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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 12 December 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 12 December 2017 at 6:00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 28 November 2017

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting NOT required)

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act, the General Manager is required to keep a register of Councillor voting on planning matters. Planning matters are any decisions made in the exercise of a function of a council under the EP&A Act and include decisions relating to a development application, an environmental planning instrument, a development control plan or a development contribution plan under that Act. In addition, Randwick City Council has resolved (22 July 2008) that its register of voting include the voting on all tender matters.

CP83/17    Randwick Health and Education Precinct - Collaboration Area and Stakeholder Agreement......................................................................................... 1

CP84/17    Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and Eastern City District Plan, and draft Future Transport Strategy 2056....................................................................... 5

General Manager's Reports

GM28/17   Continuation of Community Partnership with Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club..................................................................................... 77

Director City Services Reports

Nil

Director Governance & Financial Services Reports

GF48/17    1-11 Rainbow Street, Kingsford.  Classification of land under the Local Government Act 1993.......................................................................................... 81

GF49/17    Monthly Financial Report as at 31 October 2017....................................... 83

GF50/17    Cost Shifting: Impact on
Current and Future Budgets................................................................. 93  

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM80/17   Notice of Motion from Crs Bowen, Neilson, Parker, Luxford and Said - Moore Park stadium and Westconnex Alison Rd and Anzac Pde intersection................... 95

NM81/17   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy ...................................................................................................... 97  

Closed Session (record of voting required)

Director Goveranance & Financial Services Reports

GF51/17    Tender T2018-13 Mechanical Repairs

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

GF52/17    Tender T2018-14 Catering Services

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Notice of Rescission Motion

NR9/17     Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Matson, Shurey (Mayor) and Neilson - Development Application report - 4/199-203A Malabar Rd, South Coogee (DA/153/2015/A)............................................................................... 99  

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP83/17

 

Subject:             Randwick Health and Education Precinct - Collaboration Area and Stakeholder Agreement

Folder No:                   F2010/00346

Author:                   Joanna Hole, Co-ordinator-Strategic Planning      

 

Introduction

 

The Randwick Health and Education Precinct is Randwick City’s largest employment centre. In the new draft Greater Sydney Region and Eastern City District Plans prepared by the Greater Sydney Commission, this precinct is identified as a strategic centre and a priority Collaboration Area, with strong forecast employment growth (note that a separate report to Council on these Plans has been prepared).

 

There is interest from the University of NSW and NSW Health, as core stakeholders of the precinct, to coordinate resources and work together in planning for the precinct’s future. This report outlines the Collaboration Area process and proposed stakeholder agreement, and seeks Council’s endorsement to participate in the stakeholder agreement.

 

Issues

 

Randwick Health and Education precinct

This precinct is recognised in the Randwick City Plan for its economic importance and contribution to local jobs and services for the community, as well as its support for the viability of the surrounding town centres and local economy. 33% of the university and hospitals’ campuses employees live in Randwick City, with a further 20% living in a neighbouring LGA, making this one of the centres with the highest employment self-containment in Sydney, with benefits for local liveability and sustainable transport.

The precinct has historically been a focus of Randwick’s economy, and its prominence continues as the City’s major employment location, and strong employment growth is forecast. Its citywide significance is recognised in the new draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and Eastern City District Plan, with nomination as a priority Collaboration Area.

 

Randwick Collaboration Area

Collaboration Areas have been established by the Greater Sydney Commission (the Commission) to provide a whole of government approach, and to work with key stakeholders in coordinated planning for selected key economic centres. The Commission’s goal is to facilitate collaboration between local councils, state agencies and other key stakeholders to enhance the liveability, sustainability and productivity of the area.

 

The Randwick Health and Education Precinct has been nominated as a priority Collaboration Area in the draft Eastern City District Plan. There are four other priority Collaboration Areas identified by the Commission for 2017-2018. These are Camperdown-Ultimo, Westmead, Liverpool and Penrith, all of which are also growing health-education precincts.

 

The Randwick Collaboration Area includes the key sites of the UNSW and Hospitals Campuses, with its influence extending to Randwick TAFE, the adjacent town centres of Kensington, Kingsford, Randwick Junction and the Spot, and Randwick Racecourse as a large site with a common boundary to the key institutions.

 

Further details of the draft Eastern City District Plan and a draft Council submission are included in a separate report to the 12 December Council meeting.

