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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 26 June 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick  on Tuesday, 26 June 2018 at 6:00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 22 May 2018

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

GM13/18   Mayor and councillor induction program .................................................. 1

GM14/18   Randwick City Council Operational Plan and Budget 2018-19........................ 3

Director City Planning Reports

CP22/18    Bastille Day at La Perouse................................................................... 51

CP23/18    Minimum lot size review consultation outcomes....................................... 53

CP24/18    Affordable Housing Dwelling at lots 1,2,5 and 6, in Strata Plan SP96689 - Classification of Land under the Local Government Act 1993..................... 107

CP25/18    Accelerated LEP review funding grants................................................. 111

CP26/18    Smart Cities and Suburbs Program Grant Applications............................. 139

CP27/18    Information session - Residential renters and tenancy rights.................... 143

Late Director City Planning Report

CP28/18    Post Exhibition - Planning Proposal to Amend Subdivision Provisions for Attached Dual Occupancies – TO BE DISTRIBUTED FRIDAY 22 JUNE 2018

Director City Services Reports

CS22/18    Tree Removal – Outside 49-51 Milroy Avenue, Kensington........................ 147

CS23/18    Todman Avenue and Lenthall Street - Strategic Cycleway........................ 157

Director Governance & Financial Services Reports

GF33/18    Business Continuity Planning (BCP) update............................................ 161

GF34/18    Family and Domestic Violence Policy.................................................... 217

GF35/18    Contingency Fund - status as at 31 May 2018........................................ 225

GF36/18    Monthly Financial Report as at 31 May 2018.......................................... 229

GF37/18    Investment Report  - May 2018.......................................................... 239

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM45/18   Notice of Motion from Crs Hamilton & Stavrinos - Pedestrian Safety Lenthall Street, Kensington ..................................................................................... 249

NM46/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - A Randwick City Council ban on single-use plastic usage................................................................................... 251

NM47/18   Notice of Motion from Crs Seng, D'Souza & Da Rocha - Incentives for "Build to Rent" Developments ........................................................................ 253

NM48/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch -  Motion to be submitted to the LGNSW 2018 Annual Conference– Call for LGNSW to seek representation on the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) Electromagnetic Energy Reference Group (EMERG)....................................................... 255

NM49/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Motion to be submitted to the LGNSW 2018 Annual Conference– Call for Review of Land Acquisition Act..................... 257

NM50/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch – Motion to be submitted to the LGNSW 2018 Annual Conference - Call for direct financial support for specialist front-end services, crisis accommodation and affordable housing for women and children affected by domestic violence............................................................ 259

NM51/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Roberts - Reducing the use of Single Use Plastics in Randwick City Council....................................................................... 261

NM52/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Roberts - Kerb Ramp Retrofitting...................... 263  

Closed Session (record of voting required)

Goverannce & Financial Services Report

GF38/18    Tender No. T2018-21 - CLASS System Replacement for DRLC

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

City Services Reports

CS24/18    Tender No. T2018-12 - Infrastructure Services Panel

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

CS25/18    Tender No. T2018-26 - Coastal Walkway Construction - NSW Golf Course

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

CS26/18    RFQ No. Q2018-27 - Quotation for the Supply and Delivery of a 20 Cubic Metre Rear Loading Compactor

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Closed Session (record of voting NOT required)

General Manager’s Report

GM15/18   Randwick City Council Organisation Structure

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (a) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).

 

Late Confidential Report (record of voting required)

CP29/18    102-104 Brook Street, Coogee (DA/284/2015) – TO BE DISTRIBUTED FRIDAY 22 JUNE 2018

Notice of Rescission Motion

NR2/18     Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by the Mayor (Cr Shurey) and Crs Matson and Neilson - Proposed painted line markings for parking spaces.............. 265  

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM13/18

 

Subject:             Mayor and councillor induction program

Folder No:                   F2018/00181

Author:                   Luke Fitzgerald, Executive Manager     

 

Introduction

 

The Mayor and councillors play an important role in making complex decisions on behalf of the Randwick City community. These decisions relate to community infrastructure, services and programs delivered to those who live, work and visit the LGA.

 

To successfully undertake these roles, the Mayor and councillors are required to participate in an induction program after being elected to Council, as outlined by the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Issues

 

As part of the new Councillor Induction and Professional Development guidelines issued under section 23A of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act), council is to develop, deliver, evaluate and report on the induction and professional development programs provided to the Mayor and councillors under the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

Candidate information sessions

Randwick City Council offered two (2) candidate information sessions to all interested persons prior to the election. The sessions were held at the Randwick City Council chambers and offered an insight into the role of council, roles and responsibilities of councillors and staff under the Act, Legal and ethical responsibilities, Skills and knowledge and support available to councillors.

 

Induction program

Randwick City councillors took part in an induction program in the first six months after being elected to council that included one on one meetings with the General Manager, a councillor workshop in November 2017 and briefings covering the following topics:

 

§ Effective leadership as a governing entity;

§ Council assets and Infrastructure;

§ Randwick City socioeconomic profile and key issues for the LGA;

§ Legal and political context of Randwick City Council;

§ Councillor roles and responsibilities;

§ The functions of council;

§ Legal, ethical and risk management principles;

§ Effective decision-making;

§ Integrated planning and reporting;

§ Strategic planning;

§ Natural resource management;

§ Financial context of Randwick City Council;

§ Governance and support available to councillors;

§ Specific Mayoral workshops including media training, chairing meetings and performing ceremonial duties;

§ Code of Conduct & Code of Meeting Practice.

 

Briefings were conducted over a number of weeks and were delivered by the General Manager and the Directors of City Services, City Planning and Governance & Financial Services. All sessions were well attended by the Mayor and councillors.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick City Council is a leader in Local Government and strives to demonstrate best practice in the delivery of infrastructure, programs and services to the community. Council is committed to the ongoing professional development of the Mayor and councillors for the benefit of those who live, work and visit the area.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Mayor and councillor induction program report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM14/18

 

Subject:             Randwick City Council Operational Plan and Budget 2018-19

Folder No:                   F2018/03000

Author:                   Anne Warner, Manager Corporate Performance     

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council Meeting on 24 April 2018, it was resolved that the Draft Randwick City Council 2018-19 Operational Plan, which includes the 2018-19 Budget and associated Fees and Charges, be placed on public exhibition from 1 May to 1 June 2018 inviting submissions from the public.

 

Issues

 

During the public exhibition period the following activities were undertaken:

 

·      A Your Say Randwick website was launched on 1 May 2018:

www.yoursayrandwick.com.au/Budget2019

-     The site included the Draft 2018-19 Operational Plan, Budget and Fees and Charges, an overview video on the budget and suburb highlight factsheets.

-     The site provided submissions to be made online and included a Q&A forum (18 questions were received and responded to)

-     the site had 2,479 unique visitors during the exhibition period

-     from the site 3,809 documents were downloaded (258 Draft Operational Plan and Budget, 133 Draft Fees and Charges and the remaining 3,418 downloads were the suburb specific factsheets.

·           A quarter page advertisement was placed in The Southern Courier on 1 May 2018. It was also advertised as an item in the Mayor's column in The Southern Courier on 1 and 8 May, in The Beast May edition and in Council’s electronic Randwick News on 9 May.

·           A Direct email campaign was launched on 2 May 2018. Using Council’s eNews database, eNews subscribers were sent a ‘Budget Special’ email campaign with projects relevant to their suburb of residence.

 

Campaign

Recipients

Opens

Clicks

Clovelly

462

51%

15%

Coogee & South Coogee

2,734

47%

13%

Kensington

810

38%

13%

Kingsford

1,177

39%

16%

La Perouse, Phillip Bay & Little Bay

425

53%

20%

Malabar

337

56%

22%

Maroubra

2,326

46%

12%

Matraville & Chifley

962

52%

18%

Randwick

3,050

38%

7%

General campaign (suburb of residence unknown)

9,596

37%

25%

 

·           A Feature story in Council’s SCENE magazine distributed to 65,000 households in Randwick City.

·           Bus shelter posters were on display at 10 bus stops across Randwick City.

·           Exhibition material was available online at Council’s website and in hard copy at the Customer Service Centre and Council’s the three libraries.

·           Precincts were notified of the consultation via email and hard copies of the Draft 2018-19 Operational Plan, Budget and Fees and Charges delivered on request.

·           Fact sheets detailing projects by suburb were published online and were downloaded as follows:

 

Maroubra                                     624 downloads

Coogee & South Coogee                 589 downloads

Randwick                                     529 downloads

Matraville & Chifley                        322 downloads

Kingsford                                     298 downloads

Clovelly                                       296 downloads

La Perouse, Phillip Bay & Little Bay   275 downloads

Kensington                                   251 downloads

Malabar                                       234 downloads

·           Council’s Facebook page was used to host a number of videos about the Budget & Operational Plan. This included suburb-specific videos outlining the changes taking place in each area. These were geotargeted to residents living in those areas.

·           72 formal submissions were received, which addressed issues such as rates, cycleways, footpaths and upgrades to parks and playgrounds.  In addition, 60 submissions were received regarding the Hire Fees for Kensington Park Community Centre.

·           All formal submissions received were acknowledged and reviewed, and are tabled as an attachment to this report.

 

Building on an approach that was successfully utilised for the preparation of Council’s previous Operational Plans, Council again sought input from the Precincts during the Operational Plan preparation (rather than exhibition) phase.

 

Overall there were 36 issues/suggestions raised by the Precincts through the initial process, covering aspects such as: landscaping; stormwater management; traffic calming; the protection of fauna; signage; litter management; and outdoor exercise equipment.

 

Activities

 

The activities detailed in the Operational Plan and Budget reflect the review of the Randwick City Plan which commenced towards the end of 2017 and address the corresponding six theme of the City Plan.  

 

Activities range from the continued delivery of high quality services, projects and capital works; and initiatives through the Sustaining our City and Our Community Our Future programs. Some of the specific projects include construction of the Mahon Pool amenities; activating the La Perouse museum; ongoing construction of the coastal walkway; and continued planning towards a new indoor multi-purpose sporting facility and gymnastics facility at Heffron Park.

 

Recommended Operational Plan 2018-19

 

A number of administrative changes were made to reflect updates such as: the latest release of Estimated Residential Population data (page 11); IPARTs approval of Council’s Special Rate Variation application (pages 66 and 89); and Council’s adoption of the revised Waste Strategy (page 59).

 

As recommended by the Office of Local Government, the description of works in Heffron Park have been expanded to include developing a proposal for a Community High Performance Centre (CHPC) for the South Sydney District Rugby League Football Club (The Rabbitohs). Additional details around that it would be delivered via a Public Private Partnership have also been included. (Page 41)

 

Updates were made in relation to Council’s resolution to provide an additional $75 rebate for eligible pensioners. (Page 91 and see also budget changes)

 

Recommended Capital Works Program 2018-19

 

There are no changes to the Draft 2018-19 Capital Works Program.

