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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 22 May 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick  on Tuesday, 22 May 2018 at 6:00pm

 

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 24 April 2018

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

General Manager's Reports

GM8/18     Next phase of Rock Fishing Safety Act 2016............................................. 1

GM9/18     Randwick City Council March Quarterly Report 2018................................. 11

 

Director City Planning Reports

CP9/18      Living Infrastructure Program.............................................................. 37

CP10/18    Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 15 March 2018 - 4 May 2018 .............................................................. 51

CP11/18    Seeking Council endorsement for Randwick's Carbon Netural project........... 55

CP12/18    NSW State Design Review Panel Pilot Program........................................ 59

CP13/18    Arts and Cultural Advisory Committee Terms of Reference........................ 63

CP14/18    Update on Our Energy Future, the  energy saving and solar campaign for Randwick residents and seeking approval to continue for an additional 12 months....... 69

Director City Services Reports

CS14/18    Napper Street, South Coogee - Consultation Outcome - location of stairs proposed for construction in the 2017-18 Footpath Capital Works Program................ 73

CS15/18    Waste Management Strategy - Stakeholder and Community Feedback......... 79

Director Governance & Financial Services Reports

GF20/18    Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy - results of public exhibition.......... 155

GF21/18    Quarterly Budget Review - March 2018................................................ 185

GF22/18    Monthly Financial Report as at 30 April 2018.......................................... 205

GF23/18    Local Government NSW - 2018 Annual Conference................................. 215

GF24/18    Investment Report - April 2018........................................................... 217

GF25/18    Business sub-category for rating 2018-19............................................. 227  

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM33/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reduce parking competition around POW and to improve work health and safety for staff (DEFERRED)............................ 231

NM34/18   Notice of Motion from Cr  Matson - Provide foot washing facilities at the new Coogee amenities block on the lower beach promenade (DEFERRED)......... 233

NM35/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Promote ERLGATSIF upcoming 'Living Cultures' awards in May (DEFERRED)............................................................... 235

NM36/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Return & Earn Vending Machines in LGA (DEFERRED).................................................................................... 237

NM37/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Efficient Measures in Reporting Road Maintenance (DEFERRED).................................................................. 239

NM38/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Estabilishment of a Community Affairs Committee (DEFERRED).................................................................... 241

NM39/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Anti Social Behaviour Devices at Yarra Bay/La Perouse (DEFERRED)........................................................................ 243

NM40/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Seeking legal advice on the legal judgement permitting operation of a Dan Murphy's liquor store in Brook Street, Coogee 245

NM41/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Proposed extension of residential parking scheme - southern side of Dolphin Street between Powell and Melody Streets 247

NM42/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - West Ward Landscaping and street improvements................................................................................. 249

NM43/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Propose painted line markings for parking spaces........................................................................................... 251

NM44/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Hamilton - Partial Closure - Judge Lane, Randwick 253  

 

Closed Session (record of voting required)

City Services Report

CS16/18    Tender report - Waste receival and processing/disposal services (T2018-04)

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

Governance & Financial Services Report

GF26/18    SSROC Tender T2017-09 Provision of Mattress Collection and Processing Services

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

  

Notice of Rescission Motion

NR1/18     Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Seng and Stavrinos - Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Boundary Extension and Inclusion of Local Heritage Items............................................................................................ 255  

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM8/18

 

Subject:             Next phase of Rock Fishing Safety Act 2016

Folder No:                   F2016/00539

Author:                   Joshua Hay, Communications Manager      

 

Introduction

 

On 1 December 2016, the NSW State Government introduced the Rock Fishing Safety Act (RFSA) making it compulsory for people to wear lifejackets while rock fishing in declared high risk areas. The Randwick Local Government Area was declared a high risk area and a 12-month trial of the legislation was implemented with a moratorium on fines from 1 December 2016 to 1 December 2017. The moratorium on fines was then extended until 31 May 2018 while an evaluation was undertaken.

 

On 13 April 2018 the Minister for Emergency Services Troy Grant announced the results of the evaluation and the next phase of the legislation. The evaluation was positive and the next phase commences on 1 June 2018 and provides for $100 on-the-spot fines to be issued to people rock fishing in declared high risk areas without a compliant lifejacket.

 

So far the Randwick Local Government Area is the only area affected by the legislation with other local government areas able to opt-in.

 

Issues

 

Since 2005, in NSW over 100 people have died while rock fishing. In Randwick City there have been 18 rock fishing deaths in the past decade or so making the Randwick City coastline the most treacherous in the country for rock fishing.


Council has been working proactively over many years to help educate and improve safety for rock fishers. Council resolved on 17 September 2013 to support the compulsory wearing a lifejackets for rock fishers and has reinforced this position on subsequent occasions.

 

In 2013, Randwick Council initiated an on-the-ground survey of rock fishers to better understand the people who fish the rocks and their behaviour. This survey lead Randwick Council to become the first in the country to pilot a series of ‘shock signs’ – large multilingual red signs featuring skulls and crossbones installed at popular fishing locations with the number of fatalities displayed like a scoreboard. The rationale behind the signs is to reinforce to those fishing the rocks just how many deaths have occurred and attempt to influence the behaviour of rock fishers for the better.

 

During a Coronial Inquest in June 2015 into the deaths of a number of fishermen along the NSW coast, Deputy State Coroner Magistrate Forbes noted Randwick Council’s proactive approach to rock fishing safety and recommended that the shock signs be rolled out in other coastal council areas and that lifejackets be made mandatory.

 

In late 2016, Randwick Council was invited to join the State Government’s Rock Fishing Lifejacket working group to help oversee and advise on the implementation of the new lifejacket legislation.

In 2017, Council secured a NSW Government grant under the NSW Water Safety Fund to help fund and implement a communication strategy to help educate and engage with rock fishers most at risk. This strategy resulted in a series of highly successful workshops hosted by Council in partnership with the NSW Government and Recreational Fishing Alliance in October and November 2017 and run by Sydney’s only professional rock and beach guide - Alex Bellissimo. Participants were given important safety information and training on how to rock fish safely. All participants were also given a free lifejacket.

 

Trial period

A 12 month trial of the new life jacket law was held from 1 December 2016 to 1 December 2017. The site of the trial location was selected by Government following advice from a working group comprising government and non-government representatives and academics, and because Randwick was the local government area with the highest number of rock fishing related fatalities and near-drownings. The pilot allowed all agencies involved in the RFSA to trial a range of community engagement strategies and to develop standard operating procedures and training materials. During the trial there were eight rock fishing related drowning deaths across the state. During the trial there was one fatality in the Randwick LGA.

 

The NSW Government engaged an independent evaluator to considered data collected during the trial including observational research and data collected by enforcement officers; fatality and rescue data; a multilingual face-to-face survey. The public was invited to make a submission on the RFSA via email and a survey via the NSW Government ‘Have Your Say’ website. Over 700 submissions and online survey responses were received.

 

Rock Fishing Safety Act (RFSA)

 

The RFSA requires people rock fishing, or anyone assisting someone rock fishing, in high-risk locations to wear lifejackets. high risk rock fishing location is a naturally occurring rock platform or other rock formation exposed to ocean swell within a declared area. Within the Randwick Local Government Area this definition applies to the vast majority of our 29km coastline, irrespective of height above sea level, including the coastline fronting Botany Bay (see attached map).

 

Under the RFSA, enforcement is the responsibility of council, NSW Police Force, NSW Department of Primary Industries and the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service. The penalty under the RFSA is a $100 on-the-spot fine, allocated to the Recreational Fishing (Saltwater) Trust Fund. Adults must wear a lifejacket that complies with at least Level 50S of Australian Standard AS 4758; children under 12 must wear a jacket that is at least level 100.

 

Implementation

 

Council’s Rangers have proactively enforced the legislation in conjunction with NSW Maritime Police by patrolling known rock fishing locations in Randwick City and issuing warnings. Since the introduction of the Rock Fishing Act within Randwick, Council’s Rangers have conducted approximately 1,500 patrols of known rock fishing locations within the Randwick City Council Local Government Area. Council’s Rangers have observed and spoken with in excess of 620 rock fishers since the new law commenced in December 2016, to advise them of the new laws and to encourage them to wear a compliant lifejacket. Council’s Rangers records show that in the three month period January to March 2017, 79 rock fishermen were observed fishing without a life jacket with only 35 rock fishermen observed wearing a required life jacket. In the three month period January to March 2018, Council’s Rangers records show that 42 rock fishermen were noted as wearing an approved life jacket whilst 40 rock fishermen were observed fishing without a life jacket.

 

Council’s Rangers will continue to patrol the Randwick coastline to help ensure there is compliance with the new life jacket laws. Council’s patrols will also be supported by those undertaken by the NSW Water Police and NSW Fisheries.

 

Opt-in model for other council areas

 

On 13 April 2018 the Minister for Emergency Services Troy Grant announced that other coastal councils could elect to opt-in to the Rock Fishing Safety Act. The Randwick Local Government Area is automatically included in the Act. A grant from the Water Safety Fund of up to $30,000 is available for each council that chooses to implement the RFSA. The Water Safety Fund grant can be used by local councils for signage, training and other rock fishing safety, education and awareness measures. A specialised tool kit that brings together resources, such as educational materials, signage examples and other guidance materials that were developed during the trial will also be available to councils that opt-in. This tool kit is largely based on the successful approach taken by Randwick Council during the trial.

 

The Minister also announced a review of international life jacket standards in response to requests from local fishing associations to consider approving some overseas manufactured lifejackets for use in NSW. This review will seek to identify additional international standards that also meet the same quality and performance standards set under the Australian Standard.

 

The administration of the RFSA will move to the authority of the Minister responsible for Fisheries, the Minister for Primary Industries.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2: A vibrant and diverse community

Direction 2c: Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and government agencies

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The implementation of compulsory lifejackets for rock fishers in Randwick City will improve safety for rock fishers. The trial over the past 12 months has been positively supported and its permanent implementation will help to educate rock fishers, particularly beginner and less experienced fishers about safety.

 

Randwick Council continues to be a leader in the area of rock fishing safety and Council’s education, enforcement and communication approaches during the trial are being used as a model for other councils who chose to opt-in to the legislation.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council commends the NSW Government on its proactive approach to water safety and reaffirms its commitment to support the Rock Fishing Safety Act.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Media release - Troy Grant - OPT-IN MODEL THE WAY FORWARD FOR ROCK FISHING 13 April 2018

 

2.

Rock fishing declared high risk locations - Randwick Local Government Area

 

3.

Fact Sheet - Rock Fishing Safety Act

 

 

 

 


Media release - Troy Grant - OPT-IN MODEL THE WAY FORWARD FOR ROCK FISHING 13 April 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


Rock fishing declared high risk locations - Randwick Local Government Area

Attachment 2

 

 


Fact Sheet - Rock Fishing Safety Act

Attachment 3

 

 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM9/18

 

Subject:             Randwick City Council March Quarterly Report 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/03001

Author:                   Anne Warner, Manager Corporate Performance      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2017-18 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on 27 June 2017. In this report, achievement and status comments are provided for each action in the 2017-18 Operational Plan.

 

Issues

 

This is the March 2018 Quarterly Report and third review of the 2017-18 annual Operational Plan. Projects are proceeding as planned and overall all services were delivered to agreed standards.

 

This report demonstrates our commitment to meeting the actions in the 2017-18 annual Operational Plan.