 

Several projects with multiple stakeholders, high forecast employment growth and large scale investment in and around the Health and Education precinct have driven its inclusion and prioritisation as a Collaboration Area. These include:

-    Delivery of the CBD and South East Light Rail

-    Redevelopment pressure along the Anzac Parade corridor and Council’s Kensington to Kingsford Planning Strategy

-    Commencement of a review of the Randwick Junction Town Centre

-    $720million redevelopment and expansion of the Prince of Wales Hospital

-    $100 million partnership between UNSW and China on the Torch Innovation Precinct

-    Commencement of a major master-planning exercise for the UNSW Kensington campus

-    20 year employment growth forecast in the precinct of between 40% and 56%

 

The Commission is preparing a Collaboration Area agreement in the form of a Memorandum of Understanding for the Commission and core stakeholders, including Council, UNSW and NSW Health. Government agencies include the Department of Planning and Environment and Transport for NSW. The Collaboration Area agreement will outline the key processes, a governance structure and planning activities for the area, with outputs being a place strategy and infrastructure plan. These are intended to be high level plans that reflect the key agreed outcomes for the precinct, to reinforce cross-government coordination, and inform future investment priorities.

 

Randwick stakeholder alliance

In addition to the Collaboration Area, and to complement its activities, the University of NSW has suggested to establish a precinct stakeholder group, covered by an agreed Memorandum of Understanding. NSW Health Infrastructure has also acknowledged the potential for a formal stakeholder agreement to build on the work undertaken by individual organisations, and provide a stronger foundation for the precinct to successfully compete in the global health, education, and research field. Potential members of the alliance would include UNSW, NSW Health (encompassing hospitals and research institutions) and Council.

 

This can enable coordinated stakeholder input to the Collaboration Area process, as well as facilitate joint input and coordination of resources in preparing a strategic vision, economic profile and potential precinct master-planning. Similar agreements exist in other prominent health, education and research precincts such as the Westmead Alliance and the Macquarie Park Innovation District.

 

The benefits of participation in a formal stakeholder agreement for Council are to enable input into a joint vision and planning for the future of the precinct that encompasses an understanding of the wider context, the interface of the precinct with its surrounds, and the needs of the community.

 

This report recommends that Council endorses participation in a stakeholder agreement for the Randwick Health and Education Precinct. It is expected that, if agreed by the participants, the terms of the agreement will be established through a Memorandum of Understanding, which will cover membership, joint activities, a governance structure and sharing of resources and information.

 

It is proposed that a Council Steering Committee is established, comprising the Mayor and three Councillors to provide input and direction to Council Strategic Planning staff represented on the stakeholder group. External specialist consultants can be engaged on key matters to provide advice to the Steering Committee, in addition to Council staff.

 

Further updates to Council will be provided on the status of agreement by all parties to formalise a stakeholder group, and if agreed, on progress towards a formal memorandum of understanding.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 8:       A strong local economy.

Direction 8b:      Support and strengthen the Hospital and University Precinct’s provision of specialised education and health services, and employment growth.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Randwick Health and Education precinct is Randwick City’s largest employment centre, and a focus of local jobs and services with substantial wider flow-on economic benefits. With strong forecast employment growth and several major projects and investments, it is important to coordinate planning across Council, the state government and the precinct’s key sites to deliver positive outcomes for the precinct, its surrounds and for the community. Establishment of and participation in a Collaboration Area and stakeholder agreement can help achieve coordinated outcomes.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorses:

 

a)        Participation by Council in a stakeholder agreement for the Randwick Health and Education precinct, and associated Memorandum of Understanding, and;

 

b)        Establishment of a Council Steering Committee comprising the Mayor and three Councillors to provide input and direction to Council staff in relation to the stakeholder agreement.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP84/17

 

Subject:             Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and Eastern City District Plan, and draft Future Transport Strategy 2056

Folder No:                   F2017/00475

Author:                   Joanna Hole, Co-ordinator-Strategic Planning     

 

Introduction

 

This report informs the Council on three submissions prepared by Council officers on the exhibition of: 1. the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan; 2. the revised draft Eastern City District Plan; and 3. the draft Future Transport Strategy 2056. It also seeks the Council’s endorsement of the draft submissions for forwarding to the Greater Sydney Commission (the Commission) and Transport for NSW for their consideration in finalising these plans.