 

Recommended Budget 2018-19

 

Since drafting the Budget for 2018-19 the Council resolved (GF13/18 24 April 2018) to provide an additional $75 pensioner rebate to eligible pensioners from the 2018-19 rating period. The additional rebate will be allocated against the domestic waste management charge.

 

The budget has been updated to reflect the total increase in the pensioner rebate by $75 to a total of $325 per annum. The revised pensioner rebate budget for 2018-19 is $1.5m, a $381,100 increase from the draft budget.

 

The impact of this change is:

 

·        A decrease in rates and annual charges from $116.7m to $116.3m (as the rebate is offset against this income)

·        A decrease in the transfer to the domestic waste management reserve from $477k to $96k to offset the higher rebate.

 

Recommended Fees and Charges 2018-19

 

Since the drafting of the Fees and Charges for 2018-19, an additional note has been included within the Des Renford Leisure Centre section of the document:

 

‘Credit card merchant service fees incurred with direct debit payment arrangements may be passed on in full to the customer.’

 

While credit card surcharges have been removed for Randwick customers from 1 July 2018, a provision is required for the fees charged by the third party payment provider used for direct debit customers at DRLC.

 

LINCS – Sales: CD – Whole Database and LINCS – Sales: Photocopy – Per section or Printed Directory two fee items are removed from 2018-19 Fees and Charges as Council is not going to renew the subscription with LINCS.

 

There are no other changes to the draft 2018-19 Fees and Charges.

 

Rates

 

All councils are subject to the annual rate peg unless otherwise covered by a ‘Special Variation’. In May 2018, IPART approved the Council’s application for a special variation to increase rates for the next three years, to fund the Our Community Our Future program of projects and services which will run for the next seven years.

 

The approved increases are shown in the following table.

 

Year

Financial year

Rate-peg %

SRV % above rate-peg

Total approved increase

1

2018-19

2.3%

5.34%

7.64%

2

2019-20

2.5%*

3.02%

5.52%

3

2020-21

2.5%*

3.02%

5.52%

*assumed rate-peg for 2019-20 and 2020-21

 

Port Botany Business

 

Council at its meeting 22 May 2018, resolved to determine a sub-category of the business category, known as ‘Port Botany Business’.   The sub-category applies to land zoned SP1 Special Activities, as defined by the Three Ports SEPP 2013.

 

In 2018-19, business properties located within the Port Botany Business sub-category will attract a higher rate than business properties located throughout the City of Randwick.

 

Under s.494 of the Local Government Act 1993, Council must make and levy an ordinary rate each year on all rateable land in its area. The 2018-19 rates are shown below. 

 

Rate Description

Rate

No. of Properties

Rate Revenue

Residential - ad valorem

0.131665

22,824

$38,958,339

Residential - minimum

$805.68

27,296

$21,991,841

Business - ad valorem

0.49714

1,406

$12,028,072

Business - minimum

$1,298.32

626

$812,748

Port Botany Business - ad valorem

0.819261

26

$4,572,501

Port Botany Business - minimum

$1,298.32

1

$1,298

Environmental special rate

0.010884

52,179

$4,385,668

 

 

 

$82,750,467

 

Environmental Special Rate

 

The Environmental Levy funds the Sustaining our City program and has been in place for the past 14 years. The Levy was originally introduced in July 2004 for five years, calculated at 6 per cent of the Council’s overall rates income. Since then the Levy has been extended at the same rate, for two further consecutive five year periods, effective from July 2009 and July 2014.

 

2018-19 is the fifth and final year of the current Environmental Levy, with the special variation approval due to expire on 30 June 2019. 

 

Domestic Waste Management Charge

 

Under s.496 of the Local Government Act 1993, Council must make and levy an annual charge for providing domestic waste management services. Under s.504 of the Act, income from the charge must not exceed the reasonable cost to Council of providing those services. For 2018-19, the Domestic Waste Management Charge will increase 2.5 per cent from $554.00 to $567.85 for each residential parcel.

 

For residential premises with shared facilities, ie; shared bathroom and kitchen, the charge will apply one charge per 10 beds. For all other residential premises with self-contained units, ie; non-shared bathroom and/or kitchen, one charge will apply per unit/occupancy.

 

The Domestic Waste Management Charge for an ‘additional’ 140 litre service will be $273.27 in 2018-19.

 

A new domestic waste ‘availability’ charge will apply to vacant (unoccupied) residential land from 1 July 2018, charged at 50 per cent of the full domestic waste service charge.   The Domestic Waste Management Availability charge will be $283.93 in 2018-19.

 

The Domestic Waste Management Charge provides for existing services; charges for tipping to landfill; the ongoing operation of the Perry Street Recycling Centre; continuation of Council's Contaminated Site Remediation Program and Council's commitment to alternate waste technologies in an effort to increase the amount of rubbish diverted from landfill.

 

For 2018-19 the estimated gross yield for the Domestic Waste Management Charge is $33,545,147.

 

The draft Fees and Charges document has been updated to reflect the Domestic Waste Management Charge.

 

Stormwater Management Service Charge

 

The Stormwater Management Service Charge was introduced in the 2008-09 financial year to establish a sustainable funding source for providing improved stormwater management across Randwick City. Under s.496A of the Local Government Act 1993, Council may make and levy an annual charge for stormwater management services for each parcel of rateable land for which a stormwater management service is provided.

 

The Stormwater Management Service Charges are set in accordance with the Local Government Act Regulations 2005, and remain unchanged from last year.

 

The Stormwater Management Service Charge will appear as a separate charge on the 2018-19 rate notices and is determined by the type of property:

·      Residential property: $25 per annum

·      Residential strata property: $12.50 per annum

·      Business property: $25 per annum plus an additional $25 for each 350m2 or part thereof by which the parcel of land exceeds 350m2

·      Business strata property: calculated as per a Business property and apportioned by unit entitlement for each business strata lot with a minimum charge of $5.

·      Company title properties: calculated in accordance with the rating category of the land and then apportioned according to the number of shares held by each shareholder.

 

For 2018-19 the estimated gross yield of the Stormwater Service Management Charge is $1,133,319.

 


 

Interest Charge 2018-19

 

In accordance with s.566(3) of the Local Government Act 1993, the Minister for Local Government has determined that the maximum rate of interest payable on overdue rates and charges for the 2017-18 rating year will remain at 7.5 per cent per annum. Randwick City Council will apply the maximum rate in 2018-19.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The Council is in a strong financial position with a sustainable and balanced budget, sufficient unrestricted cash and available working capital, strong liquidity, sufficient cash reserves, and a good debt collection ratio.

 

Conclusion

 

Significant initiatives are detailed in the Operational Plan and Budget ranging from the construction of amenities to providing practical solutions to community issues.

 

The activities outlined in the Plan aim to foster a sense of community and enhance liveability of Randwick City, reflecting the broader directions of the 20-year Randwick City Plan.

 

The Plan is underpinned by a participatory democracy approach and strong governance as outlined in the Responsible Management theme.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the Recommended Operational Plan and Budget 2018-19 be adopted as per the attached, and that the General Manager be authorised to make any minor changes as requested by the Council or the NSW Office of Local Government;

 

b)     the Recommended General Fees and Charges be adopted for 2018-19 as per the attached;

 

c)     Council make and levy the ordinary Residential Rate for 2018-19, under s.494 and s.498(1)(a) and (2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as a rate of 0.131665 cents in the dollar on the land value of all rateable land within the City of Randwick being categorised as Residential;

 

d)     Council make and levy the ordinary Business Rate for 2018-19, under s.494 and s.498(1)(a) and (2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as a rate of 0.497140 cents in the dollar on the land value of all rateable land within the City of Randwick being categorised as Business;

 

e)     Council make and levy the ordinary Port Botany Business rate for 2018-19, under s.494 and s.498(1)(a) and (2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as a rate of 0.819261 cents in the dollar on the land value of all rateable land within the Port Botany Business sub-category area, defined by the SP1 Special Activities zone of the Three Ports SEPP 2013;

 

f)     Council make and levy the Environmental Levy special Rate for 2018-19, under s.495 and s.498(1)(b) and (2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as a rate of 0.010884 cents in the dollar on the land value of all rateable land within the City of Randwick;

 

g)     Council make and levy the ordinary Residential minimum rate for 2018-19 under s.548(1)(a), (2), (4) and (5) of the Local Government Act 1993, as $805.68;

 

h)     Council make and levy the ordinary Business minimum rate for 2018-19 under s.548(1)(a), (2), (4) and (5) of the Local Government Act 1993, as $1,298.32;

 

i)      Council make and levy the Port Botany Business minimum rate for 2018-19 under s.548(1)(a), (2), (4) and (5) of the Local Government Act 1993, as $1,298.32;

 

j)     Council make and levy the Domestic Waste Management Charge for 2018-19 under s.496 of the Local Government Act 1993, as $567.85;

 

k)     Council make and levy a Domestic Waste Management Charge for an additional 140 litre bin for 2018-19 under s.496 of the Local Government Act 1993, as $273.27;

 

l)      Council make and levy a Domestic Waste Management Availability Charge for vacant/unoccupied Residential land under s.496 of the Local Government Act 1993, as $283.93.

 

m)    Council make and levy the Stormwater Management Service Charge for residential properties for 2018-19 under s.496A of the Local Government Act 1993, as $25.00;

 

n)     Council make and levy the Stormwater Management Service Charge for residential strata properties for 2018-19 under s.496A of the Local Government Act 1993, as $12.50;

 

o)     Council make and levy the Stormwater Management Service Charge for business properties for 2018-19 under s.496A of the Local Government Act 1993, as $25.00 plus an additional $25.00 for each 350m² or part thereof by which the parcel of land exceeds 350m²;

 

p)     Council make and levy the Stormwater Management Service Charge for business strata properties for 2018-19 under s.496A of the Local Government Act 1993, calculated in accordance with the land area as per business properties in ‘o’ above and then apportioned by unit entitlement subject to a minimum charge of $5.00 per business strata lot.

 

q)     Council make and levy the Stormwater Management Service Charge for company title properties for 2018-19 under s.496A of the Local Government Act 1993, calculated in accordance with the rating category of the land and then apportioned according to the number of shares held by each shareholder for each respective lot.

 

r)     the interest rate on overdue rates for 2018-19 be set at 7.5 per cent which is the maximum rate as determined by the Minister for Local Government; under s.566(3) of the Local Government Act 1993; and

 

s)     Council grant a further $75 rebate in addition to the existing statutory $250 pensioner concession in 2018-19 for eligible pensioners, with the additional rebate applied to the Domestic Waste Management Charge.

