result of the proposed modifications, the approved development will remain compliant with SEPP No. 65 and the ADG.

 

State Environmental Planning Policy (Housing for Seniors and People with a Disability) 2004

The proposed modifications relate to an approved seniors housing development, therefore the relevant provisions of the HSPDSEPP that relate to the proposed modifications are taken into consideration. As a result of the proposed modifications, the approved development will remain compliant with HSPDSEPP.

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The subject site is zoned R3 Medium Density Residential under the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP). The proposed modifications are ancillary to the approved seniors housing development, which is permissible in the zone. The proposed modifications will result in a development that will promote the aims of the RLEP in relation to the aesthetic character, sustainability, environmental qualities and social amenity of the locality.

 

Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013

The RDCP provides guidance for development applications to supplement the provisions of the RLEP. Whilst the RLEP provisions for height of buildings and floor space ratio are not applicable due to the Concept Plan approval for the development, there are General Controls in part B of the RDCP that remain relevant to the application, providing guidance in achieving a good planning outcome.

 

In relation to the considerations that remain in the RDCP that are relevant to the subject modifications, these are largely assessed as acceptable and where necessary have been the subject of technical officers’ comments and conditions recommended for inclusion in the determination.

 

Relationship to City Plan

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design.

Direction 4a:       Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion:

That the Section 4.55 (2) modification to DA/132/2017 seeking consent for reduction in car parking, changes to balconies in Buildings E and F, internal changes, external changes to some facades, alterations to landscaping and letterbox, changes to external stairs, alteration to communal area in Building E, alteration to awnings, revised Building C level 1 courtyard, and addition of plant on the roof of Buildings E and F, at the Montefiore Seniors Housing site located at 30-36 Dangar Street, Randwick, be approved (subject to new and modified conditions) for the following reasons:

 

·      The proposal satisfies the matters for consideration under Section 4.15 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended.

·      The proposal remains substantially the same development in accordance with Section 4.55 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended.

·      The proposal remains compliant with the requirements of the State Environmental Planning Policy No. 65 – Design Quality of Residential Flat Development.

·      The proposal remains compliant with the requirements of the State Environmental Planning Policy (Housing for Seniors and People with a Disability) 2004.

·      The proposal is consistent with the objectives contained within the RLEP 2012 and the relevant requirements of the RDCP 2013.

·      The proposal will not result in adverse amenity impacts to surrounding residential and non-residential land uses.

 

Recommendation

 

That the SECPP assessment report for DA/132/2017/C at the Montefiore Seniors Housing site located at 30-36 Dangar Street Randwick be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA - Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel - DA/132/2017/C - 30-36 Dangar Street, Randwick

 

 

 

 


DA - Sydney Eastern City Planning Panel - DA/132/2017/C - 30-36 Dangar Street, Randwick

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP38/18

 

Subject:             18 Boronia Street Kensington
Fire & Rescue NSW Referral

Folder No:                   F2017/06103

Author:                   Greg Hynes, Coordinator Building Certification & Fire Safety      

 

Introduction

 

Council has received correspondence from Fire & Rescue NSW (FRNSW) in accordance with Schedule 5, Clause 17 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. The correspondence recommends that Council undertakes an inspection and assessment to address any identified fire safety deficiencies in the subject nine storey residential building.

 

The referral of these matters to Council is standard practice, as Council is the appropriate regulatory authority for these matters under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Schedule 5, Clause 17 of the Act, specifically requires Council to table the FRNSW report at a Council meeting.

 

Background

 

FRNSW carried out an inspection of the subject building/s pursuant to Clause 9.32 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, following a “fire incident”

 

FRNSW advise Council that their inspection was limited to a visual inspection of the essential fire safety measures identified in the report, and a conceptual overview of the building, where an inspection had been conducted without copies of the development consent or copies of the approved floor plans.

 

FRNSW have not carried out an assessment of previous approvals or certification of the building, which would ordinarily be carried out by Council officers during their detailed investigation and assessment of the building.

 

Issues

 

FRNSW have attended the subject premises and identified a number of possible fire safety and maintenance deficiencies in the building. FRNSW recommended that Council undertake an inspection of the building and address the items identified in their report and any other identified deficiencies, as Council is the appropriate regulatory authority to issue any necessary Orders under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

Council’s authorised officer subsequently carried out an inspection of the building on 14 June 2018 and the officer has recently issued a notice of intention to serve an Order upon the owners of the premises, in relation to the identified fire safety matters.

 

Council’s officer will consider any representations made by the building owners in this matter in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, prior to the possible issue of a fire safety Order. And, the officer will follow up the matters accordingly until the terms of the Notice or Order have been satisfied.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6c:      The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The investigation of this matter can be accommodated within Council’s existing regulatory budget.

 

Conclusion

 

FRNSW and Council work together to protect the occupants of buildings and support community safety.

 

FRNSW refer any identified ‘building-related’ fire safety matters to Council for detailed investigation and any appropriate regulatory action in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

An authorised Council officer has carried out an investigation into the matters raised by FRNSW and the officer has issued a notice of intention to serve an Order, in relation to the identified fire safety matters.

 

Council’s officer will undertake the appropriate course of action and issue any necessary Orders, to ensure that the building contains adequate provisions for fire safety.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report from FRNSW and the Director City Planning Report relating to 18 Boronia Street, Kensington be received and noted

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

18 Boronia Street Kensington Fire & Rescue NSW Inspection Report

 

 

 

 


18 Boronia Street Kensington Fire & Rescue NSW Inspection Report

Attachment 1

 

 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP39/18

 

Subject:             34 Meeks Street, Kingsford Fire & Rescue NSW Referral

Folder No:                   F2017/06103

Author:                   Greg Hynes, Coordinator Building Certification & Fire Safety      

 

Introduction

 

Council has received correspondence from Fire & Rescue NSW (FRNSW) in accordance with Schedule 5, Clause 17 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. The correspondence recommends that Council undertakes an inspection and assessment to address any identified fire safety deficiencies in the subject nine storey residential building.

 

The referral of these matters to Council is standard practice, as Council is the appropriate regulatory authority for these matters under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Schedule 5, Clause 17 of the Act, specifically requires Council to table the FRNSW report at a Council meeting.

 

Background

 

FRNSW carried out an inspection of the subject building/s pursuant to Clause 9.32 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, following a complaint from a member of the public.

 

FRNSW advise Council that their inspection was limited to a visual inspection of the essential fire safety measures identified in the report, and a conceptual overview of the building, where an inspection had been conducted without copies of the development consent or copies of the approved floor plans.

 

FRNSW have not carried out an assessment of previous approvals or certification of the building, which would ordinarily be carried out by Council officers during their detailed investigation and assessment of the building.

 

Issues

 

FRNSW have attended the subject premises and identified a number of possible fire safety and maintenance deficiencies in the building. FRNSW recommended that Council undertake an inspection of the building and address the items identified in their report and any other identified deficiencies, as Council is the appropriate regulatory authority to issue any necessary Orders under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

Council’s authorised officer had previously received a complaint about the condition of the subject premises in April 2018 and subsequently carried out an inspection of the building on 15 May 2018. The officer has issued a notice of intention to serve an Order upon the owners of the premises, in relation to the identified fire safety matters.

 

Council’s officer will consider any representations made by the building owners in this matter in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, prior to the possible issue of a fire safety Order. And, the officer will follow up the matters accordingly until the terms of the Notice or Order have been satisfied.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  6 - A Liveable City.

Direction:  6c - The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The investigation of this matter can be accommodated within Council’s existing regulatory budget.

 

Conclusion

 

FRNSW and Council work together to protect the occupants of buildings and support community safety.

 

FRNSW refer any identified ‘building-related’ fire safety matters to Council for detailed investigation and any appropriate regulatory action in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

An authorised Council officer has carried out an investigation into the matters raised by FRNSW and the officer has issued a notice of intention to serve an Order, in relation to the identified fire safety matters.

 

Council’s officer will undertake the appropriate course of action and issue any necessary Orders, to ensure that the building contains adequate provisions for fire safety.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report from FRNSW and the Director City Planning Report relating to 34 Meeks Street, Kingsford be received and noted

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Fire & Rescue NSW - Inspection Report - 34 Meeks Street Kingsford

 

2.

Notice of Intention to give a Fire Safety Order - 34 Meeks Street Kingsford

 

 

 

 


Fire & Rescue NSW - Inspection Report - 34 Meeks Street Kingsford

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


Notice of Intention to give a Fire Safety Order - 34 Meeks Street Kingsford

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP40/18

 

Subject:             Community Hub/ Foodbank at Lexington Place, Maroubra: Update on Progress

Folder No:                   F2009/00217

Author:                   Teresa Mok, Manager Community Planning & Development      

 

Introduction

 

The Council at its meeting of 13 December 2016 considered a mayoral minute and resolved as follows:

 

(Mayor, Cr N D'Souza) that Council provide its in principle support for establishment of a foodbank/ community services hub at Lexington Place and that a report be provided to Council in early 2017 detailing Council’s monetary and staff commitment to the project.

