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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 27 February 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 27 February 2018 at 6:00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 12 December 2017

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Urgent Business

Director City Planning Reports

CP1/18      Minimum lot size review ...................................................................... 1

CP2/18      Randwick Development Assessment Panel ............................................. 17

 

 

General Manager's Reports

GM1/18     Disclosure of Interest Returns.............................................................. 27

GM2/18     Review of the Randwick City Council 2017/18 Operational Plan – December Quarter...................................................................................................... 29

Director City Services Reports

Nil

Director Governance & Financial Services Reports

GF1/18      Delegations of Authority...................................................................... 81

GF2/18      Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures................................ 87

GF3/18      Quarterly Budget Review - December 2017........................................... 107

GF4/18      Investment Report - November 2017................................................... 127

GF5/18      Investment Report - December 2017................................................... 137

GF6/18      Investment Report - 31 January 2018.................................................. 147  

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM1/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Andrews - Proposed Review of Pensioner Rebate 157

NM2/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Support for the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service.......................................................................................... 159

NM3/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Ensuring safety on the Alison Road Shared Bike Path.............................................................................................. 161

NM4/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Inadequate Width of New Bicycle Ramp at Western (Cul-De-Sac) end of King Street............................................. 163

NM5/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Welcome Banners and Posters supporting Cultural Diversity in Randwick City ...................................................... 165

NM6/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Assistance for residents affected by the Randwick Hospital Campus redevelopment ........................................... 167

NM7/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Request for information on plans for the Anzac Parade planned Precinct and the status of Public Housing assets in the Randwick LGA............................................................................................... 169

NM8/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Excessive tree removals by Waratah Tree Services......................................................................................... 171

NM9/18     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Consideration of alcohol restrictions in Munda Street Reserve................................................................................ 173

NM10/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reducing speeding through Bundock Lane between Canberra and Avoca Streets.................................................. 175

NM11/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Failure by WaterNSW to ensure that local households are not deprived of water due to required work on public infrastructure.................................................................................................... 177

NM12/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Augmenting Alison Rd, Anzac Pde and Dacey Ave intersection resolution of 12 December 2017................................... 179

NM13/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - Review of bike sharing schemes............. 181

NM14/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - More incentives to encourage housing for seniors and people with a disability................................................................ 183

NM15/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed Increase in the Pensioner rebate in the Randwick LGA............................................................................ 185

NM16/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed Loop Bus Service.............. 187

NM17/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Submission to the Financial Services Royal Commission regarding Company Title Duplexes...................................... 189

NM18/18   Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Proposing a long term nightlife strategy. 191  

Closed Session (record of voting required)

GF7/18      SSROC Tender T2017-10 - Supply and Delivery of Copy Paper

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

 

CS1/18      Tender T2018-08 - Materials Supply & Disposal

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (c) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CS2/18      Tender T2018-15 - Civic Signage

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (c) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

Closed Session (record of voting NOT required)

CP3/18      Domestic and family violence: Additional support for affected residents

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (b) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with discussion in relation to the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer.

  

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP1/18

 

Subject:             Minimum lot size review

Folder No:                   F2017/00530

Author:                   Elena  Sliogeris, Senior Environmental Planning Officer - Strategic Planning; Asanthika Kappagoda, Senior Strategic Planner; Ting Xu, Senior Strategic Planner     

 

Introduction

 

This report provides an update on analysis undertaken to date in relation to a review requested by Council, of the minimum subdivision provisions under the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP 2012) applicable to the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

The subject review has been instigated in response to concerns raised by some members of the community that the lending restrictions placed by banks on attached dual occupancies under company title is placing financial hardship on the owners of these properties. 

 

This report provides an outline of key findings including an overview of some implications for consideration should the minimum lot size provisions be reduced to facilitate the subdivision of attached dual occupancies in the R2 Low Density Residential zone (e.g. urban design, amenity and affordable housing impacts). It also seeks Council’s endorsement of a community consultation programme on this issue. The community consultation programme is to run for two months and includes a community forum to be held in March 2018 to obtain public input on this matter.

 

Background

 

What is an attached dual occupancy?

An attached dual occupancy provides two dwellings within one building form on the one allotment of land. The dwellings may be attached by a common wall or floor/ceiling and may share a driveway, but generally all other facilities are separate. Both dwellings that comprise an attached dual occupancy generally share a similar built form.

 

Attached dual occupancies provide a low density housing form and when well designed and integrated can respond to the streetscape and density of low density residential zones. Attached dual occupancies are not intended to be a major provider of housing in our low density residential areas, as their cumulative impact is more significant than single dwelling housing (see section below on ‘potential implications’). They are intended as a type of housing that allows for rental accommodation or to accommodate family members, contributing to housing diversity and choice in the Local Government Area (LGA).

 

Under the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP 2012) attached dual occupancies are permitted in all residential zones across the LGA. In the R2 Low Density Residential zone, Torrens or Strata subdivision of an attached dual occupancy is not permitted unless the building is situated on an allotment that is 800m2 of more, and the newly created lots each have at least 400sqm in land area and meet the frontage requirements under the Development Control Plan 2013 (DCP).

 

A summary of controls applicable to attached dual occupancy is provided below under Current Standards section of this report.

 

History of dual occupancy development in Randwick City

A comprehensive review of dual occupancy and associated subdivision provisions was undertaken in 2005, which is detailed in the Dual Occupancy and Subdivision Issues Paper (2005). The outcome of this review has largely informed the present day subdivision standards contained in the RLEP 2012.

 

By way of historical background, Randwick City was one of the first areas in Sydney to permit dual occupancy development through the gazettal of the Randwick Planning Scheme Ordinance (PSO) 1978. The PSO provisions were superseded by Sydney Regional Environmental Plan (SREP No 12) in 1987, which permitted dual occupancy (both attached and detached) where dwelling houses were permitted. The SREP 12 set out minimum site areas and development standards for dual occupancy including a minimum 400m2 lot size for attached and 600m2 for detached dual occupancy and an FSR of 0.6:1. The SREP 12 also permitted the strata subdivision of dual occupancy. 

 

Following widespread concerns about poor urban design and amenity outcomes, the blanket SREP 12 provisions on dual occupancy were repealed in 1995 and councils were required to prepare residential strategies articulating how housing opportunities and choice were to be provided suitable to the context of each Local Government Area (LGA).

 

In 1998 the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 1998 (Consolidation) (RLEP 1998) introduced a 450m2 minimum lot size for attached dual occupancy in the 2A Residential Low Density (now R2 Low Density Residential) zone. The provisions did not allow for the subdivision of attached dual occupancies (including Torrens and Strata subdivision) unless the building was situated on a 900m2 allotment. These provisions were established to act as an investment disincentive so that attached dual occupancies were maintained for only rental or family use, to protect the amenity and streetscape character of low density residential neighbourhoods, and to minimise adverse impacts on on-street parking reduction and traffic generation.

 

Following the aforementioned 2005 review, the minimum lot size subdivision provisions for the R2 Low Density Residential zone were reduced to 400m2, thus requiring a minimum of 800m2 of land for the subdivision of an attached dual occupancy. Review outcomes considered that a reduction of the minimum lot size to 400m2 would still be able to provide for a dwelling of an appropriate modern size while maintaining landscape requirements and that the number of the additional lots affected was not significant. These provisions were gazetted in 2010 under the RLEP 1998, translated across to the comprehensive Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 (RLEP 2012) in 2013 and remain in force today. 

 

Current Attached Dual Occupancy and Minimum Subdivision Development Standards

The minimum lot size for the subdivision of land in the R2 Low Density Residential zone under the RLEP 2012 is 400m2. Therefore, to facilitate the subdivision of an attached dual occupancy (i.e. into Torrens or Strata), a minimum land size of 800m2 would be required so that each newly created allotment meets the 400m2 lot size requirement.

 

Subdivision of attached dual occupancy also needs to comply with the frontage width requirement under the DCP. The frontage width for a new lot is a minimum of 12m. 

 

The following table summarises the subdivision provisions applicable to the R2 Low Density Residential zone under the RLEP 2012:

 

Clause No

Objectives

Relevant Provisions (Summary)

4.1   Minimum subdivision lot size

(a)  a) to minimise any likely adverse impact of subdivision and development on the amenity of neighbouring properties

(b)  

400m2 minimum lot size for dwelling houses under the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

450m2 minimum lot size for attached dual occupancy in the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

(2  

(3   Nb: a minimum area of 800m2 would be required for the subdivision of attached dual occupancy (Torrens).

 

T    b) to ensure lot sizes allow development to be sited to protect natural or cultural features, including heritage items, and to retain special features such as trees and views,

 

(c)  c) to ensure that lot sizes are able to accommodate development that is suitable for its purpose.

 

4.1AA   Minimum subdivision lot size for community title schemes

a)     to ensure that land to which this clause applies is not fragmented by subdivisions that would create additional dwelling entitlements.

(3A)  if the subdivision is of a lot on which there is a dual occupancy (attached) the size of each

(a)   lot resulting from the subdivision is not to be less than 400 square metres, and 1 dwelling must be situated on each lot resulting from the subdivision.

(b)

4.1A   Minimum subdivision lot size for strata plan schemes in Zone R2

(1)  The objective of this clause is to ensure that land to which this clause applies is not fragmented by subdivisions that would create additional dwelling entitlements.

(4)  if the subdivision is of a lot on which there is a dual occupancy (attached):

(a)  the size of each lot resulting from the subdivision is not to be less than 400 square metres, and

(b)  1 dwelling must be situated on each lot resulting from the subdivision.

 

 

Over the past five years, approximately 240 development applications (DA) were approved for dual occupancies in the R2 Low Density Residential zone. Approved dual occupancy applications make up approximately 7.6% of the total number of residential development applications approved over the past five years; and as the table below outlines, make up a very small proportion of the total residential development applications approved in Randwick City.

 

Table 1.1: Dual occupancy DA approvals within the R2 Low Density Residential Zone

Year

No. of DA approvals for dual occ.

