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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 24 July 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 24 July 2018 at 6:00 p.m.

 

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 26 June 2018

Extraordinary Council Meeting - 2 July 2018

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

GM17/18   Councillor professional development........................................................ 1

GM18/18   Mayor and Councillor representation on proposed advisory committees - Digital Strategy Committee and Protecting Public Places Committee....................... 7

Director City Planning Reports

CP30/18    Enabling the uptake of electric vehicles across the eastern suburbs.............. 9

CP31/18    2018-19 Community Partnerships Funding Program - Recommended Allocations 11

CP32/18    Proposed Changes to the Council's Australia Day Community Service Awards Program & Delivery of  Australia day Events........................................... 21

CP33/18    La Perouse Museum........................................................................... 27

CP34/18    Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP NO.1 and Clause 4.6 - 5th MAY 2018 - 13th JULY 2018............................................................ 45

Director City Services Reports

CS27/18    Proposed Water Stations Along the Coastal Walkway................................ 51

CS28/18    Street Garden Policy and Guidelines...................................................... 55

CS29/18    Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee.................. 99

CS30/18    Clovelly Catchment Floodplain Committee............................................. 105

CS31/18    Street Library Box Outside Chifley Public School - In-kind Assistance.......... 109

CS32/18    Newmarket Randwick - Proposed Naming of new Streets and Public Park... 111

Director Corporate Services Reports

CO39/18    Investment Report - June 2018........................................................... 129

CO40/18    Contingency Fund - status as at 30 June 2018....................................... 139

CO41/18    2017-18 Funding Carry Over Schedule................................................. 143

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM53/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Notification of respite package for Randwick LGA residents affected by South East Light Rail out of hours construction noise. 155

NM54/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Open Spaces and Greener Sydney - Application for Funding...................................................................... 157

NM55/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Authorisation of Mobile Phone Antenna Locations........................................................................................ 159

NM56/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Traffic and Parking Study - Randwick Racecourse .................................................................................... 161

NM57/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Proposed Naming of a section of Arthur Byrne Reserve......................................................................................... 163

NM58/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Ausgrid monopoly in the undergrounding of power lines..................................................................................... 165

NM59/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reducing risk of collision between buses and residents exiting driveways on Carrington Road, Coogee.......................... 167

NM60/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reverse previous resolution to retain homemade rope swings in the Albie Place reserve in Randwick................. 169

NM61/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Proposed Review of the Public Art Strategy 171  

 

Closed Session (record of voting required)

 

Director City Services Reports

CS33/18    Tender for Coogee Bay Road Streetscape Upgrade -         T2018-07

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS34/18    Tender for Mahon Pool Amenities Building Upgrade - T2018-17

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

  

Notice of Rescission Motion

NR4/18     Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, D'Souza and Da Rocha - Notice of Motion from Cr Roberts - Kerb Ramp Retrofitting...................... 173  

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Jorde Frangoples

Acting General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM17/18

 

Subject:             Councillor professional development

Folder No:                   F2008/00459

Author:                   Luke Fitzgerald, Executive Manager      

 

Introduction

 

The Mayor and councillors play an important role in making complex decisions on behalf of the Randwick City community. These decisions relate to community infrastructure, services and programs delivered to those who live, work and visit the LGA.

 

To successfully undertake these roles, the Mayor and councillors are required to continue their professional development as outlined by the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Issues

 

As part of the new Councillor Induction and Professional Development guidelines issued under section 23A of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act), General managers must prepare a report to the first council meeting held after 30 June in each year outlining the councillor professional development program.

The report must identify the professional development activities offered to the mayor and each councillor in the year to 30 June and indicate whether they participated in them. The general manager is also required to ensure these reports are published on the council’s website. Council is also required to adopt a Councillor Training and development policy

 

Randwick City Council’s professional development is underpinned by the Councillor Professional Development Program and the Councillor Training and Development Policy.

 

Randwick City Councillor Professional Development Program

Randwick City Councillors are able to develop the skill required to effectively execute their civic roles by the participation in a range of development activities. The development needs of councillors are assessed in consultation with the councillor and the executive.

 

The councillor professional development program consists of the following components, ensuring councillors have the required skills to undertake their roles in the community. 

 

1.     Needs analysis

The needs analysis identifies gaps or future learning that the councillor wishes to undertake to develop their knowledge of the role or sector. These are assessed individually for the Mayor, councillors and the governing body.

 

Skills assessed in the analysis cover the following required skills:

 

-     Leadership

-     Communications

-     Ethical conduct and accountability

-     Governance

-     Strategic planning

-     Decision making

-     Land use planning and regulatory functions

-     Financial management

-     Environmental and asset management

 

2.     Skills assessment and development

Councillors undertake a skill assessment, guided by council officers to determine their professional development requirements. Skill assessments are tailored discussions for the Mayor and each councillor. Information obtained from these sessions will form part of the councillor development plans.

 

Councillor development plans are structured to deliver the required skills for each councillor and include the following:

 

-     Outcomes

-     Current knowledge

-     Development requirements

-     Learning to be undertaken including cost/type of training

-     Responsible officer and process

-     Costs

 

Councillor Training and Development Policy

The Councillor Training and Development Policy demonstrates Randwick City Council’s commitment to ensuring that the Mayor Councillors have access to the required training and development opportunities to ensure they are able to best serve the people of Randwick City. The Policy is attached for review.

 

The policy outlines the following:

 

-     Statement of commitment

-     Induction program

-     Assessment of skills and knowledge

-     Ongoing professional development

-     Responsibilities

-     Induction and professional development activities

-     Budget

-     Training approval and expenses

-     Reporting

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick City Council is a leader in Local Government and strives to demonstrate best practice in the delivery of infrastructure, programs and services to the community. Council is committed to the ongoing professional development of the Mayor and councillors for the benefit of those who live, work and visit the area.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     The Councillor professional development report be received and noted by council;

 

b)     Council adopt the Councillor Training and Development Policy;

 

c)     Councillor professional development activities be published on the Randwick City Council website.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Councillor Training and Development Policy - 2018

 

 

 

 


Councillor Training and Development Policy - 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM18/18

 

Subject:             Mayor and Councillor representation on proposed advisory committees - Digital Strategy Committee and Protecting Public Places Committee

Folder No:                   F2018/00315

Author:                   Anne Warner, Manager Corporate Performance      

 

Introduction

 

It is proposed that an advisory committee be established to guide implementation of Council’s Digital Strategy and that an additional advisory committee similarly be established to oversee preparation of a protecting public places strategy.

 

In-line with the recent review of the Randwick City Plan and establishment of the 2018-19 Operational Plan and Budget, implementation of Council’s Digital Strategy and protecting public places have been identified as key priorities.

 

Council’s Digital Strategy states that “Council is enhancing the way we do business with our customers by adopting new technologies, work practices, and breaking free of traditional thinking. We endeavour to become the leader in providing services to our customers at any time, and from anywhere via digital channels. Even as we become more digitised, we will still be providing high quality in-person customer service.” Many initiatives will be explored and implemented through the Digital Strategy such as how we can make data more open and accessible to the community and how we can progress as a smart city.

 

As per the Federal Government’s Australia’s Strategy for Protecting Crowded Places from Terrorism 2017, local government has a duty of care to develop, implement, and regularly test protective security measures.

 

In the first instance, a protecting public places strategy will be prepared to determine the relevant approaches for Randwick City around aspects such as design and infrastructure, surveillance and event management. This will build on existing work and partnerships, such as event planning and management in cooperation with the Local Area Command, and be supported through a cross-functional approach and research. 

 

Issues

 

The proposed Digital Strategy and Protecting Public Places Committees will be advisory in nature similar to the Cycleway and Bike Facilities Committee.

 

It is proposed that each of the Committees be comprised of the Mayor, three Councillors and the relevant Executive and specialist staff. The Digital Strategy Committee will be further supported by a staff Steering Group and work in each of the areas will be progressed through cross-functional teams and approaches.

 

It is proposed that the Committees will be established over the next few months and will meet quarterly. One of the initial tasks for each Committee will be to develop a Terms of Reference for the consideration of Council and towards guiding the work and priorities in each of the areas. Committee arrangements such as meeting times will be established in-line with the preferences of the committee members.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  1: Leadership in sustainability

Direction:  1a. Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

In-line with the recent review of the Randwick City Plan two key priorities for Council are the implementation of the Digital Strategy and preparation of a Protecting Public Places strategy. The establishment of advisory committees will be beneficial in guiding work in these areas. Contributions from the Mayor and Councillor representatives will be integral to ensuring that community priorities and needs are addressed.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     The Mayor and three Councillors nominate as representatives on the proposed Digital Strategy Committee; and

 

b)     The Mayor and three Councillors nominate as representatives on the proposed Protecting Public Places Committee.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP30/18

 

Subject:             Enabling the uptake of electric vehicles across the eastern suburbs

Folder No:                   F2012/00398

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability      

 

Introduction

 

One of the key projects currently underway across Randwick’s 3-Council Regional Environment Program, the environmental collaboration between Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils, involves establishing a public electric vehicle charging network across the eastern suburbs. This would involve installation of public electric vehicle charging stations at 8 sites across the 3 Local Government Areas (LGAs).