 

The three key strategic land use and transport plans aim to provide an integrated approach towards planning for population growth and change across Greater Sydney to 2056.

 

The draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and revised draft Eastern City District Plan are on exhibition until the 15 December 2017. A draft submission prepared on these plans are attached as Attachments 1-4.

 

The Future Transport Strategy is on exhibition until the 3 December 2017 and the draft submission prepared to the strategy is attached as Attachment 5-6.

 

The following provides a brief overview of each of the three plans and a summary of key issues of particular relevance to Randwick City. 

 

Issues

 

1.   The Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan

As an update of the current Metropolitan Strategy (A Plan for Growing Sydney), the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan (the draft Region Plan) has been prepared to demonstrate a strengthened response to the new trends, challenges and opportunities for Sydney’s future. It is the first regional plan prepared by the Commission, an independent agency responsible for leading metropolitan planning and it is therefore not Government policy.

 

Following a coordinated and integrated approach, the draft Region Plan has been developed concurrently with the revised draft District Plans, and importantly, the NSW Government’s Future Transport 2056 and State Infrastructure Strategy, to achieve a shared vision for Sydney’s land use and infrastructure planning and delivery. Built on an aspirational 40-year vision, the draft Region Plan aims to transform Greater Sydney into a metropolis of three connected cities where most people can travel to their nearest metropolitan city centre or strategic centre within 30 minutes by public transport.

 

The Commission has introduced two new approaches, being Collaboration Areas and Growth Infrastructure Compacts (GIC), to guide and facilitate sustained growth aligned with infrastructure delivery in key economic centres. A GIC starts by identifying where significant employment growth could occur, followed by investigations to outline what new and enhanced local and regional infrastructure will be required to support the growth, how much it will cost, how it will be funded and when it can be delivered. The GIC approach could be extended to provide long term benefits and support strategic centres such as the Randwick Health and Education precinct.

 

In order to boost the supply of affordable housing, the draft Region Plan incorporates mandated Affordable Rental Housing Targets (5-10% of the new residential floor space generated by up-zoning) and requires investigation of new housing models (e.g. built to rent) to provide affordable and longer-term rental accommodation to moderate income households to support Sydney’s workforce.

 

The draft Region Plan is structured around four themes, being ‘Infrastructure and collaboration’, ‘Liveability’, ‘Productivity’ and ‘Sustainability’ and ten directions. Each direction is translated into specific objectives, strategies and actions. 14 metrics or KPIs are proposed to enable monitoring and reporting on the performance of the Region Plan. Key issues or areas suggested for the Commission’s further consideration are summarised below while specific comments on the proposed objectives, actions and metrics are included in the attached Submission table.

 

·      Extensive community consultation and close collaboration with local councils should be undertaken to inform decision-making, in particular decisions relating to nomination of major renewal/growth areas and delivery plans for critical infrastructure;

·      Place-based and place-specific contribution schemes should be widely explored so that additional levy schemes (on top of the existing local contribution system) apply to areas undergoing significant growth, to recognise these areas’ higher demand for infrastructure;

·      The current framework of numerous approaches driving housing and employment growth (e.g. City Deal, Collaboration Areas, Priority Precincts, Priority Growth Areas and Urban Transformation) should be simplified. Similarly, the current situation with various government bodies and agencies involved in planning and delivery of affordable housing should be improved for enhanced consistency in policy-making and efficient use of resources;

·      More effective mitigation measures should be explored and implemented to carefully manage the adverse impacts from the operation of Port Botany and the airport which are subject to ongoing growth and intensification. Given the increasing pressure and constraints affecting Port Botany, alternative locations should be investigated to help handle the projected growth;

·      It is recommended that a more comprehensive review be undertaken to investigate all possible solutions to mitigate the heat island effect and provide environmental benefits, in particular innovative design measures, such as rain gardens, green roofs and green walls; 

·      Opportunities for improved access to open space should be widely explored for all areas, instead of a particular focus on areas subject to renewal. Tailored plans and programs are suggested to be established to facilitate shared use of existing open space by the general community. When planning for new open space, quality and quantity are equally important;

·      Additional metrics are recommended to address key objectives, such as heritage consideration, biodiversity protection and active transport. To achieve a sound evaluation framework, baseline data and targets should be established as an immediate action to enable comparison and monitoring of performance over time.