 

t)     Council borrow $27 million for the purpose of funding the major works outlined in the Our Community Our Future Program. The General Manager is delegated to go to market to source these funds, and only borrow in the form, and from financial institutions, mandated in the Borrowing Order issued under s624 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

u)     the Responsible Accounting Officer be delegated to make changes as adopted by Council.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Submissions and responses to the Operational Plan and Budget 2018-19 and Fees and Charges 2018-19

 

2.

Randwick City Council Operational Plan and Budget 2018-19

Included under separate cover

3.

Randwick City Council Fees and Charges 2018-19

Included under separate cover

 

 

 


Submissions and responses to the Operational Plan and Budget 2018-19 and Fees and Charges 2018-19

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP22/18

 

Subject:             Bastille Day at La Perouse

Folder No:                   F2018/00436

Author:                   Katie Anderson, Manager, Cultural Events and Venues     

 

Introduction

 

Since 2013 Council has supported a Bastille Day event at La Perouse. The event has incorporated a ceremony and celebration for invited guests.

 

Bastille Day is a significant community event which celebrates our cultural history and the diversity of our community.  This year, Bastille Day (14 July) falls on a Saturday. The Bastille Day celebrations have included speeches and wreath laying at the monument followed by morning tea and champagne toast in the Museum.

 

The Bastille Day event is held in conjunction with the French Consulate and the Friends of La Perouse Museum.

 

Issues

 

Bastille Day falling on a Saturday is a great opportunity for Council to broaden this event and open it up to the wider community. In the past this event has attracted a targeted group however having this event on a weekend will allow more of the local community to attend to celebrate this national day. It is a great opportunity for Council to showcase the Museum and create a special celebration event for the local community to attend. As well as the ceremony at the monument in the morning it is proposed that additional activities will be held. These include:

 

·           Chris Cody (French Australian jazz musician) and his band will perform a musical depiction of the adventures of Laperouse. This will be performed in the courtyard of the Museum

·           Festival activities on the lawn of the Museum – children’s Parisian art session & lawn games (croquet & pétanque)

·           Roving entertainers and musicians on the balcony of the Museum 

·           Morning tea and sparkling wine toast following the ceremony

·           Coffee and sparkling wine available for purchase from the Museum coffee cart (with liquor licence approval)

·           French themed food stalls selling refreshments on the lawn of the Museum

 

The cost for the event is outlined below:

 

Bastille Day Cost Breakdown

Description

Cost

Entertainment, instrument hire, sound and staging for ceremony and musical

 

$                              7,000.00

 

 

Catering
French inspired appetisers (baguettes, brioches & croissant)
Croquembouche tower

Champagne toast

 

 

 

$                              4,000.00

Site:
Power
Hire equipment and furniture
Security

 

 

$                              3,800.00

Promotion:
Graphic design
Resident letter
A3 posters
Banners

 

 

 

$                              2,400.00

Activities:
Children’s art program
Lawn Games

 

 

$                                 800.00

Total event cost

 $                           20,000.00

Budget allocation in 2017/2018 Events budget

 $                              9,000.00

Additional funds required

 $                           11,000.00

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  2.     A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction    2a:   Our cultural diversity is appreciated and respected: deliver and sponsor a range of cultural programs to promote a sense of community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The budget allocation for Bastille Day is $9,000.00. Should Council accept the report recommendation, the financial implication to Council is an additional $11,000.00 to be funded through the September budget review.

 

Conclusion

 

Celebrating Bastille Day is an excellent opportunity to showcase Council’s commitment to our heritage and recognition of the significance of the local French community. It is also a great opportunity to showcase the newly acquired La Perouse Museum and celebrate the French history of the area.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council increase the event budget for Bastille Day by $11,000.00.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP23/18

 

Subject:             Minimum lot size review consultation outcomes

Folder No:                   F2017/00530

Author:                   Elena  Sliogeris, Senior Environmental Planning Officer - Strategic Planning; Ting Xu, Senior Strategic Planner; Emese Wolf, Environmental Planning Officer       

 

Introduction

 

This report provides an overview of the outcomes of Council’s initiated consultation on the minimum subdivision lot size review.  The consultation programme ran for a period of eight weeks from 9 March to 4 May 2018. The objectives of the consultation were to inform the community about Council’s review of the minimum subdivision lot size standards, gather feedback from the community and provide updates as the review progressed. Attachment A provides a report on the consultation strategy including consultation activities undertaken and results to these activities.

 

In summary, there was overwhelming interest from the community on the review including 4,160 visits to the dedicated Your Say webpage and more than 1,000 survey responses and submissions received on the review. Many responses received were in support of a change to the minimum subdivision lot size standard, to allow for the subdivision of existing attached dual occupancies in the R2 Low Density Residential zone. Attachment B lists all the submissions and survey responses received including Council officer’s response.

 

As part of the consultation, the Council also held a community forum on the 28 March 2018 at the Prince Henry Community Centre to hear from the community on this important issue. The forum was facilitated by Professor Sue Holliday and a summary report on the community forum (also prepared by Professor Sue Holliday) is attached as, Attachment C. 

 

The following provides a brief background to the review and a summary of the key points raised from the submissions including Council officer’s response. Note the outcomes of Councils recent exhibition of the planning proposal to amend Randwick LEP 2012 (RLEP) to allow for the subdivision of existing and/or approved attached dual occupancies is being considered in a separate report.

 

Background

 

In February 2018, the Council considered a report at its Ordinary meeting on the findings of a review of the minimum subdivision lot size standard and attached dual occupancy development in the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

The review was instigated in response to concerns raised by some members of the community that the lending restrictions placed by banks on attached dual occupancies under company title is placing financial hardship on the owners of these properties. The Council subsequently resolved at this meeting to:

 

a) endorse a two month community consultation programme on the review of the

minimum lot size standard and;

 

b) a report be prepared outlining the outcomes of the consultation programme

and any key recommendations with respect to changing the minimum lot size

standard and the controls relating to attached dual occupancies in the R2 zone.

 

In response to the resolution, a consultation programme on the review of the minimum lot size standard commenced on the 9 March 2018 to 4 May 2018. 

 

However, since the consultation began, the NSW Government released its Low Rise Medium Density Housing Code (the Code) to take effect from 6 July 2018. The state-wide code will permit new dual occupancy homes built on 450sqm or more to be subdivided, as complying development. However, the Code does not apply to existing and/or approved dual occupancy development prior to 6 July 2018.

 

With the release of the Code, the Council called an extraordinary meeting on 17 April 2018 to consider the implications of the new Code to Council’s review of the minimum lot size standard. Council resolved at this meeting, to amend its Local Environmental Plan (LEP) to allow the subdivision of existing and approved attached dual occupancies. This was on the basis that the Council had received strong community support (to allow for the subdivision of existing attached dual occupancies) since the consultation programme began.

 

The Council submitted a draft planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) for Gateway determination. On 10 May 2018, the Council received Gateway approval to proceed with the exhibition of the planning proposal. The draft planning proposal was placed on exhibition from 22 May 2018 to 19 June 2018. A separate report is considering the outcomes of this statutory exhibition of the planning proposal.

 

The Council has also written to the Minister for Planning requesting a deferment to the commencement of the Code. Verbal advice received from the DPE have indicated that the DPE will soon write to all those councils who have requested a deferment to the Code with a formal response to their request.

 

Given that the planning process is underway to amend Randwick LEP to allow for the subdivision (with development consent) of existing attached dual occupancies, the following notes the submissions received and outlines the council officers’ response in consideration of these submissions.

 

Minimum subdivision lot size survey and submission responses

 

The following table outlines the breakdown of survey responses (991 in total) from the Your say webpage and submissions received directly to the Council (54 in total) according to those in support; those not in support; and those submissions which did not clearly indicate a position or it was unclear.

 

Supportive

499

48%

Not supportive

349

33%

Position unclear

197

19%

Total

1045

100%

 

Supportive of a change

 

Key points and issues raised in support of a change to the minimum subdivision lot size standard include:

·      A reduction of minimum lot size should be made for increased housing supply, improved housing affordability and to meet the changing housing needs for smaller houses.  Some suggested removal of lot size controls in line with other neighbouring councils;

·      Subdivision of existing dual occupancies on small lots should be permitted as:

-   these properties are already approved to be built but unable to be  sold/financed due to restriction in bank lending practices;

-   subdivision of existing development would not have negative impact on traffic, on-street parking and streetscape character; and

-   there have been so many Torrens titled semi-detached houses approved on really small lots.

·      A number of submissions suggested that existing dual occupancies should be allowed to convert to strata title;

·      Some expressed their support for subdivision of existing dual occupancies to help address the financial issues but explicitly objected to reduced minimum lot size mainly due to their concerns about increased density and associated parking and traffic congestion issues.

 

Council officer’s response

The Council has heard from the community its support for a change to the minimum subdivision lot size provisions for existing attached dual occupancies due to the financial hardship caused by lending restrictions. This in addition to the announcement of the Low Rise Medium Density Code by the DPE, has led to the Council to proceed with an amendment to its LEP to allow for the subdivision of existing and/or approved dual occupancies with a valid development consent issued prior to the 6 July 2018.

 

Not supportive of a change

 

Key points and issues raised in relation to those not in support of a change include:

 

·      The main concerns are increased density, related parking and traffic impacts, and issues relating to residential amenity, loss of street character, lack of green space and street trees and growing pressure on local infrastructure and services; 

·      Changes in bank lending criteria should not be the driver for review of planning controls and those property owners affected by the changed bank rules were fully aware of the restrictions on company title when they purchased the properties. Buying company titled dual occupancies is like any investment which runs the risk of being impacted by regulatory changes; and

·      Reduced lot size and increased number of dual occupancies is not the solution for improved housing affordability as those newly-built dual occupancies were not sold at affordable prices and Randwick City is one of the most sought-after areas where property price will always be high. 

 

Council officer’s response

Concerns regarding the potential implications from a reduction of the minimum lot size controls are noted. And as a result, the Council resolved not to proceed with an amendment of its minimum subdivision lot size controls for new attached dual occupancy development after 6 July 2018 until such time that the Council undertakes it local housing strategy. Preparation of the local housing strategy will allow the Council to strategically review its current and future housing capacity to best identify where housing growth can be supported and/or delivered. It will also allow the Council to review the implications of the NSW Government’s Low Rise Medium Density Code against councils existing development standards for attached dual occupancy development.

 

In relation to the points raised regarding that bank lending criteria shouldn’t be the driver for review of planning controls, the proposed amendment is only to be applied retrospectively. This is to address the difficult circumstances encountered by owners of a discrete class of development which would not eventuate in the future due to general awareness of the community about the implications of company title.