 

This report seeks Council endorsement of the project and approval to install 4 public electric vehicle charging stations at Council locations across Randwick.

 

Issues

 

In 2016, in response to the draft Low Carbon Future Plan prepared as a result of the 3-Council regional environmental collaboration between Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils, a survey was conducted on potential barriers to the uptake of electric vehicles across the eastern suburbs. The two key issues identified included the pricing of electric vehicles and the lack of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles in the public domain.

 

A subsequent analysis sought to identify possible locations for electric vehicle charging infrastructure, in keeping with particular criteria established with various stakeholders. Fifteen potential sites were established across the eastern Sydney LGAs. These have more recently been reduced to 8 suitable sites under the control of the respective eastern suburbs Councils.

 

Expressions of interest were also sought on the pricing and range of vehicle charging technologies capable of catering to the widest range of electric vehicle models. This is all the more important with around 8 electric vehicle models announced to launch onto the Australian market over the next few months.

 

A project plan has been prepared for the possible installation of public electric vehicle charging stations at these 8 Council locations, 6 to be funded from the 3 Council Regional Environment Program, and 2 additional installations in Randwick planned to be funded via Council’s environmental levy program. The cost of each installation is expected to be in the order of$15,000 depending on the electrical connections distance to distribution boards at the planned locations.

 

Tendering of this service is ready for circulation to a number of companies who have previously provided expressions of interest for this work.

 

The four locations identified and evaluated for Randwick include:

-    Brook Street, adjacent to and outside the Coogee Senior Citizens Centre

-    Silver Street carpark, Randwick

-    Randwick Community Centre, Randwick

-    Des Renford Leisure Centre, car-park, Maroubra.

 

These public electric vehicle charging sites will be a first for local Councils in NSW (and apparently only second for local government in Australia, to those installed in the City of Adelaide).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:         A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2(a):     Meet the needs of our diverse community and provide equitable access to services and infrastructure

Outcome 4:         Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4(a):     Improved design and sustainability across all development

Outcome 9:         Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction 9(b):     The community is informed, educated and encouraged to use sustainable transport.

Outcome 10:       A healthy environment.

Outcome 10(f):    Energy conservation and efficiency programs are implemented

 

Financial impact statement

 

Budget allocation for 6 of the 8 proposed public electric vehicle charging stations is covered in the budget of the 3-Council Regional Environment Program. The additional 2 charging stations to be located in Randwick would be costed against the Climate Change budget of the environmental levy program.

 

Conclusion

 

Detailed analysis has been undertaken over the past 2 years to ensure this new and innovative technology solution provides an important service to residents across the eastern suburbs as communities and governments transition to a low carbon future.

 

The 3 Council’s lead in this initiative will continue to demonstrate the sustainability leadership of local government, particularly Randwick, in providing practical and important infrastructure in keeping with sustainability and smart city planning and operational frameworks.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council

 

a)     endorses the 3-Council Regional Environment Program’s project for the installation of public electric vehicle charging stations and approves the 4 locations for these facilities to be installed in Randwick; and

 

b)     approves the funding of two of these four public electric vehicle charging stations from the environmental levy budget at a cost of approximately $30,000 per location.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP31/18

 

Subject:             2018-19 Community Partnerships Funding Program - Recommended Allocations

Folder No:                   F2008/00139

Author:                   Warren Ambrose, Senior Social Planner      

 

Introduction

 

The Community Partnerships Funding Program is now in its tenth year. It offers not-for-profit social service providers the opportunity to apply for financial assistance to fund programs and projects that address the needs of disadvantaged Randwick local residents within an allocated annual budget of $160,000.00. This Program allows social services organisations to apply for a maximum of $20,000.00 per year over three years.

 

The Council has received 15 applications seeking a total of $231,440 in year one, $80,000 for second year projects in 2019-20 and $80,000 for third year projects in 2020-21. Programs and projects prioritised for funding have been assessed in accordance with the program’s funding guidelines. The applications recommended for funding are summarised in the body of this report. Attachment one (1) contains details of applications recommended and not recommended for funding.

 

This report recommends eight (8) organisations to receive funding totalling $112,490.00 under the 2018-19 Community Partnerships Funding Program.

 

Issues

 

Council’s Grants Programs

Randwick City Council provides an extensive range of community services to its residents, in keeping with the Department of Local Government’s social planning requirements. In addition to its advocacy, community development, and information provision functions, the Council provides financial assistance to community organisations through the following programs:

 

1.     Community Partnerships Funding Program, the subject of this report, which has an annual budget of $ 160,000.00.

2.     Rental Subsidy Program, currently valued at $1.291 million for 2018/2019, whereby service providers renting the Council’s premises pay substantially discounted market rents.  The value of the rent discounts enable savings to be directed towards provision of community service.

3.     Cultural Community Grants Program which allocates about $110,000.00 annually (2 funding rounds per year) to assist resident groups and not for profit organisations implement a range of cultural activities.

 

The total value of the Council’s annual social/community development program expenditure described above is $1.561 million.

 

Community Partnerships Funding Program 2018-19

The 2018-19 funding round opened on 13 February 2018 and closed on 22 May 2018. The Program was promoted in the local media, on the Council’s website and through local community networks. The maximum grant available for allocation round per application is $20,000.00 for three years.

 

The allocated budget for the new financial year 2018-19 ($160,000.00) will fund three (3) organisations that are due to receive their final year recurrent funds totalling $46,738.00 approved in the 2016-17 Round.  There are no organisations receiving year two or year funds because only one year grants were allocated in the 2017/18 funding round. The total amount available for allocation is $113,262.00, as shown below:

 

Recurrent funding commitments (2016-17 funding round) $ 46,738.00     

 

Recurrent funding commitments (2017-18 funding round) $         0.00    

 

Allocated budget 2018-19                                             $160,000.00

 

Less recurrent funding commitments                               $46,738.00

 

Total budget available for 2018-19 allocation         $113,262.00

 

The Program requires and expects a high level of accountability from funding recipients. This is achieved by undertaking a robust annual reporting process for organisations receiving more than $5,000.00. If an organisation receiving recurrent funding is unable to meet its annual progress reporting requirements, funding for subsequent years will not be allocated, and returned to the budget.

 

Organisations in receipt of recurrent funding are not eligible to apply for new funding.

 

Assessment of Applications

The assessment process was undertaken by a panel consisting of: Council officers with expertise in community services, and the Council’s Internal Auditor. All applications were placed on a grants program assessment broadsheet. They were assessed and given scores reflecting their compliance with the program’s funding priorities and guidelines and the organisation’s capacity to deliver the funded services. These scores were totalled and given a priority ranking of either A, B or C based on those scores, with an A being the highest score priority. The Council’s current priorities were identified through the Council’s social inclusion plan, An Inclusive Randwick City.

 

Given the limited available funds of $113,262.00 the assessment panel recommended that only the eight (8) projects that had achieved an A ranking to receive funding.  It should be noted that four projects have been recommended to receive less funds than requested to maximise the number of funded projects across the limited funds.  The recommended projects are:

 

·           Safety Net, South Randwick (Beaches Outreach Project) Funds to employ project workers to patrol the southern suburbs of Randwick every Friday night between 8pm and 4am to provide information and assistance to young people under 18 who are engaging in at risk behaviours. Amount recommended $20,000.00 for three years.

·           Seniors Wellbeing (Holdsworth Community) Funds to increase the capacity of the Seniors Wellbeing program. The Program aims to support the ongoing physical and mental health of elderly people who are frail and either recovering from a stay in hospital or have been identified as high risk for falls or social isolation. The program includes transportation to and from the Kensington Park Community Centre. Amount recommended: $11,000 for three years.

·           Happy Ageing for People from CALD backgrounds (Ethnic Community Services Cooperative) Funds to provide a range of projects to link participants with appropriate services, provide opportunities for improved social inclusion and building social networks and friendships. Projects include healthy living workshops, information forums on local services, art therapy sessions, training in use of technology bus outings, and the Cultural Bridges Concert. Amount recommended: $13,000 for three years.

·           Randwick House – accommodation & support in Randwick City for people facing homelessness and other crises (Jewish House) Funds towards the establishment of a house in Randwick to provide temporary accommodation and support for persons facing homelessness, personal, financial, and or family crisis. Amount recommended: $10,000 for three years.

·           Supported Communities Through Kooloora Community Centre (Kooloora Community Centre) Funds towards wages for a community worker to link social housing tenants, and families with young children with relevant information and services, support seniors social groups, provide transport for frail older persons, facilitate workshops with guest speakers on topics of interest to the local communities.  Amount recommended: $20,000 for three years.

·           Ngalya Banga (Working Together) (Souths Cares) Funds to hire an Aboriginal Recruitment Worker to provide an intensive and holistic mentoring program to Aboriginal candidates from Randwick to successfully gain employment. Amount recommended: $14,000 for three years.