 

2.   The Revised Draft Eastern City District Plan

The revised draft Eastern City District Plan (October 2017) replaces the previous draft Central District Plan (November 2016). It is a 20 year plan to manage population growth and change across the Eastern City district which covers the Bayside, Burwood, City of Sydney, Canada Bay, Inner West, Randwick, Strathfield, Waverley and Woollahra local government areas (LGA). Population growth across the eastern city district is projected to increase by 325,000 more people by 2036, to 1,338,250 people. This will generate a projected dwelling demand of an additional 725,000 new dwellings of which 59% is estimated to be met by apartments. 

 

The revised draft Eastern City District Plan (the draft District Plan) is a guide for implementing the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan at a district level, on strategic land use, transport and infrastructure planning. The draft District Plan informs the preparation and review of LEPs by Councils and the assessment of planning proposals (as illustrated in Figure 1).

 

Figure 1 The Planning Hierarchy 

 

It is structured in six chapters around four main themes (as in the draft Region Plan). Each theme contains a number of planning priorities and actions which planning authorities must give effect in undertaking strategic planning process and/or considering planning proposals.  The District Plans will be finalised by the Commission following finalisation of the Regional Plan. On finalisation of the District Plans, councils are required to update their LEPs to give effect to the District Plans, within three years of the District Plans being finalised.

 

The draft submission highlights key points under each of the four key themes and reviews each of the 74 actions (where relevant) with comments and/or suggestions for consideration by the Commission, as summarised below:

 

·      Overall, the draft District Plan provides a sound framework to address the overarching priorities of ‘Infrastructure and Collaboration’, ‘Liveability’, ‘Productivity’ and ‘Sustainability’;

·      The draft submission supports the emphasis of the draft District Plan on integrating land use and transport planning to deliver a 30-minute city; its recognition of the Randwick Collaboration Area and its potential to become an ‘Innovation District’; the introduction of an Affordable Rental Housing Target; and initiatives towards implementing low carbon precincts for targeted growth areas;

·      Key issues/areas identified in the draft submission for further investigation and improvement include:

-    Council does not support the inclusion of the area between south Kingsford and Maroubra (as shown on Page 41) as a Priority Precinct, on the basis that it is neither within, nor close to a strategic centre and not supported by any committed transport infrastructure. The draft Future Transport Strategy proposes investigations into extension to the CBD and South East light Rail and potential mass transit (metro) rail in a 10-20 year timeframe, which is clearly outside the timeframe for delivery of a priority precinct. Council considers it is best placed to lead the planning for housing and growth in Randwick City;

-    It is recommended that the GIC approach be investigated for extension to other Priority Collaboration Areas, such as Randwick Education and Health Collaboration Area;

-    We note that Eastgardens/Maroubra Junction is identified as a strategic centre, and we request investigation by the Commission and councils into a cohesive future economic strategy for this combined centre. The strategic centres of Eastgardens/Maroubra Junction and the Randwick Collaboration Area have 20 year job targets, and we seek clarification and detailed directions as to how local planning is to respond to these job targets, and;

-    We request further investigation of the Affordable Rental Housing Target scheme, the local development contributions framework and the proposed sustainability initiatives for efficient implementation and improved outcomes.

 

3.   Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056

The draft Future Transport Strategy updates and replaces the NSW Long Term Transport Master Plan (2012). It provides a 40 year vision to 2056, and a 20 year plan to 2036, consistent with the draft Region Plan. The draft Strategy has also been coordinated to align with the key structuring elements and population growth in the draft Region Plan.

 

The draft Strategy sets a vision based on 6 outcomes of customer focus, successful places, growing the economy, safety and performance, accessible services and sustainability. Future directions for investigation are based around the subjects of future customers, future mobility, future services, the future network and sustainability. Importantly, the draft Strategy acknowledges the impacts of rapidly changing technology and innovation on the transport network, and proposes government as an enabler of new transport services delivered through increased use of technology, with a higher emphasis on personal mobility and flexible transport options.

 

Future transport network improvements and infrastructure proposed for investigation are based on milestones of 0-10 years, 10-20 years, and a 20+ year vision. In Randwick City the major new investigations include extension of the CBD and South east Light Rail to Maroubra Junction, and investigation into mass transit (metro) rail to the south-east in a 10-20 year timeframe. A 20+ year vision includes additional transit (light rail or rapid bus) connections to La Perouse, Bondi Junction, Sydney Airport and Green Square. A connected cycle network of 5km around strategic centres and 10km around cities is also proposed.