 

Some of the highlights during the quarter included: Adoption of the Randwick City Plan and Resourcing Strategy; Opening of the Malabar Headland Western Walking Track; holding over 400 individual events at the libraries which were attended by over 9,000 people; and the commencement of a review of the Affordable Housing Policy to enable temporary transitional housing for women and children exiting crisis accommodation.

 

Opening of Malabar Headland Western Walking Track and escarpment view (next page)

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the March Quarterly Review is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2017-18 Annual Operational Plan. In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20-year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the March quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick.

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the March Quarterly Review of the 2017-18 annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Randwick City Council March Quarterly Report 2018

 

 

 

 


Randwick City Council March Quarterly Report 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP9/18

 

Subject:             Living Infrastructure Program

Folder No:                   F2017/00467

Author:                   Asanthika Kappagoda, Senior Strategic Planner     

 

Introduction

 

This report seeks endorsement for the preparation of a Living Infrastructure Strategy setting out the framework for the prioritisation of initiatives to encourage and promote green walls, roofs and facades in our Local Government Area (LGA).  The proposed Strategy is in response to the following Council resolutions made on 28 February 2017 and 28 April 2017 respectively:

 

(Matson/Andrews) that Council brings back a report to Councillors on the City of Sydney’s Green Roofs and Walls Policy assessing adoption of our own version of the Policy along with possible amendments to our Development Control Plan.

 

(Andrews/Matson) that Council's Strategic Planning and Sustainability Departments:

 

a)   Review recent designs and builds of vertical forests residential towers such as the Bosco Verticale in Milan, One Central Park in Sydney, Nanjing Green Towers in China and Agora Gardens in Taipei;

 

b)   Report back to Council on the high level benefits, challenges and obstacles to this style of development; and

 

c)   Outline what steps the Council could take to encourage this style of development in its existing high rise zones.

 

The proposed Strategy is also a key outcome of Council’s ‘Living the Green Symposium’ held in August 2017, which brought together leading industry experts from across Australia to share expertise on how to best support the ‘greening’ of our cities. The Symposium covered a broad range of topics related to the design and delivery of living infrastructure projects. Presenters showcased the latest research findings on ‘breathing wall’ technologies, award winning projects including the vertical forests at One Central Park and the Wayside Chapel’s roof top garden, urban agriculture projects in Australia and overseas, and policy initiatives being implemented in Melbourne and Adelaide including best practice guidelines and co-funding schemes.

 

The proposed Strategy comprises the next stage of Council’s living infrastructure program, distilling key messages from the Symposium with the main objective of raising awareness and encouraging property owners, architects and developers to integrate green walls, roofs and facades into development projects. The proposed Strategy will provide the overarching framework and timeframes for Council to undertake a consolidated package of measures which may include amendments to local planning controls, new technical guidelines, demonstration projects on Council sites/buildings, a co-funding program providing financial incentives for residents and businesses to take up green roofs and walls, as well as community education/awareness educational initiatives.  If endorsed, the draft Strategy is anticipated to be reported to Council in late 2018.

Background

‘Living infrastructure’ is an umbrella term for systems where plants and vegetation are integrated into the design and function of a building, and includes green walls, roofs and facades.

 

A green roof is a vegetated landscape created by the installation of layers of plants and growing medium on top of a building’s water proofing layer. They can range from container beds supporting trees, shrubs and urban farming, to light weight configurations of only a few centimetres in depth covered by succulent and herbaceous vegetation.

 

A green wall incorporates plants and vegetation, growing substrate, irrigation and drainage into the one system. Plants root in a structural support that is attached to the internal or external walls of a building. Water and nutrients are received from within the vertical support instead of from the ground.

Green facades are created by growing plants up and across the face of the building. Plants can either be rooted on the ground or grown from containers installed at different levels on the façade of the building.

 

Notable developments that integrate living infrastructure into the overall design and function of buildings include Patrick Blanc’s vertical forest at One Central Park in Broadway (Figure 1), the Wayside Chapel’s award winning roof top garden in Potts Point (Figure 2) and Bosco Verticale in Milan one of the world’s largest vertical forests (Figure 3). At a local level the green roof at the Prince Henry Centre is an example of how living infrastructure can be integrated into the overall building design (Figure 4).

                  

Figure 1: One Central Park, Broadway

Source: www.architectureanddesign.com.au  

 

Figure 2: Wayside Chapel Rooftop Garden, Potts Point

Source: www.idea-awards.com.au

 

Figure 3: Bosco Verticale, Milan                              Source: www.stefanoboeriarchitetti.net                

Figure 4: Prince Henry Centre, Little Bay

Source: www.lahznimmo.com

 

Benefits of Living Infrastructure

Over the past 12 months Council resolutions have been made to investigate potential planning/policy mechanisms to facilitate the provision of living infrastructure in new development. While Council’s existing planning framework allows for green walls and roofs to be installed in new buildings, the take up of such has been somewhat limited since the controls came into effect in 2013. It is possible that a lack of knowledge and access to information about the different types of systems and their benefits, and the costs associated with installation and maintenance may have a bearing on lower green wall/roof installation rates in the LGA.

 

Living infrastructure is a growing frontier with research demonstrating that integrating green walls, roofs and facades into development can offer substantial environmental, socio-economic and design specific benefits for our cities. Aside from the aesthetic benefits of beautifying our urban environment, living infrastructure can assist with:

 

·      Reducing the urban heat island effect

·      Improving building efficiency and energy savings by reducing heat absorption and reflection

·      Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving air quality

·      Reducing run off and enhancing water quality

·      Enhancing biodiversity by increasing available area and quality of habitat; and

·      Providing opportunities for urban agriculture and food production capacity at the local level.

 

International and Australian Policy Initiatives

On a global level, the take up of living infrastructure is gaining momentum as cities contend with the effects of increasing temperatures and urbanisation of the landscape which in turn has contributed to the ‘urban heat island effect’, loss of vegetation and habitat, flash flooding and negative effects on human health and well-being. Policies on living infrastructure have been subsequently developed by local authorities to manage increasingly variable climate and to add to the liveability of a place. The City of Toronto, for instance, established a green roof policy in 2009 which mandates all buildings with a gross floor area of 2000m2 to allocate a percentage of the rooftop as a green roof.

 

At the national level, while Australia has not used green wall and roof technology to the same extent as North American or European countries, local understanding and use is increasing, with standout projects demonstrating sound sustainability and aesthetic outcomes.  Green walls, roofs and facades are an appealing way of adding vegetation back into our dense urban areas because they can be incorporated into new buildings or retrofitted into existing buildings while utilising very little, if any, space on the ground.

 

Over the last few years the Cities of Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide have embarked on a robust suite of policy initiatives to promote and encourage the installation of living infrastructure in these respective council areas. The City of Sydney, for instance, has developed the ‘Green Walls and Roofs Policy’ and ‘Implementation Plan’ which sets out actions to further progress the integration of green roofs and walls into the urban fabric of the city. Initiatives include Council led demonstration projects, planning controls on living infrastructure, and technical guidelines. Similarly the City of Melbourne and the City of Adelaide reference ‘living infrastructure’ in key sustainability policies and have embarked on a number of initiatives such as technical guidelines and co-funding schemes to raise the profile and encourage the installation of green walls and roofs. Some of these initiatives could be further explored by Randwick City, as discussed further in this report.

 

It is also worth noting that living infrastructure has also been identified in the draft Eastern City District Plan as a mechanism in which to increase the amount of ‘green cover’ in the Eastern City District, therefore reflecting growing awareness about its environmental benefits for our cities.

 

Living the Green Symposium

To kick start a conversation on living infrastructure and to inform background research into this area, Council hosted a Symposium “Living the Green” in August 2017, providing a forum for industry experts from across Australia to engage in dialogue about key issues and challenges of providing green walls, roofs and facades in our cities.

 

The key objectives of the Symposium were to:

 

·      Advance our understanding and awareness of living infrastructure technologies

·      Tap into the expertise and knowledge of leading living infrastructure industry experts

·      Identify the benefits and challenges of integrating green walls/roofs from a planning, design, construction and maintenance perspective

·      Gain exposure to stand-out living infrastructure projects

·      Identify best practice to achieve successful, sustainable green roofs and walls

·      Encourage architects and developers to incorporate green roof/walls in projects within the Randwick City area; and

·      Garner ideas for implementation of a new policy framework.

 

Event Format

The half day event, a first for Council, was held at the Prince Henry Centre and primarily aimed at Councillors, industry, and Council staff. The format comprised a working lunch, a series of presentations, a panel debate and an exhibition of living infrastructure design concepts from the UNSW Landscape Architecture School (see attachment 1 for Event Program).

 

Tone Wheeler from Environa Studio who is an eminent sustainability architect based in Sydney was the MC for the event. Presentations covered a broad range of topics related to the design and delivery of living infrastructure projects. All speakers also participated in a panel discussion facilitated by Linda Cockery, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture (UNSW) and current National President of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects. Debate centred on what Government can do better to support the implementation of living infrastructure initiatives.

 

A summary of speakers and presentations is provided as follows:

 

Topic 1 : One Central Park and Other Junglefy Projects

Speaker: Jock Gammon, Managing Director of Junglefy

The presentation delved into the environmental and health benefits of providing green walls and roofs in our cities, and showcased stand out projects at the forefront of living infrastructure innovation in Australia. 

 

Case studies focused on the speaker’s own experiences in the installation and maintenance of the vertical forests at One Central Park, Broadway and the design and installation of ‘breathing walls’ at the Lend Lease Head Office in Barrangaroo. The Junglefy ‘breathing wall’ is one of the latest innovations in green wall systems, incorporating active ventilation across plants and growing material to remove air pollutants, improve energy efficiency and reduce air conditioning costs (Figure 5). The presentation outlined future aspirations of rolling out breathing walls in public spaces and high traffic areas such as adjacent to busy road corridors.

 

Figure 5: Junglefy’s ‘breathing walls’ at the Lendlease Head Office, Barangaroo

Source: Randwick City Council 2017

 

Topic 2: Functional Green Infrastructure for Sustainable Urban Environmental Quality

Speaker: Dr Fraser Torpy, Senior Lecturer and Director of the Plants and Environmental Quality Research Group University of Technology Sydney

Dr Torpy presented on the latest UTS research findings on ‘breathing wall’ technology, including demonstrated effects on improving indoor air quality, the reduction of air temperature, the mitigation of the urban heat island effect, and improving the habitability of our cities. The presentation outlined that plant based systems (such as the aforementioned ‘breathing wall’) provide a more efficient, economical and healthier alternative than traditional HVAC systems.

 

The next stage of the UTS research project will involve the installation and testing of portable breathing walls in high trafficked areas across Sydney, subject to grant funding. Council has given in-principle support to the UTS breathing wall research project, and there is scope to collaborate by identifying sites within the LGA where portable breathing walls could be installed and tested on a temporary basis. This pilot breathing wall program could form part of a broader community awareness package as discussed further on in this report.

 

Topic 3: Urban Agriculture and Rooftop Projects

Speaker: Indira Naidoo, The Edible Balcony

The presentation looked back at the speaker’s experiences in urban agriculture and roof top gardening in Australia and internationally. Case studies included the Wayside Chapel’s roof top garden in Potts Point including an in-depth look at its role in promoting social interaction, improving health and well-being, and fostering a sense of inclusion amongst the local community. The presentation also explored large scale urban rooftop farming projects in America which are delivering food production in cities such as New York.