 

The project encountered a number of delays in 2017 due to difficulties including finding an appropriate shopfront to lease. As the driving force behind this project, Council continued its search for a suitable property.  After several months of searching, a shopfront became available towards the end of 2017.  Council staff then worked with representatives from the South East Sydney Local Health District (SESLHD) to identify a partner leaseholder.  Funding to refurbish the community hub premises and its running costs was successfully secured from key government agency partners.   

 

This project to establish a community hub and foodbank facility (the hub) in one of the commercial space at the Lexington neighbourhood shopping centre involves the following key project partners: NSW Department of Health (SESLHD), NSW Department of Family and Community Services, and The Deli Women and Children’s Centre (leaseholder) and Randwick City Council.  The hub involves:

 

§ Provision of a foodbank program where registered families and individuals can purchase affordable fresh food

§ Provision of a range of support services/activities delivered by multiple funded service providers.  Council staff will also be able to deliver a range of community capacity building and awareness raising sessions from this hub. 

§ Provision of specialist intervention programs and to better equip parents and caregivers with the necessary skills to avoid adverse childhood events, and encourage development of social, emotional well-being and resilience in children

 

Council officers will continue to take a lead role in progressing the refurbishment phase of the community hub project, and actively support the leaseholder, The Deli, in managing the community hub and foodbank program following its establishment.

 

The report outlines the progress of this collaborative effort taken to date, as well as the details of the Council’s monetary and in-kind contribution towards the establishment of the community hub facility.

 

 

Community Hub

 

A shop front in Lexington Place neighbourhood shopping centre was identified and commercial lease signed between property owner and The Deli with 100% of funding provided by SESLHD.  The terms of the lease is for 3 years plus option to renew for a further 3 years (6 years in total).

 

The Steering Committee that was established has been meeting on a fortnightly basis since early 2018 to identify funding opportunities and develop a governance framework. 

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the key project partners that is being drafted by council staff details the level of commitment, roles and responsibilities of the signatories.  It is envisaged that the MOU will be finalised before the end of August 2018.  Randwick Council’s role to be reflected in the non-legally binding MOU are described below:

§ Assist the leaseholder (The Deli) in securing quotes, and undertake roles in engaging building contractors.

§ Assist and support the leaseholder in overseeing refurbishment project, undertake management tasks on behalf of the Steering Committee)

§ Allocate 1 FTE Community Project Officer to assist The Deli with the coordination and operations of the community hub for an initial 2 years

§ Identify and apply for grants designed to address local community needs or improve services

§ Hold a range of capacity building and awareness raising events/activities to different age groups, delivered from the hub facility, including Coffee & Conversation Café Program

§ Liaison and service coordination functions with service providers relating to use of hub space/book service delivery session times

 

A local architectural firm donated to The Deli (as the leaseholder) a design for the hub interior space, and assisted in securing the necessary building work approvals.  There was already an existing consent to use the shop as a community facility. 

A builder has been selected by the leaseholder from three available quotations.  It is anticipated that refurbishment works (which includes provision of an accessible toilet) is scheduled to commence before end of August 2018.

 

The building contract cost of the refurbishment works is $150,000, including a $10,000 allowance to cover unexpected building contingencies.

 

Financial contribution for refurbishment works

 

NSW Health (SESLHD)                                       $75,000

NSW FACS                                                              $50,000

Randwick Council                                                     $25,000

                                                             Total:        $150,000

 

Initially, there was a funding shortfall of $25,000 to meet the refurbishment costs of $150,000.  In light of the financial contribution already committed by our two government agency partners, the Council is able to cover the required $25,000 as a one off financial contribution towards the refurbishment works.  This amount will be in addition to the in-kind support that council staff provides.  The amount of $25,000 is inclusive of the $10,000 contingency allowance, which will only be drawn upon as the need arises.  In this regard, any unspent amount will be return to Council.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a:      Meet the needs of our diverse community and provide equitable access to social services and infrastructure

Direction2b:       Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The financial impact to Council is a financial contribution not exceeding $25,000.  This amount will be sourced from savings in existing programs already identified in the community development budget (2018/19).  As this project is integral to Council’s community development program, budgeted resources will be put towards this project.

 

Conclusion

 

The area identified within South Maroubra is highly disadvantaged and many of its very low income residents are at-risk and vulnerable, having to deal with complex personal situations.  Having a place-based community hub will improve residents’ access to much needed support services. Community organisations will also be able to run their programs from the community hub, minimising the need for their clients to travel longer distances to access support services.  The community hub directly addresses access and equity principles, which is about removing barriers which prevent people from knowing and participating in services that they wish to utilise.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council note the progress of the community hub project located at Lexington Place, and endorse the financial and in-kind contribution detailed in this report 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP41/18

 

Subject:             Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP NO.1 and Clause 4.6 - 14th July - 20th August 2018

Folder No:                   F2008/00122

Author:                   Terry Papaioannou, Environmental Planner Officer (Technical & Research)      

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)     Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6;

 

2)     Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)     Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

4)     Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 14 July 2018 and 20 August 2018.

 

 

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 13 JULY 2018 TO 20 AUGUST 2018

 

 

 

 


SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 13 JULY 2018 TO 20 AUGUST 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS35/18

 

Subject:             Kingsford to Centennial Park Walking and Cycling Streetscape Improvements - Results of Public Consultation

Folder No:                   PROJ/10180/1527782/6

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council has over many years supported the use of bicycles as a sustainable, healthy transport mode.  Since the 1990’s the Council has identified and worked toward the delivery of a number of local routes as cycle routes.  In 2015 the community was consulted and eleven specific routes were endorsed by the Council as the high priority routes.  The cycle route identified as the highest priority for Randwick City Council is the ‘Doncaster Avenue / Houston Road’ route.

 

Randwick Council received Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) funding in the 2017-18 Financial Year to plan two new cycleways in our city.  One is to connect the new Kingsford Light Rail Terminus with Centennial Park (the Doncaster / Houston route), the other is to connect South Coogee to the Kingsford Light Rail Terminus.  These initiatives, which align with the Council’s adopted priorities for cycleway planning, will promote active transport in our city by providing safe and pleasant routes for people who choose to walk or cycle to key destinations.

 

The cycleway projects were reported to the Ordinary Council meeting on 28 November 2017, (Streetscape and Cycleway Improvement Project – Kingsford to Centennial Park, and South Coogee to Kingsford Light Rail Terminus) where Council resolved that:

 

a)     Council Officers report back to Council with the final concept design and the results of the community consultation;

 

b)     further routes be considered to service the south of the Randwick city area; and

 

c)     the General Manager have discussions with the light rail construction company with the intent of integrating the bike path concepts we are generating with the unfolding design of the light rail.

 

A concept design for the Kingsford to Centennial Park walking and cycling streetscape improvements was prepared first and exhibited to the public for feedback over a five week period between the 25 May and 2 July 2018. The consultation drawings are found in Appendix 1 – Community Consultation drawings.  The concept design received in-principle approval by RMS prior to exhibition.

 

This report responds to Council resolution (a) above, and outlines the community consultation activities and outcomes for the proposal.  It addresses the key themes and issues and makes recommendations on the concept design to improve the amenity of the streets along the route.

 

 

Background

 

Strategic framework

In 2015, Randwick City Council undertook significant community consultation to review our bicycle routes and to establish priorities for constructing routes within the city.  The connection from Kingsford to Centennial Park was identified as the top priority route in Randwick (see Appendix 2 - Randwick City Council Priority Construction Routes).  The route was also identified by the NSW State Government in its ‘Sydney’s Cycling Future’ strategy, and is a significant step to achieving Council’s 20 year City Plan objective of providing safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways.

 

Route Description

The route is approximately 2.6 kilometres long, and extends northerly from the Light Rail Terminus at Anzac Parade, Kingsford via Sturt Street, General Bridges Crescent, Houston Road, Day Avenue and Doncaster Avenue.  At the Doncaster Avenue and Alison Road intersection, the route connects to the existing shared path on Alison Road for access to Centennial Park and the City of Sydney. The location of the cycleway within the road corridor was determined by factors such as the number of intersections, driveways, school and loading zones, as well as connections to existing cycleways and shared paths. 

 

Figure 1 below shows the route from the Kingsford Light Rail Terminus to Centennial Park as a solid orange line. The dotted line shows the proposed route from the Kingsford Light Rail Terminus to South Coogee.  This is a separate project currently being undertaken by Randwick City Council, also with RMS funding. The concept design for this route is currently being finalised, with community consultation planned for late 2018. Results of the community consultation for the Kingsford to South Coogee route will be reported separately to Council.

 

Project route and area map - draft 01 low res

Figure 1: Proposed Kingsford to Centennial Park route

 

Design Elements

Wherever possible the cycleway is designed to provide full separation from other road users. Two types of bi-directional cycleway feature in the design, being the ‘interrupted median’ (separation of bike riders from the road by 0.4m wide spaced concrete blocks) and ‘flush-to-footpath’ (kerb extension to create a cycleway at the same level as the existing footpath). The design detail along the route was determined by a number of technical factors identified in the site analysis, including existing services, road gradients and susceptibility to flooding.