·           A WAY Safe Summer Project (WAYS Youth & Family Waverley Action for Youth Services) is an outreach youth run peer education program promoting healthy living and education around topics such as safe sex practices for young people across Eastern Sydney during the summer period.  Funds will go towards funding an outreach program in Randwick (primarily at Clovelly, Coogee and Gordon’s Bay) and aims to engage with 3,000 young people.  This program is partly funding by the NSW Dept. of Health and local councils in the Eastern Suburbs. Amount recommended: $4,490.00 for one year.

·           Weave Kool Kids Community ‘Cool To Be Kind’ Program (Weave Youth and Community Services) Funds to provide a range of programs aiming at promoting kindness, positivity and to teach kids how to be kind to themselves, others and the environment. The project includes: production of a culturally appropriate short video advertising the Cool to be Kind Program, recognition of acts of kindness while participating Kool Kids Club, promotion of Kool Kids Club to schools, and supporting young people transitioning from primary to high school. Amount recommended: $20,000 for one year.

A total of eight (8) new applications are recommended to receive funding of $112,490.00.

 

All applicants will be advised of the outcomes of their application whether they are successful or not. Upon request, feedback will be provided to unsuccessful organisations

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:   2:   Vibrant and diverse community.

Direction:  2b:   Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our target groups and encourage and seek opportunities to expand appropriate community services.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no additional financial impact for this matter. The recommended expenditure is within the allocated budget for this purpose.

 

Conclusion

 

The Community Partnerships Funding Program plays an important role in providing support services to vulnerable and at risk target groups living in our City. It does so by allocating funds to social service providers to help increase their capacity to deliver much needed services to disadvantaged residents in the Randwick area.

 

Programs and projects prioritised for funding have been assessed in accordance with the program’s funding guidelines and the Council’s social inclusion plan, An Inclusive Randwick City.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council approve funds totalling $112,490.00 to be allocated to the organisations listed in Attachment One of this report.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Community Partnerships Funding  Program 2018-19 Attachment One  - Applications Recommended and Not Recommended

 

 

 

 


Community Partnerships Funding  Program 2018-19 Attachment One  - Applications Recommended and Not Recommended

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP32/18

 

Subject:             Proposed Changes to the Council's Australia Day Community Service Awards Program & Delivery of  Australia day Events

Folder No:                   F2017/00118

Author:                   Teresa Mok, Manager Community Planning & Development      

 

Introduction

 

At the Civics Affair Committee meeting of 12 December 2017, the Council resolved as follows:

 

“(Matson/Mayor, L Shurey) that

 

a)   Council select the Award recipient/s for the Randwick City Council Community Service Award for 2017-18 from the attached list of nominations, in accordance with the selection criteria;

b)   the Council select recipient/s for the Randwick City Council Young Citizen of the Year Award for 2017-18 from the attached list of nominations, in accordance with selection criteria;

c)   the Council note that all selected Finalists of the Randwick City Council Community Service Awards will be presented with a special Medallion and a Certificate and the Young Citizen of the Year be awarded a framed certificate;

d)   Council note that all the names of selected Award recipients and nominees are to be kept confidential until the Council’s announcement on Australia Day on Friday 26 January 2018, as per the standard protocol; and

e)   a report to come back to Council outlining ways to increase the number of nominations for future awards.

 

In responding to resolution e) council staff also used this opportunity to conduct a review of the Council‘s Australia Day Community Services Awards Program.   The review, completed earlier this year, has identified a number of improvement areas, which if implemented may encourage better quality applications and award recipients.  The review aims to also improve scrutiny and objectivity to the assessment process, and puts forward the suggestion that the Community Services Affairs Committee can take on the role of judging panel.

 

Issues

 

Resolution e) Ways to increase the number of nominations for future awards

 

The following promotional strategies will be implemented to increase the number of nominations for the Council’s future Awards Program:

 

1.  Widen the achievement areas to include contribution to the community in areas of education, health, business, arts, the environment, or any other area that contributes to the advancement and wellbeing of the Randwick community

2.  Establish an online nomination process

3.  Purchase promotional space in Southern Courier to run a campaign in recognition of the award recipients and to promote the awards program to lift its profile (include photos and/or info of award recipients)

4.  Run a direct mail campaign targeting local volunteer & community groups

5.  Mount a digital campaign for website and social media channels (using video) 

6.  Design new branding to freshen up the awards; improve the appearance of the framed Award certificates including giving it a more prestigious appearance so that the recipients would be proud to publicly display.

 

Proposed changes to the Awards Program

 

The key changes to the existing Awards Program are presented in the table below:

 

Existing program components

 

Proposed changes

 

Two categories:

1.   Community Services Award

2.   Young Citizen of the Year Award

 

 

Three categories:

1.  Community Services Award (Individual)

2.  Community Services Award (Group, where by only 1 group will be chosen)

3.  Young Achiever Award

 

Sitting Councillors are eligible to submit award nominees

 

Sitting Councillors, not eligible to submit award nominees

 

Nominators required to supply the names of 2 referees with their contact details 

 

Nominators to provide 2 letters of support from 2 referees with application form (substantiated evidence)

 

 

Staff checks applications comply with eligibility criteria, summarises  nominees’ contributions, and prepares a report to Civics Affairs Committee under confidential cover

1.    Council staff vets applications submitted to Council to ensure compliance and documentation are in order.

2.    Council staff summarises eligible nominee’s contributions and prepares a list for the Community Affairs Committee’s (Judging Panel) consideration.

 

Civic Affairs Committee meet late November/early December to discuss content of the report, select and endorse final award recipients  

 

The Judging Panel meets to discuss and assess nominees against a set of established criteria.  Staff prepares a report reflecting the Judging Panel’s recommendation for Council’s approval

 

 

 

Council considers report containing Judging Panel’s recommendations at monthly Ordinary Council Meeting

 

 

In summary, the proposed key changes are:

 

·      Introduction of an additional Group Award category

·      Rename the Young Citizen of the Year Award from to Young Achiever Award

·      Sitting Councillors no longer eligible to make nominations

·      Community Affairs Committee as Judging Panel

 

Delivery of Australia Day events

 

Current arrangement

At present, Council holds three events on Australia Day, namely:

 

§ Joint Community Service Awards and Citizenship Ceremony (morning at PHC)

§ Community celebration activities (noon-2pm at PHC); and

§ Community celebration activities (10am-2pm at Coogee Beach)

 

At the Australia Day Committee meeting on 28 November 2017 the Committee (Chair: Councillor Anthony Andrews) requested that a report come back to Council with options to rotate future Australia Day community celebrations around the various beach side locations and reserves including Maroubra Beach.

 

In order to effectively rotate the venues for holding Australia Day community celebration activities, some changes will need to be introduced in order to address both logistical and staffing issues.  This report proposes that the Citizenship & Community Services Awards ceremony be held on the eve of Australia day at PHC.  The table below details the proposed event delivery approach:

 

Current

 

Proposed

Citizenship & Community Service Awards ceremony held at PHC on Australia Day. 

 

 

**At the Citizenship Ceremony on Australia Day, 30 recipients receive their new citizenship status.  Annually, and at least 990 new citizens attend the monthly ceremonies held at Randwick Town Hall.

Hold the Citizenship & Community Service Awards ceremony at PHC on the evening of 25 January, the eve of Australia Day.

 

This will allow the award recipients to receive the citizenship certificates and awards the evening before, leaving them free to celebrate Australia Day with their families and friends. It would also alleviate the need for staff to be turning from one event to the next in a short timeframe.

 

It is noted that the National Australia Day Awards are presented the night before Australia Day. The proposed format for PHC will also allow for local MPs to attend both Randwick Council’s ceremony the night before; and any other ceremonies held on Australia Day in other LGAs. Council would still request an Ambassador through the Australia Day Council to speak at its ceremony.

 

Two Community Celebration events are held on Australia Day:

 

PHC, Little Bay

 

Goldstein Reserve, Coogee Beach

Hold one major Community Celebration on Australia Day, rotated across 5 venues.

 

To secure the best use of resources and to equitably share the Australia Day Community Celebrations across Randwick City it is proposed that only one community celebration event be held on Australia Day, and the event location is rotated between 5 venues. Each year the program would include:

 

·      Entertainment (music, reptile show)

·      Activity (rides/waterslides/arts and craft)

·      Food trucks

·      A give-away (ice-cream; plant)

The proposed revolving locations could include:

 

·      Clovelly Beach/Burrows Park

·      Coogee Beach

·      Maroubra Beach/Arthur Byrne Reserve

·      Kensington Oval and Community Centre

·      Little Bay

 

Subject to Council’s approval, the rotational order of Community Celebrations will be a follows: first up Maroubra Beach, then rotated to Kensington (year 2020), Clovelly (year 2022), Coogee (year 2023) and Little Bay (year 2021)

 

In summary, the report presents 3 options for the Council’s consideration relating to the delivery mode of its Australia Day events:

 

Option 1

No change

 

Option 2

·    Hold Community Services Awards and Citizenship Ceremony on the eve of Australia Day (25 January)

·    Hold one larger community celebration event on a rotational basis

(No fixed noon community celebration held at PHC and Coogee Beach)

 

Option 3

·    Hold Community Service Awards and Citizenship Ceremony on the morning of Australia Day at PHC (as per usual)

·    Hold one larger community celebration event on a rotational basis between 5

(No fixed noon community celebration held at PHC and Coogee Beach)

 

Option 4

·      Hold the Community Service Awards and Citizenship ceremony and the Communality Celebration on Australia Day at rotating venues, together

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction1b:       Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no additional financial impact for this matter. The total budget approved for the Australia Day Community Service Awards and Community celebration is

$50 000.00.   The Community Service Awards cost is $14 000.00; and the allocated budget for the Community Celebration is set at $36 000.00.