 

Topic 4: Living Infrastructure Perspectives from Adelaide

Speaker: Daniel Bennett, Associate Director Design and Strategy, City of Adelaide

The presentation explored a range of initiatives currently being implemented to make Adelaide a greener, liveable and more sustainable city. These included the Adelaide Design Manual of which key objectives are to improve the environmental and aesthetic value of Adelaide’s streetscapes through the provision of living infrastructure on demonstration sites, extensive street tree planting to reduce the urban heat island effect, water sensitive urban design, and opportunities for urban forest and urban agriculture development (Figure 5).

 

The presentation also covered the Adelaide Green City Grant Co-Funding Program which encourages residents and businesses to undertake living infrastructure projects in streets and public spaces by matching funding to a certain limit, subject to meeting criteria. A similar co-funding program could be explored for Randwick City Council as discussed further in this report.

 

 

  Figure 5: Pirrie Street Green Wall

  Adelaide City Council Chambers Demonstration site

  Source: Adelaide Design Manual 2017

 

Topic 5: The Growing Green Guide

Speaker: Julie Francis, Co-Author of the Growing Green Guide, City of Melbourne

The presentation focused on Melbourne’s Growing Green Guide, considered to be one of Australia’s leading guideline documents on the design, installation and maintenance of green walls and roofs.

 

The presentation provided an overview of the key stages in the development of the guide, including demand drivers, collaboration between private and public sectors and technical considerations from a design, planning, installation and maintenance perspective. Policy options for Melbourne City were also examined including engagement, leadership, collaboration, and education initiatives. Many of these initiatives could potentially be carried forward to the Randwick context.

 

Feedback

The Symposium was well attended by a diverse range of industry practitioners including state and local government planners, designers and sustainability practitioners, private sector architects, landscape architects, designers, property developers and tertiary institution representatives.

 

The event was well received with feedback from attendees confirming that it was successful in raising awareness and furthering understanding of the barriers and challenges to the take up of living infrastructure technologies. In particular, positive feedback has been received from the property development/design industry commending Council’s proactive approach in the curation of the event including selection of presentation topics/speakers. Moreover the University of NSW and UTS have indicated a willingness and enthusiasm to collaborate and partner with Council in the development and implementation of living infrastructure initiatives.  

 

It is also worth noting that the Living the Green Symposium was selected for a poster display exhibition at the recently held 10th International Urban Design Conference in the Gold Coast (13-15 November 2017). The conference focused on innovations and projects embracing transformational change in urban environments. Attendees at the conference provided positive feedback about Council’s innovative approach to the promotion of living infrastructure (see attachment 2 for conference poster).

 

 

 

     

Figure 6: Living the Green Symposium

Source: Randwick City Council

 

Key Messages

The Symposium has provided ample food for thought on the type and scope of initiatives that could be further explored for Randwick City. Key messages derived from the presentations and discussions are summarised as follows:

 

·      A multi-faceted approach would maximise the take up of green walls and roofs in a local area including a high degree of stakeholder engagement, funding mechanisms and education programs. Relying on a single approach, such as planning controls, or where industry expertise/involvement is minimal is unlikely to yield beneficial outcomes.

 

·      Councils need to take a leadership role in promoting and advancing living infrastructure in their local areas. Leadership could be demonstrated through policy, guidelines, educational programs and demonstration projects that clearly showcase the environmental, economic and social benefits of living infrastructure to the community.

 

·      Community awareness is integral to achieving a take up of green walls and roofs at a fine grain local level.  Education and engagement programs would help facilitate community understanding, acceptance and sense of ownership of living infrastructure projects (e.g. public roof top gardens).

 

·      Councils need to commit sufficient financial resources towards preparation of guidelines, grant funding, education and promotional programs to achieve measurable and practical benefits.  

 

Proposed Living Infrastructure Initiatives

As noted above it is clear that a multi-pronged approach is required to effect meaningful change with respect to the take up of green walls and roofs in Randwick City. Such an approach has been adopted by the City of Sydney and the City of Melbourne, both leaders in the promotion and delivery of living infrastructure. To this end the following initiatives are proposed for consideration which are largely derived from key learnings from the Symposium:

 

Living Infrastructure Strategy

It is proposed that a Living Infrastructure Strategy be prepared to guide and prioritise a suite of living infrastructure initiatives for Randwick City. The benefit of a Strategy is that it would provide an integrated approach to the delivery and monitoring of living infrastructure initiatives, articulate the framework for collaborative partnerships, help maximise funding opportunities and provide a reference document that Council plans and strategies could align with.

 

Technical Guidelines

A simple, clear set of technical guidelines on the design, installation and maintenance of green walls and roofs is proposed as educational material for building owners. The technical guidelines may cover similar areas as the Melbourne Green Growing Guide including optimum water proofing and installation techniques, different building typologies and scenarios (e.g. houses, mixed use development, retrofitting heritage buildings), plant species selection suitable to different green roof and wall systems as well different climatic conditions.

 

Review of Council’s Planning Controls

There is scope to review and strengthen existing planning controls on living infrastructure. As noted earlier in this report, Council’s DCP contains planning controls which provide broad guidance on green roofs and walls, requiring that proponents use high standard components (e.g. waterproofing membranes, irrigation and drainage systems etc.) as well as submit a maintenance plan.

 

Potential mechanisms that could be further explored as part of this review may be planning incentives to encourage the take up of green walls/roofs in new development and/or requiring key sites over a certain size to incorporate living infrastructure for the benefit of occupants and the wider community. As a point of reference, the Sydney City DCP requires the provision of green walls/roofs on certain key sites in Green Square with criteria guiding location and size. Furthermore the Burwood DCP mandates that 50% of the rooftop of development sites provide a green roof.

 

Similar approaches could be further explored for key sites in Randwick City, such as those strategic sites identified in the Kensington and Kingsford town centres under the draft K2K Strategy, whereby due to their size, scale and prominent location have the potential to demonstrate a higher level of design excellence and sustainability.

 

Co- Funding Scheme

A co- funding scheme for living infrastructure projects could be explored for Randwick City, modelled on the City of Adelaide’s successful Green Grant Program. The City of Adelaide’s $200,000 co-funding scheme encourages residents and businesses to undertake ‘greening projects’ with the Council covering up to half the cost of each project. 

 

Grants start at $500 for residents and $1,000 for businesses, up to a maximum grant of $10,000 in matched funding. Applications are required to address stringent criteria such as being visible from the street or public space, complement the character of the local area, be located in areas where there is little existing greenery, offer a particular benefit to the local community and meet strict technical guidelines (e.g. ensure accessibility, appropriate plantings for public spaces etc). A similar scheme could potentially be investigated for Randwick City and trialled on a short term basis subject to budget and funding requirements.

 

It is interesting to also note that Melbourne City Council has recently embarked on a co-funding program-the Urban Forest Fund which aims to increase the urban forest cover within the City by providing matched funding towards greening projects that provide community benefit including green roofs and walls. The Urban Forest Fund target at $10 million is leveraged through matched funding arrangements to achieve a $20 million outcome. Melbourne City estimates that this level of funding would result in 6 hectares of new green roofs, 4.6 hectares of green facades, 0.9 hectares of green walls and 40,000 new trees, offering substantial environmental and amenity benefits to the City.

 

Community Awareness Program

A targeted community awareness program would help increase the profile for green roofs and walls in our community.

 

The Architecture on Show series of talks was recently harnessed as a first step in promoting community awareness and understanding of green wall/roof technologies. Held in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Architects, the talks are an outreach program aimed at demystifying architecture and design, by facilitating engagement between architects and the community. The Architecture on Show Talk held in October 2017 featured Jock Gammon from Junglefy and Mark Giles from PTW

Architects who explored the vertical forest installation at One Central Park and the architectural issues and innovative design used to achieve this sustainable precinct.

 

Other community awareness initiatives that could be further explored over the next 12 months may include: talks, workshops, and fact sheets on the design, installation and maintenance of green walls, roofs and facades.

 

Demonstration Sites

Council led demonstration projects are an important means of showcasing to the public about what is involved in the construction and maintenance of green roofs, walls and facades and the benefits they provide. The undertaking of demonstration sites is a key action of Melbourne’s Growing Green Guide as well as the City of Sydney’s Green Wall Policy and Implementation Plan.

 

Council could adopt a similar approach by undertaking demonstration projects within the LGA in outdoor spaces as well as Council owned buildings. It is recommended that further investigations be undertaken to identify Council sites capable of accommodating living infrastructure demonstration projects. The site opportunity assessment would be based on criteria such as indicative project costs, public accessibility and maintenance considerations to assist in identifying the suitability and feasibility of the demonstration project.

 

Another demonstration opportunity is the aforementioned UTS Breathing Wall Research project whereby stage 2 is the installation of portable breathing walls in public areas and subsequent testing of air quality. Pending the UTS project receiving grant funding from the NSW Environment Trust, there is scope to install temporary portable breathing walls in key locations in our LGA for testing and to raise community awareness. Potential sites for the UTS breathing wall pilot program could be plazas in the Kensington and Kingsford town centres. 

Dedicated Living Infrastructure Webpage

One of the key issues identified in the Symposium is the difficulty for stakeholders to find appropriate and reliable information on living infrastructure. It is therefore proposed that a dedicated page be incorporated on Council’s website that is regularly updated with useful information on living infrastructure including the aforementioned initiatives with links to best practice documents. Information on workshops, events and programs would be placed within this section of the website.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:    

Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:  

Improved design and sustainability across all development.

Direction 4b:  

New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

Outcome 6:    

A liveable city.

Direction 6d:  

A strategic land use framework provides for our lifestyle changes and        for a continuing, yet low rate of growth across our City.

Outcome 10:  

A healthy environment.

Direction 10a: 

Council's programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural   changes and outcomes.

Direction 10b: 

Policies and programs are developed and implemented in response to environmental risks and their potential impacts.

Direction 10c:  

Bushland, open spaces and biodiversity are protected and enhanced for future generations.

 

Financial impact statement

 

An allocation of $15,000 would be required to cover printing and marketing costs for the Living Infrastructure Strategy and community education material.

 

Conclusion

 

Living infrastructure offers multiple social, environmental and economic benefits, improving our health and well-being, and the liveability and the aesthetic quality of our urban environment. For these reasons, green walls, roofs and facades should be actively encouraged in our City.

 

Council could play an active role through leadership, education and awareness raising and engaging and collaborating with key stakeholders to encourage and promote green walls and roofs in our local area. A multi-pronged approach would be consistent with key messages derived from Randwick City’s ‘Living the Green Symposium’ which highlighted that a high degree of stakeholder engagement, funding mechanisms and education programs are needed to effect genuine change. 

 

To this end it is recommended that Council endorse, as a first step, the preparation of a Living Infrastructure Strategy setting out the priorities and timeframes for the delivery of living infrastructure initiatives in our City. It is also recommended that Council endorse the undertaking of background research into the establishment of a co-funding grants program and the identification of potential living infrastructure demonstration sites in Randwick City. It is anticipated that the Living Infrastructure Strategy be reported back to Council in the second half of 2018.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     endorse the preparation of a Living Infrastructure Strategy which prioritises initiatives and practical actions to encourage the provision of green walls, roofs and facades in Randwick City.

 

b)     endorse background research into the establishment of a living infrastructure co-funding grants program.

 

c)     commence background investigations to identify potential Council owned sites that could showcase living infrastructure demonstration projects including the UTS breathing wall pilot program.

 

d)     partner with the University of NSW and the University of Technology Sydney in the development and promotion of living infrastructure initiatives.