 

Other general comments

 

·      Reduced lot size could be considered only if sufficient off-street parking and landscaped area is provided for each development and any additional housing is adequately supported by existing and planned local infrastructure and key services;

·      A few of the submissions expressed their strong support for dual occupancy development as an affordable and low-impact housing form contributing to overall housing supply, housing diversity and improved streetscape, which is much more preferred than high density, high rise apartment buildings;

·      Some suggested that minimum lot size should not be reviewed in isolation and a more coordinated strategic planning process should be undertaken to review all relevant development standards in a holistic manner.

 

Council officer’s response

The Council will be undertaking a local housing strategy as required by the Greater Sydney Commission’s Eastern City District Plan, to ensure there is sufficient housing capacity to meet projected population growth and need to 2036. The Council recognises that dual occupancy development is an important contributor to housing diversity. In preparation of the local housing strategy, Council officers may consider reducing the minimum subdivision lot size controls but only where it is supported by good design controls and where there is existing and/or planned infrastructure to support growth.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in Urban Design and Development.

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

Outcome 6:       A liveable City

Direction 6d:      A strategic land use framework provides for our lifestyle changes and for a continuing, yet low rate of growth across our City

Direction 6e:      Enhance housing diversity, accessibility and adaptability to support our diverse community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council has undertaken a comprehensive consultation on its review of the minimum subdivision lot size standard which also included a community forum to hear from the community on this important issue. The outcomes of this consultation programme have demonstrated that there is in general, support for a change to the minimum subdivision lot size standard to assist those in financial hardship. This support has led to the Council to begin the planning processes to amend its LEP to allow for the subdivision of existing and/or approved attached dual occupancies within the R2 Low Density Residential zone with a development consent issued before the 6 July 2018. It will also importantly allow the Council to begin its work towards a local housing strategy for Randwick City.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council note the outcomes of the consultation on the minimum lot size review.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment A - Consultation Report Min Lot Size Review

 

2.

Attachment B - Submissions table

Included under separate cover

3.

Attachment C - Prof. Sue Holliday Report - Community forum

 

 

 

 


Attachment A - Consultation Report Min Lot Size Review

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Attachment C - Prof. Sue Holliday Report - Community forum

Attachment 3

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP24/18

 

Subject:             Affordable Housing Dwelling at lots 1,2,5 and 6, in Strata Plan SP96689 - Classification of Land under the Local Government Act 1993

Folder No:                   F2004/07991

Author:                   Warren Ambrose, Senior Social Planner      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to seek Council resolution to classify its affordable housing units, being Lots 1, 2, 5 and 6 in Strata Plan (SP) 96689 at 64-66 Minneapolis Avenue, Maroubra, as ‘operational’ under the Local Government Act 1993, for the purposes of Council’s Affordable Rental Housing Program. The Council resolved to classify all of its affordable rental housing dwellings as ‘operational land’.

 

The proposal to classify the subject properties to operational land has been publicly advertised in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993. No submissions were received.  The report recommends that Council classify the affordable housing units at Lots 1, 2, 5 and 6 in Strata Plan (SP) 96689, 64-66 Minneapolis Crescent Street, Maroubra, as ‘operational land’ under the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Background

 

On 10 April 2018, the Council received title deeds for four two bedroom affordable rental housing units located at 64-66 Minneapolis Crescent, Maroubra.  These properties were acquired through a joint venture construction project with Community Housing Limited, a community housing specialist with its own construction division.

 

Issues

 

The Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires that all public land be classified as either ‘operational’ or ‘community’, which includes the affordable housing properties acquired by Council. The Act further provides that should a decision not be taken by Council to classify the acquired land within three months after transfer, the land will automatically default to a ‘community’ land classification.

 

A ‘community’ classification would limit Council’s capacity to cost effectively manage its affordable housing stock under the Affordable Rental Housing Program. Council’s Solicitor has confirmed that an ‘operational’ classification is appropriate for A ‘community’ land classification will affect the ease by which the dwelling may be renewed, and affect the long term financial health of the program.

 

An ‘operational’ classification will not change the status of the properties for use as affordable housing accommodation.  It allows Council to manage assets in a timely manner as well as ensuring the affordable housing stock continues to match the target group’s needs.

 

Methods of classification

The Local Government Act provides for two methods for classifying public land:

 

1)  By the local environmental plan (LEP) and public inquiry process

 

2)  By resolution of the Council (for land acquired after 1 July 1993) – Any acquired land, if not classified via a Council resolution within 3 months from the acquisition date, is taken to have been classified under a LEP as community land.

 

Classifying the property via a Council resolution (Method 2) is considered more time and resource efficient and is the purpose of this report.

 

Public notice

Section 34 of the Act requires Council to give public notice of its proposal to classify land. A period of not less than 28 days must be specified for the receipt of public submissions.

 

Public notice of Council’s proposal to classify the subject property as operational land was included in the Southern Courier. The general public was invited to make submissions during the advertised period from 24 April 2018 to 25 May 2018 (30 days). Information was available for perusal at Council’s Customer Service Centre, libraries.

 

No submissions were received in response to the public notification process.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:   6:    A Liveable City.

Direction:  6a:   Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

Direction   6c:    Housing diversity, accessibility and adaptability to support our diverse community is enhanced.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact associated with the proposed resolution.

 

Conclusion

 

An ‘operational’ land classification for Council’s affordable housing properties is consistent with the objectives set out in Council’s Affordable Rental Housing Program and Procedures (endorsed on 13 June 2006). It is standard practice for all of the Council’s affordable housing units to be classified ‘operational’.

 

The proposal to classify the subject property to operational was publicly notified in accordance with the requirements of the Act, and no submissions were received.

 

The process of achieving the ‘operational’ land classification via a Council resolution needs to be completed promptly to avoid a default to ‘community’ classification.

 

 

 


 

Recommendation

 

That Council resolve to classify the affordable housing units Lot 1, 2, 5 and 6 in Strata Plan (SP) 96689 at 64-66 Minneapolis Crescent Maroubra as ‘operational’ land in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP25/18

 

Subject:             Accelerated LEP review funding grants

Folder No:                   F2011/00542

Author:                   Elena  Sliogeris, Senior Environmental Planning Officer - Strategic Planning      

 

Introduction

 

The Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) has recently written to councils advising that applications for a financial grant of up to $2.5 million are currently open to assist councils in accelerating their Local Environmental Plan (LEP) reviews from three years to two years. A copy of the letter is attached in Attachment A. The letter outlines that five successful councils will receive the grant funding along with additional support from government agencies to advance the LEP review within the two year period.

 

Recent amendments to the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act) which commenced in March 2018, now require councils to review their LEPs, to give effect to the planning priorities and actions in the relevant district plan within three years of the district plan being made final. The Eastern City District Plan which covers Randwick City Local Government Area (LGA) was made final in March of 2018.

 

To provide guidance to Councils on the LEP review process, the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) has recently released a ‘LEP Roadmap guidelines for updated LEPs to give effect to the District Plans in the Greater Sydney Region’, which outlines what is required to undertake a LEP review including key milestones. A copy of the guidelines is attached in Attachment B.

 

In response to the letter of offer of funding grants available, this report recommends that the Council proceed with an application for grant funding under the DPE accelerated LEP review funding program subject to agreed timeframes and outcomes by the Council.

 

Further information on the LEP review process, accelerated LEP review funding application and considerations for Randwick City is provided below.

 

LEP review process

 

The Act was amended in November 2017, commencing in March 2018, to shift the planning framework emphasis from a regulatory focus towards more upfront strategic planning. These amendments are outlined in Part 3 Division 3.1 of the Act. In this division, section 3.8 requires LEPs to ‘give effect to’ the objectives and priorities identified in the relevant District Plan.

 

This involves Councils:

·      Reviewing their strategic planning framework, including a review of the existing LEPs against the relevant District Plan;

·      Undertaking necessary studies and strategies and preparing a local strategic planning statement which will guide the update of LEPs.

Section 3.9 of the Act requires each Council to prepare and make a local strategic planning statement (LSPS) and review the statement at least every seven years. The role of the LSPS is to provide an alignment between district plans and local strategic planning and delivery. The following diagram provides an overview of the key elements in the process to review and update LEPs.

 

As the diagram below illustrates, the process has been divided into six phases to deliver a LEP review within the accelerated two year timeframe. A more detailed timeline for those Councils taking part in the accelerated LEP review is outlined on page 20 of the attached LEP roadmap guideline.

 

Source: Greater Sydney Commission (2018) LEP Roadmap

 

More detailed information on each of the key phases are outlined in the attached guidelines including how to prepare a LSPS.

 

Accelerated LEP review financial grant application

 

The attached letter notes that a resolution of the Council must accompany an application for a financial grant. While the letter advises that applications close the day before Council’s June Ordinary Council meeting, the DPE have advised that an application may be forwarded to the DPE after the Council meeting, should the Council resolve to proceed with an application for funding.

 

Criteria that will be used to assess applications for funding are outlined in the attached letter, however, they are generally centred around housing supply and require the application to address:

·      Long term housing capacity;

·      Bottlenecks that may constrain housing growth eg. infrastructure; and

·    Identified housing need eg. provision of diverse housing to meet local need.

Funds will be subject to contractual arrangements with the DPE and are to be used for studies, resources and other items needed to advance the LEP review within the two year period.

 

Considerations for Randwick City

 

If the Council’s application for grant funding is successful, the Council will seek to agree on suitable timeframes and outcomes with the DPE, for the delivery of the accelerated review of its LEP.

 

This is on the basis that information on the LEP review process has only just been released by the GSC and DPE. As such it is difficult to ascertain at this stage particularly before the LEP review funding application closing date, the full extent of work and studies required to be undertaken by the Council and associated timeframes.

 

Some of the key strategic work that will need to be undertaken as part of the LEP review process include: preparation of a local strategic planning statement; preparation of a local housing strategy and any related reviews of heritage conservation areas or items; preparation of affordable rental housing contributions schemes; an economic review and/or centres strategy for Randwick’s strategic centres (Maroubra Junction – Eastgardens and the Randwick Collaboration Area); an updated recreation needs and open space needs assessment; and infrastructure planning and/or review of Councils’ development contributions scheme. Other strategic work, research or studies may also be identified after a more detailed review of Randwick’s LEP against the district planning priorities and actions is undertaken as part of the project planning phase.

 

Community engagement and consultation will also be an essential component to the LEP review process and a consultation strategy will need to be prepared. The consultation strategy will identify the key consultation activities to be undertaken and methods for engagement which may include a dedicated webpage; focus groups; direct mail outs etc.

 

The GSC and DPE will be hosting a series of technical working groups, over the next couple of months to assist councils to prepare their LEP reviews. The first technical working group meeting has been scheduled for 21 June 2018.