 

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed tightening up of the selection and eligibility conditions may reduce the number of nominations submitted to Council.  However, this impact can be mitigated by implementing a more targeted promotional campaign as described in this report. While there is a risk that the Council may end up presenting awards to only a handful of award recipients, it will serve to strengthen the prestige of the Council’s Australia Day Community Services Award.  The proposed use of the Community Affairs Committee as the selection/judging panel may help expedite decision making at the Council’s Ordinary Meeting.

 

Holding one key event instead of three separate events on Australia Day represents a better use of resources in that council staff will be able to focus on the delivery of community celebration activities at one location instead of having to deliver 3 separate events from two venues, and over a longer day.  Rotating the larger community celebration once every year between the 5 different venues allow residents to enjoy the Council’s various parks and beaches.

 

In relation to the proposed approach of staging the Citizenship and Community Awards ceremonies on the eve of Australia Day, staging this event on the eve of Australia Day allows award recipients and new citizens to fully spend the national public holiday with families and friends.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse:

 

a)     the proposed changes to the Australia Day Community Services Awards Program,

 

b)     the suite of strategies listed in the report to increase the number of nominations for the Council’s future Awards Program

 

c)     Option 2 as the preferred option for the delivery of Australia Day events

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP33/18

 

Subject:             La Perouse Museum

Folder No:                   F2017/00418

Author:                   Katie Anderson, Manager, Cultural Events and Venues      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Council has entered in to a lease agreement with National Parks and Wildlife Services (NPWS) to lease the La Perouse Museum and headland for 21 years + 21 years option. The Museum and headland were handed over to Council in October 2017 and since then the Museum has been open 4 days a week for free entry. There have been 9,200 visitors to the Museum and 400 school children. A coffee space has been installed at the Museum and there have been some activation events held in the Museum and on the headland. Council has received positive feedback about the Museum and its collection and high levels of engagement about the future of the Museum.

 

A Business Plan for the Museum has been drafted for Council’s approval. This Business Plan concentrates on the initial set-up phase of the Museum from an organisational and services point of view. The Business Plan outlines the Purpose and Vision for the Museum and outlines strategies to achieve those visions.

 

The Business Plan will inform the master planning process for the Museum and Headland.

 

A budget for the Museum was approved by Council at its meeting on 26 June. The Draft Business Plan was endorsed by the Museum and Headland Trust at its meeting on 28 June.

 

The Museum building is in need of some immediate minor building works before a major upgrade occurs in the next 12-18 months. Whilst the Museum operates in the interim period a program of exhibitions and events is required. A proposed program of activities is outlined in this report.

 

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has approached Council about an opportunity to apply for grant funding through the Australian Research Council. The aim of this grant would be to work with researchers and artists from UNSW to re-invigorate the Museum and the headland; with the grant funding going towards 5 major artwork installations.

 

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s approval;

·      of the business plan with a view to use the plan as the basis for the master planning process;

·      for the proposed program of exhibitions and activities and the required funding;

·      for the funding required to participate in the Australian Research Council grant with UNSW.

 

 

 

 

Issues

 

 BUSINESS PLAN

 

The draft Business Plan is attached to this report. The detail in the plan will be used to brief specialist design teams to inform the master planning process for the major upgrade of the Museum and Headland. The consultant team will review the Museum and Headland opportunities which may include the headland toilet upgrade.

 

The Business Plan notes that it is imperative to develop policies and procedures to protect the current collection and expand future collection. The vision for the future collection is based on the main themes of the Museum; with the two main themes being Aboriginal, French; and to a lesser extent science, the environment and local history. 

 

There are a number of considerations associated with the Museum including heritage constraints of the building and required specialist consultants to address this; expanding the building footprint to include other permissible uses; the café/restaurant/retail/function space opportunities; the Aboriginal community connection and participation; and the upgrading of the La Perouse story.

 

PROPOSED ACTIVITIES


Interim building maintenance works are required to bring the Museum to a fit and functioning building in the short-term, whilst the master planning process takes place. During this interim period a suite of short-term and diverse programs are proposed to activate the Museum as a cultural hub. A more detailed explanation of these programs is attached to this report.

 

The proposed programs are:

·      Temporary exhibitions including;

 

Reconciliation Exhibition - Gallery showing of the Pauline McLeod Award artworks.

Aboriginal Art of La Perouse. The artistic depth and traditions of the La Perouse Aboriginal artists is renowned and evolving; ranging from the iconic shell art to paintings and multimedia work, including progressive work by UNSW graduates and practising artists today. This exhibition will feature artworks created by artists with demonstrated connections to La Perouse.

 

La Perouse through the Lens. The exhibition will comprise 30 to 40 archival images reproduced in Gallery frames (images sourced from RCC, Randwick Historical Society, NPWS and State Library NSW collections) documenting moments and vistas of La Perouse from the 20th and 21st centuries; many of which will be accompanied by first person recollections of that moment or landmark.

 

Objets Francais. A small but focussed selection of significant objects of French origin or connection; sourced from the La Perouse Museum collections, and in consultation sourced from the Friends of La Perouse Museum and the French community.

 

TOTAL COST FOR TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS = $55,000.00

 

·      Proposed suite of public and school workshops and events. These can be viably produced within the next 12 months without major expenditure or infrastructure needed before the Museum’s refurbishment commences. The proposed programs include events in partnership with the Aboriginal community and artists, partnerships with key stakeholders including NPWS, local schools, local performers and cultural tourism operators.

For most events it is proposed RCC charge patrons $10 per person as a nominal fee to cover administration costs. The workshops include basket weaving workshops, art classes, Aboriginal tours & French themed programs.


TOTAL COST FOR PUBLIC PROGRAMS = $14, 000.00 (revenue estimated at $3000.00)

 

 

AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL GRANT

 

There is an opportunity for a proposed environmental arts partnership with UNSW through renowned artist Allan Giddy via an Australian Research Council (ARC) part-funded grant. The grant would allow for innovative and interactive site artworks exploring the Museum and its environment. The outcomes of this linkage grant for Council will be 5 art installations based around the main themes of the Museum and La Perouse Headland, being Aboriginal and French history, with the local environment and communications connections also being incorporated. These projects will meet the grant funding assessment requirements because they require research to be undertaken by University art and design researchers. The projects will assist reinvigorate the area and offer interactive art installations around the headland.

In addition to the projects part of the grant will allow access to UNSW connections including technology and design experts.

 

These 5 artworks as well as the input of some of Australia’s leading academics and cultural specialists will also allow Council and the Museum to trial progressive ways on interpreting key themes, and to encourage visitors to think laterally about how a Museum can engage with its communities and audiences. More information on the proposed installations is attached to this report.

 

The contribution from Council is $88,000.00 over 3 years. This money can be sourced through Section 94 funding. The total value of the grant will be $420,500.00.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  2.     A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction    2d:   Our cultural diversity is appreciated and respected: deliver and sponsor a range of cultural programs to promote a sense of community.

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction 5b:      A range of sporting and leisure activities.

 

Outcome 7.       Heritage that is protected and celebrated

Direction 7a:      Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated.

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

The budget for the Museum upgrade works has been approved in the 2018-2019 budget allocation.

 

The cost of the proposed activities and programs as outlined above is $69.000.00, with expected revenue of $3000.00. The funding will be allocated within the 2018-2019 operational budget.

 

The cost of Council’s contribution to the ARC Grant is $88,000.00 over three years.

 

This will be funded through Section 94 contributions.

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s lease of the La Perouse Museum and Headland provides a fantastic opportunity to reinvigorate this space as a Cultural Hub. The Business Plan outlines the purpose and vision for the Museum as well as some options for its future use. This document will be used to inform the Master planning process as a starting point for the design brief for the new Museum.

 

In the interim the Museum needs to be activated whilst the planning process takes plan. In order to do this a suite of diverse, innovative and community-focused programs will play a major role in activating La Perouse Museum as a focal point for Randwick, as well as celebrating what makes La Perouse itself unique. The public programs included in this proposal celebrate the Museum’s stakeholders, its collections and the core stories that draw visitors from afar, whilst also aiming to making new and stronger connections within the region.

 

Australian Research Council grants are only open to Universities and it is a good opportunity to access Federal Government funding for a research grant. The grant requires Council to contribute a specified amount of funding to go towards the production of projects, with the majority of funding coming via the grant to fund the research component of the projects which would include artists’ time, building part of the artwork as a trial and an online presence.