 

e)    approve an allocation of $15,000 to cover printing and marketing costs for the Living Infrastructure Strategy and community education material.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Attachment 1 Symposium Program

 

2.

Attachment 2 Living the Green Poster

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1 Symposium Program

Attachment 1

 

 


 


Attachment 2 Living the Green Poster

Attachment 2

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP10/18

 

Subject:             Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No.1 and Clause 4.6 - 15 March 2018 - 4 May 2018

Folder No:                   F2008/00122

Author:                   Frank Ko, Coordinator Fast Track      

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)     Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6;

 

2)     Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)     Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

4)     Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 15 March 2018 and 4 May 2018.

 

Relationship to the City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SEPP1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 Between 15th March 2018   to 04 May 2018

 

 

 

 


SEPP1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 Between 15th March 2018   to 04 May 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP11/18

 

Subject:             Seeking Council endorsement for Randwick's Carbon Netural project

Folder No:                   F2005/00230

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability      

 

Introduction

 

This report is in response to a number of Council resolutions over the years relating to actions aimed at offsetting our greenhouse gas emissions and/or proposing Council to achieve carbon neutrality as a result of Council’s energy consumption activities. These resolutions include:

 

(Matson/Andrews) Ordinary Council, Oct 2015, a report be presented to a re-established Greening Randwick Committee exploring:

 

1.     establishing a community partnership program to revegetate Council’s street verges and open spaces with indigenous plantings; and

2.     funding this program by Council creating carbon offsets either:

a) as Emissions Reductions Units (ERUs) earned under the Australian

b) As non-Kyoto ‘Verified or Voluntary Emissions Reductions’ (VER) units to be sold by Council on the voluntary carbon market systems.

 

(Matson/Andrews) Ordinary Council, Oct 2015, a Councillor’s briefing session assess options for how Council’s accumulating energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions might be constrained with the ultimate objective of becoming fully carbon neutral as other Councils have done.

 

(Veitch/Neilson) Ordinary Council, March 2018, that:

1.  Council notes that, as a recognised leader in environmental sustainability, it has committed in its 2018 Randwick City Plan to an in-principle objective of achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030

2.  Council notes that through Outcome 10 of the 2018 Randwick City Plan, Council continues to establish strategies and pathways for the implementation of water conservation and stormwater harvesting projects; energy conservation, efficiency and renewable programs; major community education initiatives; and bushland restoration and conservation efforts aimed at increasing tree canopy.

3.  A report be brought to Council detailing the measures and associated costs of meeting the targets listed below, in order to continue our leadership in sustainability and plan the roadmap to achieve our energy, greenhouse and water conservation goals;

(i)    Greenhouse gas emissions from Council’s operations –

net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, including but not limited to the following measures:

Council’s total energy consumption - 100% replacement by renewable sources by 2030

Council’s vehicle fleet – net zero emissions by 2030.

(ii)    Total water consumed by Council’s operations – at least 50% replacement by non-mains / non-potable water sources by 2030.

(iii)   50% increase in total tree canopy coverage by 2030 from current 2018 baseline.

Issues

 

In accordance with the resolutions above and existing environmental programs, staff have been examining greenhouse gas emissions from our operations (i.e. buildings, facilities and activities using energy across Council).

 

Major initiatives have been taken and are underway to reduce Council’s overall energy consumption, given that greenhouse gas emissions from this consumption contributes to Climate Change. Whilst the abatement of energy consumption is an ongoing challenge for large and small organisations, particularly as buildings or facilities are upgraded or added, e.g. Des Renford Leisure Centre, another approach to responding to greenhouse gas emissions is to ‘offset’ them. Carbon offsets have been available for some time and are now supported nationally by the Australian Government through a verifiable and accredited process known as the National Carbon Offset Standard (NCOS).

 

Three capital city Councils have applied the NCOS rules and purchased carbon offsets to achieve a carbon ‘neutral’ status on their greenhouse emissions. A very small number of other local Councils have taken a similar path over recent years, mainly in Victoria to be carbon neutral.

 

Following the development of the National Carbon Offset Standard by the Australian Government, Council staff obtained quotations from accredited auditing companies to enable Randwick Council be one of the first NSW local Councils to achieve carbon neutrality in the current financial year. Many of the 5 steps involved to become carbon neutral can be carried out directly by Council over subsequent years but in this first instance, the cost of achieving carbon neutrality for this financial year is $51,000. Approximately half of this amount goes to purchasing carbon offsets from carbon abatement programs accredited by the Australian government through the NCOS program.  The remaining costs enable a carbon footprint assessment, verification by an accredited auditor, submitting documentation to the accrediting authority and the NCOS licence fee.

 

It is proposed to replicate this process to achieve carbon ‘neutrality’ until 2020 while Council continues programs to reduce energy consumption across its operations. The cost of going carbon neutral in 2019 and 2020 is expected to be less than $40,000 for each of those years. The continuing decrease in price can be attributed to the streamlining of the reporting process and the expected reduction in Council’s greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability

Direction 1(a):   Council has a long term vision based on sustainability

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment

Direction 10(f):  Energy conservation and efficiency programs are implemented.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost for Randwick Council to go carbon neutral in the current financial year is $50,355 (excluding GST) and in the order of $40,000 for year 2 (2019) and year 3 (2020).

 

Conclusion

 

Achieving carbon neutrality demonstrates Randwick’s leadership in sustainability.

The Commonwealth’s NCOS rules provide a transparent and consistent framework for achieving carbon neutrality for all organisations considering making such a commitment. Completion of this project for Randwick will facilitate a greater understanding of our greenhouse gas emissions and how energy consumption and ongoing efficiency measures can impact on this carbon ‘footprint’.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

1.  agrees to purchase carbon offsets for this financial year at a cost of $50,355 (excluding GST); and

 

2.  purchases carbon offsets to the cost of $40,000 (excluding GST) to achieve carbon neutrality in 2019 and 2020.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP12/18

 

Subject:             NSW State Design Review Panel Pilot Program

Folder No:                   F2018/08420

Author:                   David Ongkili, Coordinator Strategic Planning      

 

Introduction

 

In April 2018, the Minister for Planning launched the inaugural pilot NSW State Design Review Panel (NSW SDRP).

 

The purpose of this report is to nominate a panel member for the Randwick LGA to be on the NSW SDRP for matters that relate to the Randwick LGA as required under the Terms of Reference of the NSW SDRA.

 

The role of the pilot NSW SDRP is to provide independent, expert and impartial design advice on the design quality of significant development proposals in New South Wales so as to assist the Government Architect NSW (GANSW) in forming their advice to proponents and to the Minister for Planning, where the Minister is the consent authority. The role of the Panel is advisory only.

 

The NSW SDRP will be delivered by the GANSW and subsidised by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment (DPE).

 

The types of projects that will reviewed by the Panel will primarily include:

 

·      any project referred to GANSW by the Minister or his delegate

 

·      projects on Government owned land that includes public use of that land and/or may impact on the public domain, including Green Corridors

 

·      projects declared state significant development in the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011, including:

 

identified sites (for example the Royal Randwick Racecourse, Bays Precinct, Barangaroo, the Rocks, Moore Park Showgrounds, Darling Harbour)

certain land uses (for example tourism, health or education uses, or commercial / residential premises within a rail corridor)

other types of state significant development where the project is adjacent to or impacts on sensitive areas.

 

·      selected projects declared state significant infrastructure in the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011.

 

Please note that the types of projects listed above are assessed by the DPE and determined by the Minister for Planning with Council only providing comments in the process.

 

The NSW SDRP review dates will occur fortnightly, commencing Wednesday 2nd May 2018.

 

The NSW SDRP panel pool of members comprises a cross-section of built environment and design professionals. Members will be registered with relevant professional bodies. An open tender recruitment process was held and a list of NSW SDRP panel members has been prepared. Up to 25 applicants will be invited to serve as members of the NSW SDRP. Panel member tenure will be for a period of two years. It is anticipated that that the SDRP would evolve into an ongoing program at the end of the pilot.

 

Issues

 

The terms of reference of the NSW SDRP require that one panel member for each project (relevant to a Local Government Area) is nominated by the relevant local Council as an expert from a design field who has detailed working knowledge of the local context.

 

Accordingly, Council has received an invitation from GANSW to nominate a panel member for review of projects in the Randwick LGA. GANSW advise that Council’s nominee is not to be an advocate or representative of Council views within the panel. Rather they are nominated for their strong knowledge of the local area and for their independent expertise. As such, GANSW advise that requirements for each Council nominee are that they be:

 

·      Independent, qualified and (where relevant) Australian registered practitioners, or retired practitioners, in one of the following fields: architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, and/or other relevant discipline with equivalent experience (in accordance with the mandatory criteria for panel members per the open tender process).

 

·      Demonstrate strong working knowledge of the relevant LGA (either through experience on local design review panel or as consultant to Council), particularly in respect of large projects including education or health related projects, industrial and infrastructure projects, heritage, strategic design, master planning, open space and green infrastructure, as well as high density and mixed use development

 

Council’s nominee will be reviewed and approved by GANSW, appointed directly by GANSW for a 24 month period, remunerated on the same basis as the existing SDRP members, and held to the NSW SDRP Terms of Reference, and in particular the principles of good design review. Nominations from Councils are required by May 30 2018. GANSW has provided a list of built environment and design professional who were applicants shortlisted through the open tender process that Council can nominate from. GANSW advises that, in the interim, until such time as Council representatives are ratified, Councils will be contacted individually by GANSW in relation to any projects being reviewed in relevant LGAs to discuss options.

 

Having regard to these requirements and the shortlist provided, it is suggested that Council nominates Mr David Chesterman as Randwick Council’s nominee for NSW State Design Review Panel. Mr Chesterman meets the requirements for nomination in that Mr Chesterman:

 

·      is a qualified architect and town planner who was a founding director of a high profile architectural firm, Jackson Teece Chesterman Willis, which has an extensive portfolio of Australia-wide award winning projects for town centres, shopping centres, institutional buildings, campus buildings, urban design works for infrastructure projects.

 

·      has over 50 years of design experience which is wide and extensive as reflected in his work with Jackson Teece Chesterman Willis.

 

·      has been a long-standing member of the previous Randwick Waverley Design Review Panel ever since the creation of this Panel in 2003 and accordingly, has a deep understanding and significant knowledge of urban design and planning issues in Randwick.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in Urban Design and development.

Direction 4A:      Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter. The Council representative panel member will be fully remunerated by the State Government.

 

Conclusion

 

After due consideration and assessment, it is recommended that Council’s nominee for the NSW State Design Review Panel be Mr David Chesterman as Mr Chesterman readily meets the requirements for membership of the Panel and, in particular, his significant knowledge of, and extensive experience as a former Design Review Panel  member in, the Randwick LGA.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     endorse the nomination of Mr David Chesterman as Randwick Council’s panel member on the NSW State Design Review Panel.

 

b)     submits to the Government Architect NSW Mr David Chesterman as Council’s nominee for Randwick Council’s panel member on the NSW State Design Review Panel.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP13/18

 

Subject:             Arts and Cultural Advisory Committee Terms of Reference

Folder No:                   F2004/08008

Author:                   Avril Jeans, Project Officer      

 

Introduction

At its Ordinary Meeting of 24 June 2008, Council resolved to establish the Arts and Cultural Advisory Panel and adopted a Terms of Reference (TOR) charter to help guide the Panel’s activities and membership selection. This Panel met for 3 years and provided valuable input to the development of the Council’s Cultural Plan and Public Art Strategy. Since then, the Arts and Cultural Advisory Panel has not met due to low attendance rates and a number of other factors.