 

Figure 2 below shows a diagram of a typical bi-directional cycleway.  The existing road corridor width and footpath conditions vary along the route.

 

Figure 2: Typical street section showing a bi-directional separated cycleway

 

General Streetscape upgrade works

The implementation of the active transport route is an opportunity to increase the amenity for people who walk or cycle, and to improve safety for motorists.  Aside from providing a bidirectional cycleway to separate bike riders from cars and pedestrians wherever possible, a number of other streetscape upgrade proposals are included in the concept designs including:

 

·       An overall increase of approximately 50 new trees along the route;

·       New garden beds and enhancement of existing verges and streetscape;

·       Improved safety with new intersection improvements and traffic calming devices;

·       New pedestrian crossings;

·       Calmer traffic through implementation of clear markings and separation;

·       Pavement and kerb ramp upgrades for improved pedestrian access; and

·       New shared zone markings to improve awareness and safety where pedestrians, bike riders and vehicles cross paths.

                                                                      

Figure 3 shows the location of proposed new pedestrian crossings, new signalised intersections with improved pedestrian access, pedestrian refuges and bent-out intersections (which incorporate a pedestrian crossing).  These elements will make it easier and safer for pedestrians crossing the road and for bike riders traveling from Kingsford to Kensington.

 

Project route w additions - draft 01 low res

Figure 3: Proposed pedestrian improvements along the Kingsford to Centennial Park route

 

Consultation activities

 

Community consultation of the design plans for the proposed new cycleway and streetscape upgrade works was conducted over a 5-week period between May 25 and July 2 2018 (extended from the original consultation closing date of 22 June).

 

The consultation activities included:

 

·       Your Say Randwick project page, including: detailed designs for each section of the route, Frequently Asked Questions, Question and Answer forum, as well as options to make a submission and register for future project updates; 

·       Advertising for the consultation in the Southern Courier, Daily Telegraph online, Council Weekly email bulletin and on Facebook;

·       A letter mailed to all residents and owners along the route informing them of the consultation (see Appendix 3 – Letter to Residents and Owners);

·       Concept designs exhibited at the Administration Building and Randwick City Council Libraries;

·       Door knocking of all households along the Kingsford to Centennial Park route to offer an opportunity to discuss the project, and inform residents on the ways they could make a submission; 

·       Two pop up stalls with free coffee, one on the route and one near Centennial Park; and

·       Information session at Kensington Public School.

A full report of consultation activities and results can be found in Appendix 4 – Community Consultation Report.

 

It should also be noted that the General Bridges Crescent portion of the route is located in Bayside Council’s local government area.  Bayside Council has provided support and approval for this project, and carried out their own community consultation regarding the proposal between 6 June and 1 July 2018.  Submissions were received through “Have Your Say Bayside” and concept design exhibition at Bayside Council customer service centres.

 

Submissions received 

 

As outlined in Appendix 4 – Community Consultation Report, the concept designs for the Walking and Cycling Streetscape Improvements Kingsford to Centennial Park received a significant amount of interest, including:

 

·       3310 visitors to Your Say Randwick website;

·       2077 pages downloaded;

·       9 questions asked and responded to;

·       396 Have Your Say submissions; and

·       38 email submissions

 

The majority of submissions received for the project were supportive (approximately 70%), with reasons most cited being safety improvements for pedestrians and bike riders along with the tree planting and streetscape improvements.

 

Approximately 30% of respondents were either neutral or opposed to the project, citing concerns including impacts on traffic and parking, loss of trees, and impacts on driveways.

 

A full list of the submissions received is included in Appendix 5 – Community Consultation Responses.

 

The general themes raised by respondents are explored in further detail below.

 

Issues

 

Main themes

Although there was a wide range of issues raised in the submissions, a number of prominent recurring themes have been identified for further discussion in this report. 

 

These are:

 

1.     Safety for bike riders

2.     Cycle network, including links to Centennial Park and University of New South Wales (UNSW)

3.     Trees and streetscape improvements, including traffic calming

4.     Pedestrian safety

5.     Intersections

6.     Parking and disability parking 

7.     Kensington Public School

8.     Driveway access

 

A full list of all issues raised in the submissions, along with the response provided by Council officers, is provided in Appendix 5 – Community Consultation Responses.  Each of the key themes above is discussed in more detail below.

 


 

1.     Safety for bike riders

A key outcome for this project is to improve safety for bike riders and pedestrians along this priority route. A cycleway that is separated from the footpath and the road significantly reduces the conflict and likelihood of accidents between people who walk, people on bikes and motor vehicles.   It is widely acknowledged that providing safe cycling infrastructure is the key in making bike riding a viable transportation option for many in the community. 

 

The route, in its current state, provides an on-road bike facility.  This requires the bike rider to mix with traffic, often forcing the bike rider to ride close to parked cars where there is a risk of ‘car dooring’ (when a driver opens the car door onto a bike rider, causing a crash).  Many submissions made by bike riders as part of this consultation considered the existing route to be particularly unsafe and often stressful, especially along Doncaster Avenue between Alison Road and Anzac Parade where traffic volume is high.

 

A significant number of respondents noted that the proposed design would improve safety for bike riders traveling along the route.  This in turn was seen to encourage more people to cycle, especially those with the noted safety concerns regarding the current on-road cycle lane.  Benefits to health and to the environment were also noted.

 

Discussion – Safety for bike riders

The proposed design significantly increases safety for people on bikes as;

·      They would be located between the kerb and the parking lane, and with a 400mm separated buffer;

·      The cycleway would be adjacent to the passenger door side, reducing the frequency of car doors opening onto the cycleway (as many cars are occupied by the driver only); and

·      Due to the bi-directional nature of the cycleway, the bike riders closest to the parked cars would be travelling facing the parked cars.  This provides greater visibility of possible upcoming conflicts.

 

Outcome - Safety for bike riders

The proposed cycleway will increase the safety of bike riders, and provide a safer transport option for those in our community who wish to use it.

 

2.     Cycle network, including links to Centennial Park and University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Support for an expansion of the cycleway network was a common theme amongst written responses through the Your Say Randwick website.

 

Comments relating to the project include improving connections to:

 

·       UNSW

·       Sturt St, east of Anzac Parade

·       Alison Rd shared path, next to Centennial Park

·       Centennial Park, via a bridge.

 

A number of respondents requested more separated cycleways be constructed in Randwick City. Safer cycling infrastructure was requested for:

 

·       Todman Avenue

·       Anzac Parade, between Doncaster Avenue and High Street

·       High Street

·       Anzac Parade, from Kingsford to Maroubra and La Perouse

 

Discussion – Cycle network

Randwick City Council will explore the following future projects to address the desire for a more legible and connected cycle network in our area:

·      Strengthening the connection to UNSW by creating a shared path on the eastern side of Anzac Parade between Doncaster Avenue and High Street. This will be addressed once light rail construction is completed.

·      Strengthening the connection from Doncaster Avenue to the Alison Road shared path at Centennial Park by continuing to work with Light Rail and RMS. The establishment of a shared path on the southern side of Alison Road between Doncaster Avenue and Darley Road would help improve this access, and create a smoother and more efficient connection to the shared path on Alison Road between Darley Road and Wansey Road.

 

Outcome – Cycle network

Reinforcement of cycling connections as suggested by respondents will be actively considered and all suggested additional routes are noted. Council is committed to providing safe bicycle infrastructure in accordance with the 2015 Randwick City Council Priority Construction Routes established by community consultation in 2015 (see Appendix 2 – RCC Priority Construction Routes).

 

3.     Trees and streetscape improvements

A number of respondents stated that they supported the proposed trees and landscaping along the route, with the streetscape improvements contributing to the amenity of the area.  Some also noted that the proposed improvements, such as planter beds, would assist in calming traffic along the route.

 

Some residents express concerns about the impact which the project will have upon some street trees.

 

Discussion – Trees and streetscape improvements

Although every endeavour has been made to accommodate the existing trees into the design where possible, some trees are planned for removal in the concept to accommodate traffic changes or to meet minimum safe sight lines. A total of 21 trees are proposed to be removed with 72 new trees to be planted along the route. This results in a net gain of 51 street trees which will significantly add to the amenity of the area.

 

In addition to the new trees, it is proposed to install new ‘kerb build outs’ (see Figure 4) at intersections and pedestrian crossings. These are specifically designed as planter beds to further improve the greening of the streetscape.

 

Outcome – Trees and streetscape improvements

The project increases the number of trees and landscaping along the route. Further opportunities for planting of trees and planter beds along the route will be considered during design development of the project.

 

4.     Pedestrian Safety

Improving pedestrian safety was a key consideration in the consultation responses, and submissions that raised this issue were generally supportive of the proposed improvements, such as:

 

·       The proposal discourages bike riders from riding on the footpath by providing a dedicated space for people who ride;

·       Pedestrians, bike riders and cars are separated wherever possible; and

·       Pedestrian crossings and signalised intersections along Doncaster Avenue and Houston Road will improve safety for residents and others who walk in the neighbourhood. 