Total no. of residential DA approvals

% dual occ. DA approvals / total no. residential DA approvals

2013

18

485

3.7

2014

39

463

8.4

2015

55

628

8.8

2016

59

591

10.0

2017

69

372

18.5

Total

240

3,167

7.6

Source: RCC Pathways property information database and DPE Greater Sydney Regional Housing Activity report (2017)

 

State planning policy context

 

The following provides a brief overview of the key state planning policies and relevant directions of the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Eastern City District Plan which have implications for this review.

 

Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and Draft Eastern City District Plan

 

The draft Greater Sydney Region Plan – ‘Our Greater Sydney 2056’ has a 40 year vision to 2056, with specific strategies for a 20 year timeframe towards a coordinated approach in managing population growth and infrastructure delivery across the city.

 

The draft Eastern City District plan elaborates on the 20 year strategies in the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan, and includes specific priorities and actions for the District, including population, dwelling and employment forecasts and actions for strategic centres. Councils local planning will need to implement the District Plan’s directions and actions within three years of the district plans being made final.

 

Of relevance to this review, are the actions contained in the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Eastern City District Plan in relation to meeting housing targets and preparing a local housing strategy. The draft Eastern City District Plan sets a 0-5 year housing target of an additional 2,250 new dwellings by 2021 and a 20 year strategic housing target for the District for an additional 157,500 new dwellings to meet projected population growth.

 

Councils will be required to prepare local housing strategies that respond to housing targets set by the Greater Sydney Commission. Local housing strategies are to outline how housing growth is to be managed and what the right locations are for additional housing supply in each LGA; and will inform updates of LEPs. The draft Eastern City district plan outlines key aspects the local housing strategies will need to respond to including for example, housing need and diversity, infrastructure provision and good design.

 

Council’s submission to the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Eastern City District Plan noted that Council was on track to meet the 0-5 year housing target based on known and approved development projects and existing development capacity under the local planning framework. However, Council will need to begin work on a local housing strategy to inform the 6-10 year housing target and to contribute to the 20-year strategic housing target for the district, as required by the Greater Sydney Region Plan and district plan.

 

State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009

 

The Affordable Rental Housing SEPP (2009) (ARHSEPP) makes permissible secondary dwellings or ‘granny flats’ at a maximum size of 60sqm within all residential zones (but only where dwelling houses are permissible) either attached to the principal dwelling, located within the principal dwelling or separate from the principal dwelling, on lot sizes of 450 sqm and greater as either complying development or as a development application; and prohibits subdivision. The inability to subdivide and restricting the size of the secondary dwellings are measures aimed to deliver affordability.

 

Prior to the introduction of the ARHSEPP in 2009, the only form of secondary dwelling that was permissible in Randwick City was in the form of dual occupancies (attached and detached) on lot sizes of 450sqm or greater. The intent being to provide affordable family housing to extended families and to contribute to housing diversity in the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

Since the introduction of the ARHSEPP (in 2009), two types of secondary dwellings are now permissible in Randwick City:

i)        at 60sqm as prescribed by the ARHSEPP; and

ii)       as larger family accommodation via dual occupancies as prescribed by Randwick LEP 2012.

 

The inability to subdivide secondary dwellings and/or to limit the subdivision of attached dual occupancies under Randwick LEP 2012 is an investment disincentive, with the intention that this leads to a more affordable housing choice to mainly rent and allow families to stay together. The implication of allowing subdivision on smaller lots in relation to housing affordability is discussed in more detail under ‘potential implications for reducing minimum lot sizes’.

 

Draft Medium Density Housing Code

 

In 2015/16 the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) released an ‘Options Paper’ on expanding complying development to cover medium density housing types such as dual occupancies, townhouses and terraces and manor homes, also known as the ‘missing middle’. Following the exhibition of the options paper, the Department later released a design guide and code which outlined proposed development standards for the proposed medium density housing types including attached dual occupancies.

 

The key implication of the proposed code is that it permits attached dual occupancies on lot sizes of 400sqm and enables the subdivision (torrens and strata) of these lots to 200sqm individual lots as complying development, but only where it is permissible in the LEP. Based on a desktop analysis of lot size in the R2 Low Density residential zone this could hypothetically make (based on lot size only) 10,585 lots eligible for dual occupancy development including subdivision in our low density zone (assuming also the Draft Medium Housing Code made subdivision permissible).

 

The potential cumulative impacts of increased density through the permissibility of dual occupancies particularly in the lower density residential areas, are significant given that these areas are less accessible to services and transport. These impacts are discussed in more detail below under the section ‘key implications’ of this report.

Based on this, Council outlined in its submission to the DPE on the draft Medium Density Housing Code that it did not support the permissibility of the medium density housing types as complying development in the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

Some of the key points raised in Councils submission to the exhibition of the draft Medium Density Housing Code include:

·      the potential to significantly alter the streetscape “character” of the area and has the potential for widespread land fragmentation.

·      Community backlash to increasing density ‘by stealth’ through the permissibility of medium density housing types as complying development.

·      Pressure on existing infrastructure, Council services and parking provision, in an area which is typically less accessible to transport and services.

 

The proposed code is under consideration by the Department.

 

Minimum Lot Size Review 2017/18

Over recent years, some members of the community have raised concern that the subdivision standards pertaining to the R2 Low Density Residential zone are precluding the Torrens or Strata subdivision of attached dual occupancy development.

 

This has largely been brought about by limitations and/or restrictions in financing from banks to people who have entered company title schemes. Company title is a form of ownership that entails that a company owns the building and land that it occupies and is governed and regulated by the Corporations Act 2001 (Commonwealth). Owners do not own a title, but rather a ‘share’ into the company that owns the title. The elected Board of Directors of the company must approve prospective share owners to enable settlement, sale to be completed and the share transfer to be registered. In contrast, under a Strata title scheme, individual ‘lots’ (e.g. apartments, townhouses etc) are privately owned, with the owners collectively owning the shared common property (eg. party walls).

 

As highlighted above, under the current provisions, only properties over 800m2 may be subdivided into Strata or Torrens title lots (to meet the 400m2 lot size control). Consequently, a number of attached dual occupancies built on smaller allotments (some as low as 450m2) have been subject to Company Title, which does not require Council approval under a Development Application process or the issuing of a subdivision certificate.

 

As such, in response to limitations in lending by banks to properties held under Company Title schemes, it has been reported that attached dual occupancies under company title are selling more slowly than Strata or Torrens titled properties due to difficulties potential buyers are facing to secure finance.

 

Given these issues Council considered a Motion Pursuant to Notice and subsequently resolved:

 

RESOLUTION: (Parker/Matson) that:

 

(a)    Council commence a review of the minimum subdivision lot size standard in the R2 zone and bring back a report detailing the implications of reducing the minimum lot size and the process required to amend the Randwick LEP 2012;

 

(b)    Council establish a register of existing attached dual occupancies under company title;

 

(c)    Council conduct a forum chaired by either the Mayor or Deputy Mayor and invite the State Members Ron Hoenig, Bruce Notley-Smith and Michael Daley as well as the Federal Member Matt Thisthlethwaite, to hear from the community on this significant issue;

 

(d)    the review consider the directions and planning priorities in the Greater Sydney Commission Eastern City District Plan;

 

(e)    the review also consider the objectives and strategies of the Greater Sydney Plan and its potential relationship and integration with a new Randwick LEP.

 

Background research

To help inform the review, two key data gathering exercises were undertaken:

i.   a lot size analysis of all lots within the R2 Low Density Residential zone according to suburb; and

ii.   to identify attached dual occupancies including those under company title in the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

The following outlines the results of the analysis.

 

Lot size analysis

The table below outlines the number of lots within the R2 Low Density Residential zone according to lot size. From this table, it is evident that lot sizes to the north of the city (i.e in the suburbs of Randwick and Clovelly) are smaller compared to the suburbs within the southern city (i.e Chifley and Little Bay). Kensington has a higher average lot size when compared to the adjoining suburbs of Kingsford and Maroubra however this can be attributed to the heritage overlays which apply to most of the suburb.

Table 1.2: Lot size analysis in the R2 Low Density Residential zone

 

R2 zoned land

Suburbs

Av. lot size

Number of lots

200

[200,

400)

[400,

450)

[450,

500)

[500,

600)

[600,

700)

[700,800)

>=800

TOTAL

North

Randwick

397

84

943

264

128

147

117

42

56

1781

Clovelly

364

35

676

73

88

73

32

5

12

994

Coogee

475

2

303

70

86

126

79

35

42

743

South Coogee

470

6

348

98

126

230

106

32

26

972

Kensington

663

3

84

25

47

246

415

47

26

893

Kingsford

437

24

954

409

276

308

79

65

35

2150

Central

Maroubra

428

16

2468

488

595

749

345

133

92

4886

South

Chifley

576

1

86

22

67

311

306

60

25

878

Little Bay

571

0

52

12

29

235

160

32

16

536

La Perouse

476

0

23

20

10

22

10

3

0

88

Malabar

522

3

169

65

166

316

156

36

25

936

Matraville

566

0

195

129

310

803

372

139

63

2011

Philip Bay

567

0

12

28

81

30

28

8

17

204

TOTAL

501

174

6,313

1,703

2,009

3,596

2,205

637

435

17,072

Source: RCC (2018) GIS cadastre

 

Based on the above analysis, the number of lots eligible for subdivision under Councils’ existing minimum subdivision lot size requirement (of 800 sqm) would equate to approximately 435 lots. If the minimum lot size be reduced further to 700sqm, approximately 1,072 lots would be eligible for torrens or strata subdivision; and reducing the minimum lot size to 400sqm (comparable to the minimum lot size proposed under the draft Medium Density Housing Code) results in approximately more than 10,500 lots eligible for torrens or strata subdivision, assuming all other conditions are met. This is summarised in the table below. 

 

Table 1.3: Number of lots eligible for subdivision based on lot size only

 

Min. lot size

No. of lots eligible for subdivision (torrens or strata)

Current controls

(800m2 before subdivision)

435 lots eligible for torrens or strata subdivision

If reduced to 700m2

1,072 lots eligible for torrens or strata subdivision

If reduced to 600m2

3,777 lots eligible for torrens or strata  subdivision

If reduced to 500m2

6,873 lots eligible for torrens or strata subdivision

If reduced to 400m2

10,585 lots eligible for torrens or strata subdivision

Source: RCC (2018) GIS cadastre

 

Dual occupancy (attached) audit

The following table and map outlines the number and distribution of dual occupancies (attached) within the R2 Low Density Residential zone across the entire LGA. The audit identified dual occupancies which are built and occupied. It did not account for those dual occupancies which may have a development application approval and/or construction certificate but had not been completed and/or a final occupation certificate had been issued.