 

Council officers will soon prepare a project plan and brief the Councillors on the approach, milestones and timeframe to deliver a LEP review as more information comes to hand. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in Urban Design and Development.

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

Outcome 6:       A liveable City

Direction 6d:      A strategic land use framework provides for our lifestyle changes and for a continuing, yet low rate of growth across our City

Direction 6e:      Enhance housing diversity, accessibility and adaptability to support our diverse community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The DPE are offering financial grants for up to five councils of up to $2.5 million to accelerate their LEP reviews from three to two years. It is a statutory requirement that all councils are to review their LEPs to implement the objectives and planning priorities of the relevant district plans. While Council officers are only just receiving the information required to understand the LEP review process, an application for funding under the accelerated LEP review program (and should the Council be successful) will help fund the strategic studies and research needed to help inform the preparation of an updated LEP which will guide growth and change over the next 10 years.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council proceed with an application for grant funding under the DPE accelerated LEP review funding program, and commit to accelerating its LEP review within two years, subject to agreed timeframes and outcomes.  

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment A - NSW Planning & Environment -  Acclerated LEP Review Grant

 

2.

Attachment B - GSC LEP Roadmap Guidelines

 

 

 

 


Attachment A - NSW Planning & Environment -  Acclerated LEP Review Grant

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


Attachment B - GSC LEP Roadmap Guidelines

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP26/18

 

Subject:             Smart Cities and Suburbs Program Grant Applications

Folder No:                   F2018/01230

Author:                   Rebecca Jacobs, Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Introduction

 

The Federal Government Smart Cities and Suburbs Program provides an opportunity for Council to pursue innovative projects that will increase Council’s systems capability and improve liveability for residents. The Smart City Working Group has identified three preferred projects for the Smart Cities and Suburbs Program grants and this report is seeking Council’s endorsement to submit grant applications for these projects.

 

Issues

 

The Federal Government has released a second round of matched funding under the Smart Cities and Suburbs Program, with $22 million available to support projects that apply innovative technology-based solutions to urban challenges. Projects must be collaborative, including both a local government and a private sector partner during the life of the project.

 

Smart city projects are to align with at least one of the following priority areas:

 

1.     Smart infrastructure (efficiency, reliability, delivery and maintenance)

2.     Smart precincts (liveability, productivity, sustainability and safety)

3.     Smart services and communities (community-focused services)

4.     Smart planning and design (land use planning and strategic planning and governance)

 

Grant submissions can apply for between $250,000 and $5 million funding, up to 50% of project costs. The applications close on 2 July 2018 and successful applicants will be notified in October 2018. Successful projects are required to be completed within a two year timeframe (July 2020).

 

Council staff have reviewed a range of ideas and three preferred projects have been recommended which fall within the scope of the grant guidelines and align with Council’s City Plan and the priorities identified in community consultation for the draft Smart City Strategy. The projects outlined below expand Council’s access to data for improved decision-making, and help address traffic congestion and parking problems.

 

1.   Integrated Data Platform

 

The Integrated Data Platform will introduce new operational efficiencies and improvements to Council’s monitoring capability, establish new ways of automating Council’s services resulting in productivity gains and cost benefits, improve transparency, and provide an open dataset for use within and external to Council. This project has been identified as a priority in the ICT Digital Strategy endorsed by Council on 13 February 2018.

 

 

Council’s monitoring capability will be improved, allowing real-time data from Council existing assets and operations to be visualised on computer screens and other devices. This may include:

·      The location of current maintenance works

·      The location of customer service requests

·      The quantity of waste and recycling collected from each dwelling.

·      The status of lights and sprinklers at Council sports fields and amenity buildings.

·      The status of Council sports fields, being open or closed.

·      The number, location and type of development applications and approvals.

·      The quantity of energy generated by Council’s solar panels

·      The quantity of energy and water used at each of Council’s sites

·      The quantity of water saved through water recycling systems

 

The platform will allow Council to expand its ‘internet of things’ (network of sensors) to additional functions in the future. This may include:

·      Pedestrian foot traffic in town centres to inform strategic planning.

·      Flooding detection in water pits to alert staff of a blockage.

·      Moisture sensors in the soil of sports fields and parks allowing irrigation as needed.

·      Managing and prioritising tree canopy cover augmentation.

 

Council services and decision-making will be improved through new monitoring capabilities. For example, gross pollutant trap monitoring will enable servicing to transfer to a need-basis, reducing cost and ensuring they remain fully functional in the case of a severe rain event. Foot traffic in our town centres can be counted to assist with town centre planning and upgrade decisions. The platform will standardise the data sets, enabling them to be released as ‘open data’, to meet best practice and increase transparency.

 

2.   Mobility as a service (eastern suburbs trial)

 

Council will work with Waverley Council, Woollahra Council, the University of New South Wales, and Transport for NSW on an Australia-first trial releasing local data to support mobility as a service. Council will gather and release local data relevant to getting around our city to support alternative modes of transport, such as walking, cycling, public transport, and on-demand transport. Supporting a shift away from private car use towards mobility as a service will help address traffic congestion and parking shortages in the busy parts of our city.

 

This project supports the growing trend for mobility as a service, where transport services are purchased as they are required, rather than relying on private car ownership. Transport services include public transport, on-demand buses, share bikes, and share cars (such as go-get). Shifting trips away from private car ownership towards active transport and shared transport infrastructure can relieve traffic congestion and parking pressure. 

 

3.   Smart Parking for beaches and town centres

 

Council will partner with the University of New South Wales to implement smart parking at beaches and town centres to assist in the management of parking in high-demand areas. The smart parking system will involve installing in-road sensors which will communicate information on whether the parking space is full or empty, guiding drivers to available parking spaces, or directing them elsewhere.

 

The system will include an app, which can remind users when they are nearing the allowable time limit, encouraging them to move their car and avoid a fine. The smart parking system can also be used to guide rangers towards cars which have overstayed the allowable parking time, ensuring that high-demand parking spaces are not monopolised by the minority of people who overstay the time limit. This will encourage turnover of timed parking in the city’s highest-demand areas, supporting local businesses and equity of access. This stage of the smart parking program will involve one beach and two town centres and can be expanded to additional beaches and town centres over time.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability

Direction 1b.      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

Direction 1c.      Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

Outcome 3:       An informed and engaged community

Direction 3a.      Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide service

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport

Direction 9d:      Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment

Direction 10a:    Council's programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes

Direction: 10e:   A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, re-use and water quality improvements is adopted

Direction: 10f:   Energy conservation and efficiency programs are implemented.

 

Financial impact statement

 

If a grant application is successful, the Smart City and Suburbs Program will contribute up to 50% of the cost of the project, and Council’s potential costs are detailed below.

 

1.  Integrated Data Platform: The total cost to Council of new software, staff costs, hardware and subject matter experts is $300,000 ($600,000 total project cost).

 

2.  Mobility as a Service eastern suburbs trial: Costs will be shared between all three participating Councils, UNSW and Transport for NSW, resulting in a total cost to Randwick of $120,000 (total project cost over $500,000).

 

3.  Smart parking for beaches and town centres: The total cost to Council of new software, staff costs, sensors, and mapping is $400,000 (total project cost $800,000).

 

These grants will enable acceleration of projects which have been funded under the ICT Digital Strategy endorsed by Council on 13 February 2018.

 

Conclusion

 

The Federal Government Smart Cities and Suburbs Program provides an opportunity for Council to pursue innovative projects that will increase Council’s systems capability and improve liveability for residents. Each project will utilise technology in innovative ways to improve the lives of our residents and place Randwick City Council at the forefront of smart city development within Sydney.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the submission of three grant applications and associated funding commitments for:

 

a)     an integrated data platform;

 

b)     eastern suburbs trial of mobility as a service; and

 

c)     smart parking for beaches and town centres.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP27/18

 

Subject:             Information session - Residential renters and tenancy rights

Folder No:                   F2004/07991

Author:                   Warren Ambrose, Senior Social Planner      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council at its 24 April 2018 Ordinary Council meeting resolved in response to Notice of Motion (MM31/18) from Cr Veitch - Support for Residential Renters in the Randwick LGA:

 

(Veitch/Matson) that Randwick City Council:

 

1.     notes that a growing number of households in the Randwick Local Government area are renting their homes - currently 41.2% of people in Randwick are renters. Many of these are families, as well as an increasing number of older people, and people sharing homes;

 

2.     acknowledges the importance of housing security and stability for those renting their homes in the Randwick Local Government Area;

 

3.     recognises that current tenancy law in NSW does not provide adequate protections for renters against unfair evictions;

 

4.     assists residential renters in the Randwick LGA by supporting the Make Renting Fair NSW campaign; and

 

5.     brings back a report to Council on conducting an information session at the Bowen Library or another suitable location to provide information to residential renters on their tenancy rights, and the support and advocacy services available to them.

 

In relation to Resolution 4, Council has demonstrated its support for the ‘Make Renting Fair NSW’ campaign by including the Council logo on the campaign’s website.

 

This report has been prepared in response to Resolution 5.  It describes a proposal for holding an information session at Coogee East Seniors Centre in the early evening after business hours where members of the community can obtain information about tenancy rights and how to access support, and meet with relevant service providers regarding tenancy issues. 

 

Issues

 

Proposed information session

An information session can be held by Council in partnership with the Eastern Area Tenants Service and the Tenants Union of NSW.  Discussions held with staff from the Tenants Union NSW suggest the following session format.

 


 

Event Purpose

The information session aims to provide practical information for renters, as well as a forum for resident renters to identify and highlight problems commonly faced by people renting their homes in Randwick and what can be done to address these.

 

Information Session agenda

1.  Introduction

Renting in Randwick today (who rents, for how long, key problems faced)

 

2.  ‘How to’ of renting in Randwick

·      Basic overview of key renting law in NSW and resolving disputes (i.e. explanation of process going through NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal)

·      Top tips for renters

·      Accessing available supports, what they do, how to contact them, and resources.

 

3.  Open discussion with questions and answers

 

Delivered by guest speakers from Eastern Area Tenants Service and the Tenants’ Union NSW.

 

Eastern Area Tenants Service offers free advice, information and help to tenants in the Waverley, Woollahra and Randwick council areas who are having problems with their landlords or real estate agents. Eastern Area Tenants Service is funded by NSW Fair Trading.


Proposed time and place to hold the information session

Date:               On an available date available date in 2018

Time:               6:30-7:30pm on one day Monday to Thursday,

Venue:             Coogee East Ward Seniors Citizens Centre. 

 

The centre is recommended because of its central location to the suburbs with high rental properties, close to public transport and has the appropriate meeting room facilities. 