 

The draft submission includes key summary comments and a more detailed table responding to the draft Strategy’s outcomes, targets, measures and directions. Major issues raised in the draft submission include:

 

·      Support for the consistent structure of Sydney as a metropolis of three cities applied to the Strategy and the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and District Plans. Underpinning the 3 city model is the concept of the 30 minute city, promoting access for people to jobs and services within 30 minutes by public transport. This common initiative to all three plans provides a sound basis for integrated land use and transport planning and is also supported;

·      Recommendations to provide stronger, more specific and measurable targets and actions that more closely reflect the desired outcomes of the Strategy, and which include clear accountabilities, timeframes and priorities, and opportunities for local government, stakeholders and the community to work with the state government on common issues;

·      Support for long-term planning and identification of public transport infrastructure improvements. However, Council does not support the automatic expectation that residential densification should accompany mass transit investigation. This has resulted in poorly considered, reactive and opportunistic development. Future housing supply is best evaluated on a comprehensive basis such as local housing strategy prepared by councils; and

·      Acknowledgment of the potential for technology to transform the future transport system, and support for the Strategy’s long term and forward-thinking approach. However the submission notes that the draft Strategy is limited in its attention to current transport issues and solutions, and risks an over-reliance on 3rd party technology suppliers to determine future transport services. The role of state government to provide strong regulatory and policy leadership and procurement expertise in this situation is critical.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4

Excellence in Urban Design and Development

Direction 4b

New and existing development is managed by a robust framework

Outcome 6

A liveable City

Direction 6d

A strategic land use framework provides for our lifestyle changes and for a continuing, yet low rate of growth across our City

Direction 6e

Enhance housing diversity, accessibility and adaptability to support our diverse community.

Direction 6f

Foster distinct neighbourhoods with commercial centres that meet the needs of our community as places to work, shop, live and socialise.

Outcome 8

A Strong Local Economy

Direction 8a

Vibrant business, commercial, and industrial sectors that provide ongoing and diverse employment opportunities and serve the community

Direction 8b

Support and strengthen the Hospital and University precinct's provision of specialised education and health services and employment growth

Direction 8e

Tourism's role in the local economy is acknowledged

Outcome 9

Integrated and Accessible Transport

Direction 9a

A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycle ways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities

Direction 9c

Advocate and /or plan for integrated local and regional transport improvements, including high capacity transport such as light/standard rail

Outcome 10

A Healthy Environment

Direction 10b

Policies and programs are developed and implemented in response to environmental risks and their potential impacts


Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Following a thorough review of the draft plans, the three draft submissions have been prepared based on comments received from staff across multi-disciplines. While we support numerous new initiatives proposed towards a liveable, prosperous and sustainable City, a number of issues have been raised and recommended for further investigation prior to the finalisation of the draft plans.  

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council endorse the attached submissions on the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan, the revised draft Eastern City District Plan and the draft Future Transport Strategy 2056 for forwarding to the Greater Sydney Commission and Transport for NSW for their consideration in finalising these plans.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Draft Submission on Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan (Main Submission)

 

2.

Draft Submission on Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan (Submission Table)

 

3.

Draft Submission on Draft Revised Eastern City District Plan (Main Submission)

 

4.

Draft Submission on Draft Revised Eastern City District Plan (Submission Table)

 

5.

Draft Submission on Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056 (Main Submission)

 

6.

Draft Submission on Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056 (Submission Table)

 

 

 

 


Draft Submission on Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan (Main Submission)

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Draft Submission on Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan (Submission Table)

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Draft Submission on Draft Revised Eastern City District Plan (Main Submission)

Attachment 3

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Draft Submission on Draft Revised Eastern City District Plan (Submission Table)

Attachment 4

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Draft Submission on Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056 (Main Submission)

Attachment 5

 

 


 


 


Draft Submission on Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056 (Submission Table)

Attachment 6

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM28/17

 

Subject:             Continuation of Community Partnership with Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club

Folder No:                   F2014/00414

Author:                   David Kelly, Manager Administrative Services      

 

Introduction

 

At the ordinary meeting held Tuesday 13 December 2016 Council resolved:

 

“(Stavrinos/Bowen) that:

 

a)     Council continues with the “Community Partnership” with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club with the $30,000.00 plus GST contribution to come from Council’s Community Development budget;

 

b)     the General Manager be delegated authority to enter into a Memorandum of    Understanding with Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club; and

 

c)     a report on the success of the 2017 Community Partnership to come back       before Council.”