 

The audit also looked at the title of the property to identify those properties under company title. From the table and map below, the audit identified 688 dual occupancies in the R2 Low Density Residential zone, the majority of which are located to the south of the city including those under company title (at 24%).

 

In total, the analysis identified that 20% of all dual occupancies within the R2 Low Density Residential zone are under company title. The remaining 60% of dual occupancies are under a single title (i.e torrens) with a further 20% under strata title.

 

Table 1.4: Dual Occupancy audit within R2 Low Density Residential Zone

 

Randwick City

Suburbs

Number of dual occ.

Number of dual occ. under company title

% of all dual occ under company title

North

Randwick

39

1

3%

South Coogee

25

1

Clovelly

20

Coogee

20

Kensington

17

Kingsford

33

2

Central

Maroubra

87

4

5%

South

La Perouse

4

24%

Little Bay

60

23

Malabar

64

17

Matraville

175

45

Phillip Bay

17

1

Chifley

127

43

Total in the City

688

137

20%

Source: RCC (2018) Pathways property information database

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1.1: Distribution map of dual occupancies in the R2 Low Density Residential zone within Randwick City

Source: RCC Pathway (2018) Property Information database

 

 

The majority of the dual occupancies under company title have lot sizes between 500-700sqm as shown in the table below.

 

Table 1.5: Audit of dual occupancy under company title according to lot sizes in R2 Low Density Residential zone

 

No. of company titled dual occupancy lots

450~500m2

500~550m2

550~600m2

600~700m2

700~800m2

>=800m2

7

15

41

51

21

2

Total

137

 

Looking more broadly across the entire R2 Low Density Residential zone (which contains more than 17,000 residential lots), dual occupancies make up only 4% of the housing stock within the R2 low density zone; and those under company title only 0.8% of the total residential lots within the R2 Low Density Residential zone. As such, the analysis illustrates that the focus of this review, being attached dual occupancies under company title, make up a very small proportion of all lots within the residential zone.

 

Table 1.6: Proportion of lots in R2 Low Density Residential Zone including those under company title

 

R2 Zone

No. lots in R2

No. dual occ in R2

% of all lots that are dual occ

% of all lots that are company titled dual occ

North

7533

154

2%

0.05%

Central

4886

87

2%

0.08%

South

4653

447

10%

2.77%

Total

17,072

688

4%

0.80%

Source: RCC Pathway (2018) Property Information database

 

Other comparable council standards

In undertaking this review, a desktop review of other comparable council standards on minimum subdivision lot size controls and attached dual occupancies was also undertaken. The following table outlines key standards of adjoining council standards and that of Willoughby Council who have established dual occupancy provisions.

 

As the table below illustrates, the standards on minimum lot size and dual occupancy vary. Both the City of Sydney and Bayside Councils (in relation to the former Botany Council area) do not contain standards on minimum subdivision lot size for dual occupancies. In comparison, Willoughby’s dual occupancy provisions contains a control which prohibits the subdivision of a dual occupancy until five years after an occupation certificate has been issued. 


 

 

Council

Relevant LEP

Permissibility of dual occupancy in R2

LEP Min. lot size for erection of dual occupancy

LEP Min. subdivision lot size

Bayside

Botany Bay LEP 2013

Dual occupancy prohibited in R2

Nil

Nil

 

Note: The DCP contains some general provisions relating to torrens, strata and community subdivision (no numerical controls for minimum lot size).

Waverley

Waverley LEP 2012

Dual occupancy (both attached & detached) permissible in R2

No relevant LEP provisions, but contained in the DCP.

 

DCP controls

1.5 Dual Occupancy Development (Part C)

·      450m2 for erection of attached dual occupancy

·      600m2 for erection of detached dual occupancy

Cl4.1

For zone R2, the size of any lot resulting from subdivision is either 325m2 or 500m2 (depending on the locations).

 

This requirement however does not apply to strata or community title schemes.

City of Sydney

Sydney LEP 2012

Dual occupancy (both attached & detached) permissible in R2

Nil

Nil

 

Note: The DCP contains some general provisions relating to subdivision (no numerical controls for minimum lot size).

Willoughby

Willoughby LEP 2012

Dual occupancy (both attached & detached) permissible in R2

Cl6.10

·      700m2 for erection of attached dual occupancy in R2

·      900m2 for erection of detached dual occupancy in R2

·      5000m2 for erection of a dual occupancy on the Dual Occupancy Restriction Map.

 

Cl4.1

For zone R2, the size of any lot resulting from subdivision varies depending on the locations, being 550 m2, 650 m2, 740 m2, 835 m2, 1500 m2, 2500 m2, 4000 m2, 8000 m2, and 1.4ha.

 

This requirement however does not apply to strata or community title schemes.

 

Cl4.1C

Subdivision of a lot on which there is an existing dual occupancy is permitted only if:

·      the lot is not on the Dual Occupancy Restriction Map;

·      the size of each lot resulting from the subdivision is at least 350m2;

·      each of the resulting lots will have one of the dwellings on it,

·      the FSR of each dwelling does not exceed 0.4:1 or FSR shown on the FSR map for the lot, whichever is lesser, and

·      a final occupation certificate was issued for the dual occupancy at least 5 years before the consent for the subdivision is granted.

 

 

Key Implications of Reducing Minimum Lot Size

The existing RLEP 2012 minimum lot size subdivision have been established following a comprehensive analysis and careful consideration of the urban form and character of R2 Low Density Residential zoned areas across our City, including the subdivision pattern, topography, accessibility to centres and public transport, streetscape, and environmental and amenity impacts on adjoining neighbours.

 

The provisions in their current form allow for the reasonable provision of attached dual occupancy in the low density suburbs of Randwick City. They provide a balance of incentive and restriction so that density is not spread broadly throughout the low density residential suburbs and that reasonable opportunities for this form of housing can still be provided where a good standard of design can be met and adverse amenity impacts are capable of being minimised.

 

A major impact of reducing the minimum lot size for subdivision for both Torrens and Strata is that it would incentivise the development of attached dual occupancies, leading to a likely substantial increase in this housing typology in the R2 Low Density Residential zone. The cumulative impacts of this level of attached dual occupancy development would have the following implications on our low density suburbs:

 

·      Housing diversity and choice: A reduction in the minimum lot size for subdivision would further encourage development speculation and the likely proliferation of attached dual occupancies at the expense of other low density housing forms. A substantial increase in an attached dual occupancy typology is thus likely to impact upon housing choice and diversity in the low density residential areas. It is important to note that attached dual occupancies are only one form of housing form and were never intended to be the dominant building typology in the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

·      Land fragmentation: An increase in the development of attached dual occupancy developments resulting from reduced subdivision requirements may exacerbate land fragmentation by setting a precedent for smaller allotments. This in turn would change the subdivision pattern and open character of our low density residential areas.

 

·      Affordable Housing: As noted in this report, a benefit of the current provisions is that attached dual occupancy held under the one title allows for one dwelling to be rented and/or kept within the family. Attached dual occupancies thus provide an affordable rental option in the R2 Low Density Residential zone. Reducing the minimum requirements for subdivision is likely to result in the construction and subdivision of more attached dual occupancy sites (into Torrens or Strata). This in turn has implications on the stock of affordable rental housing in the low density suburbs. This issue is pertinent given the prevailing housing affordability issues affecting the LGA.

 

·      On-street parking and traffic generation: A substantial increase in attached dual occupancy would have implications on on-street parking availability and traffic generation. Attached dual occupancies involve two rather than one households and therefore with each new development, often two driveways are required, resulting in a net loss of one on-street parking space per development or alternatively, one wider driveway when garages are joined. Similarly, the subsequent growth in dwelling numbers would contribute to an increase in traffic generation in low density areas. This is pertinent as the majority of low density zoned sites are situated in the southern suburbs which are not well serviced by frequent public transport, with households generally relying on private transportation.

 

·      Streetscape Impacts: An increase in development that additional subdivided allotments would generate, may have detrimental impacts on aesthetics, amenity and streetscape character. Intensification of built form, doubling of capacity and reduced openness (that is otherwise afforded by single dwellings on individual allotments) compounded with the dominance of garages and driveways all have the potential to adversely affect streetscape aesthetics and visual amenity.

 

·    Infrastructure Capacity: While attached dual occupancies may be similar in scale to a single dwelling house, they pose greater potential impacts due to higher occupancy rates on the same parcel of land. Existing low density residential areas affected by change to the minimum subdivision provisions may not have the existing soft and hard infrastructure to support population intensification associated with increased density (e.g. road networks, public transport, schools and childcare). This issue requires further analysis, in the context of growth more broadly across all land use zones.

 

·      Local Housing Strategy: Council is required to prepare a Local Housing Strategy to meet district planning targets indicated in the draft Eastern City district plan. The Strategy will identify opportunities to increase housing supply as well as improving housing mix, affordability and availability to meet diverse needs of our community. A comprehensive housing study would take into careful consideration the unique character, amenity and infrastructure needs of our diverse areas. Reducing the minimum subdivision standards in the R2 Low Density Residential zone prior to the Housing Strategy being developed is an ad hoc and a piecemeal approach to strategic planning. Significantly, the reduction of subdivision requirements may lock out longer term development potential in many areas.

 

Community consultation programme

It is proposed that Council undertake a community consultation programme over an 8-week period to seek the views of the community on this issue. Key consultative actions and events are to include:

·      a dedicated ‘yoursay webpage’ providing the opportunity for residents to upload a submission and/or register to speak at the community forum/ public hearing;

·      a public hearing/ forum, to be held in March to enable the Council and invited State and Federal MPs to hear the concerns of the community on this issue.

 

Given the issue is of local planning significance, there is a question around the value of having the community forum with invited State MP’s. There are many other community engagement tools available that can achieve the same if not better results.