 

Promotion of Information session

The information session would be promoted in Council’s Randwick News, What’s On listing, notices at Customer Service Centre and branch libraries, A5 leaflets, and a quarter page advertisement in the Southern Courier. Local community service organisations would be notified through their interagencies.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  3:     An informed an engaged community

Direction:      3a:      Effective communication method and technology are used to share information and services

 

Financial impact statement

 

The following cost of holding this information session is estimated at $2,300 which can be funded from the Council’s 2018/19 Community Development budget allocation.

 


 

Conclusion

 

A renter’s information session is a practical way for residents to receive information about their rights as a private renter. The session would introduce the relevant support services that residents can contact with their specific tenancy related concerns.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the expenditure of $2,300 to hold an information session for residential renters to be held in the 2018 calendar year.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS22/18

 

Subject:             Tree Removal – Outside 49-51 Milroy Avenue, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2018/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

In May 2017, the owners of 51 Milroy Avenue, Kensington, requested Council to investigate the tree root damage to their property being caused by the roots of a large and significant Council owned Ficus macrocarpa var. ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) located outside the front of their property.

 

Issues

 

Background

There have been issues with the roots of this large tree asset causing damage to both private property and public infrastructure that date back to at least 2001.

 

In 2002, Council’s Coordinator Tree Management Services drafted a report advising that the roots of this tree were causing structural damage to the brick fence between 49 and 51 Milroy Avenue as well as causing cracking that was running across the internal concrete carport slab inside 51 Milroy Avenue. As a result of this damage, Council repaired the damaged fence at a cost of several thousand dollars and roots from the tree were severed at the property boundary as much as was possible.

 

In 2010, the property owners wrote to Council advising of a range of tree root damage within their property and requesting that the following be undertaken:

 

·      Removal of damaged footpath slabs outside the front of their property;

·      Cutting all tree roots travelling under the footpath and entering their property;

·      Repair/rebuild the damaged front brick boundary fence;

·      Repair the concrete under the carport gate that had cracked.

 

They also reiterated that the concrete underneath the carport itself was cracked due to fig tree roots. They advised that they could not close the gates due to tree root damage and that they would have to have them replaced. In response to the request, Council officers investigated the damage by removing the footpath immediately adjacent to the property so that tree root intrusion/damage could be assessed.

 

Excavation and trenching revealed large Ficus ‘Hillii’ tree roots growing across the footpath area and entering the front of the premises. The roots growing into the property at that time were far enough away from the tree to allow them to be severed without affecting the health and stability of the tree. Council then reinstated the concrete footpath. All possible repairs to the footpath and front fence were undertaken and Council’s insurers settled a damages claim with the owners of 51 Milroy Avenue, Kensington, in March 2011. Between December 2008 and May 2017 there have been eleven separate requests logged with Council for this tree to be root pruned because of damage to the footpath or the adjacent property. In addition, between November 2004 and December 2017 there have been eight requests logged for sewer blockages caused by fig tree roots.

 

Since November 2015, there have been four requests from the property owners to severely prune back large branches overhanging their property. The owners of 49 Milroy Avenue, Kensington, have also been experiencing the same type of tree-related problems as the owners of 51 Milroy Avenue, Kensington. They submitted the first of many tree root pruning requests with Council in November 1997 and their initial sewer blockage request was in July 1998. Damage to adjacent public infrastructure and their property was first reported to Council at the end of 2001.

 

In June 2017, the owner of 49 Milroy Avenue emailed Council specifically detailing a range of issues associated with this particular street tree asset. The fig tree roots were causing damage to their property and ongoing blockages to the sewage system. A private plumber had to clear over two metres of tree roots from the sewer pipes. At that time, the front gate to the property would not open due to damage to the entrance pathway caused by tree roots.  This damage extended along the full length of the garden path, creating a dangerous and uneven surface. The property owner advised that his elderly mother-in-law was 78 years old and struggled with mobility and general health issues.  He pointed out that walking on an uneven surface was an added risk she should not be subjected to in her condition.  

 

There are tree roots protruding directly up through the front lawn area of the property and the owner has expressed concern about the damage these roots will cause to the building itself and the foundations it sits on. Roots from the subject tree have caused damage to both the asphalt roadway and adjacent kerb and gutter over a long period of time.

 

Tree Assessment

This tree is listed on Council’s Register of Significant Trees as part of a group of Hill’s Weeping Figs along both sides of Milroy Avenue, Kensington. These trees have local significance in terms of their historic, visual, aesthetic, cultural and social values.

 

This remnant avenue (now largely a single row plantation) is a historically significant example of a single species road plantation (i.e. planted within the wide asphalt roadway rather than on the pedestrian public verge). The remnant row plantation remains more or less contiguous for much of the street, however, only a small section retains the original avenue effect of interlocking canopies over the roadway.

 

The subject tree is estimated to be more than seventy years old and up until this point, every effort has been made to retain it, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity. The tree has been assessed as having important scenic and amenity value and providing habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the ongoing and increasing damage being caused by its roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Using Australian Standard ASDR99307 it has been calculated that the tree has an amenity value of $21,600. Because of the size and amount of root material that has previously been removed from this tree over many years to effectively deal with the damage being caused by its roots, root pruning is no longer a viable option. This is supported by the findings and recommendations of Council’s Tree Gang arborists when large fig tree roots were exposed on 8 September 2017 adjacent to the front fence and entering the property. Regrettably, a number of roots that were severed in February 2010 have regenerated and are once again growing into the adjacent properties and causing significant structural damage. A large basal cavity has been found in the base of the tree that will have to be monitored because this is the result of internal fungal decay that impacts on the stability and long-term viability of any infected tree.

 

When the tree was inspected by tree management staff on 14 March 2018 no nests or hollows were found and there were no signs of birds or fauna inhabiting the tree. The habitation of birdlife and other fauna within Council tree assets is a primary consideration of tree management staff whenever trees are inspected for pruning or removal works. In addition, it is a requirement for all tree trimming contractors to inspect trees for fauna/wildlife habitation prior to any tree works being undertaken on Council trees. This on-site inspection forms part of the site specific risk assessment all tree contractors undertake prior to works being undertaken and if any wildlife is encountered they ensure they contact WIRES to have any such fauna removed and relocated.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost to remove and stump grind this Council street tree and to replace it with two super-advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) is estimated at $10,000.

 

Conclusion

 

There have been ongoing and increasingly serious problems associated with this tree for well over two decades. Up until now, Council has taken whatever steps it could to retain this significant public tree asset. However, the damage caused by these tree roots has increased to the point that there are visible settlement cracks, lateral movement and dislodgement of tiles on the front verandah of the residence at 51 Milroy Avenue, Kensington.

 

Cracks have also been found within the front bedroom walls of the residence. These cracks vary from horizontal to sub-vertical and are typical of cracks caused by the failure of house foundations. This damage may directly correlate with the presence of fig tree roots adjacent to this wall.

 

A structural engineer’s report provided to Council by the property owners highlights that it is evident that the damage caused to the road pavement, driveway crossing, footpath, kerb and gutter, front brick fence, carport pavement, concrete pathways, front verandah, as well as cracks to the front house walls, are a direct result of tree root growth, including root cross sectional area expansion and the extent of intruding tree roots.

 

Council has resolved that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year.

 

The proposed removal of this street tree asset will not contravene the resolution and removal is only being recommended because there are no viable management options available that would deal with the damage being caused by the roots of this tree.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing in the roadway outside 49 and 51 Milroy Avenue, Kensington, be removed and replaced with two advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys).

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 - Photographs

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 - Photographs

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS23/18

 

Subject:             Todman Avenue and Lenthall Street - Strategic Cycleway

Folder No:                   F2018/00158

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

In 2015, Randwick City Council undertook significant community consultation regarding the review of our bicycle routes. The review established a priority listing for the implementation of bike routes through the Randwick Council area. One of the routes which the community ranked as a high priority was the Todman Avenue/ Lenthall Street link, at Kensington.

 

This link connects areas of significant employment with areas of significant residential density.  Accordingly, it is considered that Council should seek to have this link placed upon the State Government’s Priority Cycleways list.

 

Issues

 

The Todman Avenue and Lenthall Street Bicycle Corridor

This bike route corridor was identified by the Randwick community as the third highest priority bike route. 

 

The proposed corridor would link our proposed Doncaster Avenue cycleway through to the City of Sydney’s inter-connected cycleway networks in the Rosebery, Zetland and Waterloo areas.  The City of Sydney’s cycleway networks also link through to Central, the Sydney CBD, Green Square, Sydney University, etc.

 

The Kensington and Kingsford Town Centres are projected to undergo significant dwelling and population growth under the draft Kensington to Kingsford Town Centre Planning Strategy (2016). The existing and projected dwelling numbers are included in the table below.

 

Projected Dwellings Growth in the Kensington and Kingsford Town Centres

Town Centres

Existing

Projected growth

(to 2031)

Total

(at 2031)

KENSINGTON

Dwellings

     591*

1855**

2446

Population

1,272

4081**

5353

*   according to 2011 census

** based on Council Planning Strategy, at 80m₂ dwellings

 

The proposed cycleway will also connect to the high density areas of Zetland, Waterloo and Rosebery of a combined population of approximately 38 700 according to 2011 census data. These areas will continue to grow as more apartment blocks are built.

 

ZETLAND      

Existing

Dwellings

     5,122*

Population

 11,268

WATERLOO

 

Dwellings

     8,056*

Population

 16,112

ROSEBERY

 

Dwellings

     4,415*

Population

 11,338

Total Population

38,718

*  according to 2011 census

 

Providing a separated cycleway will mean this significant catchment will be able to access the UNSW, the Light Rail service, the Royal Randwick Racecourse, the major employment centre of the Randwick medical and hospitals precinct.

 

Sydney Strategic Bicycle Network

The design and construction of bike routes such as this one can be partly or fully funded under the NSW Government’s Active Travel Program. This program is aimed at strengthening cycling infrastructure in Sydney by connecting cycleways within five kilometres of activity centres and public transport interchanges.  Cycle routes that meet this criteria are called Priority Cycleways and are identified in the Sydney’s Cycling Future.

 

Typically a cycleway that is separated from the footpath and the road is the preferable typology as it improves safety and provides well for ‘Enthused and Confident’ bike riders as well as the ‘Interested but Concerned’ bike riders (Portland Classification). 

 

 

Separated cycleways require a higher level of funding given the detail of the work involved and the possible adjustments to drainage, kerbs, paths, street lights etc.

 

Currently the Todman/Lenthall link is not identified as a Priority Cycleway.  Accordingly, it would not be fully funded by the State Government.  There is a chance that it could be funded on a 50/50 basis; if the Council was successful with future applications.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:     A Vibrant and Diverse Community.

Direction 2c:    Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

Outcome 6:     A Liveable City.

Direction 6c:    the safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies.

Outcome 9:     Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9a:    A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreational opportunities.