 

There was, however, some concern that the safety of passengers exiting parked cars next to the cycleway would be compromised. The design has considered this issue by providing a 0.4m separation from parking and cycle path areas. The bi-directional design allows vehicle passengers and approaching riders to have clearer views of each other, reducing the likelihood of collision.

 

Discussion – Pedestrian Safety

The community consultation raised valuable suggestions for further pedestrian improvements along the route.  This included incorporating kerb ‘build outs’ at intersections opposite the cycleway. 

 

Incorporating kerb build outs into the design serves to improve safety by:

 

·      Reducing the distance pedestrians have to walk across the road;

·      Improving sight lines for pedestrians crossing the road; and

·      Providing additional traffic calming along the route.

 

As detailed earlier in this report, kerb build outs also provide increased opportunities for planting along the route. They can also provide opportunities for additional parking spaces by reducing the required set-back to the intersection allowable for parked cars.

 

A typical design of kerb buildouts is shown in Figure 4 below.

 

Outcome – Pedestrian Safety

The kerb build outs opposite the cycleway should be incorporated where feasible into the design.

 

Buildout

Figure 4:  Kerb build outs improve safety for pedestrians and provide opportunities for planting.

5.     Intersections

Some respondents made detailed comments regarding particular intersections along the route. Detailed intersection analysis was used to determine the most appropriate intersection treatments. Traffic counts were analysed and the likely traffic impacts were modelled using a SIDRA analysis for each key intersection.

 

The existing roundabouts on the route are not compatible with bi-directional cycleways, as illustrated in Figure 5 following.  In a roundabout arrangement, vehicles have no storage space and would regularly block the cycleway. There are poor sight lines and the arrangement leaves bike riders and pedestrians vulnerable. There is also an increased risk of head-on collisions for bike riders traveling in the ‘opposing’ direction along the bidirectional cycleway. 

 

As a result of this incompatibility, roundabouts along the route will be converted to either a signalised or priority controlled intersection. 

 

roundabouts

 

Figure 5:  Conflict points at roundabouts for cycleways.

 

Discussion – Intersections

Based on the modelling, it was determined that the following intersections could be converted to priority controlled intersections (with the removal of existing roundabouts) with minimal impact on traffic flows:

 

·      Doncaster Avenue and Day Avenue

·      Houston Road and Barker Street

·      Houston Road and Strachan Street

·      Houston Road and Borrowdale Road

 

Determination as to the most appropriate treatment at the Doncaster Avenue and Ascot Street intersection is subject to further investigation and discussion with RMS.

 

A number of respondents were concerned with the bicycle wait times at signalised intersections. Light phasing is the responsibility of Roads and Maritime Services. We are working closely with RMS on the light phasing to ensure all road users are efficiently accommodated.

 

Outcome – Intersections

Further analysis of all intersections will be undertaken during the detailed design of the project and suggestions from the public consultation will be incorporated where feasible. These will include:

 

a)  Doncaster Avenue and Alison Road intersection

This intersection is currently restricted by light rail design. We will continue to explore ways to improve the separation for bike riders at this intersection and will work with RMS to try to reduce wait times at traffic lights.

 

b)  Doncaster Avenue and Ascot intersection

The current design shows a signalised intersection at Doncaster Avenue and Ascot Street.  We will conduct further investigation with RMS to determine whether the Doncaster Avenue and Ascot Street intersection should be signalised or adjusted to be priority controlled.

 

c)  Doncaster Avenue and Todman Avenue intersection

We will investigate ways to improve bicycle access to Todman Avenue while actively discouraging illegal riding on the footpath. We will investigate ways to improve access to Kensington Public School for people either walking or riding (see also Section 7 following).

 

d)  Doncaster Avenue and Day Avenue intersection

We will improve bike connectivity to the cycleway from west of Day Avenue and south of Doncaster Avenue.

 

e)  Houston Road and Day Avenue intersection

We will investigate ways to further improve the safety of bike riders and pedestrians at this intersection.

 

6.     General Parking and Mobility Parking  

Many respondents were concerned with the parking loss along the route. 

 

Although every effort has been made to minimise any parking loss along the route, some spaces are proposed to be removed in order to accommodate new pedestrian crossings and the like.  New parking spaces have been created wherever possible.

 

Street

Parking Spaces Removed

New Parking Spaces Gained

Outcome

Doncaster Avenue

21

3

18 spaces removed

(mainly to provide for required sightlines at new pedestrian crossings)

Houston Road

9

9

Total supply remains unchanged

General Bridges Crescent*

1

2

1 additional space *(Bayside Council area)

Sturt Street

3

0

3 spaces removed

(to provide for three new street trees)

Total

34

14

-20

Table 1 – Street by street Impact of proposal on parking supply

 

Overall, there will be a nett loss of 20 parking spaces along the full 2.6 kilometre length of the route; being a removal of 34 spaces, with 14 new spaces created.

 

There were also some concerns raised regarding specific mobility impaired persons’ parking spaces affected by the route.

 

Discussion – General Parking and Mobility Impaired Persons’ Parking

In recent times, due to the light rail project, Randwick Council has increased the parking supply in some Kensington and Kingsford side streets.  This was undertaken to address concerns about parking loss along Anzac Parade.  An increase in the total parking supply in these side streets was achieved and for some streets, the new full time parking supply even exceeded the previous ‘Clearway’ affected parking spaces which were removed due to the light rail project.

 

Implementing new locations for people to more safely walk across the road has resulted in an adjustment to some of the parking spaces along the cycleway route.

 

This is considered a balanced outcome for our community.

 

Outcome – Parking and Mobility Parking

We have commenced discussions with stakeholders and residents along the route where mobility parking may be subject to change.  These discussions will continue in the next stage of the project to accommodate concerns.

 

7.     Kensington Public School

Kensington Public School is located on the west side of Doncaster Avenue.  While not on the same side of the road as the proposed cycleway, the school is seen as an important stakeholder along the route – especially given the intense parking activity at certain times of the day.

 

Council officers have met with the Principal of Kensington Public School a number of times and with representatives of the Parents and Citizens’ Association regarding the project.  The following issues were raised by the school.  An indication of the Council’s response to their issues is shown in italics:

 

a)  Car parking provision of the required sightlines at proposed pedestrian crossings has resulted in a net loss of only 2 spaces on Doncaster Ave, within 100 metres of the school.   

b)  Pedestrian safety - The design of the cycleway is arranged to accommodate people walking, cycling and driving.

c)  Mobility parking – The Council has incorporated existing mobility parking spaces into the design.

d)  Footpath access during events Adequate footpath access will be maintained along the whole route; sufficient to meet the needs of nearby events.

e)  Todman Ave and Doncaster Ave intersection – The school has raised concerns about the current operation of this intersection with regard to pedestrian movements. We will continue to work with the Principal to ensure the needs of the school are considered within the final design.

 

Discussion – Kensington Public School

The wider community consultation highlighted that many bike riders currently feel quite unsafe as they navigate cars (and sometimes, buses) pulling into and out of the Kensington Public School pick up and drop off zone on Doncaster Avenue.

 

Some respondents supported the project as it will make it safer for parents dropping and picking up their kids and for bike riders as they will be fully separated from each other. Respondents also noted that providing a separated cycleway will encourage more children to cycle to Kensington Public School.

 

There was also some concern regarding potential conflict between bike riders and pedestrians at this ‘pinch point’.

 

Outcome – Kensington Public School

Although this project will improve the safety of the Kensington Public School drop off and pick up zone by separating the bike riders from cars and pedestrians, it is acknowledged that the Doncaster and Todman intersection has the potential for conflicting requirements and desire lines.

 

In the next stage of the project we will investigate ways to strengthen safe connections to Kensington Public School for parents and children (whether they be riding or walking to school), and into Todman Avenue for bike riders.

 

8.     Driveways

There were some respondents who were concerned about how driveway access would be impacted by the project, including:

 

·      Safety concerns when exiting driveways, with drivers having to look out for bike riders, pedestrians and vehicles in both directions; and

·      The large number of driveways along the route creating many points of potential conflict.

 

Discussion – Driveways

Residents with driveways located on the cycleway will need to take care when entering and exiting, as per existing conditions.  There will be additional care required due to the bi-directional nature of the cycleway.  Bike riders using the route will also need to be alert when crossing driveways.

 

The design will include green surface paint and bicycle symbols at all driveways to alert drivers and bike riders of the potential conflict and the need for care.

 

Council will continue to consider new driveway construction requests as per current practices.

 

Outcome – Driveways

Design measures as noted such as green paint and bicycle symbols will be used at each driveway to alert all road users of the potential conflict point. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 3:         An informed engaged community.

Direction 3c:        The community has increased opportunities to participate in decision making progress.

Outcome 4:         Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:        Improved design and sustainability across all development.