 

In accordance with clause (c) of the above resolution this report is submitted and recommends continuing with this community partnership after another very successful year.

 

Issues

 

Our community partnership with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club was established to target schools and disaffected youth in the central and northern suburbs in the Randwick City area. As part of the partnership, a total of fifty tickets will again be made available to every Roosters’ home game and will be available for Council to distribute as it sees fit. In 2017 these tickets were used as a reward for progress made at school, for volunteer work undertaken in the local area, for group morale building events, as gifts to schools in the area and for many other reason chosen by Council and its youth workers.

 

Throughout the year there will again be tickets allocated to Council for various events which Council will also be able to utilise as a reward for those community members identified as having made the most outstanding contribution to our community in a voluntary capacity.

 

Once again, under this community partnership, there will be an annual coaching clinic held by the Sydney Roosters at Burrows Park, Clovelly. This year’s event, held on 7 December 2017, was a great success with over 150 students from schools across the Clovelly, Coogee, Randwick, Kensington and Maroubra areas, as well as the full Roosters squad, in attendance. The Roosters will continue to provide high profile player(s) to certain Council events such as White Ribbon Walk, Coogee Family Fun Day, Randwick Spot Festival, Randwick Sports Awards and NAIDOC Week.

In addition to these wonderful programs there are a number of other opportunities that both organisations are able to utilise to get our positive messages out into the community. These include, but are not limited to:

 

·           Joint banners at strategic locations throughout Randwick and Clovelly promoting youth events;

·           Youth project related stories from both organisations in our respective newsletters;

·           Links between our websites with each other’s good news and/or important stories on our respective websites and other publications;

·           Roosters school visits advising the kids about some of Council’s Programs and other youth programs available;

·           The Roosters working with our local chambers of commerce to work together to create business and economic development opportunities; and

·           The Roosters working with Randwick City Council Partner organisations, community groups and programmes in particular Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Programs and Multicultural Programs and Projects.

 

Our community partnership in 2017 again targetted our local primary school aged children who benefitted from the clubs’ Roosters Against Racism Program, NRL Wellbeing and Teacher’s Aid programs. Over the previous year we also expanded our partnership by adding a new program for our secondary school students entitled “Leadership, Mentoring and Work Experience.” The feedback received on this new initiative over the previous year has been outstanding.

 

Led by Sydney Roosters Anthony Minichiello and the Roosters Community Department, the program is designed to inspire high school students to define their ambitions and career goals and create the steps to achieve them. Using the NRL Dream Believe Achieve teaching resource, the classroom based program covers SMART goals, resilience, self-belief and leadership. A highlight of the program is a career talk by Anthony Minichiello and how he overcame many challenges throughout his career to achieve success through hard work and determination, consistency and making the right choices off the field.

 

The aim of the program is to harness the Roosters popularity to empower and educate students about the importance of having a dream and how to work towards their goals and aspirations. The program is linked to the Australian Curriculum. To further support year ten students the Sydney Roosters will work in partnership with secondary schools and make available work experience opportunities across all departments of the business including but not limited to Commercial, Marketing, Digital and Community

 

In 2017 we also commenced a new School to Work Indigenous Program at Marcellin College. The School to Work program is an education and employment program that utilises the positive profile of the game of Rugby League to support and encourage young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to complete their schooling and successfully transition into further education or employment. There are currently 12 participants on the program.

 

It should also be noted that as part of this community partnership, Council was able to secure the services of Anthony Minichiello as the keynote speaker at Council’s ‘All Stops to Randwick’ corporate training program in 2017.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2c:      Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of this community partnership for 2018 will be $33,000.00 plus GST, which has been allowed for in Council’s Community Development budget.