 


 

Financial impact statement

 

The placing of the Todman/Lenthall bike link onto the State Government’s strategic cycleway list would result in this link being 100% funded by the State Government. 

 

Conclusion

 

The Todman/Lenthall route is of high strategic importance as it links the major population centres of Zetland, Waterloo and Rosebery to Kensington and the light rail stops, UNSW, Randwick Racecourse and will link in with the future separated cycleway on Doncaster Avenue.

 

Given that this link connects areas of significant employment with areas of significant residential density it is considered that Council should seek to have this link placed upon the State Government’s Priority Cycleways list.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council approach the State Government asking that it strongly consider placing the Todman Avenue and Lenthall Street routes on the Sydney Strategic Bicycle Network.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF33/18

 

Subject:             Business Continuity Planning (BCP) update

Folder No:                   F2013/00252

Author:                   Olena  Golubyeva, WHSR&W Officer       

 

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council had initially developed Business Continuity Planning (BCP) documents in 2012 to meet the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet Division of Local Government requirement.  This requirement was to develop a Business Continuity Plan that addresses the key risks to council’s continued activities and provides a guideline to minimise the potential impact of these risks.

 

In 2014 a full revision of Business Continuity Planning and relevant documents was undertaken with the purpose to monitor progress and determine the opportunities for improvement.

 

Following this revision and recommendations for further improvement:

 

BCP Awareness Training was conducted for all Managers and nominated key staff

Departmental Sub-Plans were reviewed

Scenario testing was conducted simulating a real life situation

BCP Awareness Training session for all staff was conducted at All Stops to Randwick.

 

Issues

 

To ensure our Business Continuity Plan capability we have reviewed the main Council BCP documents in 2017-2018 to assess the level of preparedness and ensure the plan’s suitability, adequacy and effectiveness.

 

In partnership with relevant stakeholders we have reviewed the critical business functions outlined in the Business Impact Analysis (BIA), including impact level, maximum allowable outage, recovery time and staffing minimums.

 

As a result of the review of the Information Technology BIA it was evident that the retention of the alternate site at St Leonards should be discontinued as this arrangement is no longer practical. Since the St Leonards site was secured in 2011 as Council’s disaster recovery facility, Council has established Lionel Bowen Library as an alternate capable recovery location with appropriate backup servers. Technology Systems plan to use other existing Council sites and facilities that have capability and the equipment, and could be better prepared in the case of a Business Continuity Event with shorter recovery time and better accessibility for staff.  

 

The BIA is included as an attachment to the Business Continuity Manual.

 

Desktop review of the BCP documents was also undertaken by Statewide Mutual of Jardine Lloyd Thompson (JLT) as part of their overall insurance review.

The main change to the BCP documents is a replacement of the BCP procedure with a ProMapp Process (attached to this report).

 

An extensive revision of the BCP Contact List has been completed, with a scheduled maintenance procedure now in place for regular review of the contact list. 

 

A designated Microsoft Team site for essential BCP contacts has been set up to enable efficient communication between the main stakeholders and a readily available repository of the key BCP documents. 

 

Further work is planned in coming months including:

 

1.  Review of all sub plans.

2.  Development of an action kit that will have all necessary documents available.

3.  Train all key and alternate personnel.

4.  Test new arrangements in a scenario based exercise.

5.  Monitor and review the process.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Direction: Responsible Management.

1b.8:    Provide a safe and healthy environment for staff, contractors and the community.

1c.3:     Proactively manage enterprise risks within Councils integrated risk management system.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no financial impact associated with this recommendation.

 

Conclusion

 

Replacement of the BCP procedure with a ProMapp process will enable better electronic access and efficiencies in the event of a Business Continuity Event.

 

If discontinuance of the St Leonards site is approved, then the alternate arrangement to use Lionel Bowen Library and other Council sites will be confirmed and the other sites prepared accordingly, to ensure the sites are capable of functioning appropriately in the case of a Business Continuity Event (BCE).

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

a)    adopt the updated BCP documents in Attachments 1-3; and

b)    endorse Lionel Bowen Library as Council’s primary disaster recovery facility and discontinue the use of the St Leonards facility.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

BCP Manual and BIA version 4  for approval- May 2018

 

2.

BUSINESS CONTINUITY Tools version 4 for approval May 2018

 

3.

Business Continuity Procedure - Promapp for approval - May 2018

 

  


BCP Manual and BIA version 4  for approval- May 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 

 

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


BUSINESS CONTINUITY Tools version 4 for approval May 2018

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Business Continuity Procedure - Promapp for approval - May 2018

Attachment 3

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF34/18

 

Subject:             Family and Domestic Violence Policy

Folder No:                   F2013/00379

Author:                   Lee Angell, Manager Human Resources      

 

Introduction

 

·      One in three Australian women experience domestic violence.

·      One in four Australian children are exposed to domestic violence.

·      Domestic violence is the leading factor in homelessness for women and children in Australia.

·      Domestic and intimate partner homicides represent the highest proportion of any category of homicides in Australia.

 

Family and Domestic Violence is a complex issue and a community issue, which of course our workplace is a part of. Family and Domestic Violence does not stop at home and the impact of violence may affect our employees, their colleagues and our organisation.

 

Family and Domestic Violence is contrary to Randwick City Council’s organisational culture, values and Code of Conduct and we want to provide support to our workers who are victims and actively prevent family and domestic violence.

 

This report proposes a new Family and Domestic Violence Policy for Council staff, providing support to retain their job and income, providing choice, reduced isolation, and assist them to care for their children and families.

 

This internal staff policy has been submitted to Council for the reason of endorsing the additional special leave included in the policy.

 

Issues

 

Randwick City Council has been a leader in the support of Family and Domestic Violence programs in the community for many years; funding and coordinating domestic violence prevention programs in the community and schools, co-chairing of the local Eastern Suburbs Domestic Violence Network and organising the annual Sydney White Ribbon Walk. This policy is to support victims of Family and Domestic Violence in our own workplace.

 

The baseline consideration for the policy includes The Crimes Act (Personal and domestic violence), the Commonwealth National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022, the Local Government (State) Award and the advocating of various unions on the topic.

 

The highlights of our policy for staff include;

§ 10 days paid special leave

§ Education and support

§ Flexible work options

§ Key contacts

§ Confidentiality

§ Workplace disclosure pathways

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The financial impact of this policy is expected to be minimal considering any staff member experiencing domestic violence is already using sick leave or some other form of leave entitlements.

 

Conclusion

 

This workplace policy on Family and Domestic Violence will:

 

§ Support workers whose work life is affected by Family and Domestic Violence, whilst encouraging their continued participation in the workplace;

§ Create a work environment which promotes respectful relationships.

§ Raise awareness of Family and Domestic Violence and the impacts it has on affected workers, family members of workers, and our workplace.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council adopts the Family and Domestic Violence Policy.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Family and Domestic Violence Policy

 

 

 

 


Family and Domestic Violence Policy

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF35/18

 

Subject:             Contingency Fund - status as at 31 May 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/07396

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions.

 

Issues

 

For the 2017-18 financial year there have been 39 allocations totalling $141,892.56 and for the 2018-19 financial year there have been 2 allocations totalling $8,749.85. All allocations are listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

2017-18

Annual contribution (ongoing)

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$14,500.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Gold Telethon)

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 26 April 2016

Annual contribution (5 years from 2016-17 - Sydney Children’s Foundation Lights for Kids Christmas campaign)

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Annual contribution (5 years from 2017-18 to 2021-22) - Randwick Girls’ High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

2017-18 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 28 Mar 2017

Financial assistance – Randwick Boys & Girls High Schools – 2017 combined production

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Jun 2017

Financial assistance – Souths Cares NAIDOC Festival 2017

$6,700.00

Ord Council – 27 Jun 2017

Financial assistance – Surfing NSW Grommet Surfing Titles

$15,601.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Waiving of fees - NSW Police Force & International Students' Beach Soccer Day

$2,130.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Donations - Rainbow Street Public School - Fundraising Cookbook

$750.00

Ord Council – 25 Jul 2017

Peter Hoffman - Commemoration

$500.00

Ord Council – 22 Aug 2017

Waiving of Fees - International Day of People with a Disability

$440.00

Ord Council – 22 Aug 2017

Waiving of fess - Filipino Cultural and Arts Festival 

$2,237.00

Ord Council – 10 Oct 2017

Waiving of fees - Friends of Malabar Headland

$110.00

Ord Council – 24 Oct 2017

Waiving of Fees - Carols by Candlelight - St Lukes Anglican Church, Clovelly

$4,118.00

Ord Council – 24 Oct 2017

Waiving of fees - Randwick Botany Cycling Club Inc - Retro Day

$823.00

Ord Council – 24 Oct 2017

Waiving of fees - South Maroubra Surf Club

$1,995.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Waiving of fees – Carols by Candlelight – St Nicolas Anglican Church

$2,189.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Financial assistance – Surfing NSW – World Tour Surfing event

$7,500.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Waiving of fees – Greek Epiphany Festival – Jan 2018

$12,350.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Sponsorship – 2018 Sydney Film Festival

$5,000.00

Ord Council – 28 Nov 2017

Financial assistance – Coast Centre for Seniors

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Waiving of fees – Surf Life Saving Sydney

$1,268.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Financial assistance – Digging Deep for Myanmar

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Funding assistance – Vintage Sports Car Club of Australia – book launch Maroubra Speedway

$1,200.00

Ord Council – 12 Dec 2017

Financial assistance – Jarrah House

$1,500.00

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Prince of Wales Hospital Foundation 160 year anniversary

$4,857.56

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Chifley Public School – Request for Assistance

$15,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees - Australian Mitochondrial Disease Foundation – ‘The Bloody Long Walk’

$1,619.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees - Regional Titles Surfing NSW Maroubra Beach

$5,407.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees - Special Olympics Sydney East at the Des Renford Leisure Centre

$1,390.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Donation – 2017 White Ribbon Walk

$2,000.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of fees and donation - Autism Awareness Week

$1,953.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Waiving of Fees – Maroubra Surfers Association and North Maroubra Surf Rider – Monthly Surfing Contests

$3,815.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Donation to ‘Can Too Foundation’ for Marathon Des Sables - Heather Hawkins

$500.00

Ord Council – 27 Mar 2018

Maroubra Volunteer Lifesavers - Request for Financial Assistance

$1,000.00

Ord Council – 24 Apr 2018

Waiving of fees – Maroubra Swimming Club – use of Des Renford Leisure Centre for carnivals

$3,690.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

2018 International Day of Yoga

$3,000.00

 Total - 2017-18 Contingency Fund allocations:                              $141,892.56

2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 27 Feb 2018

Financial assistance - Randwick Boys' and Girls' High Schools Show 2018

$4,000.00

Ord Council – 22 May 2018

Waiving of fees - Charity Car Show and Shine

$4,749.85

 Total - 2018-19 Contingency Fund allocations:                                  $8,749.85

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:         Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:         Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $140,795.00 in the 2017-18 Budget for contingencies. Budget adjustments, if required, are dealt with as part of quarterly budget reviews.