 

Following the public hearing, the council officers will report back to the Council on the outcomes of the consultation including any key recommendations. The flow chart below outlines the key steps of the consultation programme including timeframe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Process of amending RLEP 2012

The resolution of Council which initiated this review also sought that council officers ‘… bring back a report detailing the implications of reducing the minimum lot size and the process required to amend the Randwick LEP 2012’.

 

The following outlines the planning proposal process.

 

The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (The Act) and Regulations set out the process for amending the zoning or planning provisions relating to a parcel(s) of land in NSW (rezoning). Changes to the zoning or planning provisions can only be made via a formal amendment to the Local Environmental Plan (LEP).

       

A Planning Proposal is the first step to commence changes to the zoning or planning provisions relating to a parcel of land. It is a formal application that sets out the objectives, intended outcomes, and justification for the proposed changes, and also details the community consultation to be undertaken.

 

Council can initiate a Council led Planning Proposal through a resolution of the Council which is then forwarded to the Minister for Planning for a ‘Gateway Determination’. The ‘Gateway Determination’ is essentially a checkpoint for Planning Proposals, and enables those proposals that are not well founded, or not in the public interest to be stopped early in the process, before significant resources are committed in carrying out technical studies or investigations.

 

The Minister’s ‘Gateway Determination’ will stipulate whether the Planning Proposal should proceed, whether it needs to be resubmitted, the timeframe for its completion (usually nine months from the date of the Determination), the community consultation and State/Commonwealth agency requirements and whether a public hearing is needed. 

 

Following the Gateway Determination, a Planning Proposal is formally placed on public exhibition for comment. The final LEP and any accompanying maps which amend the Council’s principal planning instrument (i.e. the RLEP 2012) are made by the Minister for Planning (and notified on the NSW legislation web site) in accordance with the Act.  Certain LEPs which are of local significance can be finalised by Council via delegation from the Minister (this is determined at the gateway stage). 

 

It is important to note that a Planning Proposal is a separate process to a DA. A Planning Proposal involves Council’s resolution to commence a process to amend the LEP, whereas a DA seeks Council’s consent to enable a development to proceed.

 

In the circumstance that a Planning Proposal is supported, resulting in amendments to an LEP, a DA for subdivision based on the new standard would not be able to be determined by Council until the amendment to RLEP 2012 comes into effect. The process of amending the LEP would take in excess of 12 months.

 

However, it is important to note that, even if the Council did resolve to amend the LEP to change the minimum lot size standards in the R2 Low Density Residential zone, the DPE may not support a planning proposal which seeks to amend the LEP on a single development standard in isolation of a wider comprehensive housing strategy.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4

Excellence in Urban Design and Development

Direction 4b

New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

Outcome 6

A liveable City

Direction 6d

A strategic land use framework provides for our lifestyle changes and for a continuing, yet low rate of growth across our City

Direction 6e

Enhance housing diversity, accessibility and adaptability to support our diverse community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

This report responds to a resolution of Council which sought a review of minimum lot sizes in the R2 Low Density Residential zone. It provides an overview of minimum lot size subdivision standard and attached dual occupancy development in Randwick City including those under company title. The analysis demonstrates that attached dual occupancy development contributes a relatively small proportion towards the housing diversity and stock of Randwick City’s R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

The potential implications of reducing minimum lot size in relation to attached dual occupancy development, as outlined in this report is significant. Increasing density in areas that are not as accessible to public transport and services is contradictory to metro and district planning directives. As the analysis demonstrated, any changes to minimum lot sizes within the R2 Low Density Residential zone will be most felt in Randwick’s southern suburbs.

 

Based on this, this report urges that a precautionary approach be undertaken towards a review of minimum lot sizes and that any potential changes to minimum lot size be considered as part of a wider housing strategy for the LGA, as required by the Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Eastern City District Plan.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     endorse a two month community consultation programme on the review of the minimum lot size standard  and;

 

b)     a report be prepared outlining the outcomes of the consultation programme and any key recommendations with respect to changing the minimum lot size standard and the controls relating to attached dual occupancies in the R2 zone.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP2/18

 

Subject:             Randwick Development Assessment Panel

Folder No:                   F2017/00351

Author:                   Emma Fitzroy, Executive Planner      

 

Introduction

 

Under section 23I of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, from 1 March 2018, the functions of council as a consent authority will no longer be exercisable by Councillors. Development applications will be determined by:

 

·      a local or regional planning panel; or

·      an officer/employee of the council to whom the council delegates those functions.

 

Consequently, council is required to establish an Independent Hearing and Assessment Panel by 1 March 2018. This local planning panel will be known as the Randwick Development Assessment Panel (RDAP).

 

The minister for planning has issued draft directions under Section 117 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (Act) that identify the likely referral criteria and operational procedures for the local planning panel. The minister has advised that they are still in the process of finalising the draft directions and that they may not be published until 1 March 2018.

 

The table below summarises the types of applications that are likely to require referral to the local planning panel based on the draft directions:

 

 

Developments that do not require referral to a local or regional planning panel, will be determined by delegated council staff.

 

Delegations

 

In accordance with section 23I of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (Act), from 1 March 2018 Councillors will no longer be able to determine development applications. Consequently, council is required to delegate authority to the General Manager to determine all development applications that are not required to be determined by a local or regional planning panel.

 

Currently, staff delegation is limited to developments with an estimated cost equal to or less than $2 million. The draft directions require the threshold for staff delegation to be increased to $5 million.

 

To comply with the Section 117 directions whilst maintaining community confidence in the decisions made by council, the General Manager intends to require that development applications with an estimated cost of $2,000,001 to $5,000,000 (that do not require referral to a local or regional planning panel), be approved by two delegated officers, with one being either the Manager of Development Assessment OR the Director of City Planning.

 

This will ensure that all applications over $2 million will be subject to a second review prior to determination.

 

Panel members

 

Chair and alternates (3 members)

The Minister has approved the following people for appointment to Randwick’s IHAP:

·      Annelise Tuor (chair)

·      Lindsay Fletcher (alternate chair)

·      Garry West (alternate chair)

 

Council is required to formally appoint the chair and alternates to the panel.

 

Expert members (8 members)

The following 8 expert members have already been appointed to the panel:

·      Jason Perica

·      Kara Krason

·      Janette Murrell

·      Oliver Klein

·      Sandra Robinson

·      Heather Warton

·      Peter Romey

·      Julie Savet Ward

 

Community representatives (6 members)

The following 6 community members have already been appointed to the panel:

·      Kerri Hamer

·      Sarah Kelly

·      Brenton Thomas

·      Mio Margarit Chow

·      Peter Ryan

·      Michelle Finegan

 

As detailed above, the RDAP consists of 17 members; however, only 4 members (1 chair, 2 experts and 1 community representative) will be selected to vote on each matter.

 

The Department of Planning and Environment has advised that an important part of the panel procedures will be that the chairs and members rotate regularly between meetings. This measure protects against undue influence of any one person in the decision making process.

 

The community representative for each meeting will be selected by the presiding chair after the agenda has been set. The chair will nominate who they consider is most closely associated with the matters that are being considered at that meeting, and that person shall be nominated as the voting community representative for the meeting.

 

If the chair considers that an agenda requires more than one community representative, they may appoint different community representatives for different items on the agenda.

 

Panel procedures

 

As per the requirements of the Act, the panel will conduct their meetings in public; however the draft directions allows for the panel to adjourn from the public meeting to deliberate before reconvening for voting and determination. The procedures for the public meeting will include an opportunity for Councillors to address the panel on any DA in their ward.

 

The attached draft panel guidelines incorporate the procedural requirements from the Act and draft Section 117 directions. The guidelines are provided for information purposes only and are subject to change when the Section 117 directions are published. The procedures may also be varied from time to time as required to ensure the efficient and effective operation of the panel.

 

Code of conduct

 

Panel members will be required to adhere to a code of conduct issued by the minister for planning. The final version of the code has not yet been published.

 

Remuneration

 

The minister for planning has set remuneration rates for IHAP members as follows:

·      Chair: $2,000 (plus GST) per meeting

·      Independent experts: $1,500 (plus GST) per meeting

·      Community representatives: a minimum of $500 up to a maximum of $1,500 (plus GST) per meeting.

 

The rates assume a full day (seven hours) and includes time for meeting preparation, site visits and participation at the meeting.

 

Given that more than one community representative may be present at any one panel meeting, it is proposed that the remuneration rate for community representatives be based upon the number of applications that they are required to consider and vote on:

·      $500 (plus GST) per meeting if they are required to vote on 1 to 2 items; OR

·      $1000 (plus GST) per meeting if they are required to vote on 3 to 4 items; OR

·      $1500 (plus GST) per meeting if they are required to vote on 5 or more applications.

 

It is expected that a maximum of 8 applications will be considered per meeting. Where possible, a single community representative will be selected to vote on all matters at a particular meeting; however, the above scale allows for the responsibility to be shared between multiple community members when required.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

 

Financial impact statement

 

The required frequency of meetings is unknown at this time as the Section 117 directions detailing the criteria for referral to the panel have not yet been finalised. However; based on the draft criteria it is expected that 1 to 2 meetings will be required per month.

 

Based on 1 to 2 meetings per month and the remuneration rates detailed in this report, it is expected that the operating costs of the panel will be between $100,000 and $150,000 per year.

 

Conclusion

 

From 1 March 2018, the functions of council as a consent authority will no longer be exercisable by Councillors. All development applications will be determined by either a planning panel or a delegated council officer.

 

To prepare for the imminent commencement of the panel, council is required to:

·      Delegate authority to the General Manager to determine all development applications that are not required to be determined by a local or regional planning panel;

·      Appoint the chair and alternate chairs to the panel; and

·      Approve remuneration rates for panel members

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

·    Delegates authority to the General Manager to determine all development applications that are not required to be determined by a local or regional planning panel.