Outcome 5:         Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction 5a:        Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active and passive open space uses.

Outcome 6:         A liveable city.

Direction 6a:    Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Outcome 9:     Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction 9a:    A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreational opportunities.

Financial impact statement

 

Randwick City Council was successful at obtaining funding for the development of a concept design for this project under the RMS Active Transport Program. Further design phases and construction of the cycleway and streetscape improvements are eligible for full NSW Government funding under this program. However, this funding has not yet been allocated.

 

The community consultation process was funded through the project budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The existing bike facilities that connect Kingsford to Centennial Park are perceived by many as unsafe.  They are not utilised by the wider public due to the fear of bicycle/car collisions. This project will separate bike riders from the cars, providing a safe environment for all road users. The project also strengthens the amenity of walking connections within parts of Kingsford and Kensington with proposals for new pedestrian crossings and refuges, and via the many proposed trees, planter beds and intersection treatments.

 

The community consultation resulted in 3310 visits to the ‘Your Say Randwick’ website. 2077 pages were downloaded and we received 434 written submissions.  Of the written submissions received, approximately 70% supported the project.

 

Loss of parking, driveway access, and some proposed intersection treatments were of concern to the community.  However, the majority of participants were in favour of the proposed walking and cycling streetscape improvements. The additional trees and street calming improvements were welcomed by our community, as was the higher degree of safety and separation afforded to all road users by the project.

 

The proposed walking and cycling streetscape improvements between Kingsford and Centennial Park will provide a strong and safe link between these key destinations, and to links into the City of Sydney. This will greatly benefit those in our community who choose to walk or cycle, whether as commuters or for recreation.  Providing this alternative active transport option for short trips to work, school, shops and parks also serves to reduce the loads on our roads and public transport.  

 

Recommendation:

 

That:

1.     Council adopt the concept plans for the Kingsford to Centennial Park cycleway and streetscape improvements as the foundation to finalise design development and proceed to construction of the project, when funded; and

 

2.     Council seek funding from RMS for the implementation of the project.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Community Consultation Drawings

Included under separate cover

2.

RCC Priority Construction Routes

 

3.

Letter to Residents and Owners

 

4.

Community Consultation Report

 

5.

Community Consultation Responses

Included under separate cover

 

 


RCC Priority Construction Routes

Attachment 2

 

 


Letter to Residents and Owners

Attachment 3

 

 


 


Community Consultation Report

Attachment 4

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS36/18

 

Subject:             Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee

Folder No:                   F2018/00158

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

The Council’s Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meets quarterly to examine issues relating to bike riding and cyclist facilities.


The May 2018 meeting of the Advisory Committee was attended by Councillors, representatives of BIKEast and UNSW, members of the community and Council staff were in attendance.

 

Issues

 

The Advisory Committee considered numerous matters of importance to local bicycle riders and the Minutes from the Committee’s meeting, held on 23rd May, 2018, are attached. 

 

The Minutes of the subsequent Committee meeting, held on 15th August, 2018, will be reported upon at a future meeting of the Council.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:   Integrated and accessible transport

Direction 9a:  A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities.

Key action:    Integrated community transport, pedestrian and cycle links between town centres and key locations.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Any proposals for expenditure arising from the Advisory Committee’s recommendations are either covered by existing funding allocations or would be the subject of separate reports to the Council for funding.

 

Conclusion

 

The Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee is a positive forum for the consideration of matters important to bicycle riders. The Committee’s recommendations are supported and it is considered that they should be endorsed by the Council.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the recommendations detailed within the minutes of the Cycleways and Bicycle Facilities Advisory Committee meeting, held on 23rd May, 2018,  be endorsed.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

MINUTES - Cycleways and Bicycles Facilities Advisory Committee - 23 May 2018

 

2.

REPORT - Randwick Council - Initiatives for Bicycle Riders - 25 May 2018

 

 

 

 


MINUTES - Cycleways and Bicycles Facilities Advisory Committee - 23 May 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


REPORT - Randwick Council - Initiatives for Bicycle Riders - 25 May 2018

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS37/18

 

Subject:             New Laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick - Naming Proposal

Folder No:                   F2004/07140

Author:                   Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services      

 

Introduction

 

The new laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick was constructed by Transport for NSW (TfNSW) as part of the CBD and South East Light Rail (CSELR) project. The new laneway provides access to properties fronting Arthur Street, High Street and Botany Street.

 

In accordance with the Geographical Names Board (GNB) NSW Address Policy, Council is responsible for endorsing the official road name and ensuring it is approved and gazetted.

 

The names Wansey Lane, High Lane and Sunnyside Lane were proposed in a report considered in the Works Committee meeting held on 8 August 2017. It was resolved:

 

“(Smith/Neilson) that:

a)     the staff be thanked for their naming suggestions; and

 

b)     a further report be brought back to Council offering three further proposed names for the new laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick.”

 

Issues

 

Road naming is legislated under the Roads Act 1993. This Act empowers Local Government, as the custodians of addresses, the authority to name the roads within their Local Government Area (LGA).

 

Under the Geographical Names Act 1966, the Geographical Names Board are responsible for maintaining the State Gazetteer for place names and road names. Therefore, they assess the proposed road names before approval is determined.

 

The guidelines set by the Geographical Names Board of NSW for the naming of roads has been considered during the review of the proposal. The proposed names have been developed in consultation with Council’s Local Studies Librarian.

 

Eurimbla Lane

The Prince of Wales Hospital is expanding and acquiring Eurimbla Avenue, Randwick as part of the development. As the road will cease to exist, the proposed name will commemorate the community of Eurimbla Avenue.

 

Writtle Lane

The laneway is located on the opposite side of Arthur Street to Writtle Park and therefore, has a local connection.  Writtle Park is an important area of open space surrounded by medium density residential development. The park is therefore an important local landmark.

 

Johnson Lane

At a Council meeting held on 22 August 2017, Council resolved to recognise the Hon. (Johno) John Richard Johnson who had recently passed and his unique contribution and public service in Randwick City. Johnson Lane is offered as a naming suggestion for the lane to commemorate Johno and his contribution to the local Randwick community. He was a local resident, Director of the Prince of Wales Hospital, a long serving board member and one time president of the Randwick Labour Club. The close proximity of the laneway to the hospital provides a geographical link for the naming of the laneway.

 

Wansey Lane

The new laneway runs parallel to Wansey Road. Laneways were traditionally named after streets that they run parallel to. Historically, it was customary to have a road layout with parallel lanes, usually used by the night soil cart in the days before sewers. The name of the road and lane was often the same.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost for the administration and consultation associated with the road naming proposal will be funded from the 2018-19 operational budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Council is required to name the new laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick. Three further names have been proposed as the name of the new laneway. Each of the proposed names comply with the guidelines set by the Geographical Names Board.

 

It is recommended that Wansey Lane be selected as the proposed name for the new laneway as it maintains the tradition of naming laneways to correspond with the name of the parallel street.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

a)     Council endorse Wansey Lane as the proposed name for the new laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick.

 

b)     The endorsed street name nomination be submitted to the Geographical Names Board.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Location map of new laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Location map of new laneway off Arthur Street, Randwick

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS38/18

 

Subject:             Boat And Trailer Parking Legislation

Folder No:                   F2018/00250

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport     

 

Introduction

 

In March 2018, at the Works Committee meeting, the Council resolved as follows:

 

“(Hamilton/Neilson) that the Council:

 

1.     Endorse the proposal to declare the whole of the Randwick Council area a “Declared Area” for the purposes of the Impounding Amendment (Unattended Boat Trailers) Act 2015.

 

2.     Initiate community consultation regarding this issue in accordance with the Community Consultation Principles

 

3.     Report the results of the community consultation back to Council with a view to commencing implementation of the provisions of the Impounding Amendment (Unattended Boat Trailers) Act 2015 as soon as possible thereafter.”

 

The purpose of this report is to provide Council with the results of the community consultation.

 

In particular, the report discusses the proposed application of the Impounding Amendment (Unattended Boat Trailers) Act 2015 within the Randwick local government area.

 

Issues

 

Council regularly receives complaints from residents and businesses claiming that boat trailers, storage trailers, advertising trailers and horse floats are causing parking, road safety, residential and visual amenity issues.

 

Currently, it is legal for registered trailers and boat trailers (less than 4.5 tonnes and 7.5 metres long) to park in built-up areas provided they are parked in accordance with any other parking restrictions outlined in the NSW Road Rules. Presently, the only option Council has to control boat trailer parking is to install parking restrictions through the Traffic Committee process.

 

The installation of parking restrictions which prevent the long term parking of boat trailers is unfortunately a sub optimal solution and is not supported as a long term traffic management tool.

 

These type of parking restrictions may affect all vehicles (not just boat trailers) and may disadvantage residents and their visitors,  requiring them to move their vehicles regularly or risk getting fined. The installation of these types of parking restrictions also does not prevent boat trailers from coming to a particular area and parking on street. It merely shifts them from one location to another nearby location. Furthermore, in some areas where boat trailers park, the installation of parking restrictions are not justified as the roads have low parking occupancy rate.