 

Approval from Council for the Business Plan will allow the next steps in the building refurbishment process; and approval for the programs and activities will allow some immediate activations of the Museum and provide some new and exciting exhibitions for the community.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse:

 

a)  the draft Business Plan

b)  the proposed activities and programs and associated funding

c)  the funding contribution and the joint application with UNSW for the ARC grant funding

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

LA PEROUSE MUSEUM BUSINESS PLAN (AS ADOPTED BY THE TRUST)

 

2.

La Perouse Museum Proposed activities 2019 2010

 

3.

ARC Linkage Grant funding information

 

 

 

 


LA PEROUSE MUSEUM BUSINESS PLAN (AS ADOPTED BY THE TRUST)

Attachment 1

 

 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


La Perouse Museum Proposed activities 2019 2010

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


ARC Linkage Grant funding information

Attachment 3

 

 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP34/18

 

Subject:             Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP NO.1 and Clause 4.6 - 5th MAY 2018 - 13th JULY 2018

Folder No:                   F2008/00122

Author:                   Frank Ko, Coordinator Fast Track      

 

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)     Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6;

 

2)     Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)     Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

4)     Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 5 May 2018 and 13 July 2018.

 

Relationship to the City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 05 MAY 2018 TO 13 JULY 2018

 

 

 

 


SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 05 MAY 2018 TO 13 JULY 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS27/18

 

Subject:             Proposed Water Stations Along the Coastal Walkway

Folder No:                   F2008/00522

Author:                   Kerry Colquhoun, Coordinator, Open Space Assets      

 

Introduction

 

At the ordinary Council Meeting of the 28th November 2017, Council resolved as follows:

 

“RESOLUTION: (Parker/Andrews) that the General Manager report on the feasibility of the installation of water refill drinking stations along the coastal walkway.”

 

Council officers have investigated the feasibility of installing additional water stations (drinking fountain, bottle fill tap and dog bowl) that provide water along the coastal walkway within the Randwick LGA.

 

The type of water station considered is the same to those that have already been installed along the Coastal Walkway (refer Attachment 1).

 

Issues

 

In 2004, Council installed a number of water stations along the coastal walkway in the northern beachside parks and these have proven to be very popular.

 

These water stations were proposed to provide users of the coastal walkway with access to water for personal hydration and to offset the environmental impact of single use plastic bottles. In addition, they can also provide water for dogs.

 

Environmental Impact

Clean Up Australia says that plastic bottles are among the 10 most common rubbish items picked up on Clean Up Australia Day, and actively encourages people to avoid bottled water and buy a reusable bottle.

 

Clean Up Australia advises:*

 

“Although plastic bottles are recyclable, many end up in landfill and take up to 1000 years to break down. When littered they often end up in the sea where they break up in small pieces, killing marine life that mistake them for food.”

 

Personal Hydration

The benefit of Council installing water stations is to provide access to regular water for hydration and comfort of recreational walkers using the coastal walkway and other users of nearby facilities.

 


 

Proposed Locations

A further assessment has been undertaken to identify suitable locations for water stations along the coastal walkway. There are a number of water stations in the northern sections of the walkway so it is intended that they be installed along the southern part of the walkway. It is proposed that new water stations be installed as per the table below:

 


Location

Number of Water Stations

Malabar Beach and Pioneers Park

2

North Maroubra Beach including Jack Reserve Vanny

3

South Maroubra Beach including Arthur Byrne Reserve

3

Lurline Bay

1

Total

9

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10e:    Our community is encouraged to implement waste minimisation strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The total estimated capital cost to install 9 drinking fountains is $120,000.

 

Funding has been allocated in the draft 2018-19 Capital Works budget from the Coastal Walkway program to install 4 water stations. The remaining 5 water stations will be included in subsequent Capital Works programs.

 

Conclusion

 

There are environmental benefits to installing additional water stations along our popular Coastal Walkway. Water stations providing regular hydration is a healthy amenity for our community. 

 

The proposed installation of 9 new water stations along the southern sections of the coastal walkway will provide hydration and water refill opportunities at regular intervals along the walkway.

 

Recommendation

 

That the proposal to install an additional 9 water stations along the southern sections of the coastal walkway be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Proposed water station

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Proposed water station

Attachment 1

 

 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS28/18

 

Subject:             Street Garden Policy and Guidelines

Folder No:                   F2018/00166

Author:                   Angus Palmer, Landscape Architect      

 

Introduction

 

The draft Street Garden Policy and Guidelines was considered at the Council meeting held on the 24 April 2018. Council resolved the following:

 

“(Stavrinos/Andrews) that the draft policy and guidelines be exhibited for community consultation and a report bought back to Council on the outcome.”

 

A community consultation program was undertaken on Council’s draft Street Garden Policy from 11 May 2018 to 8 June 2018, over a period of 28 days.

 

The consultation strategy aimed to inform Randwick City residents about Council’s draft policy and guidelines, and invite comments and suggestions. The new draft policy aims to replace the current policy and reconsider the framework and processes to permit residents to create, install and maintain a garden in the nature strip. The draft policy is also accompanied by supporting guidelines which outline key objectives to ensure a desired outcome for the resident, Council and pedestrians.

 

Issues

 

During the community consultation period, Council conducted several activities to invite comments from the public. These included:

 

·      Your Say Randwick project page

·      Advertising in The Southern Courier

·      Media Coverage within The Southern Courier

·      Randwick News Bulletin

·      Online Media Release

·      Social Media

·      Notification to Precinct Committees

 

Council received 32 survey submissions via the Your Say project page which included 1176 visits. The Randwick News bulletin received 1454 visits. Further information about the consultation activities, examples of communications and Your Say summary and results can be found within Attachment 3: Community Consultation Report.

 

As a result of the feedback submission, the draft Policy and Guidelines have been amended accordingly. These amendments include:

 

·      Provisions for laneway gardens

·      An exclusion zone around power poles

·      An Approval Flow Chart Diagram, and

·      A Frequently Asked Questions section, which is based on the more common questions from the community consultation.


 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectation and defined levels of service.

 

Outcome 10:     A healthy environment.

Direction 10c:    Bushland, open spaces and biodiversity are protected and enhanced for future generations.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Council staff have conducted community consultation on the draft Street Garden Policy and Guidelines. Following this consultation, the proposed draft Street Garden Policy and Guidelines have been amended and improved, whereby allowing residents to establish a compliant nature strip garden, laneway garden, or an authorised planter box in front, or adjacent to their property.

 

The amended supporting Guidelines provide detailed information on the requirements and criteria that must be met to ensure the street garden proposal is approved and compliant throughout its life.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     adopt the Street Garden Policy 2018.

 

b)     acknowledges the Street Garden Guidelines as a supporting document for the new policy.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Street Garden Policy

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Street Garden Guidelines

 

3.

Attachment 3 - Community Consultation Report

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Street Garden Policy

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


Attachment 2 - Street Garden Guidelines

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Attachment 3 - Community Consultation Report

Attachment 3

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS29/18

 

Subject:             Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee

Folder No:                   PROJ/10059/2014

Author:                   Sebastien  Le Coustumer, Drainage Engineer      

 

Introduction

 

Council is studying flood behaviour in accordance with the process presented in the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government). It allows Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The specialist consultant WMAwater was engaged by Council to undertake the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan (KCP FRMS&P). The Draft Study and Plan was presented at the Works Committee on 13 September 2016. Council resolved to place the Draft report on public exhibition and to organise a workshop to receive community feedback.

 

Prior to the public exhibition, critical information became known regarding the light rail development which was identified as impacting the accuracy and reliability of the Draft KCP FRMS&P. A new rainfall data standard was also released around this time.

 

After discussion with the Office of Environment and Heritage, it was determined to update the FRMS&P to incorporate the following before undertaking public consultation:

 

-    Light Rail modification to the catchment including the raising of the levee in Centennial Park, a large raised stabling yard and changes of topography;

-    Use of the newly developed “Australian Rainfall and Runoff 2016” with regards to both rainfall data and process for modelling.

 

These changes were incorporated into the Study and Plan and a draft document was presented to the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee on 28 June 2018. A copy of the minutes, which reflects discussions and outcomes, is attached to this report. The Committee recommended that the KCP FRMS&P be placed on public exhibition.

 

Issues

 

Mitigation options

Seventeen mitigation options were investigated as part of the original FRMS&P including basins, drainage upgrades and ground level modifications. Most options were found to have minimal impact on flooding and therefore, poor benefit cost ratios. There were however two options recommended in the 2016 Draft FRMS&P because they have a significant impact on reducing the impact of flooding and have a viable benefit cost ratio. These options were:

 

-    Increasing the height of the embankment level along Alison Road to provide additional flood storage in Centennial Park (option B);

-    An upgrade of the drainage under Gardeners Road (option I).

 

 

The Principal of WMAwater states: “The construction of large flood mitigation works in urban areas is less likely for a variety of reasons to a point where there have been less than 5 major structural flood mitigation measures proposed by WMAwater in more than 50 studies that have been constructed in the Sydney basin over the last 35 years. The raising of the height of this embankment was the highest ranked mitigation measure for this catchment as it significantly reduces above floor inundation for a large number of houses. That Council was able to successfully lobby for change so that measure was incorporated into the light rail project ranks as a significant floodplain management achievement and is an outstanding result for the people living within the catchment. It stands out as a great example of how public authorities should cooperate in areas of common interest”.