 

Responding to renewed community interest in reconvening the Arts and Cultural Advisory Panel meetings, the TOR charter was recently reviewed and updated to better reflect the Council’s current priorities in the arts.

 

The purpose of this report is to seek the Council’s endorsement of the newly revised Arts and Cultural Advisory Committee TOR.

 

Issues

 

The review was undertaken and the following changes have been proposed:

 

Name

·         The name of the Arts and Cultural Advisory Panel be changed to the Arts and Cultural Advisory Committee (ACAC). This minor change will bring it into line with Council’s other advisory bodies known as Committees;

Objectives

A new set of objectives were introduced to replace the Roles of the Panel which, on review were determined to be too prescriptive and didn’t accurately reflect Council’s cultural arts priorities and activities. The new objectives are:

 

·         To advise and support Council in matters regarding arts and cultural initiatives and activities

·         Provide informed local community input, and advice on the development of the Council’s cultural arts policies, strategies and actions

·         Identify ideas and opportunities, and make submissions for the Council’s consideration relating to the implementation of its cultural arts and related educational projects

 

Membership

·         The minimum number of local residents, with relevant knowledge and expertise will increase by one to six members (not including Councillors).  There will be eight members in total;

·         The number of Council staff in attendance will increase by one, to two officers;

·         Provision has been made to appoint a sub-committee when deemed necessary by the ACAC which will report to the ACAC

 

Eligibility

·         Applicants must be able to represent a broad range of views that reflect the diversity of the community and constructively participate in an advisory capacity.

 

Tenure of Membership

·         The tenure of membership will be for the duration of a Council term. Members may re-nominate for a further term.

·         The Committee through a group vote may at any time recommend to Council the removal of a member of the Committee but shall observe the principles of natural justice and be respectful of their rights

·         The Committee may call for nominees to fill a vacant position mid-term via an EOI process to be conducted by Council staff.

 

Guiding Principles of Behaviour

 

The following guiding principles have been added in line with Council’s other advisory committees:

 

·         We are inclusive, open minded and respectful of everyone’s perspective

·         We put our personal agendas aside and provide advice for the greater good of Randwick City’s community

·         We are realistic about what we can achieve

·         We have a strong focus on outcomes

·         We represent and commit to the values of the committee

·         We are punctual, well prepared, and timely with responses and we follow through

 

Council’s ICARE Values have been removed from the TOR and Council’s Code of Conduct has been inserted. The ICARE values were written by Council staff and are applicable to Council staff only. The Code of Conduct which replaces the ICARE values is based on the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW – November 2015. It sets out the requirements of conduct for committee members in carrying out their functions. The following principles are covered by the Code of Conduct:

 

·         General conduct obligations

·         Conflict of interests

·         Personal benefit

·         Relationship between council officials information and council resources

·         Maintaining the integrity of this code

 

The code of conduct document will be distributed to new committee members as part of the information package.

 

There are no other changes proposed for any other parts of the ACAC TOR.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  A Vibrant and Diverse Community.

Direction:  Maintain a current understanding of our community needs.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter. The Committee meetings will be provided by existing council officers as part of their operational work plan.  Any additional costs related to activities identified by the Committee will require the approval of the Council.

 

Conclusion

 

The ACAC will provide an opportunity to assemble key stakeholders in arts and cultural development within Randwick City. Representation on the ACAC is to be called for by way of public advertisement and notification to established arts and cultural groups, organisations and practitioners within the Randwick Local Government Area.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)    Endorse the new name and the Terms of Reference;

 

b)    Note that expressions of interest will shortly be advertised and invited from local arts practitioners and institutions for membership of the ACAC; and

 

c)    Note that the first meeting will be convened shortly after its membership is finalised.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Proposed Arts and Cultural Advisory Committee Terms of Reference  (May 2018)

 

 


Proposed Arts and Cultural Advisory Committee Terms of Reference  (May 2018)

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP14/18

 

Subject:             Update on Our Energy Future, the  energy saving and solar campaign for Randwick residents and seeking approval to continue for an additional 12 months

Folder No:                   F2005/00230

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability      

 

Introduction

 

In mid 2017, Randwick Council commenced an energy saving and solar panel campaign for residents known as Our Energy Future. Our Energy Future is an initiative of the Southern Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils (SSROC), which following an exhaustive tender process, established service providers for member Councils able to give residents access to reliable advice and products to save on energy bills and reduce greenhouse gas emissions around their homes and businesses.

 

This report provides an update on the Our Energy Future campaign and seeks to continue the service for a further 12 months.

 

Issues

 

Randwick Council was one of 8 original member Councils signing up to SSROC’s Our Energy Future initiative.

 

Our Energy Future provides services for residents including:

·      a telephone hotline for residents to speak directly to specialists and get advice on reliable solar and energy saving products (in Australia)

·      access to a carefully selected list of contractors able to quote and install relevant solar and energy saving products

·      the Our Energy Future website where residents can access further information on services and advice available, and

·      additional services which member Councils can choose to opt into or out of including information sessions for residents, energy assessments, campaign materials and specific campaigns that focus on solar panels, battery storage and energy saving measures.

 

Randwick Council was one of the first SSROC Councils to conduct a specific campaign for its residents, operating from our Eco Living Fair in September to the end of November. A Mayoral letter was sent to all residents living in single dwellings inviting their participation, three information sessions were conducted on a monthly basis and advertising was conducted inviting all residents to find out about the campaign and to obtain free quotes on solar or energy saving products for their home.

 

The results to date establish the strong interest from our residents in seeking advice, working through the Our Energy Future website and hotline and in installing energy saving and renewable energy measures around their home. Randwick’s results for Our Energy Future make up almost half of all results across the participating SSROC Councils (see Table 1).

 

Table 1:     Randwick residents’ participation in Our Energy Future campaign (as at March 31, 2017)

 

Actions taken by residents from OEF campaign  and promotions

Randwick residents take-up and participation

Total for all 11 participating Councils

 

Quotes for solar

 

717

 

1858

 

Solar sales taken up through OEF

 

119

 

269

 

Insulation and draft proofing quotes

 

20

 

65

 

LED lighting quotes

 

45

 

115

 

Home Energy Assessments quotes

 

22

 

83

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a):  Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes.

Direction 10(f):  Energy conservation and efficiency programs are implemented.

.

Financial impact statement

 

To extend the Our Energy Future campaign for Randwick residents for the 2018 / 2019 year, the cost is $32,750 (excluding GST). This will include 2 separate campaigns covering solar and energy efficiency and 3 information sessions for residents. This funding will come from the Climate Change budget of the environmental levy program.

 

Conclusion

 

As indicated in Table 1, Randwick’s residents make up almost half of the total results for the Our Energy Future initiative.

 

An extension of the Our Energy Future initiative enables Council to continue providing residents the opportunity to find out and make their own decision on implementing energy savings or renewable energy measures and in reducing greenhouse gas emissions contributing to Climate Change.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     notes the strong results and participation by Randwick residents in the Our       Energy Future initiative; and

 

b)     approves $32,750 (excluding GST) to extend Our Energy Future for an     additional 12 months with funding allocated from the Climate Change budget of       the environmental levy program.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS14/18

 

Subject:             Napper Street, South Coogee - Consultation Outcome - location of stairs proposed for construction in the 2017-18 Footpath Capital Works Program

Folder No:                   F2017/01301

Author:                   Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services     

 

Introduction

 

The northern side of Napper Street has a sandstone retaining wall approximately 1.8m high on the edge of the road pavement. The footpath and houses on the northern side of Napper Street are positioned above the retaining wall.

 

Following requests from residents to improve access to the street, the construction of a set of stairs in Napper Street was included in the 2017-18 Footpath Capital Works Program. Council’s Engineering Services team developed a concept to optimise access between the upper level footpath and the street below. The affected residents of Napper Street were presented with the concept and given the opportunity to comment.

 

The submissions received in response to the consultation shows that they are in favour of having a new set of stairs but do not agree on the proposed location of the stairs.

 

Issues

 

Residents of Napper Street made representations to Council for the construction of a set of stairs to improve access to the street from properties 12, 12A, 14 and 16 Napper Street. 

 

A set of design principals were prepared for locating the stairs.  The design were:

 

1.     To improve access for residents.  A key consideration is to minimise the distance that people would need to walk on the road between their vehicle and an access point to the footpath.  The proposed location would complement the existing access points at Denning Street and outside 10 Napper Street;

2.     To minimise impacts on the existing underground sewer line and Telstra services located behind the retaining wall;

3.     To retain existing street trees;

4.     To maximise the retention of on street parking spaces.

 

The concept was sent to the residents of Napper Street.  Residents were also invited to discuss the concept with Council officers in a street meeting before providing any comments on the proposal.

 

 

 

 

Five (5) individual submissions were received. In summary:

 

·           Two (2) submissions objected to the proposed location and requested that the stairs be located approximately 18m west to between 12A and 14 Napper Street.

·           One (1) submission was in favour with Council’s proposal.

·           One (1) submission received by phone stated the stairs were a waste of money.

·           One (1) submission received by phone did not provide comments on the stairs but requested other works.

 

The following table lists the points raised in the submissions and consideration of the points raised.

 

Point of Submission

Consideration of Submission

Stairs are not servicing the customer’s residence and other residences most affected by lack of access. Customer requests that the stairs be placed between 12A & 14 Napper Street.

 

There are 13 on street car spaces between the driveway at 10 Napper Street and Denning Street.  The aim of the stairs is to equally service residents who may park in these car spaces.  Locating the stairs to the suggested location and much closer to the driveway at 10 Napper Street significantly reduces the potential benefit of constructing a set of stairs for access.

 

Small amount of lost parking space is acceptable on this street.

 

The location proposed by Council retains the existing number of on street car spaces.  A loss of one (1) car space would result if the stairs were located 18m to the west.

 

Customer requests that Council make enquiries regarding diverting a section of Sydney Water Sewer line to enable the stairs to be located between 12A and 14 Napper St.

 

Council officers have investigated diverting sewer line. The cost of sewer diversion is estimated at $74,000.

Customer indicated that they plan to build a garage at the proposed location of the stairs.

 

The stairs would need to be demolished to facilitate such a development. However, a DA has not yet been lodged.

Proposed new location outside 12A and 14 Napper Street does not impact street trees.

 

The street trees will be affected due to diversion of Sydney Water sewer line. However, further review reveals the existing tree amenity could be improved by planting better specimens.

 

Misuse of Council funds.

The proposed stairs were included in the 2017/18 Capital Works Program.

 

Customer expresses support for the location of the stairs.

 

Noted.

 


 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9a:      A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreational opportunities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of constructing a set of stairs between the frontage of 16 & 18 Napper Street was estimated at $60,000.  The amount of $60,000 has been funded in the 2017-18 Footpath Capital Works Program.

 

The requested relocation of the stairs to outside 12A and 14 Napper Street will require diversion of the Sydney Water sewer line.  The estimated cost of the sewer diversion is $74,000 bringing the total project estimate to $134,000.

 

There is no allowance within the 2017-18 footpath capital works program to accommodate the additional expenditure.

 

Conclusion

 

The set of stairs will predominantly service the residents of the 5 residences between 12 and 18 Napper Street.  Whilst a set of stairs was requested by these residents, they strongly oppose locating the stairs in the location proposed by Council.  The alternate location requested by the residents does not meet the key safety improvement of reducing pedestrian travel distance from parked cars.  It is also not viable under the 2017/18 capital works program due to the presence of underground services and the significant cost impact.