 

·      Appoints the following people to the Randwick Development Assessment Panel as chair and alternate chairs:

Ms Annelise Tuor (chair)

Mr Lindsay Fletcher (alternate chair)

Mr Garry West (alternate chair)

 

·      Approves the following remuneration rates for members of the Randwick Development Assessment Panel:

Chair: $2,000 (plus GST) per meeting

Independent experts: $1,500 (plus GST) per meeting

Community representatives:

§ $500 (plus GST) per meeting if they are required to vote on 1 to 2 items; OR

§ $1000 (plus GST) per meeting if they are required to vote on 3 to 4 items; OR

§ $1500 (plus GST) per meeting if they are required to vote on 5 or more applications.

 

·      Notes the draft Randwick Development Assessment Panel Guidelines

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Randwick Development Assessment Panel Guidelines (DRAFT)

 

 

 

 


Randwick Development Assessment Panel Guidelines (DRAFT)

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM1/18

 

Subject:             Disclosure of Interest Returns

Folder No:                   F2017/00361

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government Act requires Councillors and designated staff to lodge Disclosure of Interest Returns.

 

Section 449 of the Local Government Act 1993 requires:

 

“(1)    A councillor or designated person must complete and lodge with the general manager, within 3 months after becoming a councillor or designated person, a return in the form prescribed by the regulations.”

 

“(2)    A person need not lodge a return within the 3-month period after becoming a councillor or designated person if the person lodged a return in that year or the previous year or if the person ceases to be a councillor or designated person within the 3-month period.”

 

Section 450A of the Act requires:

 

“(1)    The general manager must keep a register of returns required to be lodged with the general manager under section 449.

 

(2)     Returns required to be lodged with the general manager under section 449 must be tabled at a meeting of the council, being:

(a)    in the case of a return lodged in accordance with section 449(1)—the first meeting held after the last day for lodgement under that subsection.”

 

Issues

 

In tabling the Register of Disclosure Returns for Councillors Da Rocha; Hamilton; Luxford; Parker; Said; and Veitch, I report that all newly elected Councillors have submitted their duly completed returns within the prescribed timeframe (that is, within 3 months of becoming a Councillors). Given that the Poll was declared on 16 September 2017, returns were required to be submitted by 16 December 2017.

 

Anyone is entitled to inspect the ‘Returns of the Interests of Councillors, designated persons and delegates’ under Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 


 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

It is necessary for the Disclosure of Interests Returns for newly elected Councillors to be tabled at this Council Meeting for the purpose of legislative compliance.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That it be noted that the Register of Disclosure of Interests Returns for those Councillors elected for the first time in September 2017, has been tabled at the Ordinary Council Meeting of 27 February 2018.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM2/18

 

Subject:             Review of the Randwick City Council 2017/18 Operational Plan – December Quarter

Folder No:                   F2017/03001

Author:                   Karen Hawkett, Coordinator Integrated Planning & Reporting      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2017/18 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on 27 June 2017. In this report, achievement and status comments are provided for each action in the 2017/18 Operational Plan. Highlights are also provided where appropriate.

 

Issues

 

This is the December 2017 Quarterly Report and second review of the 2017/18 annual Operational Plan. All projects are proceeding as planned and overall all services were delivered to agreed standards.

 

During the December report period, several key projects were completed including:

 

·      the drainage upgrade at Beauchamp Road and Poulet Street;

·      the Randwick Disability Inclusion Plan;

·      delivery of the School Beach Safety Program to over 20 local schools by Council Lifeguards;

·      installation of kiosks at each library and other technology upgrades such as the new Library print and payment management system (Monitor); and

·      the upgrade of Council’s TRIM (record management) system.

 

Key events hosted by Council during the December quarter included the Seniors Christmas Concert, Kingsford Noodle Markets, Coogee Carols and NYE Coogee Sparkles.

 

Council also began extensive consultation with the community for the review of the City Plan and resourcing the 2018-21 Delivery Program known as Our Community Our Future.

 

In acknowledgement of our efforts, Randwick City received a number of awards during the December quarter.

 

Todd Clarke, Council’s Project Management Coordinator, won the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia’s (IPWEA) Young Engineer of the Year Award. The IPWEA also awarded Randwick City the Multi-Disciplinary Project Management Award for the upgrade to Chifley Sports Reserve and highly commended the Yarra Bay Seawater and Freshwater Separation for Irrigation project for the Environmental Enhancement Project or Initiative award.

 

Council’s Eco-living Fair won the Blue Star Sustainability Going Green Education Award while our environmental sustainability initiatives were also recognised at the NSW Green Globe Awards where the 3 Council Compost Revolution was awarded the winner in the Resource Efficiency category.

 

Council’s Kensington to Kingsford (K2K) International Urban Design Ideas Competition won the Best Planning Ideas for Small Project and Innovation category at the Planning Institute Australia (PIA) awards. The PIA also acknowledged Council with the Innovation in Development Assessment award for our online lodgement of development applications.

 

There were many highlights from the activity undertaken by Council during the quarter. The following table lists our significant highlights:

 

City theme

City Plan Outcomes

Action code

Highlight

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1a. Vision for Randwick City Council

 

 

P001

 

The State of the City Report including the State of the Environment Report was completed and posted on Council's website.

 

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1b. Leadership

 

 

P008

 

Electronic delivery of Employee Newsletter commenced.

 

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1c. Continuous Improvement

 

 

P016

 

Counter-terrorism risk assessment education session held for relevant Council events stakeholders.

 

2.A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2a. Meeting Community Needs

 

S027

 

Inaugural Coffee and Conversation project implemented for residents living in Lexington Place.

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2b. Strong Partnerships

 

P020

 

Successfully applied for a State Government grant to fund the establishment of a community hub in Lexington Place.

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

 

2c. Community facilities

 

 

P021

 

Council took over management of collection catalogue for the La Perouse Museum from National Parks and Wildlife.

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

 

2d. Cultural diversity

 

P022

 

Twilight Concert Program fully implemented for 2017 calendar year.

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3a. Communicating Effectively

 

S046

 

Introduced new online forms and information pages on the public website to cater for hall hire enquiries.

Enhanced the myRandwick app.

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3b. Promoting Services

 

 

 

S050

 

A new inclusive art group “All Together Now” commenced.

 


 

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3c. Participation in decision making

 

 

 

S051

 

Commenced the Our Community Our Future consultation.

 

Our Community Our Future consultation

 

 

4. Excellence in Urban Design and Development

 

 

4a. Improved Design

 

 

P031

 

Completed Architecture on Show talks.

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

 

5b. Range of Activities

 

S054

 

DRLC supported the Victor Chang Heart Research Charity Gala Day, again hosting an attempt at the Guinness World Record Largest Thong Throw.

 

 

Thong Throw


 

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

 

5d. Innovative Library Programs

 

S056

S059

 

‘Silent Tears’ exhibition launched at Lionel Bowen Library and new activity, Learning Mandarin for English Speakers, offered.

 

6. A Liveable City

 

 

 

6a. Public Asset Management

 

 

P043

 

Construction commenced on upgrade to Heffron Netball Building.

Heffron Netball Building - construction

 

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6c. Community Safety

 

 

P044

 

Launched the 'Wise Up' anti-drug and alcohol campaign video.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6d. Strategic Land Use Framework

 

 

P049

 

Council made submissions on the Review of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 to the DPE, and on the draft Crown Land Management Regulation 2017 to Crown Lands.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6e. Housing Diversity

 

S074

 

1,072 home modification and maintenance jobs completed in the financial year to date.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6f. Distinctive neighbourhoods

 

 

P052

 

Analysis of the Randwick town centre completed.

 

7. Heritage that is Protected and Celebrated

 

7a. Heritage

 

P054

 

Conservation works to Bob Clarke memorial and Captain Cook statue completed.

 

 

 

 

Captain Cook statue

 

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

8a. Vibrant commercial centres

 

 

 

P057

 

The 'Win Dinner on Us' competition held at the Kingsford Noodle Market, promoting local food businesses.

 

 

Heffron Netball Building - construction

 

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

8b. Hospital and University Precinct

 

 

P058

 

A joint submission was prepared by the University and Hospitals Precinct Reference Group to the Greater Sydney Commission on the Revised Eastern City District Plan.

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

 

8d. Tourism

 

P059

 

Council partnered Randwick City Tourism to deliver the 'Visitor Growth - Expanding Opportunities' Business and Economic Leadership Forum.

 

 

9. Integrated and Accessible Transport

 

 

9d. Traffic management

 

S082

 

Council responded to 1,309 customer requests regarding parking concerns.

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10a. Leader in environmental sustainability

 

 

S084

 

Inaugural Best Gift Christmas Market Day held at Randwick Community Centre.

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10c  Biodiversity and natural heritage

 

 

P072

 

82 street trees were planted throughout the City during the quarter.

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10d. Sustainable waste technologies

 

P073

 

More than 8,200 residents dropped off recyclable items and/or household problem waste at the Randwick Recycling Centre.

 

 

Perry Street Recycling Centre

 

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10e. Water conservation

 

S090

 

Council saved 93 million litres of potable water, and water consumption cost of $186,000, from the use of water conservation projects.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10f. Energy conservation

 

 

S092

 

During the December quarter, Council generated around 75.8 megawatt hours of electricity from renewable energy installed on Council buildings.

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the December Quarterly Review is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2017/18 Annual Operational Plan. In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20-year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the December quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the December Quarterly Review of the 2017/18 annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

2017/18 Randwick City Council Annual Operational Plan - December Quarter Report

 

 

 

 


2017/18 Randwick City Council Annual Operational Plan - December Quarter Report

Attachment 1

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF1/18

 

Subject:             Delegations of Authority

Folder No:                   F2004/06895

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government Act 1993, and other relevant legislation authorise Council to undertake a range of functions.

 

Section 377 of the Act allows the elected Council to delegate authority to the General Manager, by Council resolution, to make most decisions and perform most functions required for Council to operate business as usual activities. The General Manager sub-delegates these functions to Council staff in order to provide for the day to day operation of the Council.

 

Councils are required to review their delegations within 12 months after each ordinary election (section 440(7) of the Local Government Act).