 

The importance of increasing the levee is a major contribution to the protection of downstream residents from flooding and has resulted in a significant reduction in the number of flood affected properties within the catchment.

 

Accordingly, the revised 2018 Draft FRMS&P recommends that only Option I be investigated further based on the potential benefits to the community and reduction in flood levels.

 

Property Modification options

Property modification measures are considered in cases where it is not possible to mitigate the flood level. The aim of property modification measures is to reduce or eliminate the risk to people and costs associated with flooding.

 

Typical property modification measures include house raising, voluntary purchase and flood proofing. House raising is only viable in sparsely populated catchments with certain housing designs. The housing density and architectural stock within the Kensington Centennial Park catchment precludes house raising as a viable option.

 

Equally, a combination of property values and the number of flood affected properties makes voluntary purchase not feasible.

 

The property modification option recommended for the Kensington Centennial Park catchment is to review requirements for flood proofing in development controls. The aim of this recommendation is to ensure that non-habitable buildings such as commercial or industrial developments are flood proof where existing or proposed floor levels are below the Flood Planning Level (FPL).

 

Response modification options

Response modifications include flood emergency management, flood warning and evacuation, and community awareness programmes. The report recommends that:

 

-    Council prepare local disaster plan and/or the SES should prepare a Local Flood Plan for the Kensington Centennial Park catchment;

-    Severe weather warnings and thunderstorm warnings should be provided on Council’s website and local media;

-    Council produce a Local FloodSafe brochure in collaboration with SES;

-    Council undertake regular community awareness campaigns, for example every two years.

 

Planning and development control measures

The Flood Planning Area (FPA) is used to identify properties which are flood affected so that development controls can be applied to future development. The NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual typically defines the FPA by the 100 year average recurrence interval (ARI) flood level + 0.5m freeboard. This approach is currently in place for properties within the Kensington Centennial Park catchment.

 

The FPA defined in the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual typically relates to areas prone to flooding due to rising water levels in lakes and rivers. The manual does not offer guidance in the case of overland flow scenarios as experienced within the Kensington Centennial Park catchment.

 

An analysis of the flooding characteristics within the catchment has identified that the use of 0.5m freeboard is excessive because it will burden a large number of property owners whose properties are not prone to flooding in even the most severe of storms.

 

The approach recommended in the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk Management Plan is to tag properties based on the 100 year ARI event where more than 10% of the lot is flooded to depths more than 150mm. There are 20% less properties within the catchment that meet this criteria compared to the 1,096 properties based on previous modelling.

 

Should this approach be adopted, then property tagging will require amendment so that S10.7 (formerly S149) certificates can be accurately issued. Council could also investigate options to allow residents to request flooding information for their property through Council’s website.

 

Once properties are identified as flood prone, controls will be put in place to ensure that new developments place the habitable floor level above the flood.  The Flood Planning Level (FPL) can vary depending on the use and vulnerability of the building/development to flooding. It is recommended the FPL be set as follows:

 

-    Areas subject to water depth <0.25m:
FPL = 100 year ARI flood level plus the depth of inundation;

-    Areas subject to mainstream flooding:
FPL = 100 year ARI flood level plus 0.5m freeboard.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding is available in the current year’s capital works budget to complete the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan. Two thirds of the funding is available through grant funding from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. The remaining contribution comes from Council funds in line with the conditions of the grant.

 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan has been updated. The Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee considers the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan to be sufficiently completed to be placed on public exhibition.


 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

a)     the Updated Draft Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be placed on public exhibition for 28 days.

b)     a workshop to receive community feedback be organised.

c)     Council officers report back to Council on the outcomes of the public consultation.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Minutes of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 28 June 2018

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Presentation of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 28 June 2018

Attachments 2, 3 & 4 available upon request

3.

Attachment 3 - Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk - Management Study and Draft Plan - Part 1

4.

Attachment 4 - Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Risk - Management Study and Draft Plan - Part 2

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Minutes of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 28 June 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS30/18

 

Subject:             Clovelly Catchment Floodplain Committee

Folder No:                   F2017/00357

Author:                   Sebastien  Le Coustumer, Drainage Engineer      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council (RCC) is responsible for local land use planning in its Local Governments Area (LGA). Council is progressively studying flood behaviour in the major catchment within its area in accordance with the process outlined in the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government). It allows Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding.

 

Waverley Council has commenced a flood study for the portion of the Clovelly catchment that lies within its Local Government Area. They have agreed to extend the study to cover the entire Clovelly catchment, including the portion of the catchment that lies within the Randwick Council Local Government Area. A map showing the Clovelly catchment boundary is found in Attachment 1.

 

The purpose of this report is to:

·       Seek a representative from Randwick Council’s elected representatives to sit on the Clovelly Floodplain Committee.

 

Issues

 

The benefits of implementing the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual in the Clovelly Catchment are as follows:

·       Adopted strategic plans outlining the actions to be undertaken to manage existing, future and continuing flood problems (e.g. works, development controls etc.).

·       A basis for the sound management of flooding issues that takes community views and expectations into consideration.

·       A basis from which funding assistance can be sought from various State agencies to enable implementation of works.

·       Individual developments are currently required to produce their own flood study and determine appropriate flood planning levels until such time as a Flood Study is completed. The study being undertaken by Council will provide far greater accuracy and consistency than those currently being provided by individual developers.

 

State Government Support

 

The NSW Government provides assistance on state-wide policy issues and technical support. The Flood Prone Land Policy and the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government, 2005) forms the basis of floodplain management in NSW.

 

The primary objective of the policy is to reduce the impact of flooding and flood liability on individual owners and occupiers of flood prone property and to reduce private and public losses resulting from floods utilising ecologically positive methods wherever possible.

 

Financial assistance is also provided through grant funding to undertake flood studies and floodplain risk management studies and for the implementation of works identified in these studies. Waverley Council is undertaking an LGA wide Flood Study under a grant awarded by the Office of Environment and Heritage’s Floodplain Management Program. The Clovelly catchment is part of this overall Flood Study.

 

The Floodplain Management Process

 

The floodplain management process is outlined in the Floodplain Development Manual and is summarised by the following figure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Floodplain Management Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Collection

è

Flood Study

è

Floodplain Management Study

è

Floodplain Management Plan

è

Plan Implementation

 

 

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The key steps in the process are the Flood Study, the Floodplain Management Study and the Floodplain Management Plan. Implementation of the process is overseen by the Floodplain Management Committee.

 

Floodplain Management Committee

 

The objective of Floodplain Management Committee is to assist Council in the development and implementation of floodplain management studies and plans.

 

The committee is both the focus of, and a forum for, the discussion of technical, social, economic and ecological issues and for the distillation of possibly differing viewpoints on these issues. The committee will oversee the implementation of the floodplain management process outlined above and ensure the community has opportunity to express their views.

 

Committee membership includes elected representatives, community representatives, Council staff and State Government representatives.

 

The community representatives will be selected from nominations by community members.

 

One (1) elected representative from Randwick Council is required for the committee.

 

Once formed, the committee will provide advice to Council and make recommendations on flooding related policies and objectives for their respective catchments as well as the implementation of the floodplain management process.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding is available in this year’s budget to complete the Clovelly Flood Study. Two thirds of the funding is available through grant funding from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, with the remainder coming from Council’s adopted drainage budget in line with the conditions of the grant.

 

Conclusion

 

The Flood Study for the Clovelly Catchment commenced in September 2017. In order to ensure the timely completion of the study it is necessary to formalise the Floodplain Management Committee to review the draft Flood Study.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

a)     The report be received and noted.

b)     A nomination for one (1) elected representative be made to the General Manager for the Clovelly Floodplain Management Committee.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Clovelly Catchment Map

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Clovelly Catchment Map

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS31/18

 

Subject:             Street Library Box Outside Chifley Public School - In-kind Assistance

Folder No:                   F2012/00318

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Acting Director City Services      

 

Introduction

 

Council has been approached by Ms Lyn Allara from Soroptimist International (SI) – Randwick/Eastern Suburbs requesting assistance to install a second street library box at Chifley Public School. This initiative comes after the successful implementation of the street library box installed at La Perouse Public School. See photo below.

 

 

Issues

 

Following the success of the street library box at La Perouse, SI - Randwick/Eastern Suburbs have requested for the initiative to expand. The Club has received support from the principal of Chifley Public School, Mr David North, for the proposed street library box to be installed outside his school.

 

The purpose of the street library is to make books easily accessible and promote a sense of community among those who enjoy reading. The library box will hold books that can be collected and returned at any time, without concerns of returning the books late. The initiative offers the community a new source of books and encourages children and members of the public to come together in reading and sharing books.

 

SI - Randwick/Eastern Suburbs have requested assistance with the construction and installation of a street library box at Chifley Public School. The artwork is to be organised by the Club and will make mention of Randwick City Council.