 

The intention of the owner at 16 Napper Street to construct a garage where the Council propose the location for the stairs reduces the viability of the location.  The inclusion of a vehicular access to this residence further reduces the benefit from the proposed stairs.

 

On this basis, it is recommended that the project not proceed at this stage.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the details of the submissions received from residents in relation to the concept plan for a set of new public stairs on Napper Street be noted. 

 

b)     the project be removed from the 2017-18 Capital Works Program because a suitable, viable location could not be found.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Napper Street Stairs Concept Plan

 

2.

Photograph of street showing stair locations

 

 

 


Napper Street Stairs Concept Plan

Attachment 1

 

 


Photograph of street showing stair locations

Attachment 2

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS15/18

 

Subject:             Waste Management Strategy - Stakeholder and Community Feedback

Folder No:                   F2004/07280

Author:                   Jorde Frangoples, Director City Services     

 

Introduction

 

At the Environment Committee meeting held on 13 February 2018 Council considered Randwick’s Draft Waste Management Strategy, 2017-2030. This draft Strategy details Council’s waste management vision, goals, targets and action plan to achieve the goals, and it was resolved:

 

(Stavrinos/Da Rocha) that:

 

1.   the Draft Waste Management Strategy 2017-2030 shown in attachment A be placed out for public exhibition for six (6) weeks; and

 

2.   the General Manager bring back a report to Council following this public exhibition with stakeholder and community feedback. The report is also to include details of the effect of the Chinese government decision in relation to acceptance of recyclables.

 

The purpose of this report is to present the stakeholder and community feedback received through the public exhibition for six weeks and seek Council’s adoption of Randwick’s Waste Management Strategy, 2017-2030.

 

Issues

 

Consultation activities conducted

The consultation was open for six weeks from Friday, 23 February 2018 to Friday, 6 April 2018. The consultation strategy aimed to inform Randwick residents about the draft Waste Management Strategy and gather feedback from the community on Council’s planned waste management to 2030.

 

The consultation activities undertaken included:

 

·           A dedicated Have Your Say Randwick project page: https://www.yoursayrandwick.com.au/waste2030

 

The site included the draft strategy, online survey and submission, and Q&A forum

 

·           Media release

·           A Facebook post to Council’s 16,800+ strong Facebook page on 1 March 2018;

·           Twitter post to Council’s 2,500+ followers on 1 March 2018;

·           Notification in The Southern Courier 6 March 2018;

·           A story in Council’s weekly Randwick News email sent to 21,000+ subscribers on 28 February 2018;

·           The Spot Festival 11 March 2018; iPads with the survey for residents to complete

·           Notification on customer service centre QFlow screens

·           Notification on the front page of Council’s website and on the Current Consultations page; and

·           Notification to all Resident Precinct Committees

·           Memo to Councillors.

 

Results summary:

·           637 visits to the Your Say website

·           199 surveys completed

·           1 question asked on the Q&A page

·           144 downloads of the Strategy document

 

In addition, Council received three written submissions via email.  

 

Facebook post 1/3/18:

Twitter post 1/3/18:

 

 

 

Randwick News 28/2/18:

 

 

Southern Courier 6/3/18:

 

 

The consultation included a number of specific questions and free text.  The results of the specific questions are detailed in Attachment 1.  The summary of the results are shown below.

 

The free text responses are included in Attachment 2, together with officers’ responses/ remarks.

 

Overall responses to survey questions

Whilst there is very high community support relating to the targets set by the strategy, the free text submissions indicate a wide variety of opinions and suggestions; in particular to the costs associated with the delivery of meeting proposed targets. 

 

Question

Support or strongly support (%)

1. How supportive are you of the targets set by the Draft Waste Management Strategy?

    Reduce waste generation per capita

93.97

    Increase recycling rate to 70%

95.48

    Divert 75% waste from landfill by 2022

94.47

    Treat all waste prior to landfill disposal by 2025

90.45

    Reduce incidents of problem waste (e.g. chemicals, etc.) in household collections

95.48

Reduce illegal dumping and littering

95.98

2.   How important is it to you that Council addresses the issue of waste management as identified in the Draft Waste Management Strategy?

95.48

3.    To achieve Council’s target of diverting 75% of our waste from landfill, we require new technology commonly called Energy from Waste technology. If such technology is introduced in Sydney it could increase Randwick Council’s landfill diversion rate from 56% to 94%. How strongly should Council explore this option?

91.46

The table above shows that the community support for the targets defined in the Draft Waste Management Strategy is very high (90% to 96%). More than 95% of the residents who made a submission feel the issues identified in the Draft Waste Management Strategy are important or very important to them.

 

More than 91% of the respondents strongly or very strongly support that Council should explore Energy from Waste technologies to achieve 94% landfill diversion.

 

Changes to the recycling industry in NSW – Energy from Waste

In relation to Energy from Waste as a future potential option for the recovery of waste, a parliamentary inquiry into Energy from Waste has recently handed its recommendations to the NSW Government.

 

The terms of reference looked broadly at waste management issues in NSW, seeking to understand the impact of waste levies, the role of waste to energy and its impact on the recycling industry, regulatory standards, guidelines and policy statements on this and references to regulations overseas. In addition, it focused on illegal dumping and actions to prevent it, impacts of landfilling and the transport of waste out of the state.

 

The committee supports energy from waste in some circumstances and considered the current application received by Government for an energy from waste facility at Eastern Creek. With regard to this proposal the committee took into account the regulatory and policy framework established in NSW via the Protection of the Environment Operations (PoEO) Act, 1997, the Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery (WARR) Act, 2001 and the NSW EPA’s 2015 Energy from Waste Policy.

 

Utilising specialist, expert and community advice on the Eastern Creek Energy from Waste proposal, the committee has indicated it does not support the development for a number of reasons including:

 

·      insufficient confidence in the performance of such a facility in terms of air quality and potential human health impacts and

·      lack of certainty in the proposed facility to satisfy requirements of the NSW EPA’s Energy from Waste policy, particularly in terms of type of waste providing fuel stock for the operation of the facility.

 

The NSW Government has indicated it will consider all the recommendations presented on waste management and energy from waste presented by the parliamentary inquiry.

 

A key element of the NSW EPA’s Energy from Waste policy which enables local Councils to consider implementation or involvement of this technology is the provision of services that include red-lid rubbish services, yellow-lid recycling services, green organics recovery and food waste recovery. While the commencement of Energy from Waste on a wider scale in NSW remains at a very early stage, Randwick’s Waste Management Strategy is largely compatible with the recommendations of the Parliamentary inquiry.

 

Changes to the recycling industry in NSW – China’s National Sword Policy

At the start of January 2017, China began to stringently enforce restrictions on the importation of recycled materials under its National Sword policy. This policy has impacted the global market for recyclable material, including the recyclable material that is currently collected across Australia and including NSW.

 

Until recently, China was a large importer of recyclable materials, accepting more than 30 million tonnes of recyclables from all over the world every year. Australia alone sent 1.25 million tonnes of recycled material to China in 2016-17 which is now impacted by China’s National Sword policy. A stand-out point with regards to the Chinese Government decision is that one of its main criticisms behind its ban on imports is the extent of contaminated material being sent with the recycling from countries such as Australia.

 

While industry faces immediate pressures to find alternative markets for recycled materials and improved processing to reduce the extent of contamination in recycling, this is seen nationally and across States and Territories as an opportunity to strengthen Australian markets and our own local recycling industry.

 

In March, the NSW Government announced a support package of up to $47 million to help local government and industry respond to these global changes. The support package is being funded by the Waste Less, Recycle More initiative and provides a range of short, medium and long-term initiatives to ensure kerbside recycling continues and to promote industry innovation.

 

The funding will initially:

 

·           enable councils to off-set some extra costs associated with kerbside recycling collections subject to guidelines

·           improve council tendering processes to increase the production and use of recycled products

·           fund community education initiatives to reduce kerbside recycling contamination.

 

The package also includes $4.5 million to support co-investment in infrastructure projects to improve the quality of recycled materials produced by MRFs and reduce the amount of unrecyclable material left at the end of the recycling process, and $5 million to fund grants and programs that identify new uses for recyclable materials and increase the production and use of recycled products.

 

The global changes to the recycling market means that recyclers are currently working to find new places to sell their recyclable materials. To assist industry, and to stop recyclable material from going to landfill, the EPA will consider temporary increases to stockpiling limits on a case-by-case basis.

 

This contract currently continues between Council and its service provider, but may change in the future. Council has allocated funds in the draft budget to dispose of the recyclables at a cost, if required, as has occurred in some regional areas and other States. At this point in time, Council’s current recycler is largely stockpiling the material at its facilities in accordance with its EPA licence. Council officers are continuing discussions with our recycler to stay up-to-date on any future impacts on our contract.

 

More recently, Commonwealth, State and Territory environment ministers have met and agreed to cut Australia’s supply of waste and to increase Australia’s recycling capability and demand for recyclable products in response to China’s new restrictions on recyclable waste.

Ministers agreed to the ambitious target that 100 per cent of packaging be recyclable, compostable or reusable by 2025 or earlier to cut down on the amount of waste produced in Australia. The 100 per cent target will be delivered by the Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation, working with its 950 member companies.

Nationally, Governments aim to examine opportunities to further develop Australia’s recycling industry to process the four per cent of recyclable waste that would have previously gone to China. This included to advocate, where appropriate, to increase the amount of recyclable materials in goods purchased by governments, such as paper, road base and construction materials.

Food waste collection and processing

An opt-in food waste collection and processing has been underway for multi-unit dwellings in Randwick on a trial basis since around 2012. While this trial was established through external funding provided to Council, its main purpose was to establish and then refine ‘best practice’ methodology for food waste to be collected from the diverse dwelling type of multi-units across the City.

 

Current volumes of this type of waste are typically around 6 tonnes per month from a current group of 4,000 multi-unit households spread across Randwick. In keeping with the keen interest of residents in this form of resource recovery, including submissions received to our draft Waste Management Strategy, it is proposed to adjust Council’s approach to food waste collection and processing.

 

Food waste service investigation and provision has been brought forward from the 5 to 10 year timeframe of Randwick’s draft Waste Management Strategy and is proposed to form one of the key actions over years 1 to 5 of our Waste Management Strategy. As a result, the trial of food waste collection from multi-unit households would end and an opt-in food waste collection scheme would be adopted and phased in for those interested multi-unit households.

 

Delivery of this service would keep Randwick Council at the forefront of local government innovation in waste recovery services and enable Randwick Council to remain eligible for entering into an agreement with an Energy from Waste provider if such a service was approved by the NSW Government and satisfying requirements of the NSW EPA’s Energy from Waste policy. Accordingly, if and when this new technology was available for local Councils, our waste diversion target is capable of moving from a likely rate of approximately 60 per cent diverted from landfill to more than 90 per cent.

 

An important feature in gaining acceptance of food waste opt-in options for households, understanding energy from waste benefits and its related technologies, and increasing Randwick residents’ contribution to minimising contamination of recyclable materials is education and raising awareness amongst our changing and diverse population throughout the timeframe of our Waste Management Strategy.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10e:    Waste is managed sustainably to ensure highest level of resource recovery.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Any savings or additional costs in implementing the Action Plan following the first five years will be reflected in the reasonable cost calculation for Randwick’s annual Domestic Waste Management Charge as required under section 504(3) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Any costs or savings associated with the introduction of any initiatives associated with the strategy will be incorporated into future budgets for consultation.