 

Issues

 

Legislative requirements

There are certain functions contained in the Local Government Act 1993 that Council is unable to delegate. Section 377 of the Local Government Act provides that:

 

(1)    A council may, by resolution, delegate to the general manager or any other person or body (not including another employee of the council) any of the functions of the council under this or any other Act, other than the following:

 

(a)  the appointment of a general manager,

(b)  the making of a rate,

(c)  a determination under section 549 as to the levying of a rate,

(d)  the making of a charge,

(e)  the fixing of a fee,

(f)  the borrowing of money,

(g)  the voting of money for expenditure on its works, services or operations,

(h)  the compulsory acquisition, purchase, sale, exchange or surrender of any land or other property (but not including the sale of items of plant or equipment),

(i)  the acceptance of tenders to provide services currently provided by members of staff of the council,

(j)  the adoption of an operational plan under section 405,

(k)  the adoption of a financial statement included in an annual financial report,

(l)  a decision to classify or reclassify public land under Division 1 of Part 2 of Chapter 6,

(m)  the fixing of an amount or rate for the carrying out by the council of work on private land,

(n)  the decision to carry out work on private land for an amount that is less than the amount or rate fixed by the council for the carrying out of any such work,

(o)  the review of a determination made by the council, and not by a delegate of the council, of an application for approval or an application that may be reviewed under section 82A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979,

(p)  the power of the council to authorise the use of reasonable force for the purpose of gaining entry to premises under section 194,

(q)  a decision under section 356 to contribute money or otherwise grant financial assistance to persons,

(r)  a decision under section 234 to grant leave of absence to the holder of a civic office,

(s)  the making of an application, or the giving of a notice, to the Governor or Minister,

(t)  this power of delegation,

(u)  any function under this or any other Act that is expressly required to be exercised by resolution of the council.

 

(1A)  Despite subsection (1), a council may delegate its functions relating to the granting of financial assistance if:

 

(a)  the financial assistance is part of a specified program, and

(b)  the program is included in the council’s draft operational plan for the year in which the financial assistance is proposed to be given, and

(c)  the program’s proposed budget for that year does not exceed 5 per cent of the council’s proposed income from the ordinary rates levied for that year, and

(d)  the program applies uniformly to all persons within the council’s area or to a significant proportion of all the persons within the council’s area.

 

Proposed delegations to the General Manager

It is recommended that the General Manager be delegated authority to exercise all the powers and functions of the Council that it may lawfully delegate, under the Local Government Act and any other Act of Parliament, subject to the limitations set out below:

 

a)     Those functions designated in Section 377(1) of the Local Government Act 1993 as functions which may not be delegated.

 

b)     Any function designated in any other Act of Parliament as a function which may not be delegated.

 

c)     The exercise of any of the Council’s functions which must be referred to a Council Committee as set out in their delegations and/or terms of reference.

 

e)     The writing off of debts over the amount of $10,000 in accordance with clause 213(2) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, in that the amount above which debts to the Council may be written off only by resolution of the Council is set at $10,000.

 

f)     The writing off of an individual rate or charge over the amount of $1,000 in accordance with clause 131(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, in that the amount above which any individual rate or charge may be written off only by resolution of the council is set at $1,000.

 

g)     any adopted policy, decisions or directions of the Council.

 

The list of Act and Regulations, under which Council has powers and functions, are substantial and varied. The list includes, but is not limited to:

 

1)       Boarding Houses Act 2012

2)       Building Professionals Act 2005

3)       Coastal Protection Act 1979

4)       Companion Animals Act 1998

5)       Contaminated Land Management Act 1997

6)       Criminal Procedure Act 1986

7)       Crown Lands Act 1989

8)       Electronic Transactions Act 2000

9)       Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

10)     Food Act 2003

11)     Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009

12)     Heritage Act 1977

13)     Home Building Act 1989

14)     Impounding Act 1993

15)     Land & Environment Court Act 1979

16)     Library Act 1939

17)     Liquor Act 2007 

18)     Local Government Act 1993

19)     Noxious Weeds Act 1993

20)     Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997

21)     Public Health Act 2010

22)     Public Interest Disclosures Act 2013

23)     Registered Clubs Act 1976

24)     Road Transport Act 2013

25)     Roads Act 1993

26)     27) Strata Schemes Management Act 2015

28)     State Emergency & Rescue Management Act 1989

29)     State Records Act 1998

30)     Strata Scheme Management Act 1996

31)     Swimming Pools Act 1992

32)     Sydney Water Act 1994

33)     Trees (Disputes between neighbours) Act 2006

34)     Waste Avoidance & Resource Recovery Act 2001

35)     Work Health & Safety Act 2011

 

A Council resolution is required with respect to the following matters by virtue of the specific wording of these Acts:

 

-    the plan making functions under Section 59 of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979.

-    the powers and functions under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993, in accordance with Section 68 of that Act.

 

If the recommendation contained in this report is adopted, the General Manager intends to sub-delegate to the staff of Council all those matters that provide for the day-to-day operation of the Council.

 

Proposed delegations to Council Committees

Committee

Delegation

Administration & Finance Committee

The Administration & Finance Committee is delegated authority to determine administrative and financial items and other relevant associated matters

Civic Affairs Committee

The Civic Affairs Committee is delegated authority to determine all matter contained on the Committee's agenda and which relate to the Committee's duties/functions

Community Services Committee

The Community Services Committee is delegated authority to determine community development items and other relevant associated matters

Economic Development Committee

The Economic Development Committee is delegated authority to determine matters associated with Economic Development and the implementation of the Randwick Economic Development Strategy and associated matters, including tourism

Environment Committee

The Environment Committee is delegated authority to determine matters associated with the natural environment and other associated environmental issues

Planning Committee

The Planning Committee is delegated authority to determine health, building and planning matters

Works Committee

The Works Committee is delegated authority to determine works items and other relevant associated matters

 

Proposed delegations to the Mayor

Title

Detail

Matters for investigation

The Mayor is delegated authority to refer to the General Manager matters considered to need investigation and report with referral to Council, as necessary

Presentation of gifts

The Mayor is delegated authority to authorise the presentation of small gifts to visitor on appropriate occasions

Public Statement

The Mayor is delegated authority to make public statements on matters of official Council attitude or interpretation of Council policy

General Manager leave

The Mayor is delegated authority to determine leave applications of the General Manager, in accordance with the General Manager's contract of employment and relevant Council policies

Certificates of Australian Citizenship

The Mayor is delegated authority to present Certificates of Australian Citizenship after applicants have pledged the Oath or Affirmation of Allegiance, as provided by the Australian Citizenship Act 2007

Correspondence

The Mayor is delegated authority to sign outgoing correspondence in relation to the Office of Mayor, however, those matters relating to the day-to-day management of Council are matters that remain with the General Manager to sign

Emergency expenditure

The Mayor is delegated authority to approve, in the event of an emergency, all necessary expenditure after consultation with the General Manager

Meeting recess

The Mayor is delegated authority to exercise, during meeting recesses, the powers, authorities, duties and functions of Council other than;                                                                                                    (i) those reserved to the Council itself by section 377 and section 379 of the Local Government Act                                                                           (ii) those powers and functions delegated to the General Manager by Council from time to time,                                                                                with such delegations to be effective from midnight on the day of the last Council meeting prior to a recess period as approved by the Council, up to the time of commencement of the first Council meeting at the conclusion of the recess period

Senior staff consultation

The Mayor is delegated authority to consult with the General Manager (in accordance with section 337 of the Local Government Act 1993) prior to the appointment or dismissal, by the General Manager, of senior staff

 

Proposed delegations to the Mayor and General Manager, jointly

Title

Detail

Miscellaneous donations

The Mayor and General Manager, jointly, are delegated authority to approve donations up to the sum of $3,000 provided that funds are available within the adopted budget for Miscellaneous Donations

Councillors attendance at conferences

The Mayor and General Manager, jointly, are delegated authority to authorise Councillors attendance at conferences, seminars and similar functions in accordance with Council's Councillor Expenses and Facilities Policy

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:       Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Delegations are a complex area. If comprehensive and practical delegations are not in place, however, the General Manager and Council staff will be unable to undertake there day to day activities and works and services will be severely impacted.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

1.     the Council, delegates to the General Manager of the Council, or to the person acting in the position of General Manager, all the powers and functions of the Council that it may under any Act of Parliament lawfully delegate effective from the date of this resolution, subject to the limitations set out below:

 

a)  Those functions designated in Section 377(1) of the Local Government Act 1993 as functions which may not be delegated.

 

b)  Any function designated in any other Act of Parliament as a function which may not be delegated.

 

c)  The writing off of debts over the amount of $10,000 in accordance with clause 213(2) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, in that the amount above which debts to the Council may be written off only by resolution of the Council is set at $10,000.

 

d)  The writing off of an individual rate or charge over the amount of $1,000 in accordance with clause 131(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, in that the amount above which any individual rate or charge may be written off only by resolution of the council is set at $1,000.

 

e)  any adopted policy, decisions or directions of the Council.

 

2.     in accordance with section 381 of the Local Government Act 1993, the Council delegates to the General Manager of the Council, or to the person acting in the position of General Manager, the plan making functions under Section 59 of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979.

 

3.     in accordance with section 68 of the Noxious Weeds Act 1993, the Council, delegates to the General Manager of the Council, or to the person acting in the position of General Manager, all the powers and functions under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993 that are delegated to the Council.

 

4.     the Council delegates to the Mayor and Mayor and General Manager jointly, those delegations detailed in this report, effective from the date of this resolution.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF2/18

 

Subject:             Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures

Folder No:                   F2005/00303

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

In December 2015 this policy was amended to bring it in line with the NSW Ombudsman’s ‘Model Internal Reporting Policy – Local Government – June 2014’.

 

The model policy has not changed, but it is suggested that Council’s policy be amended by the addition of the following templates/checklists:

 

-    Template – Internal Report Form (to assist reporters)

-    Checklist – Initial assessment of internal report (to assist Disclosure Officers)

-    Checklist – Assessment of an internal report against the criteria in the PID Act (to assist Disclosure Coordinators)

 

Issues

 

As detailed in the policy, Randwick City Council does not tolerate corrupt conduct, maladministration, serious and substantial waste of public money or government information contravention or local government pecuniary interest contravention.  The Council is committed to the aims and objectives of the Public Interest Disclosures Act.  It recognises the value and importance of contributions of staff and Council to enhance administrative and management practices and strongly supports disclosures being made by staff and Councillors without any detrimental action or reprisal for making the disclosures.