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency funds allocations for 2017-18 and 2018-19, be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF36/18

 

Subject:             Monthly Financial Report as at 31 May 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/00404

Author:                   Oliver Guo, Coordinator Financial Planning and Analysis     

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

 

a)     establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

 

b)     if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 31 May 2018. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 31 May 2018. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 31 May 2018.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:    Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Director Governance and Financial Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory. The Current Ratio as at 31 May 2018 is 2.40 compared to 2.08 as at 30 June 2017. The Current Ratio is a financial indicator specific to local government and represents its ability to meet its debts and obligations as they fall due.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements May 2018

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet May 2018

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement May 2018

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements May 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet May 2018

Attachment 2

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement May 2018

Attachment 3

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF37/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report  - May 2018

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – May 2018” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of May 2018. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 May 2018, Council held investments with a market value of $71.950 million. The portfolio value increased during May by ~$3.220 million. The increase is representative of a positive cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from May 2017 to May 2018. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

 

 

Council’s Portfolio & Compliance

 

Asset Allocation

The portfolio is highly liquid, with 11% of investments available at call. Council has a large allocation to term deposits (45%) and senior floating rate notes (44%). The FRN’s add additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 


 

Term to Maturity

The portfolio remains diversified from a maturity perspective with a spread of maturities out to 5 years. Medium-term (2-5 years) assets account for around 29% of the total investment portfolio.

 

 

All minimum and maximum limits comply with Council’s investment policy:

Compliant

Horizon

Invested
$

Invested
%

Min Limit
%

Max Limit
%

0-90 days

$22,436,555.00

31.18%

10%

100%

91-365 days

$21,013,665.00

29.21%

20%

100%

1-2 years

$7,883,745.00

10.96%

0%

70%

2-5 years

$20,616,801.00

28.65%

0%

50%

5-10 years

$0.00

0.00%

0%

25%

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances. These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit ratings do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

 

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

$9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

$7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

$2,000,000.00

 

 

This exposure has been reduced by $14.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

Compliant

Credit Rating

Invested
$

Invested
%

Max Limits

Available

AA

$44,125,390.08

61.33%

100.00%

$27,825,375.25

A

$22,820,265.25

31.72%

75.00%

$31,142,808.75

BBB

$5,005,110.00

6.96%

0.00%

-$5,005,110.00

Unrated ADI's

$0.00

0.00%

0.00%

0.00

 Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on long term S&P ratings). Overweights reflect downgrades, in the case of BOQ and Bendigo Bank.

 

Compliant

Issuer

Rating

Invested
$

Invested
%

Max Limit

ANZ Bank

AA-

$3,129,862.50

4.35%

30.00%

Commonwealth Bank

AA-

$13,935,930.58

19.37%

30.00%

NAB

AA-

$14,998,948.00

20.85%

30.00%

Westpac

AA-

$12,060,649.00

16.76%

30.00%

Rabobank Australia

A+

$1,019,419.00

1.42%

15.00%

Suncorp

A+

$10,035,289.00

13.95%

15.00%

AMP Bank

A

$7,753,596.25

10.78%

15.00%

ING Bank

A

$2,500,000.00

3.47%

15.00%

Macquarie Bank

A

$1,511,961.00

2.10%

15.00%

BOQ

BBB+

$2,005,110.00

2.79%

0.00%

Bendigo & Adelaide Bank

BBB+

$3,000,000.00

4.17%

0.00%

 

 

Performance

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period May 2015 to May 2018.

 

 

Investment performance is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.51% compared with the benchmark index of 1.90%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Term Deposits

At month end, term deposits accounted for 45% of the total investment portfolio.

One deposit of $1.5 million matured and was withdrawn in May. There were two new term deposits taken up during May totalling $2 million.

As at the end of May, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.62%, up 2 basis points (bp) from the previous month or around 54 basis points (bp) over bank bills.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

The portfolio includes $31.51 million in floating rate notes.

 

During May, Council sold out of the $1 million Bendigo Adelaide (BBB+) FRN maturing 21/2/2020 for a trading margin of 82bp, a capital price of $100.483. Council realised a capital gain of $4,830.00, switching into a higher yielding and higher rated asset via NAB’s (AA-) new FRN issue at 90bp.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 May 2018 decreased by ~$36k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2017-18 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,414,455.00. Investment income to 31 May 2018 amounted to $1,470,893.54.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 May 2018 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for May 2018 be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - May 2018

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - May 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM45/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Crs Hamilton & Stavrinos - Pedestrian Safety Lenthall Street, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/07177

Submitted by:          Councillor Hamilton, North Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

That:

 

a)     Council acknowledge the concerns raised by residents on Lenthall Street, Kensington in relation to pedestrian safety and speeding motorists.

 

b)     Conduct a community consultation and bring back a report as soon as possible, investigating the possibility of installing a pedestrian crossing with traffic calming measures on Lenthall Street between Todman Avenue and Epsom Road to address these concerns.    

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM46/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - A Randwick City Council ban on single-use plastic usage

Folder No:                   F2004/07333

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

That Council:

 

a)     from July 1 this year internally stops using single-use plastics across all Council operations, including plastic bags, single use drink bottles, helium balloons, plastic straws, plates and cutlery;

 

b)     advises all organisers of Council-supported external events, festivals and major activities that as of January 1, 2019, event permissions and booking forms will stipulate a ban on single-use plastics, single-use drink bottles, helium balloons, plastic straws, plates and cutlery, with the exception being for childcare or senior’s events where excessive temperatures or circumstances may require availability of single-use drink bottles;

 

c)     prior to the end of 2018 the General Manager brings back a report:

 

i. providing feedback on how the internal Council ban of July 1 2018 proceeded; and

 

ii. an update on how preparations for the external ban from January 1 2019 are proceeding along with any emerging issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM47/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Crs Seng, D'Souza & Da Rocha - Incentives for "Build to Rent" Developments

Folder No:                   F2016/00379

Submitted by:          Councillor Seng, Central Ward; Councillor D'Souza, South Ward; Councillor Da Rocha, South Ward      

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

1.     notes that a significant number of RCC residents are renters.

2.     also notes the many issues faced by renters such as acute shortage of rental stock, rental affordability, short term tenancy, and overcrowding.

3.     as part of its’ new Housing Strategy;

a.   develop a policy to provide incentives for Build to Rent (BTR) developments such as floor space ratio bonus, less stringent car parking requirements, fast tracking of assessments, and suitable volunteer planning agreements (VPA).

b.   lobby the State government to enact legislation to give effect to the above incentives in NSW, and

c.      lobby the Federal government to introduce tax incentives to promote BTR developments throughout the country.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM48/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch -  Motion to be submitted to the LGNSW 2018 Annual Conference– Call for LGNSW to seek representation on the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) Electromagnetic Energy Reference Group (EMERG)

Folder No:                   F2009/00197

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

That Local Government NSW:

 

1.       Notes that the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established an Electromagnetic Energy Reference Group (EMERG) to enable input from the community and other stakeholders on issues relating to EME and health.

 

2.       Writes to ARPANSA to seek representation on the Electromagnetic Energy Reference Group (EMERG), to advocate for local communities on issues relating EME and human health.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM49/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Motion to be submitted to the LGNSW 2018 Annual Conference– Call for Review of Land Acquisition Act

Folder No:                   F2004/06326

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Local Government NSW calls on the NSW State government to conduct a review, with public hearings, into land acquisition procedures and compensation across the state.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM50/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch – Motion to be submitted to the LGNSW 2018 Annual Conference - Call for direct financial support for specialist front-end services, crisis accommodation and affordable housing for women and children affected by domestic violence

Folder No:                   F2013/00153

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Local Government NSW will write to the NSW Premier, the Hon. Gladys Berejiklian, the NSW Minister for Women, the Hon. Tanya Davies, and the Hon. Pru Goward, NSW Minister for the prevention of domestic violence and sexual assault, calling for the following measures to be taken to support women and children affected by domestic violence:

 

·      A substantial increase in direct funding for specialist services and crisis accommodation providers.

·      Funding for affordable long-term accommodation.

·      A substantial increase in direct funding of legal services.

·      Transparent reporting of all spending on domestic and family violence programs

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM51/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Roberts - Reducing the use of Single Use Plastics in Randwick City Council

Folder No:                   F2004/07333

Submitted by:          Councillor Roberts, East Ward      

 

 

That:

 

a)     Council investigate the implementation of a waste education program for Randwick LGA businesses and community groups to assist in the reduction of the use of Single Use Plastics such as straws, balloons, cups and bags.

 

b)     at Council run events, a program of reducing the use of these Single Use Plastics be implemented, and Council’s Event Waste Policy be amended.

 

b)     Council investigate possible incentive programs to promote the use of reusable cups and other items by customers and employees of local businesses and organisations, in order to reduce the use of Single Use Plastics.

 

d)     a report be returned to Council with recommendations for taking action to reduce the use of Single Use Plastics in Randwick City Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM52/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Roberts - Kerb Ramp Retrofitting

Folder No:                   F2013/00125

Submitted by:          Councillor Roberts, East Ward      

 

 

That:

 

a)     Council note that the program to construct a footpath on at least one side of every street in Randwick is now complete.

 

b)     Council note a significant number of street corners in Randwick do not have kerb ramps, which disadvantages the disabled and those walking young children in strollers and prams.

 

c)     Council resolves to implement a program to fast track and prioritise the retrofitting of kerb ramps on street corners throughout Randwick City Council.

 

d)     Funds would be drawn from the footpath maintenance budget and the new footpaths budget.

 

e)     kerbs that are not adversely affected by services, such as underground Telstra cabling, would be prioritised for retrofitting.

 

f)     Council’s Director City Services is given discretion in terms of the budget allocations.

 

g)     Council have an aspirational goal of all corners in Randwick City Council with a footpath, that is not effected by services, to have a kerb ramp by September 2020.   

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                     26 June 2018

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR2/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by the Mayor (Cr Shurey) and Crs Matson and Neilson - Proposed painted line markings for parking spaces

Folder No:                   F2008/00622

Submitted by:          The Mayor, Cr Lindsay Shurey; Councillor Neilson, North Ward; Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 22 May 2018 reading as follows:

 

“That Council bring back a report with costings on the feasibility of painting line markings on streets/roads within the Randwick LGA where parking issues are of serious concern, in order to maximise the number of parking spaces available.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That Council undertake line marking for parking spaces directly adjacent to a driveway, only after receiving a request from residents identifying parking spaces requiring line marking.”