 

Given the recent impact on the market for recyclables, sales of recyclable commodities cannot adequately offset the cost of performing recycling processing, particularly in the short term.  Depending on legal advice, it is likely that Council and our recycling contractor will need to consider renegotiation of a charge that it is different to its current pricing.  This has been accommodated in the draft budget for the forthcoming financial year.

 

Conclusion

 

The draft Waste Management Strategy was on public exhibition for six weeks. Between 90 per cent and 96 per cent of the respondents either support or strongly support the waste management targets set out in the Draft Waste Management Strategy 2017-2030.

 

More than 91 per cent of respondents strongly or very strongly support Council’s investigation of Energy from Waste technologies for processing of residual waste following high level of recycling which could potentially lead to more than 94 per cent landfill diversion.

 

Considering the community feedback received during the public consultation, the Draft Waste Management Strategy has been finalised for Council consideration and approval.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council adopt Randwick’s Waste Management Strategy, 2017-2030.

 

References

1.     NSW EPA – NSW Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery 2014-21

2.     City of Sydney – Waste Strategy and Action Plan 2017-2030

3.     Waverley Council – Sustainable Waste Strategy 2015-2020

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Public Consultation Results - Waste Management Strategy 2017-2030

 

2.

Public Consultation Submissions

 

3.

Waste Management Strategy 2017-2030

 

 

 

 


Public Consultation Results - Waste Management Strategy 2017-2030

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


Public Consultation Submissions

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waste Management Strategy 2017-2030

Attachment 3

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF20/18

 

Subject:             Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy - results of public exhibition

Folder No:                   F2004/06576

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

Section 252 of the Local Government Act requires Council to adopt a policy for the payment of expenses incurred by and the provision of facilities to, the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and other Councillors.  The Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors can only be reimbursed for expenses and provided with facilities, in discharging the functions of civic office, in accordance with this policy.

 

Council must adopt a Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy within 12 months of the commencement of the new Council term (ie. by September 2018). 

 

A report in relation to the amendment of this policy, to bring it in line with the Office of Local Government (OLG) “Councillor Expenses and Facilities Template” was considered at the 27 March 2018 Council Meeting, wherein it was resolved:

 

‘(Parker/Seng) that the draft Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy be endorsed for public exhibition.’

 

Issues

 

The key points of the OLG template (as articulated by the OLG) are as follows:

 

·   The Policy template has been designed to be amended to suit local needs and circumstances. It is recognised that the provisions in the Policy template will not all be appropriate for every council.

·    Councils using the Policy template will need to include maximum expenditure limits for specific expenses and facilities. Councils should tailor these limits to their own context and community expectations. Councils may wish to benchmark against similar councils to determine these limits.

·    Under section 252 of the Act, Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policies must be adopted within 12 months of the commencement of the new council term.

·    Once exhibited and adopted, the policy must be made publicly available on the council website.”

 

The Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy was on public exhibition from Monday 16 April 2018 to Monday 14 May 2018. During the public exhibition period, the policy was available to be viewed on the ‘Your Say’ page of Council’s website.  The availability of the document was advertised in Randwick News (in the Southern Courier Newspaper) and in Council’s eNews. Hard copies of the policy were also available at Council’s Customer Service Centre.

 

There were six (6) submissions received during the public exhibition period, as follows:

 

 

Submission

Comment

“1. Why do councillors for a LOCAL council need to travel interstate or overseas? $25,000 per year could be put to a lot better use (like lower council rates).

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  How can you justify $20,000 for personal development per term for EACH councillor. My employer would never contemplate spending that much money on anyone in my division. How can you link this back to either

(1) improvement in culture amongst council staff or

(2) benefits for all residents?

 

 

 

 

 

3.    $50,000 for all councillors for attendance at conferences and seminars - how is this distinguishable from the above $20,000 personal development? Again this does not include flights (allowed for elsewhere) - what 5 star conferences are our councillors attending and how are residents benefiting? I also think that if the GM has discretion over this budget then that needs to be made public on the council's website.

4.    $4,000 for a laptop and $1,500 for a tablet - this is also pretty expensive. My employer would not spend that on me (I do not have a tablet) and these days if you have a Microsoft Surface, you do not need both.

5.    $2,500 for a mobile phone - this limit is way too high. The iPhone 10 costs $1,000 less than this

 

6.    Subscription to resource material - that should come out of their annual salary (like it does for everyone else)

 

I do think that asking for feedback on the expense policy is to be commended. I also think that the reality is this is a local council and the use off (sic) the above limits should be made public (so if a councillor attends a conference - this should be made public along with the justification). This is public money after all. I think it is extremely hard to justify interstate and overseas travel - especially if (sic) the world today where we have facilities like skype that should not make this necessary. This is a local council (not an inter-state or international council). Again all this should be disclosed publicly on the website.”

1.   Clause 6.5 of the policy states In accordance with Section 4, Council will scrutinise the value and need for Councillors to undertake overseas travel. Councils should avoid interstate, overseas and long distance intrastate trips unless direct and tangible benefits can be established for the Council and the local community. This includes travel to sister and friendship cities.’

2.   This amount is set aside for ‘Professional’ development (ie. training). The limit is considered appropriate, particularly given the Office of Local Government’s ‘Councillor Induction and Professional Development Guidelines’ (December 2017) require NSW Councils to have induction and professional development programs in place for Mayors and Councillors to continue to develop their skills and knowledge throughout their terms in office.

3.   This amount is for conferences (not professional development). The amount does include travel to and from Conferences (including flights). The total spent on Councillors conferences is reported in Council’s Annual Report.

 

 

 

 

4.   This is a per term cost and the equipment is purchased by, and remains the property of, Council and is returnable on a Councillor ceasing to hold office.

 

5.   This is a per term cost and the equipment is purchased by, and remains the property of, Council and is returnable on a Councillor ceasing to hold office.

6.   Clause 6.44 of the policy provides for ‘Subscription to resource material (including software apps and online subscriptions) which will assist in the performance of the role of a Councillor, subject to a limit of $1,200 per Councillor per annum.

 

The policy, once adopted, will be available on our website. Some expenses (such as conferences, training etc) are required to be reported on in our Annual Report.

 

“Add Personal presentation needs, from hot water for the extra shower thru to extra haircut, say $1500 pa. Travel/car/taxi allowance for attendance at Council based events. Say $1500 pa.”

No comment.

Please minimise expenses as much as possible. Each year, our expenses go up including council rates, land tax and electricity. Any increase in expenses is borne by rate payers and they are struggling to pay their bills already. Less council expenditure is ideal.”

The policy only enables ‘reasonable and appropriate reimbursement of expenses incurred by Councillors while undertaking their civic duties.’

 

In Section 6.9 of the policy an additional item should be included in the case for consideration by the council. This item would be a communication plan that the councillor would use to share outcomes of the trip. (eg. The communication plan may include Briefing sessions/papers on findings/outcomes from the trip). This would also be a key evaluation factor when assessing cases for approval by the council.”

This has been added to the policy under clause 6.15.

“Personal Development, $20,000 per Councillor per TERM??? Ι think it's a rort!”

This amount is set aside for ‘Professional’ development (ie. training). The limit is considered appropriate, particularly given the Office of Local Government’s ‘Councillor Induction and Professional Development Guidelines’ (December 2017) require NSW Councils to have induction and professional development programs in place for Mayors and Councillors to continue to develop their skills and knowledge throughout their terms in office.

I am amazed at Councillors Expenses - why are they paid $25,000 travel per year (we certainly couldn't afford that). Computer and phone costs also seem excessive. Surely if Council is purchasing this equipment you can get a better deal, as we have to continually do to afford these services, as we have to for our Energy suppliers to afford our power. These levies that Council is suggesting just seem to compound and do not end. You cannot continually bleed the ratepayers dry!

No comment.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.  Any expenses and facilities provided to the Mayor and Councillors as part of this policy are allowed for in Council budgets.

 

Conclusion

It is recommended that the Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy be amended as detailed in the table (above) in response to the public submissions received and adopted for immediate implementation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     it be noted that six (6) submissions were received as a result of the April-May 2018 public exhibition of the Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy.

 

b)     the amended Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy be adopted for immediate implementation.

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Draft Councillors Expenses & Facilities Policy - to bring in-line with OLG template policy - May 2018

 

 

 

 


Draft Councillors Expenses & Facilities Policy - to bring in-line with OLG template policy - May 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF21/18

 

 

Subject:                  Quarterly Budget Review - March 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/00402

Author:                   Caroline Foley, Manager Business Performance Projects      

 

Introduction

 

As part of the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework for NSW Local Governments, the Office of Local Government has a set of minimum reporting requirements for Councils, in order for them to facilitate progress reporting against the original and revised annual budgets at the end of each quarter.

 

Collectively, these documents are known as the Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) and are reported to Council in accordance with the relevant legislation at the end of each quarter.

 

Section 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that, at the end of each quarter, a Budget Review Statement be prepared and submitted to Council that indicates the latest estimates of income and expenditure for the 2017-18 year.

 

The regulation (Section 203 (2)) also requires that the budget review statement must include, or be accompanied by:

 

I.      A report as to whether or not the Responsible Accounting Officer believes that the Statement indicates that the financial position of the Council is satisfactory, having regard to the original estimate of income and expenditure; and

II.     If that position is unsatisfactory, recommendations for remedial action.

 

Issues

 

This report is a review of the Council’s 2017-18 current budget and recommends adoption of a revised budget for the 2017-18 financial year.

 

It proposes variations to Council’s adopted budget, which will result in a projected budget surplus at year end of $20,073.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial & operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The proposed variations in this report and listed in the attachment will result in a projected budget surplus at year end of $20,073.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Director Governance and Financial Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the report in relation to the March 2018 Budget Review be received and noted; and

 

b)     the proposed March 2018 budget variations shown in the attachment to this report be adopted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Quarterly Budget Review Statements(QBRS) - March 2018

 

 

 

 


Quarterly Budget Review Statements(QBRS) - March 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF22/18

 

Subject:             Monthly Financial Report as at 30 April 2018

Folder No:                   F2017/00404

Author:                   Oliver Guo, Coordinator Financial Planning and Analysis     

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

 

a)     establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

 

b)     if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 30 April 2018. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 30 April 2018. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 30 April 2018.

 

This report is at 30 April 2018 and does not include the proposed March Quarter Budget Variations. Approved variations will be included in the May 2018 Report.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:    Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Director Governance and Financial Services, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory. The Current Ratio as at 30 April 2018 is 3.13 compared to 2.08 as at 30 June 2017. The Current Ratio is a financial indicator specific to local government and represents its ability to meet its debts and obligations as they fall due.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements April 2018

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet April 2018

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement April 2018

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements April 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet April 2018

Attachment 2

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement April 2018

Attachment 3

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF23/18

 

Subject:             Local Government NSW - 2018 Annual Conference

Folder No:                   F2004/06645

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The Annual Conference of Local Government NSW (LGNSW) will be held in Albury from Sunday 21 October to Tuesday 23 October 2018.

 

Issues

 

This conference is the annual policy-making event for the NSW Local Government sector. For over a century, Councils have worked together through this peak body to promote local government and advocate on behalf of our communities for local democracy, informed decision-making and good governance.

 

Conference voting

Under the LGNSW formulae Randwick is able to nominate seven (7) voting delegates for voting on motions. Council is able to nominate an unlimited number of non-voting observers.