 

Council’s network of nominated disclosure officers is as follows:

 

Disclosure Coordinators:           Manager Administrative Services

                                                     Senior Administrative Coordinator

 

Disclosure Officers:                  Manager Administrative Services

Manager Organisational Staff Services

                                                     Manager Library Services

                                                     Manager Waste & Cleaning Services

                                                     Manager Aquatic Services

                                                     Manager Sustainability

Three (3) members of staff determined by election from time to time

Internal Audit Committee

 

All Council’s Disclosures Officers and the Disclosures Coordinators have undertaken appropriate training.

 

Information on protected disclosures has recently been provided to all staff via a payslips attachment and information continues to be available via Simeon.  The ‘Internal Reporting Policy – Public Interest Disclosures’ also forms part of the staff induction process.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:       Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that Council’s Internal Reporting Policy – Public Interest Disclosures be amended by the inclusion of templates and checklists from the NSW Ombudsman’s Office. The amended policy is attached.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the amended Internal Reporting Policy – Public Interest Disclosures, be endorsed.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures - February 2018

 

 

 

 


Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures - February 2018

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF3/18

 

 

Subject:                  Quarterly Budget Review - December 2017

Folder No:                   F2017/00402

Author:                   Mitchel Woods, Manager Corporate and Financial Planning      

 

Introduction

 

As part of the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework for NSW Local Governments, the Office of Local Government has a set of minimum reporting requirements for Councils, in order for them to facilitate progress reporting against the original and revised annual budgets at the end of each quarter.

 

Collectively, these documents are known as the Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) and are reported to council in accordance with the relevant legislation at the end of each quarter.

 

Section 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that at the end of each quarter, a Budget Review Statement be prepared and submitted to Council that indicates the latest estimates of income and expenditure for the 2017-18 year.

 

The regulation (Section 203 (2)) also requires that the budget review statement must include, or be accompanied by:

 

I.      A report as to whether or not the Responsible Accounting Officer believes that the Statement indicates that the financial position of the Council is satisfactory, having regard to the original estimate of income and expenditure; and

II.     If that position is unsatisfactory, recommendations for remedial action.

 

Issues

 

This report is a review of the Council’s 2017-18 current budget and recommends adoption of a revised budget for the 2017-18 financial year.

 

It proposes variations to Council’s adopted budget, which will result in a projected budget surplus at year end of $16,624.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:      Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial & operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The proposed variations in this report and listed in the attachment will result in a projected budget surplus at year end of $16,624.

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Manager Corporate and Financial Planning, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the report in relation to the December 2017 Budget Review be received and noted; and

 

b)     the proposed December 2017 budget variations shown in the attachment to this report be adopted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Quarterly Budget Review Statements(QBRS) - December 2017

 

 

 

 


Quarterly Budget Review Statements(QBRS) - December 2017

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF4/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report - November 2017

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant      

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – November 2017” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of November 2017. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 30 November 2017, Council held investments with a market value of $70.79 million. The portfolio value increased during November by ~$3.80 million. The increase is representative of a positive cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from October 2016 to November 2017. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio                               

 

The portfolio is highly liquid, with 13% of investments available at call and a further 19% of assets maturing within 3 months. Another 25% of assets maturing within the 3-12 months range. Council has a large allocation to senior FRNs (approximately 43% of investments) which provide additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

 

Council’s portfolio is well diversified with term deposits at 44%, liquid floating rate notes at 43% and call accounts at 13%.

 

The investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs).

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of November 2017.

 

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances". These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit rating do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

 

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

 

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure
as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $9.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on S&P ratings).

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period November 2014 to November 2017.

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.56% compared with the benchmark index of 1.70%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits accounted for 44% of the total investment portfolio.

Four deposits totalling $5.5 million matured and were withdrawn in November. Four new term deposits were taken up during November totalling $6.5 million.

As at the end of November, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.59%, down 3 basis points (bp) from the previous month or around 80 basis points (bp) over bank bills. This is now below what can be targeted from liquid securities over their likely holding periods.

    

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $30.64 million in floating rate notes.

 

There was no trading of FRN’s during November.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 30 November 2017 decreased by ~$1.5k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2017-18 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,414,455.00. Investment income to 30 November 2017 amounted to $758,543.62.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 30 November 2017 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for November 2017 be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer November 2017

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer November 2017

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF5/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report - December 2017

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant      

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – December 2017” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of December 2017. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 December 2017, Council held investments with a market value of $69.78 million. The portfolio value decreased during December by ~$1.29 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from November 2016 to December 2017. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio                               

 

The portfolio is highly liquid, with 11% of investments available at call and a further 22% of assets maturing within 3 months. Another 23% of assets maturing within the 3-12 months range. Council has a large allocation to senior FRNs (approximately 44% of investments) which provide additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

 

Council’s portfolio is well diversified with term deposits at 45%, liquid floating rate notes at 44% and call accounts at 11%.

 

The investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs).

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of December 2017.

 

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances". These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit rating do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

 

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

 

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure
as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $9.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on S&P ratings).

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period December 2014 to December 2017.

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.56% compared with the benchmark index of 1.69%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits accounted for 45% of the total investment portfolio.

Three deposits totalling $4.0 million matured and were withdrawn in December. Three new term deposits were taken up during December totalling $4.0 million.

As at the end of December, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.57%, down 2 basis points (bp) from the previous month or around 81 basis points (bp) over bank bills.

    

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $30.63 million in floating rate notes.

 

There was no trading of FRN’s during December.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 December 2017 decreased by ~$10k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2017-18 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,414,455.00. Investment income to 31 December 2017 amounted to $909,277.87.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 December 2017 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for December 2017 be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - December 2017

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - December 2017

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF6/18

 

Subject:             Investment Report - 31 January 2018

Folder No:                   F2015/06527

Author:                   Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant      

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – January 2018” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of January 2018. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 January 2018, Council held investments with a market value of $64.02 million. The portfolio value decreased during January by ~$5.76 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from December 2016 to January 2018. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio                               

 

The portfolio is highly liquid, with 13% of investments available at call and a further 23% of assets maturing within 3 months. Another 16% of assets mature within the 3-12 months range. Council has a large allocation to senior FRNs (approximately 48% of investments) which provide additional liquidity and are generally accessible within 2-3 business days.

 

 

 

Council’s portfolio is well diversified with term deposits at 39%, liquid floating rate notes at 48% and call accounts at 13%.

 

The investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs).

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of January 2018.

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

On 22 May 2017, S&P Global Ratings downgraded the long term credit ratings of 23 financial institutions operating in Australia due to the build-up of economic imbalances". These rating downgrades have resulted in Council’s portfolio having exposure to BBB investments which it would not have otherwise invested in.

 

The downgrades did not include the big four domestic banks (ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac) as well as Macquarie Bank as they were deemed “too big to fail” and would receive government support in the event of a crisis.  Their longer term credit rating do however remain on “Negative Outlook”.

 

At the time of the downgrade, Council held the following investments:

 

Institution

Downgraded Rating

Exposure
as at 22 May 2017

Bank of Queensland

BBB+

9,500,000.00

Bendigo Adelaide Bank

BBB+

7,500,000.00

Rural Bank

BBB+

2,000,000.00

 

This exposure has been reduced by $11.0 million since the downgrade. Term deposits that mature are recalled and reinvested in higher rated institutions. Sell opportunities for FRN’s are assessed when funds are required or when new product offerings come to market that represent an appropriate addition to the portfolio.

 

Council’s current allocation is as follows:

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy (based on S&P ratings). Overweights reflect downgrades, in the case of BOQ and Bendigo Bank and portfolio shrinkage increasing the relative weight of Suncorp.

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period January 2015 to January 2018.

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.53% compared with the benchmark index of 1.73%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, term deposits accounted for 39% of the total investment portfolio.

Five deposits totalling $6.5 million matured and were withdrawn in January. There were no new term deposits taken up during January.

As at the end of January, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.58%, up 1 basis points (bp) from the previous month or around 78 basis points (bp) over bank bills.

    

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $30.63 million in floating rate notes.

 

The $2 million Bendigo Adelaide FRN 17 September 2019 was sold on the 24 January 2018. There was a realised capital gain on disposal of $7,500.00. This disposal reduced Council’s exposure to BBB rated investments to $8 million. The funds were reinvested in a new issue CBA FRN to mature 25 April 2023.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 January 2018 increased by ~$13k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·           Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·           Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·           And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2017-18 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,414,455.00. Investment income to 31 January 2018 amounted to $1,041,864.47.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 January 2018 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Investment Report for January 2018 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - 31 January 2018

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - 31 January 2018

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM1/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Andrews - Proposed Review of Pensioner Rebate

Folder No:                   F2018/06159

Submitted by:          Councillor Andrews, Central Ward      

 

That Council review the current Pensioner Rebate of $250 given to Pensioners on their Council Rates and consider increasing the Pensioner Rebate by a further $50 bringing the rebate to $300 per annum.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM2/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Support for the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service

Folder No:                   F2017/00285

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

1.     acknowledges that there are more than forty million visits to NSW National Parks each year with an overwhelming 94 per cent of visitors being satisfied or very satisfied with their experience;

 

2.     notes that Randwick City Council is home to Kamay Botany Bay National Park and Malabar Headland National Park, which are home to the endangered Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub and its diverse and range of fauna and flora;

 

3.     notes with concern the budget and staff cuts, and restructures currently taking place within the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) and the risk this places to the environment, visitor safety, public amenity and the NSW economy;

 

4.     notes that the budget and staff cuts will result in fewer rangers, a reduction in maintenance of visitor facilities, tracks being closed, and invasive species not being managed effectively;

 

5.     calls on the NSW Government to treat NPWS staff with the respect they deserve and to stop the undermining of national parks;

 

6.     writes to the NSW Premier, The Hon. Gladys Berejiklian MP, the NSW Minister for the Environment, The Hon. Gabrielle Upton MP, the Shadow Minister for the Environment, Penny Sharpe MLC and the Greens NSW Environment Spokesperson, Dr Mehreen Faruqi MLC expressing the strong concerns raised in this resolution;