 

It is estimated that the extent of in-kind assistance requested is $500.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2b:      Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council accept the report recommendation, the financial implication to Council for the material and labour to construct and install the street library box is estimated at $500.00. The funds are available in the 2018-2019 Operational budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The free street library box is a community project organised by the Soroptimist International - Randwick/Eastern Suburbs Club. The Street Library box at La Perouse has been well received by the community and the installation of a street library box at Chifley Public School is supported.

 

It is proposed to assist with this initiative by purchasing the materials, fabricating the box and undertaking the installation.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

a)     Randwick Council support the Soroptimist International – Randwick/Eastern Suburbs Club with in-kind assistance by providing the materials and labour to construct and install the street library box at Chifley Public School.

b)     The Soroptimist International – Randwick/Eastern Suburbs Club acknowledge Council’s contributions to the street library box.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS32/18

 

Subject:             Newmarket Randwick - Proposed Naming of new Streets and Public Park

Folder No:                   DA/88/2016

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Acting Director City Services     

 

Introduction

 

In accordance with the Development Consent for the Masterplan and the Planning Agreement between Randwick Council and the developer, Cbus Property, a Street and Park Naming Strategy has been submitted for Council’s consideration.

 

Issues

 

The Masterplan layout for Newmarket Randwick, including the proposed new roads and public park is shown in Figure 1.

 


Figure 1- Masterplan property and public land layout

 

The Masterplan includes a 5,000sqm public open space lot (public park), 5 new public road lots and an extension of an existing road.

 

These lots are denoted as follows:

·      E2 – public park located in the north /east portion of the site

·      ST1 – eastern loop road – pedestrian / vehicle shared roadway

·      ST2 – northern road connecting Jane and Young Street. 

·      ST3 – southern road connecting Jane and Young Street. 

·      ST4 – extension of Jane Street to the south connecting to DV1. 

·      DV1 – southern road connecting Young Street to Botany Street. 

·      RL1 – western laneway connecting DV1 and Jane Street.  

 

The submitted Naming Strategy acknowledged the former owners and uses of the Newmarket site. The Naming Strategy is included as Attachment 1 to this report.

 

The precinct to the east of Young Street has the strongest ties to the Inglis Family and therefore, the public park and ST1 aim to honour the Inglis Family.

 

The naming strategy for the new streets to the west of Young Street is based on honouring the people and uses associated with the site prior to Inglis Family operation / ownership.

 

E2 Public Park – Inglis Park

The public park is proposed to be named after the Inglis Family in recognition of the heritage significance and 112 year operation by Inglis and Sons at this site including the Newmarket Sale Ring.

 

ST1 Road – Shaftesbury Avenue

ST1 Road is proposed as a shared pedestrian/roadway that is connected to Young Street providing street frontage to the proposed park, new residential apartments and Newmarket Big Stable.

 

The road will be located over an existing private road that the Inglis staff referred to as Shaftesbury Avenue.  This was the name of a successful Australian racehorse owned by the late John Inglis.  The proposed name seeks to honour this reference.

 

ST2 Road – Dillon Street

ST2 Road is in the northern precinct of the Newmarket development running east /west. It is proposed to name the road Dillon Street in honour of John Dillon also known as Johnny Cutts. He leased and ran the Newmarket Hotel and stables in 1866. He is also a famous jockey that rode Archer and won the first two Melbourne Cups races.

 

ST3 Road – Chiltern Street

ST3 Road is in the southern precinct of the Newmarket development, running east/ west.  The proposed new road is in the vicinity of Chiltern House and Stables at 28 Young Street.  The proposed name reflects the historic significance of the Chiltern House and Stables.

 

ST4 Road – Jane Street (existing)

ST4 is an extension of the existing Jane Street to the south to link with the proposed DV1 road.

 

DV1 Road – Fennelly Street

The proposed DV1 road is located along the southern boundary of the Newmarket Site, running east to west. DV1 Road will provide views to the Big Stable from the west.  It is proposed to name DV1 Fennelly Street in honour of Michael Fennelly who constructed the Newmarket Big Stable building.

 

RL1 Road – White Lane

RL1 Road is a rear lane that runs parallel to Jane Street and Botany Street, and returns to Jane Street.  It is proposed to name RL1 White Lane in honour of James White.  James White purchased Newmarket property in partnership with Michael Fennelly in 1878. James white was a major racing figure and a member of the Legislative Assembly.

 

It should be noted that the road will provide access to the rear of properties but not have any street addresses to White Lane. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There will be no financial impact to Council.

 

Conclusion

 

A Naming Strategy has been submitted for the public park and the new roads as part of the Newmarket Randwick development. The names are denoted in the Masterplan in Figure 2.

 

Figure 2 – Masterplan with proposed park and street names

 

 

The proposed names reflect the historical uses and ownership of the site. The proposed names are:

 

E2 Public Park

Inglis Park

ST1 Road

Shaftesbury Avenue

ST2 Road

Dillon Street

ST3 Road

Chiltern Street

ST4 Road

Jane Street (existing)

DV1 Road

Fennelly Street

RL1 Road

White Lane

 

The proposed names have been selected to be in accordance with the Geographical Names Board NSW Addressing User Manual, 2016.

 

It is recommended that the proposed street and park names be endorsed for submission to the Geographical Names Board for final approval. 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)  Council endorse the proposed names for the public park and new public roads as part of the Newmarket Randwick Development.

 

b)  The proposed street names be submitted to the Geographical Names Board for approval.

 

c)  The administration costs associated with the approval be borne by the developer.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Newmarket Randwick - Street Naming Strategy

 

 

 

 


Newmarket Randwick - Street Naming Strategy

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO39/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report - June 2018

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – June 2018” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of June 2018. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 30 June 2018, Council held investments with a market value of $65.222 million. The portfolio value decreased during June by ~$6.704 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from June 2017 to June 2018. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance

 

Asset Allocation

 

The portfolio is highly liquid, with 6.49% of investments available at call. Council has a large allocation to term deposits (45.23%) and senior floating rate notes (48.28%). The FRN’s add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

Term to Maturity

 

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 32% of the total investment portfolio.

 

 

 

 

All minimum and maximum limits comply with Council’s investment policy:

 

Compliant

Horizon

Invested
$

Invested
%

Min Limit
%

Max Limit
%

0-90 days

$19,732,956.00

30.25%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$17,765,244.00

27.24%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$7,125,809.00

10.93%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$20,598,171.00

31.58%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0.00

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances. These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit ratings do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

 

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

 

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

$9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

$7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

$2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $15.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

 

 Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

 

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on long term S&P ratings). Overweights reflect downgrades, in the case of BOQ and Bendigo Bank.

 

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period June 2015 to June 2018.

 

 

Investment performance is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.53% compared with the benchmark index of 1.98%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits accounted for 45.23% of the total investment portfolio.

Four deposits totalling $6.0 million matured and were withdrawn in June. There were two new term deposits taken up during June totalling $3.0 million.

As at the end of June, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.63%, up 1 basis point (bp) from the previous month.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $31.49 million in floating rate notes.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 30 June 2018 decreased by ~$25k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2017-18 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,414,455.00. Investment income to 30 June 2018 amounted to $1,777,951.19.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 30 June 2018 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for June 2018 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer  - June 2018

 

 

 

 


Certificate by Responsible Accounting Officer  - June 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO40/18

 

Subject:             Contingency Fund - status as at 30 June 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/07396

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2017-18 financial year there have been 39 allocations totalling $141,892.56 and for the 2018-19 financial year there have been 6 allocations totalling $27,963.85. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2017-18

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$14,500.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

2017-18 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 28 Mar 2017

Financial assistance – Randwick Boys & Girls High Schools – 2017 combined production

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Jun 2017

Financial assistance – Souths Cares NAIDOC Festival 2017

$6,700.00

Ord Council – 27 Jun 2017

Financial assistance – Surfing NSW Grommet Surfing Titles

$15,601.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Waiving of fees - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$2,130.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Donations - Rainbow Street Public School - Fundraising Cookbook

$750.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Peter Hoffman - Commemoration

$500.00

Ord Council – 22 Aug 2017

Waiving of Fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 22 Aug 2017

Waiving of fess - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival 

$2,237.00

Ord Council – 10 Oct 2017

Waiving of fees - Friends of Malabar Headland

$110.00

Ord Council – 24 Oct 2017

Waiving of Fees - Carols by Candlelight - St Lukes Anglican Church, Clovelly

$4,118.00

Ord Council – 24 Oct 2017

Waiving of fees - Randwick Botany Cycling Club Inc - Retro Day

$823.00

Ord Council – 24 Oct 2017

Waiving of fees - South Maroubra Surf Club

$1,995.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Waiving of fees – Carols by Candlelight – St Nicolas Anglican Church

$2,189.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Financial assistance – Surfing NSW – World Tour Surfing event

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Waiving of fees – Greek Epiphany Festival – Jan 2018

$12,350.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Sponsorship – 2018 Sydney Film Festival

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Financial assistance – Coast Centre for Seniors

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Waiving of fees – Surf Life Saving Sydney

$1,268.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Financial assistance – Digging Deep for Myanmar

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Funding assistance – Vintage Sports Car Club of Australia – book launch Maroubra Speedway