 

Legislative Powers

Council’s Health, Building and Regulatory Services Department and Integrated Transport Department staff have examined the amendments to the Impounding Act. A summary of what powers Council now has enforce the Act and remove/impound boat trailers parked on street is summarised below.

 

Registered Boat Trailers

Where a registered boat trailer is parked on street then under the new Amendment, it can be impounded by Council if it is determined that the trailer is “unattended” (not moved for 28 days). To do so, Council must notify the last registered owner and if the boat trailer is not “moved” within 15 days of the notification, Council can impound the trailer pursuant to Section 15A(2) of the Impounding Act 1993.

 

For the purpose of the new amendment, the minimum definition of “moved” is to locate the boat trailer onto another road or moved along the same road and passing an intersection with another road.

 

These powers can only be applied to roads and land that are gazetted as “Declared Areas” under section 15A of the Impounding Act 1993 and the Impounding Amendment (Unattended Boat Trailers) Act 2015.

 

Unregistered Boat Trailers

Where an unregistered boat trailer is parked on street, then Council can undertake the same process as outlined above for registered boat trailer under the new Amendment. However, Council also has existing powers under the Road Transport Act and Local Government Act to do the following:

 

·      Issue an on the spot fine of $177 pursuant to Section 68(1) of the Road Transport Act, 2013. Multiple fines could be issued if the trailer remains on street unregistered.

 

·      Issue an Order to the last registered owner to remove the unregistered trailer and if not removed by the owner (typically within 7 days), Council can issue a $330 fine for failure to comply with the Order and remove the trailer (if still unregistered) pursuant to section 124 of the Local Government Act. However, it should be noted that this application of the Local Government Act has not been tested and is subject to further legal advice.

 

Council’s Community Consultation:

In June 2018, Council undertook the community consultation on this matter throughout the Randwick LGA. 575 submissions were received as follows:

 

·    424 supported the introduction of boat trailer parking restrictions (74%)

·    86 did not support the introduction of boat trailer parking restrictions (15%)

·    18 were neutral or their opinion was not clear (3%)

·    47 did not make a comment (8%)

 

Furthermore:

·    90 of the submissions also suggested the legislation be extended to all type of trailers

·    22 of the submissions that were supportive also suggested that parking permits be allowed for registered boat trailers

·    47 of the submissions suggested that the problem will not be resolved

·    41 of the submissions that suggested boat trailers to park off street

·    38 of the submissions suggested to create a boat trailer parking area and suggested Council to introduce fees

·    31 of the submissions suggested that 28 days is too long

·    16 of the submissions pointed that the enforcement would be unlikely with Council’s limited resources

(NB that numerous submissions made multiple suggestions)

 

Comment regarding effectiveness of the Legislation

While the majority of respondents indicated support for the application of the ‘boat trailer legislation’ within Randwick, it should be noted that application of the legislation in some local government areas (LGAs) has not been deemed to be fully effective. 

 

Numerous boat owners in other LGAs simply await the sending of the notice and then take the trailer for a short drive ‘around the block’ so that the time clock (28 days + 15 days) commences again.  Other Councils also report that the process can be resource intensive with Rangers having to gather adequate data to prove that the trailers haven’t moved throughout the 28 day + 15 day time period.  Also, when the boat trailers are moved and then re-parked in the same parking space, neighbouring residents express frustration with the Council for perceived inaction.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9d:      Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

Direction 9e:      Parking is managed to balance convenience against reduce car reliance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There will be some ranger staff resources required to enforce the processes initially, however, they will be funded from the current operating budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The new legislation may assist in preventing the long term parking of some boat trailers within the Randwick LGA. The legislation can only be applied to “Declared Areas”.

 

Given the Council’s long standing position on boat trailers and the community’s concern about boat trailers taking up valuable on street parking spaces and creating safety issues, it is recommended that Council apply for all public roads and lands within the Randwick LGA to be Gazetted as “Declared Areas” under section 15A of the Impounding Act 1993 and the Impounding Amendment (unattended Boat Trailers) Act 2015.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council apply for all public roads and lands within the Randwick LGA to be gazetted as a “Declared Area” under Section 15A of the Impounding Act 1993 and Impounding Amendment Act (Unattended Boat Trailer) Act 2015.

 

b)     Council advertise its intentions to declare all public roads and lands within the Randwick LGA as “Declared Areas” by letter box dropping properties in streets with known boat trailer problems, on Council’s website and in the Southern Courier.

 

c)     Council write to Waverley Council, Woollahra Municipal Council and the City of Sydney and advise its intention to declare all public roads and lands within the Randwick LGA as “Declared Areas”.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Impounding Amendment (Unattended Boat Trailer) Bill 2015

 

 

 

 


Impounding Amendment (Unattended Boat Trailer) Bill 2015

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS39/18

 

Subject:             Coogee Bay Road Streetscape Upgrade - Proposed Waiver of Footway Dining Fees

Folder No:                   F2009/00243

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Acting Director City Services     

 

Introduction

 

Council will soon be commencing Stage 1 of the Coogee Bay Road Streetscape Upgrade project. Stage 1 will commence in September 2018 and be completed by December 2018.  Stage 2 is planned to commence in March 2019 and be completed towards the end of 2019.

 

During works, there will be periods where existing footway dining will not be available.  The project will deliver wider footpaths along section of Coogee Bay Road and this will provide potential for additional footway dining.

 

This report outlines the proposed management fees associated with footway dining during works and post construction for businesses with existing agreements.

 

Issues

 

Construction Phase

Coogee Bay Road (Brook Street to Arden Street) and Arden Street (Carr Street to Alfreda Street) is a popular beachside dining precinct. There are currently 12 businesses utilising footway dining along these sections and this usage will not be available during the construction phases of the streetscape upgrade.

 

Generally, due to the unavailability of the outdoor dining during works, the footway dining agreement rental fees are waived when the work is near or at the premises.  As a measure of goodwill, it is proposed that the footway dining rental fees be waived for the period from commencement until completion.  The duration is planned to be 14 months including 3 months when no work will take place between December 2018 and March 2019. 

 

Post Construction

The wider footpaths will provide the potential for increased footway dining usage. It is proposed to provide assistance to businesses with existing footway dining seeking to expand their area by making the approval process as simple as possible and waiving the application fees and the agreement preparation fees.  

 

We cannot approve the extension of the footway dining areas without meeting certain legal obligations. For each application, we need to check each footway dining area to determine whether it meets the criteria for exempt development. If it does, we can issue a Roads Act approval for the extended footway dining area without needing a new or modified development consent. If the proposal does not meet the exempt criteria, we will need to issue development consent (under the EP&A Act) and approval under the Roads Act.

 

Each restaurant operator will still need to lodge an application form with a plan showing the extended footway dining area. They will also need to enter into a new/updated agreement for the use of the area.

 

The waiving of the application fees and the agreement preparation fees associated with amended footway dining applications will only apply to businesses that have a current agreement when the construction commences.  

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6f:      Foster distinct neighbourhoods with commercial centres that meet the needs of our community as places of work, shop, live and socialise.

 

Outcome 8:       A Strong Local Community.

Direction 8f:      Vibrant business, commercial and industrial sectors that provide ongoing and diverse employment opportunities and serve the community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There are currently 12 business with footway dining agreements.  Each business pays an annual fee based on the area of the footway dining.  Combined, the monthly fees equate to $7,155.  By waiving the fees for a period of 14 months, the loss of income will be approximately $100,170.  This total figure is expected to be slightly higher due to the work continuing into the 2019-20 financial year and the setting of fees for 2019-20.

 

The financial impact due to the proposed waiving of applications fee and agreement fees cannot be calculated accurately without knowing the number of businesses that will take up the opportunity.  It is expected that at least 50% of the businesses will seek to expand their footway dining area.  The estimated total amount of fees to be waived is $3,300.

 

The waived fees for both the current footway dining agreements and the subsequent applications will be funded from the Coogee Bay Road Streetscape Upgrade budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Due to the nature of the streetscape works for Coogee Bay Road and Arden Street, footway dining usage will not be possible when the works are in the vicinity of the premises.  However, it is proposed that support be provided by waiving the footway dining rental fees for the duration of the project to build goodwill.

 

Post construction, Council anticipates ongoing benefits to the businesses along Coogee Bay Road. The creation of an attractive space, complete with trees, wider footpaths, upgraded paving, new street furniture and other landscaping will create an inviting place for customers and increase trade.

 

To encourage businesses with existing footway dining agreements to take up the opportunity of wider footpaths, it is proposed that application fees and footway dining agreement fees be waived as a one-off opportunity within 6 months of the completion of the project.

 


 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council endorse the proposed waiving of footway dining rental fees for businesses with an existing footway dining agreement when construction of the Coogee Bay Road Streetscape project commences.  The waiving of the fees be until the project is completed.

 

b)     Council endorse the waiving of the application fees and footway dining agreement fees for businesses with existing footway dining agreement when work commences to expand their footway occupation area. 