 

7.     distribute this resolution to The Nature Conservation Council, Friends of Malabar Headland and the Public Service Association of NSW.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM3/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Ensuring safety on the Alison Road Shared Bike Path

Folder No:                   F2004/06633

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council lobby Transport for NSW for design changes to ensure safety on the shared bike path adjacent to Alison Road through options such as:

 

a)     preferably providing a dedicated bike-only 3.0m wide path paralleled by an additional  1.8m pedestrian-only footpath; else

 

b)     retaining it as a shared bike path but widened to 3.2metres; and/or

 

c)     converting it to a bike-only 2.5 metre wide path by restricting pedestrians to the additional footpath under construction on the south side of the CSERL light rail line.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM4/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Inadequate Width of New Bicycle Ramp at Western (Cul-De-Sac) end of King Street

Folder No:                   F2004/06633

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council lobby Transport for NSW stressing that the shared pedestrian-bike path and kerb ramp down to Darley Road at the western cul-de-sac end of Kings Street Randwick should be widened from 1.2metres to 3.2 metres to provide a reasonable level of safety and service into the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM5/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Welcome Banners and Posters supporting Cultural Diversity in Randwick City

Folder No:                   F2004/06281

Submitted by:          Councillor Neilson, North Ward      

 

That Randwick City Council acknowledge the importance and the contribution that cultural diversity has played in shaping the Randwick LGA in a visible and friendly way by;

 

a)     once again displaying banners and/or posters including such wording as: ‘All are Welcome Here’ in a number of languages including a local indigenous language and;

 

b)     displaying the posters in bus shelters & banners at appropriate locations across the city

 

c)     if possible have banners displayed at strategic locations to coincide with Palm Sunday (March 25th).

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM6/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Assistance for residents affected by the Randwick Hospital Campus redevelopment

Folder No:                   F2017/00300

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     Notes that on 23 June 2017 the Treasurer Dominic Perrottet and Minister for Health and Medical Research Brad Hazzard released details of a $720 million expansion of the Randwick Hospital Campus, and further notes that:

 

I.   Residents of 89 properties in the area immediately west of the hospital, bounded by Magill St to the South, Hospital Road to the East, High St to the North and Botany St to the West were notified on 22 June 2017 that their homes were to be acquired by Health Administration Corporation under the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991.

II.  That Health Infrastructure, acting as the agent of Health Administration Corporation, have reached agreement regarding the acquisition of 15 freehold properties, as well as regarding the acquisition of 18 leasehold interests, with the owners of the remaining 56 properties yet to reach agreement on the valuation of their homes.

III. That Health Infrastructure will take possession of the full site in September 2018.

IV. That residents whose homes have been made subject to the compulsory acquisition process as detailed above have suffered considerable hardship and distress by what they argue is an insufficient period of notice, inadequate consultation by Health Infrastructure, and significant variations in the valuations on their properties that range from 10-30% below market value. Furthermore, the requirement for 89 households to relocate within the 12 month notice period has escalated demand for housing in an area of low availability.

 

b)     Will bring back a report to council as soon as practicable with details of the sale price of all properties sold in the area referred to above within the period 1 June 2015 – 1 June 2017.

 

c)     Write to the Treasurer Dominic Perrottet, the Minister for Health and Medical Research Brad Hazzard, and Health Infrastructure as agent of Health Administration Corporation, and calls on them to:

 

I.   Offer residents an increased solatium of 10% as per section 44 of the Victorian Land Acquisition and Compensation Act 1986, to compensate for the intangible and non-pecuniary disadvantages resulting from the acquisition or compensation on a reinstatement basis, as per Recommendation 17 of the 2014 Review of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 by David Russell SC (The Russell Review), whichever is the greater.

II.  Appoint, at the expense of Health Infrastructure, a buyer’s agent for each resident to assist them in locating and purchasing their new property.

 

III. Grant an extension of settlement to late September 2018, to support those residents who due to illness, age or other reasons have experienced significant impediments to re-locating within the current timeframe.

IV. Instigate a new review of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991, with public hearings, as per Recommendation 20 of The Russell Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM7/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Request for information on plans for the Anzac Parade planned Precinct and the status of Public Housing assets in the Randwick LGA

Folder No:                   F2013/00012

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

a)       notes that residents of the Randwick LGA have expressed significant concerns and opposition to State Government planning for the Anzac Parade corridor, specifically in relation to the 2013 Anzac Parade South Urban Activation Precinct, and more recently to the 2017 Anzac Parade Corridor Priority Precinct (now Planned Precinct);

 

a)     writes to the NSW Minister for Planning, Anthony Roberts, requesting the details and current status of plans for the Anzac Parade Planned Precinct;

 

b)     writes to the NSW Minister for Social Housing Brad Hazzard, requesting information on the status of public housing assets located in the Randwick LGA in regard to the Future Direction for Social Housing Program; and

 

c)       brings back a report to council detailing the responses obtained to the questions listed above.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM8/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Excessive tree removals by Waratah Tree Services

Folder No:                   F2018/07809

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That a report be brought back after consultation with residents and ward Councillors on the issue of whether the employment by Defence of Waratah Tree Services has resulted in tree removals from Moverly Green that do not conform to procedures required under clause B5 of the Randwick City Council Development Control Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM9/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Consideration of alcohol restrictions in Munda Street Reserve

Folder No:                   F2005/00873

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council consults residents in Dooligah Avenue Randwick and brings back a report on the need and effectiveness of introducing restricted alcohol consumption in the Munda Street Reserve including around the Randwick Environment Centre.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM10/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reducing speeding through Bundock Lane between Canberra and Avoca Streets

Folder No:                   F2008/00166

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Councillors note that Council Officers have advised residents that traffic counters will be set up in Bundock Lane between Canberra and Avoca Streets Randwick and request that the results be reported back to Councillors along with an assessment of the option of trialling a 25km per hour speed limit in the lane for six months.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM11/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Failure by WaterNSW to ensure that local households are not deprived of water due to required work on public infrastructure

Folder No:                   F2004/07489

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council notes that households in Oberon Street Randwick have been cut off from piped water for more than 24 hours on several recent occasions due to WaterNSW work on the ageing pipe structure in the street and responds by:

 

a)     recognizing that household water deprivation though public infrastructure failure is unacceptable in a modern urban environment;

 

b)     lobbing WaterNSW to adopt a standard practice of automatically letter boxing urban households once it becomes likely that they will be deprived of a water connection for more than eight hours;

 

c)     notifying the local Council of such a situation; and

 

d)     providing a phone number by which households deemed to be in immediate need in such streets may request the delivery of containerized water.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM12/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Augmenting Alison Rd, Anzac Pde and Dacey Ave intersection resolution of 12 December 2017

Folder No:                   F2017/00106

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council augments its’ resolution of 12 December 2017 by identifying the St Peters interchange of the WestConnex motorway as a major source for the extra traffic expected to arrive at the Alison Road, Anzac Parade and Dacey Avenue intersection and states its opposition to stage 3 of the WestConnex.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM13/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - Review of bike sharing schemes

Folder No:                   F2016/00303

Submitted by:          Councillor Seng, Central Ward      

 

 

That given the widespread complaints from residents Council consider the following in its forthcoming review of the current guidelines on bike-sharing operations:

 

a)     call for a public tender to license only one bike-sharing operator in the City; and

 

b)     ensure the appointed operator shall have suitable designated areas (docking stations) for the return of all bikes and all bike users shall comply with this condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM14/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Seng - More incentives to encourage housing for seniors and people with a disability

Folder No:                   F2004/07991

Submitted by:          Councillor Seng, Central Ward      

 

 

That given the ageing population and the shortage of seniors housing in NSW, Council:

 

a)     review the State Environmental Planning Policy (Housing for Seniors or People with a Disability) 2004 with the aim of developing a policy to provide incentives to encourage more supply of dwellings for people aged over 55 and people with a disability; and

 

b)     lobby the State and Federal governments to achieve the above objective.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM15/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed Increase in the Pensioner rebate in the Randwick LGA

Folder No:                   F2018/06159

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That Council increase the Pensioner Rebate by $75(to $325) to help alleviate increased cost of living pressures faced by over 4500 pensioners living in the Randwick LGA.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM16/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed Loop Bus Service

Folder No:                   F2008/00533

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That:

 

a)     Council bring back a report investigating the option of operating a loop bus service within the Randwick LGA aimed at reducing traffic and parking congestion; and

 

b)     As part of this report, contact Transport for NSW (TfNSW) requesting if they would sponsor and operate a loop bus program in the Randwick LGA.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM17/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Veitch - Submission to the Financial Services Royal Commission regarding Company Title Duplexes

Folder No:                   F2017/00530

Submitted by:          Councillor Veitch, West Ward     

 

 

That Randwick City Council:

 

a)       notes that residents in the Randwick LGA who own duplexes (attached dual occupancies) have been placed in financial difficulty by the recent decision of banks to cease lending on Company title.

 

b)       presents a submission to the Financial Services Royal Commission (Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry) detailing:

 

i.   The economic characteristics of Randwick City Council’s housing market and the need to ease lending restrictions on company title properties.

ii.   The cumulative impact of these changes on the affordability of housing in the Randwick LGA.

iii.  The impact of these changes on owners of company title duplexes who are not able to sell their homes.

 

c)       brings back a report to council detailing any responses obtained to the questions raised above.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               27 February 2018

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM18/18

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Parker - Proposing a long term nightlife strategy.

Folder No:                   F2018/00117

Submitted by:          Councillor Parker, Central Ward     

 

 

That: 

 

1.     Council prepare a long-term night-life strategy.

2.     The core aims of this strategy are:

 

a)   encouraging additional gallery and performance spaces, live music, dining and small bars options;

b)   encouraging a geographical spread of night-life across Randwick City;

c)   re-vitalising local businesses strips impacted by the light-rail construction;

d)   minimising any noise, anti-social behaviour, and parking impacts on local residents;

e)   informing future reviews of our existing planning controls; and

f)   informing future reviews of existing fees and charges.

3.     Council constitute a night-time advisory committee comprising of two councillors and 8 community members.