 

The deadline to provide LGNSW with the names of nominated voting delegates is 5pm on Tuesday 2 October 2018.

 

Conference motions

LGNSW has indicated that motions should be strategic, affect members state-wide and introduce new or emerging policy issues and actions. The deadline for submission of motions is 26 August 2018.

 

October Council Meeting

The October Council meeting has been scheduled to be held on Tuesday 16 October 2018 (the 3rd Tuesday of October) to allow all interested Councillors to attend this Conference.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1b:      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The costs associated with Councillors’ attendance at the 2018 Conference of LGNSW have been allowed for in the draft 2018-19 Budget.

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

Delegates and observers need to be nominated if Council is to be represented at the 2018 Conference of Local Government NSW.

 

The Councillors’ Expenses and Facilities Policy permits all Councillors to attend this conference.

 

Recommendation

 

That Councillors interested in attending the 2018 Conference of Local Government NSW advise the General Manager as soon as possible.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF24/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report - April 2018

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant      

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – April 2018” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of April 2018. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 30 April 2018, Council held investments with a market value of $68.772 million. The portfolio value decreased during April by ~$3.896 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from April 2017 to April 2018. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio                               

 

The portfolio is highly liquid, with 11% of investments available at call and a further 18% of assets maturing within 3 months. Council has a large allocation to senior FRNs (approximately 44% of investments) which provide additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

Council’s portfolio is well diversified with term deposits at 45%, liquid floating rate notes at 44% and call accounts at 11%. The investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs).

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of April 2018.

 

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances". These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit rating do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

 

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure
as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $13.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on S&P ratings). Overweights reflect downgrades, in the case of BOQ and Bendigo Bank and portfolio changes resulting in Suncorp’s overweight position. Suncorp’s position will be addressed as existing deposits mature over the next few months.

 

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period April 2015 to April 2018.

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.50% compared with the benchmark index of 1.80%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits accounted for 45% of the total investment portfolio.

Four deposits totalling $5.5 million matured and were withdrawn in April. There were two new term deposits taken up during April totalling $3 million.

As at the end of April, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.62%, up 2 basis points (bp) from the previous month or around 54 basis points (bp) over bank bills.

 

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $30.55 million in floating rate notes.

 

There was no trading of floating rate notes during April.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 30 April 2018 increased by ~$10k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2017-18 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,414,455.00. Investment income to 30 April 2018 amounted to $1,470,893.54.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 30 April 2018 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for April 2018 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - April 2018

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - April 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF25/18

 

Subject:             Business sub-category for rating 2018-19

Folder No:                   F2007/00367

Author:                   Cherie Muir, Coordinator Revenue      

 

Introduction

 

Following extensive community engagement around the Our Community Our Future plan of works and services, the Council at its meeting 13 February 2018, resolved to submit a special variation application to IPART seeking approval to increase rates for the next three years.

 

Our draft 2018-19 Operational Plan and IPART submission both propose a Port Botany Business sub-category of the Business category for rating from 2018-19.

 

The Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires the Council to “determine” a rating sub-category prior to the adoption of the rates.

 

The objective of this report is for Council to determine a sub-category of the Business category in accordance with Section 529(1)(d) of the Act for business properties located within the port operations area of Port Botany.

 

Issues

 

A council may determine a sub-category for rating as per Section 529 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act). In regard to the Business category, any sub-category must be determined on the basis of a ‘centre of activity’.

 

Specifically, the centre of activity for the Port Botany Business sub-category is defined by the Three Ports SEPP 2013, Port Botany zoning map, SP1 Special Activities zone. (See Rates Category map attached)

 

Resolving to determine a sub-category at this stage is distinct and separate to the decision about whether to charge a rate higher than that of other business properties in 2018-19. As such, the Council will later determine the 2018-19 annual rates and charges in conjunction with the adoption of the annual Operational Plan and Budget.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 


 

Conclusion

 

Administratively, a council must determine a sub-category before adopting ordinary rates for each category.   The 2018-19 rates and charges are currently scheduled for adoption in June 2018.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the Council determine a sub-category of the Business category for rating purposes effective for rating from 1 July 2018;

 

b)     the sub-category be based on the centre of activity defined by the Port Botany zoning map, of the Three Ports SEPP 2013, for properties located within the ‘SP1 Special Activities’ zone; and

 

c)     the sub-category be known as ‘Port Botany Business’.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Rates Category map

 

 

 

 


Rates Category map

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM33/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reduce parking competition around POW and to improve work health and safety for staff

Folder No:                   F2012/00032

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council seek to open negotiations with State Government and Prince of Wales Hospital authorities to allow hospital staff to have free access to the complexes on-site carpark in order to reduce parking competition with residents in adjacent streets and to achieve better work, health and safety for the staff.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM34/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr  Matson - Provide foot washing facilities at the new Coogee amenities block on the lower beach promenade

Folder No:                   F2004/07347

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That representatives of the Coogee Precinct Committee be invited to meet with Council officers at the Coogee amenities block on the lower promenade to assess options for providing readily accessible foot washing facilities at the entrance to the facility.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM35/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Promote ERLGATSIF upcoming 'Living Cultures' awards in May

Folder No:                   F2004/07650

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Randwick City Council notes that Inner West Council is hosting the upcoming ‘Living Cultures’ awards in May on behalf of the Eastern Region Local Government Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Forum (ERLGATSIF) and resolves to promote the event as appropriate.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM36/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Return & Earn Vending Machines in LGA

Folder No:                   F2006/00120

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     Write to the NSW Minister For Environment, the Hon. Gabrielle Upton requesting that Council be given the opportunity to have a say on the location of Return & Earn Vending Machines in our City, which are now not subject to any council approvals as they are exempt developments.

 

b)     As part of this letter, voice concerns in relation to Return & Earn Vending Machines being   placed in Residential Areas, which are impacting on the amenity of residents.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM37/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Efficient Measures in Reporting Road Maintenance

Folder No:                   F2004/08251

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     Bring back a report on ways in which Council can enhance communication with residents,   in relation to road maintenance & footpath repairs, so that potholes, irregularities & rough         surfaces can be addressed more efficiently;

 

b)     As part of this report consider conducting more surveys and greater consultation with the         community, so that residents can report matters in a more timely manner.

 

c)     Promote through its communication channels, contact details for RMS with a list of RMS Controlled Roads & Streets in our City, so that residents can lodge concerns directly with   the appropriate government agency.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM38/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Estabilishment of a Community Affairs Committee

Folder No:                   F2007/00642

Submitted by:          Councillor Parker, Central Ward      

 

That:

 

a)     Randwick establish a committee to be known as the Community Affairs Committee;

  

b)     The committee shall: 

i)      Report to full Council meetings recommendations arising from its deliberations;

ii)     Be chaired by Councillor Said with Councillor Veitch as the Deputy Chair;

iii)     Have a membership of 9 comprising the Mayor (ex officio) and two Councillors each from the Labor, Liberal, Greens and independent blocks to be advised to the General Manager;

iv)    Have a quorum of 4 with the chair to exercise a casting vote;

v)     Function: to support the social and physical welfare of residents of Randwick Local Government area by fostering social cohesion and harmony in Randwick with emphasis on promoting equality, diversity and healthy lifestyles in the Randwick community to meet on an as required basis prior to the commencement of scheduled Councillor briefing sessions with no delegated authority on decision.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM39/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Said - Anti Social Behaviour Devices at Yarra Bay/La Perouse

Folder No:                   F2005/00935

Submitted by:          Councillor Said, South Ward     

 

 

That:

 

1)     Council officers to present a report on implementing CCTV cameras, better lighting, traffic calming devices, bollards in Yarra Rd and  surrounding streets, measures to end Anti-social behaviour not just move it elsewhere in our City.  

 

2)     Council conducts extensive consultation programme with all stakeholders, Residents, Businesses, Local and State Politicians, Sailing Club, RMS, Randwick Tourism and Police in the Little Bay, Yarra Bay and La Perouse Area within a six week period.

 

3)     Once all information is collated Council will conduct a four week public exhibition, with the intention to commence implementation before the Summer months.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM40/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Seeking legal advice on the legal judgement permitting operation of a Dan Murphy's liquor store in Brook Street, Coogee

Folder No:                   DA/284/2015

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

That Council:

 

1)     Notes the Land & Environment Court judgement of 17 April this year on the successful appeal against refusal of the proposed Dan Murphy’s liquor store on the site of the former Randwick Rugby Club;

 

2)     Further notes the arguments presented to Councillor Matson by Coogee residents; and

 

3)     Resolves to seek legal advice as to whether ground exists for a challenge against the judgement.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM41/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Proposed extension of residential parking scheme - southern side of Dolphin Street between Powell and Melody Streets

Folder No:                   F2004/07236

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council survey residents for support for extending the residential parking scheme along the southern side of Dolphin Street between Powell and Melody Streets.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM42/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - West Ward Landscaping and street improvements

Folder No:                   F2007/00396

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

1.     Notes that residents of Kingsford and Kensington have expressed a desire for increased tree planting, landscaping and general street improvements to improve the amenity of the area.

 

2.     Brings back a draft report containing a timeline, locations, and recommendations regarding planting, landscaping and street improvements for West Ward.

 

3.     Place the draft report on public exhibition, and seek feedback and suggestions from local residents through a six week community consultation process.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM43/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Propose painted line markings for parking spaces

Folder No:                   F2008/00622

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

That Council bring back a report with costings on the feasibility of painting line markings on streets/roads within the Randwick LGA where parking issues are of serious concern, in order to maximise the number of parking spaces available.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM44/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Hamilton - Partial Closure - Judge Lane, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/07158

Submitted by:          Councillor Hamilton, North Ward      

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     note, as per the resolution of the Director City Services Report CS7/17 - Judge Lane, Randwick - Request for School Time Closure; that community consultation has been undertaken and a traffic audit completed; and Section 116 of the Roads Act gives Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) the authority to approve council’s request for the partial closure;

 

b)     note, the RMS representative on the Randwick Traffic Committee, and the committee itself, have raised no objections to the partial closure of Judge Lane;

 

c)     immediately implement the partial closure of Judge Lane, Randwick, between 8am and 4pm on school days, as has been requested by Claremont College since 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      22 May 2018

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR1/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Andrews, Seng and Stavrinos - Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Boundary Extension and Inclusion of Local Heritage Items

Folder No:                   F2017/00174

Submitted by:          Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor Seng, Central Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

That the resolution passed at the Council meeting held on 24 April 2018 reading as follows:

 

RESOLUTION: (Neilson/Matson) that Council:

 

1.     amend the provisions under the Randwick LEP 2012 to include No 38, 42 and 44 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee on the heritage schedule and that the associated heritage map of the RLEP be amended, and that the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area map boundary be extended to include 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street, Coogee and 122 Mount Street, Coogee;

 

2.     prepare a draft planning proposal to be forwarded to the Greater Sydney Commission or it’s delegate requesting ‘Gateway Determination’ under section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979;

 

3.     following ‘Gateway Determination’ exhibit the draft Planning Proposal in accordance with the conditions of the gateway determination and bring back a report to Council detailing the results of the community consultation for final consideration by Council; and

 

4.     authorise the Director, City Planning to make typographical, grammatical or formatting changes to the documentation.

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

That:

 

1.     Council conduct a community forum in relation to the proposed amendments to RLEP 2012.

 

2.     the matter be bought back to Council after the community forum has been held.