 

c)     the offer to waive the application fees and footway dining agreement fees to amend existing footway occupation area be maintained for a 6 month period following completion of the project.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO42/18

 

Subject:             Contingency Fund - status as at 31 July 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/07396

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2018-19 financial year there have been 21 allocations totalling $101,667.85. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2018-19

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$14,500.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 27 June 2017

Sponsorship and in-kind support - Surfing NSW - Junior State Surfing Title

$16,000.00

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - St George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,323.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - Taste of Coogee 2018

$15,451.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Financial assistance - South Sydney Rabbitohs' - Commemorate John Sutton Historic Milestone

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Our Lady of the Rosary School, Kensington Community Fair

$9,488.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$4,518.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waivng of fees - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Take 3 for the Sea

$928.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Donation - Coogee Surf Life Saving Club - Coogee Dippers (Autism) Program

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Waiving of fees - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival

$3,020.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial assistance - A National Act of Recognition

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial contribution - Commemorative Statue at the Cenotaph, Maroubra

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 24 July 2018

Financial Assistance - Blak Markets La Perouse

$7,500.00

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                              $101,667.85

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:         Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:         Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $95,000.00 in the 2018-19 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO43/18

 

Subject:             Code of Conduct

Folder No:                   F2004/06569

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

Under section 440 of the Local Government Act, Councils must adopt a Code of Conduct that incorporates the provisions of the Office of Local Government’s Model Code. The Office of Local Government (OLG) published a revised ‘Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW’ in November 2015.

 

Under section 440(7) of the Act, Councils must, within 12 months after each ordinary election, review its adopted code and make such adjustments as it considers appropriate and as are consistent with this section.

 

Issues

 

Council’s Code of Conduct was last updated March 2016 to provide for the November 2015 changes to the Model Code.

 

In October 2017 the OLG published a ‘consultation draft’ of a new ‘Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW’. The reporting of the current review of the Code of Conduct has been held off until now on the assumption that the new Model Code of Conduct would be released by the OLG. Given, however, that Council is required to review its adopted code within 12 months of the September 2017 elections, it is suggested that Council just reconfirm it current Code and conduct a comprehensive review of the Code once the new Model Code is released.

 

The new Model Code will provide for the amendments made to the Local Government Act last year and will see the pecuniary interest provisions of the Act and the Local Government (General) Regulation incorporated into the Model Code of Conduct. Once commenced, these reforms will consolidate the prescription of all ethical standards for Council officials into a single instrument.

 

Once the new Model Code is released, Councils will be given a six month transitional period in which to adopt it and to update their systems to align with the new requirements.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1(c):   Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 


 

Conclusion

 

Councils must, within 12 months after each ordinary election, review its adopted code. Given the OLG has indicated that it is likely to release the new Model Code of Conduct by the end of the year, it is proposed that Council’s current Code of Conduct (copy attached) be reconfirmed.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Code of Conduct (incorporating the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW – November 2015) be reconfirmed.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Code of Conduct - November 2015 (adopted at the 22 March 2016 Council meeting)

 

 

 

 


Code of Conduct - November 2015 (adopted at the 22 March 2016 Council meeting)

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO44/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report - July 2018

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – July 2018” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of July 2018. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 July 2018, Council held investments with a market value of $60.116 million. The portfolio value decreased during July by ~$5.128 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from July 2017 to July 2018. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance

 

Asset Allocation

 

The majority of the portfolio is spread between senior floating rate notes (52.42%) and term deposits (40.75%). The remainder of the portfolio is held in the overnight cash accounts with CBA (6.83%). The FRN’s add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

 

 

Term to Maturity

 

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 29% of the total investment portfolio.

 

 

All minimum and maximum limits comply with Council’s investment policy:

Compliant

Horizon

Invested
$

Invested
%

Min Limit
%

Max Limit
%

0-90 days

$16,604,735.00

27.62%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$15,764,681.00

26.22%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$10,147,614.00

16.88%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$17,598,951.00

29.28%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0.00

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances. These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit ratings do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

 

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

$9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

$7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

$2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $15.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

 

Compliant

Credit Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

AA Category

$35,293,823.00

58.71%

100%

$24,822,158.00

A Category

$20,816,582.00

34.63%

75%

$24,270,404.00

X

BBB Category

$4,005,576.00

6.66%

0%

-$4,005,576.00

Unrated ADIs

$0.00

0.00%

 

 

 Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on long term S&P ratings). Overweights reflect downgrades, in the case of BOQ and Bendigo Bank.

 

Compliant

 

Issuer

Rating

Invested ($)

Invested (%)

Max. Limit (%)

Available ($)

ANZ

AA-

$3,127,626

5.20%

30%

$14,907,168

CBA

AA-

$10,105,398

16.81%

30%

$7,929,396

NAB

AA-

$8,000,974

13.31%

30%

$10,033,820

Westpac

AA-

$14,059,825

23.39%

30%

$3,974,969

Rabobank

A+

$1,018,146

1.69%

15%

$7,999,251

Suncorp

A+

$8,034,260

13.36%

15%

$983,137

AMP Bank

A

$7,752,930

12.90%

15%

$1,264,467

ING Bank

A

$2,500,000

4.16%

15%

$6,517,397

Macquarie Bank

BBB+

$1,511,246

2.51%

15%

$7,506,152

X

BoQ

BBB+

$2,005,576

3.34%

0%

-$2,005,576

X

Bendigo-Adelaide

BBB+

$2,000,000

3.33%

0%

-$2,000,000

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period July 2015 to July 2018.

 

The total portfolio (T/D’s and FRNs) provided a solid return of +0.24% (actual), outperforming the benchmark AusBond Bank Index return by +0.05% (actual).The FRN portfolio (on an accrual basis) has now started to outperform the deposit portfolio, as evidenced by the returns over the past 12 months.

 

Over the past year, the combined deposit and FRN portfolio returned +2.71% p.a., outperforming bank bills by 0.88% p.a. The overall return remains solid given deposit rates reached their all-time lows in August 2016 after the RBA’s last interest rate cut. The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remains at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Performance

1 month

3 months

6 months

FYTD

1 year

Official Cash Rate

0.13%

0.38%

0.74%

0.13%

1.50%

AusBond Bank Bill Index

0.19%

0.52%

0.95%

0.19%

1.83%

Council’s T/D Portfolio

0.22%

0.66%

1.28%

0.22%

2.60%

Council’s FRN Portfolio

0.25%

0.74%

1.42%

0.25%

2.81%

Council’s Portfolio^

0.24%

0.70%

1.35%

0.24%

2.71%

Outperformance

0.05%

0.19%

0.40%

0.05%

0.88%

^Total portfolio performance excludes Council's cash account holdings. Overall returns would be lower if cash was included

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits accounted for 40.75% of the total investment portfolio.

Four deposits totalling $5.0 million matured and were withdrawn in July. There were no new term deposits taken up during July. As at the end of July, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.67%, up 4 basis points (bp) from the previous month.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $31.51 million in floating rate notes.

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 July 2018 increased by ~$22k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

 

 

 

 

Investment Register

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2018-19 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,200,934.00. Investment income to 31 July 2018 amounted to $147,925.33.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 July 2018 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for July 2018 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - July 2018

 

 

 

 


Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer - July 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO45/18

 

Subject:             Monthly Financial Report as at 31 July 2018

Folder No:                   F2018/00380

Author:                   Zorica Whitby, Assistant Accountant     

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

 

a)     establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the Council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

 

b)     if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the Council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 31 July 2018. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 31 July 2018. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 31 July 2018.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:    Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory. The Current Ratio as at 31 July 2018 is 2.89 compared to 2.12 as at 30 June 2018. The Current Ratio is a financial indicator specific to local government and represents its ability to meet its debts and obligations as they fall due.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements July 2018

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet July 2018

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement July 2018

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements July 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet July 2018

Attachment 2

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement July 2018

Attachment 3

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO46/18

 

Subject:             Draft 2017-18 Financial Statements

Folder No:                   F2017/00406

Author:                   Caroline Foley, Manager Financial Planning & Performance      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to refer the 2017-18 draft Financial Statements to Council’s Auditors for audit. The audited 2017-18 Financial Statements will be brought back to Council for adoption at a later Council Meeting.

 

As per section 416 (1) of the Local Government Act 1993 (NSW), a Council’s financial statements for the year must be prepared and audited within four months after the end of the year concerned.

 

The statutory process that must be followed is:

 

1.     The financial statements must include statements made by resolution of the Council and signed by the Mayor and at least one other Councillor as well as the General Manager and the Responsible Accounting Officer.

 

2.     The financial statements must then be referred to the Council’s Auditors and, once audited, they must be included in the Council’s Annual Report.

 

3.     Copies of the audited financial statements must be forwarded to the Office of Local Government by 31 October 2018.

 

4.     As soon as practicable after Council receives a copy of the Auditor’s report, the statements must be placed on public exhibition and notice given of a meeting at which Council proposes to present its audited financial statements together with the Auditor’s report. (Sec. 418 LGA).