$1,200.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Financial assistance – Jarrah House

$1,500.00

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Prince of Wales Hospital Foundation 160 year anniversary

$4,857.56

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Chifley Public School – Request for Assistance

$15,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees - Australian Mitochondrial Disease Foundation – ‘The Bloody Long Walk’

$1,619.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees - Regional Titles Surfing NSW Maroubra Beach

$5,407.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees - Special Olympics Sydney East at the Des Renford Leisure Centre

$1,390.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Donation – 2017 White Ribbon Walk

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - Autism Awareness Week

$1,953.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of Fees – Maroubra Surfers Association and North Maroubra Surf Rider – Monthly Surfing Contests

$3,815.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Donation to ‘Can Too Foundation’ for Marathon Des Sables - Heather Hawkins

$500.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Maroubra Volunteer Lifesavers - Request for Financial Assistance

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 Apr 2018

Waiving of fees – Maroubra Swimming Club – use of Des Renford Leisure Centre for carnivals

$3,690.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

2018 International Day of Yoga

$3,000.00

 Total - 2017-18 Contingency Fund allocations:                              $141,892.56

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - St George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,323.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Waiving of fees - Taste of Coogee 2018

$15,451.00

Ord Council – 26 June 2018

Financial assistance - South Sydney Rabbitohs' - Commemorate John Sutton Historic Milestone

$2,000.00

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                                $27,963.85

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:         Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:         Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $140,795.00 in the 2017-18 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2017-18 and 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Director Corporate Services Report No. CO41/18

 

Subject:             2017-18 Funding Carry Over Schedule

Folder No:                   F2017/00401

Author:                   Caroline Foley, Manager Financial Planning & Performance      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to carry over unspent funds from the 2017-18 financial year to the new 2018-19 financial year due to the following reasons:

 

·           Projects have already commenced and expenditure is committed;

·           Grant funding has been received for projects spanning a timeframe beyond 30 June 2018;

·           The funds were voted towards the latter part of the 2017-18 financial year, and the project has not yet commenced or been completed;

·           Funding for the project is to be raised over more than one financial year.

 

A full list of these projects and their funding is itemised as an attachment to this report.

 

The total amount proposed for carrying forward into the 2018-19 budget is $19,731,648. This amount is matched with funding including unexpended grants, section 94 contributions and internally restricted funds.

 

The Council undertakes a programmed and disciplined approach to financial planning and management. The majority of the funds being carried over form part of a financial plan, plan of management, or some other form of strategy where Council is purposefully accumulating funds for multi-year projects which will roll across several financial periods.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Adoption of the recommendation formally carries over committed and unexpended

2017-18 budgets into the 2018-19 adopted budget for the projects outlined in Attachment A. As the Council has already set aside funds for these projects, there is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Council is in a strong and stable financial position. The Director Corporate Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the financial position is satisfactory.

 

Recommendation

 

That the 2017-18 funding Carry Over Schedule be adopted as per Attachment A.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

2017-18 Funding Carry Over Schedule

 

 

 

 


2017-18 Funding Carry Over Schedule

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM53/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Notification of respite package for Randwick LGA residents affected by South East Light Rail out of hours construction noise

Folder No:                   F2015/00095

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

1.     Notes that in 2017, the Hon Andrew Constance, Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, offered Randwick LGA residents affected by out of hours construction work on the South East Light Rail line a number of support measures including:

 

·    Reimbursement of up to $200 for alternative accommodation during night time construction work.

·    An offer by Transport for NSW to arrange accommodation directly, avoiding the need for reimbursement.

·    Additional accommodation in special circumstances, decided on a case by case basis.

·    Installation of blinds and double glazing for residents on Doncaster Ave impacted by the lights and noise of the Light Rail stabling yard.

 

2.     Notes that many residents are still unaware of the respite packages being offered, as they are not detailed on CBD and South East Light Rail Notifications of out of hours work.

 

3.     Writes to Transport for NSW to request that double glazing be offered to all residents affected by out of hours construction noise.

 

4.     Writes to the NSW Government to request that full details of the respite packages are provided on all weekly notifications until the completion of the South East Light Rail, so residents are able to benefit from the package being offered.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM54/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Open Spaces and Greener Sydney - Application for Funding

Folder No:                   F2005/00923

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     Acknowledge that on the 1st April, 2018 the NSW State Government        announced its $290 Million “Open Spaces & Greener Sydney” package aimed at     increasing Green Space, creating new playgrounds and opening up school       playgrounds during holidays; and

 

b)     Apply for funding under this program, so as to increase green space and to      build/improve playgrounds within the Randwick LGA.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM55/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Authorisation of Mobile Phone Antenna Locations

Folder No:                   F2004/06429

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     Acknowledge the concerns raised by West Ward residents in relation to the      installation of Mobile Phone Antennas on power lines throughout various       locations in Kingsford & Kensington.

 

b)     Write to the Federal Minister for Communications, the Hon. Mitch Fifield    requesting that Local Governments be given greater authority as to the placement of these antennas within local government areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM56/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Traffic and Parking Study - Randwick Racecourse

Folder No:                   F2007/00029

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     Write to the ATC outlining its concerns with the proposal to build a new AFL       Training Ground(The Size of the MCG) in the centre of Randwick Racecourse as    such a proposal will only create greater parking stress to residents in Kensington particularly on race days and on days when the Racecourse is used       for other events;

 

b)     Request that as part of any proposal, the ATC provide a detailed parking and    traffic study indicating the impact that the training ground will have on the Kensington Precinct; and

 

c)     Request that the proposal for the training ground include adequate parking       which is to be made available to patrons on race days and during semesters &      school times to students at the UNSW and to parents/teachers from Kensington    Public School.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM57/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Proposed Naming of a section of Arthur Byrne Reserve

Folder No:                   F2004/06876

Submitted by:          Councillor Parker, Central Ward      

 

 

That Council Resolves to add a place name, ‘Barry Rodgers’ to the section of Arthur Byrne Reserve between Maroubra SLSC and McKeon St, Maroubra Beach.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM58/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Ausgrid monopoly in the undergrounding of power lines

Folder No:                   F2004/08164

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

Background

 

Ausgrid has a monopoly under the Electricity Network Assets (Authorised Transactions) Act 2015 for undertaking the undergrounding of power lines in NSW. This results in inhibitive costs when Council attaches conditions to development consents requiring developers to do so. Such conditions are often overturned in the Land & Environment Court.

 

Motion

 

That Council:

 

1)  Attempts to bring down the inhibitive cost of undergrounding power lines by lobbying the NSW State Government to amend the Electricity Network Assets (Authorised Transactions) Act 2015, to end the monopoly that Ausgrid has in undertaking these works;

 

2)  That Council submits the motion below to the next Local Government NSW conference.

 

“Local Government NSW attempts to bring down the inhibitive cost of undergrounding power lines by lobbying the NSW State Government to amend the Electricity Network Assets (Authorised Transactions) Act 2015 to end the monopoly that Ausgrid has in undertaking these works.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM59/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reducing risk of collision between buses and residents exiting driveways on Carrington Road, Coogee

Folder No:                   F2004/06184

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council investigates options for safely reducing the risk of collision between south travelling cars, buses and cyclists with those of cars exiting driveways on the east side of Carrington Road north of the Bream Street intersection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM60/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reverse previous resolution to retain homemade rope swings in the Albie Place reserve in Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/08218

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council sets aside its previous resolution and resolves for reasons of safety and liability to remove the two homemade rope swings in the reserve at Albie Place, Randwick in accordance with the original recommendation from Council staff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM61/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Proposed Review of the Public Art Strategy

Folder No:                   F2009/00424

Submitted by:          Councillor Parker, Central Ward      

 

 

That Council resolves:

 

1.     To review our Public Art Strategy 2010.

2.     That this future review includes, but not be limited to investigating measures taken by other councils to encourage the private take-up of wall murals.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      24 July 2018

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR4/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, D'Souza and Da Rocha - Notice of Motion from Cr Roberts - Kerb Ramp Retrofitting

Folder No:                   F2013/00125

Submitted by:          Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor D'Souza, South Ward; Councillor Da Rocha, South Ward      

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 26 June 2018 reading as follows:

 

“That:

 

a)     Council note that the program to construct a footpath on at least one side of every street in Randwick is now complete.

 

b)     Council note a significant number of street corners in Randwick do not have kerb ramps, which disadvantages the disabled and those walking young children in strollers and prams.

 

c)     Council resolves to implement a program to fast track and prioritise the retrofitting of kerb ramps on street corners throughout Randwick City Council.

 

d)     funds would be drawn from the footpath maintenance budget and the new footpaths budget.

 

e)     kerbs that are not adversely affected by services, such as underground Telstra cabling, would be prioritised for retrofitting.

 

f)     Council’s Director City Services is given discretion in terms of the budget allocations.

 

g)     Council have an aspirational goal of all corners in Randwick City Council with a footpath, that is not effected by services, to have a kerb ramp by September 2020.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That Councils footpath program continue so every street in Randwick has a footpath on at least one side of every street.”

 

 

 

 

 

   

 



* Clean Up Australia November 2017