 

Issues

 

The draft 2017-18 Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and the Regulations, the Australian Accounting Standards, and the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting. The unaudited Financial Statements are provided under separate cover as Attachment 3 to this report.

 

The Council’s Internal Audit Committee had the opportunity to meet to discuss the draft Financial Statements at their meeting on 15 August 2018. The Committee advises the Council “they had the opportunity to discuss the draft financial statements with management and to discuss the audit process with the Audit Office’s audit agent. The Internal Audit Committee advise the draft 2017-18 Financial Statements are suitable for consideration by Council for referral to audit”.

 

Section 413(2) of the Local Government Act 1993 requires the Council to form an opinion as to whether the Council’s Financial Statements reflect a true and fair position and that they have been drawn up in accordance with the Local Government Act and associated codes and standards. Statements to this effect have been prepared (refer Attachments 1 and 2) and will be presented for signature.

 

Subsequent to these Statements being signed, the Financial Statements will be referred to the NSW Audit Office for audit. On completion of the audit, the final copies of the statements including the audit report will be circulated to Councillors.

 

It is proposed that the audited financial statements be presented at a Council meeting as soon as practicable after receipt of the final audit report.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council is in a strong and stable financial position.

 

Conclusion

 

The Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the financial position is satisfactory.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     in relation to the financial statements required in accordance with section 413(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993:

 

        i)      Council resolves that in its opinion the General Purpose Financial      Statements, Special Purpose Financial Statements and Special Schedules for the    year ended 30 June 2018:

 

        a.     have been properly drawn up in accordance with the provisions of the                     Local Government Act 1993 and the Regulations there under, the                            Australian Accounting Standards and professional pronouncements, and          the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial                         Reporting;

 

b.     to the best of the Council’s knowledge and belief the statements present fairly the Council’s operating result and financial position for the year and accords with the Council’s accounting and other records; and

 

c.     the Council is unaware of any matter that would render the financial statements false or misleading in anyway.

 

ii)     The Statement by Councillors and Management for both the General Purpose Financial Statements and Special Purpose Financial Statements be signed by the Mayor, the Deputy Mayor, the Acting General Manager and the Responsible Accounting Officer.

 

b)     the financial statements be referred to the Council’s Auditor for audit.

 

c)     arrangements be made to place copies of the audited Financial Statements on public exhibition and the necessary advertisements be published.

 

e)     a copy of the audited Financial Statements be forwarded to the NSW Office of Local Government.

 

f)     the audited Financial Statements be presented at a meeting of Council to be     held in accordance with Section 418 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

2017-18 General Purpose Financial Statements - Statement by Councillors and Management

 

2.

2017-18 Special Purpose Financial Statements - Statement by Councillors and Management

 

3.

Draft 2017-18 Financial Statements

Included under separate cover

 

 

 


2017-18 General Purpose Financial Statements - Statement by Councillors and Management

Attachment 1

 

 


2017-18 Special Purpose Financial Statements - Statement by Councillors and Management

Attachment 2

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM62/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Weed Management Review

Folder No:                   F2008/00299

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

a)     notes renewed health and safety concerns about the use of glyphosate for weed management, following a $US289 million damages claim against Monsanto in August 2018;

 

b)     notes that Council currently uses the product Roundup for weed control across the Randwick LGA, including in heavily trafficked areas and in our stormwater harvesting catchments; and

 

c)     conduct a review of Council’s weed management plan, including trials of non-chemical methods such as steam spraying, to investigate alternative weed control methods that will minimise or eliminate the use of glyphosates.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM63/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Opposition to Passenger Cruise Ship Terminal

Folder No:                   F2014/00125

Submitted by:          Councillor Said, South Ward     

 

 

That Randwick Council strongly opposes a passenger cruise ship terminal and takes the following actions:

 

1.  write to the NSW Government stating Council’s strong opposition to a proposed passenger cruise-ship terminal at either Yarra Bay or Molineux Point noting Council’s strong concerns about the negative impact a passenger terminal would have on the area including traffic congestion, environmental destruction, loss of open green space and flow-on land-use pressures;

 

2.  request an urgent meeting with the relevant NSW and Federal Ministers asking for further investigation of alternate sites;

 

3.  prepare an application to list Yarra Bay Beach and Frenchman’s Beach as state heritage items;

 

4.  re-affirm its current commitment to these areas as having local heritage significance; and

 

5.  prepare a report outlining potential studies into the environmental significance of impacted areas and potential risks of a major change to land-use in the area.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM64/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Heritage Reports for 37-41 Dudley and 144-150 Brook Streets, Coogee

Folder No:                   F2018/01523

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

That Council commences a heritage study of the following dwellings in Coogee for the purpose of publically exhibiting a proposal to amend Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 to include them as listed heritage items:

 

·      37 Dudley Street, Coogee

·      39 Dudley Street, Coogee

·      41 Dudley Street, Coogee

·      144 Brook Street, Coogee

·      146 Brook Street, Coogee

·      146A Brook Street, Coogee

·      148 Brook Street, Coogee

·      150 Brook Street, Coogee

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM65/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Support for the Right to Peaceful Assembly and Protest in NSW and the Randwick LGA

Folder No:                   F2009/00201

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

1.    acknowledges that the right to protest is fundamental in a democratic society;

 

2.    notes that the NSW State Government has acted to shut down peaceful protests against CSG and coal mining through its The Inclosed Lands, Crimes and Law Enforcement Legislation Amendment (Interference) Bill 2016, while the Sydney Public Reserves (Public Safety) Bill 2017 has given police the power to move on homeless people, protesters and peaceful occupations in the City of Sydney area;

 

3.   notes that Clause 13 (1) item 4 of the Crown Land Management Regulations 2018, which came into effect on 1 July 2018, provides that “Taking part in any gathering, meeting, or assembly (except, in the case of a cemetery, for the purpose of religious or other ceremony of burial or commemoration)” can be prohibited by notice or direction. This means police or any crown lands manager can force any gathering or meeting on Crown Land to end at any time without reason and failure to comply with such a direction or notice is penalised by a maximum fine of $11,000.00;

 

4.   acknowledges that prohibiting individuals from taking part in any gathering, meeting or assembly may unduly trespass upon the rights of individuals to peacefully assemble for a common purpose and express their views;

 

5.   acknowledges that this amendment will apply to those people who may wish to hold a meeting, assembly or peaceful protest in many of the public parks and spaces in the Randwick LGA;

 

6.   Write to the NSW State Government:

 

·    to oppose Clause 13 (1) item 4 Crown Land Management Regulations 2018, for the reasons detailed above.

 

·    to express support for the right of peaceful gathering, meeting and assembly in NSW.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM66/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Improved Disability Access to La Perouse Museum

Folder No:                   F2013/00576

Submitted by:          Councillor Neilson, North Ward      

 

 

That:

a)     until Council can fully implement best practice disabled access to La Perouse Museum individual wheelchair users, or groups which include them, should not be discouraged from visiting the Museum;

b)     Council notes the following information appears on RCC website - with regard to access at the Museum. https://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/facilities-and-recreation/buildings/la-perouse-museum ;

Accessibility

 Disability access level - hard

 Wheelchairs can access this area with some difficulty.

 The downstairs section of the museum is wheelchair-accessible, but there are steps involved so you'll need some assistance.

 The upstairs section is inaccessible due to a narrow stairway.

We are working on making this venue more accessible.

 

c)     better information should be provided on the website simply outlining how the Museum can be negotiated;

d)     some simple measures to assist eg. a phone number to arrange parking etc could also be on the website. This would be consistent with the RCC Disability Inclusion Action Plan; and

e)     Council approve these or similarly appropriate measures at the earliest opportunity to improve access for the disabled at the La Perouse Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM67/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Illuminating of Trees to Improve Amenity and Safety

Folder No:                   F2007/00364

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council bring back a report, with costings, investigating the possibility of illuminating trees in designated areas (i.e. parks, playgrounds, laneways and town centres) identified by Council so as to improve amenity and safety.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                  28 August 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM68/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - Recognition of Departing General Manager

Folder No:                   F2004/06240

Submitted by:          Councillor Seng, Central Ward      

 

 

That in sincere appreciation and recognition of the enormous contribution made by our departing General Manager Ray Brownlee PSM, Council brings back a report advising on the options available to honour him, including but not limited to the following:–

 

1.   an annual Ray Brownlee Award for Academic Excellence for most outstanding postgraduate student at UNSW in a relevant field;

2.   a Ray Brownlee Award for Most Outstanding Employee of the Year of Randwick City Council (not annually but only when it’s justified);

3.   in conjunction with the Australia Day ceremony, an annual special Ray Brownlee Award presented to a local resident for outstanding contribution to the local community in volunteerism or leadership;

4.   a building to be named after Ray Brownlee; and

That a Committee consisting of the Mayor, Cr Murray Matson, Cr Ted Seng, two other Councillors and senior management be established to assist with the report.