 

Conclusion

 

This exciting “Community Partnership” with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club has resulted in major benefits for both our organisations and, more importantly, our local community. These benefits have included:

 

·           Both organisations raising their profile in the community through the local media and with mutual marketing and advertising opportunities;

·           Better targeting of schools and particular disaffected youth using high profile footballers who can better connect with these traditionally difficult areas;

·           Greater community awareness of the programs being run by both organisations; and

·           Being able to reward our volunteers, school children and disadvantaged youth for their efforts.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council continues with the “Community Partnership” with the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club with the $33,000.00 plus GST contribution to come from Council’s Community Development budget;

 

b)     the General Manager be delegated authority to enter into a Memorandum of     Understanding with Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club; and

 

c)     a report on the success of the 2018 Community Partnership to come back        before Council.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

   


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF48/17

 

Subject:             1-11 Rainbow Street, Kingsford.  Classification of land under the Local Government Act 1993

Folder No:                   F2004/06326

Author:                   Sharon Plunkett, Property Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to seek Council resolution to classify the land at 1-11 Rainbow Street, Kingsford, being Lot 1 DP 120465, as ‘operational’ under the Local Government Act 1993, for the purposes of Council’s property register consistent with Councils other commercial property holdings.

 

The proposal to classify the subject property to operational land has been publicly advertised in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993. One submission was received. 

 

Background

 

On 3 October 2017 Council finalised the purchase of the property from Transport for NSW and entered into a 2 & a half year lease of the site.

 

The Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires that all public land be classified as either operational or community acquired by Council. The Act further provides that should a decision not be taken by Council to classify the acquired land within three months after transfer, the land will automatically default to a ‘community’ land classification.

 

Issues

 

Methods of classification

The Local Government Act provides for two methods for classifying public land:

 

1)  By the local environmental plan (LEP) and public inquiry process

 

2)  By resolution of the Council (for land acquired after 1 July 1993) – Any acquired land, if not classified via a Council resolution within 3 months from the acquisition date, is taken to have been classified under a LEP as community land.

 

Classifying the property via a Council resolution (Method 2) is considered more time and resource efficient and is the purpose of this report.

 

Public notice

Section 34 of the Act requires Council to give public notice of its proposal to classify land. A period of not less than 28 days must be specified for the receipt of public submissions.

 

Public notice of Council’s proposal to classify the subject property as operational land was included in the Southern Courier. The general public was invited to make submissions during the advertised period from 31 October 2017 to 29 November 2017 (28 days). Information was also displayed at Council’s Customer Service Centre, libraries and on its website.

 

One submission was received in response to the public notification process suggesting a large conservatory with floor to ceiling glass canopy to allow a vast array of suitable indoor plants to thrive in the space.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  6: A liveable city.

Direction:  6a: Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact associated with the proposed resolution. However, should Council not adopt the proposed resolution, it will affect the ease with which the land may be developed, sold or leased. This will have long term financial implications for Council’s asset management.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposal to classify the subject property to operational was publicly notified in accordance with the requirements of the Act with only one submission received in relation to the future use of the site, not the classification. Councillors’ and the community will have an opportunity to provide input on future uses for the site as part of a future process.

 

The process of achieving the ‘operational’ land classification via a Council resolution needs to be completed promptly to avoid a default to ‘community’ classification.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council resolve to classify the land at 1-11 Rainbow Street, Kingsford as ‘operational’ land in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF49/17

 

Subject:             Monthly Financial Report as at 31 October 2017

Folder No:                   F2017/00404

Author:                   Oliver Guo, Management Accountant      

 

Introduction

 

Section 202 of Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the responsible accounting officer of a council must:

a)     establish and maintain a system of budgetary control that will enable the council’s actual income and expenditure to be monitored each month and to be compared with the estimate of the council’s income and expenditure, and

b)     if any instance arises where the actual income or expenditure of the council is materially different from its estimated income or expenditure, report the instance to the next meeting of the council.

 

Issues

 

This report provides the financial results of the Council as at 31 October 2017. Attachment 1 summarises the Council’s financial performance and its source and application of funds. It also summarises the operating result for each of the Council’s principal activities. Attachment 2 details the financial position of the Council as at 31 October 2017. Attachment 3 details the cash flow of the Council as at 31 October 2017.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:     Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:    Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational      activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council’s Manager Corporate and Financial Planning, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory. The Current Ratio as at 31 October 2017 is 1.93 compared to 2.08 as at 30 June 2017. The Current Ratio is a financial indicator specific to local government and represents its ability to meet its debts and obligations as they fall due.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Administration and Finance Committee acknowledges that the Responsible Accounting Officer has advised that the projected financial position of Council is satisfactory.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements October 2017

 

2.

Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet October 2017

 

3.

Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement October 2017

 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Income Statements October 2017

Attachment 1

 

 


 

 

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Balance Sheet October 2017

Attachment 2

 

 


Monthly Financial Statements - Cash Flow Statement October 2017

Attachment 3

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF50/17

 

Subject:             Cost Shifting: Impact on
Current and Future Budgets

Folder No:                   F2006/00588

Author:                   Mitchel Woods, Manager Corporate and Financial Planning     

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Tuesday 28 November 2017 it was resolved that Randwick City Council:

 

a)     notes that is 2015-25 Long Term Financial Plan (LTFP) identifies financial sustainability as one of the key issues facing local government

 

b)     recognises that cost shifting is one of the key factors affecting Council’s ability to meet the objectives of the LTFP.

 

c)     will bring back a report to the Council Meeting in December 2017 that identifies:

i.   The details of the cost shifting expenses contained in the 2017-18 Budget; and

ii.  The details of the cost shifting expenses anticipated to be in the 2018-19 and 2019-20 budgets.

 

Issues

 

Councils across New South Wales and Australia, together with Local Government industry bodies, have for decades unsuccessfully advocated for the removal of the cost shifting from other levels of government to local councils. As a result, direct and indirect cost shifting remains a burden on the finances of councils and Randwick City Council is no exception.

 

There are two forms of cost shifting: direct and indirect. Examples of direct cost shifting are the levies imposed by the State Government such as the Fire Services Levy, the State Emergency Services Levy and the Planning Levy. Another example of direct cost shifting is the fee that Council pays directly to the NSW Valuer-General for the provision of land values used for rating purposes. Councils are also burdened with providing the funding for the provision of street lighting across urban areas including the urban areas of Randwick City.

 

A recent example of cost shifting from the Commonwealth Government is the requirement for local councils across Australia to fund the implementation of measures to meet their anti-terrorism obligations under the Government’s “Australia’s Strategy Protecting Crowded Places from Terrorism”.

 

Examples of indirect cost shifting include instances where the State Government has introduced new legislation and then required local councils to administer them. Example pieces of legislation include Companion Animal Act (NSW) 1998, Contaminated Land Management Act (NSW) 1997, Protection of the Environment Operations Act (NSW) 1997, and Food Act (NSW) 2003. Governments further exacerbates the situation by restricting the fees and charges that Randwick can apply to recover the costs associated with this administration.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  1. Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  1a Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Below are the budget allocations that Randwick City Council has made in the 2017-18 budget and will also have to make in future budgets.

 

Direct Cost Shifting Budget Item

2017-18 Budget

2018-19

Estimate

2019-20

Estimate

 

Total

Fire Services Levy

$2,260,724

$2,317,242

$2,375,173

$6,953,139

State Emergency Services Levy

$260,788

$267,308

$273,990

$802,086

Planning Levy

$269,787

$276,532

$283,445

$829,764

Valuation Fees

$163,200

$167,280

$171,462

$501,942

Street Lighting

$2,510,000

$2,572,750

$2,637,069

$7,719,819

Total

$5,464,499

$5,601,112

$5,741,139

$16,806,750

 

The cost of indirect cost shifting does not have a separate budget allocation and the actions required to be undertaken have to be funded through existing budgets which have been set for the provision of normal Council services. Every year these expenses are estimated to be in excess of $5 million.

 

Collectively, direct and indirect cost shifting of other levels of government to councils, costs Randwick City Council in excess of $10 million annually.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick City Council, together with the local government industry, will continue to advocate for the removal or remedy of cost shifting from other levels of government. Until these advocacy efforts are successful, Council will be required to continue to allocate funds to cover the expenses of cost shifting.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM80/17

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Crs Bowen, Neilson, Parker, Luxford and Said - Moore Park stadium and Westconnex Alison Rd and Anzac Pde intersection

Folder No:                   F2017/00106

Submitted by:          Councillor Bowen, East Ward; Councillor Neilson, North Ward; Councillor Parker, Central Ward; Councillor Luxford, West Ward; Councillor Said, South Ward     

 

That Council:

 

1.     Notes the State Government’s failure to engage in meaningful community consultation and its unwillingness to commission and/or release the relevant strategic business cases.

 

2.     Agrees to collaborate with neighboring councils as well as State and Federal representatives to work together in order to effect an immediate moratorium on progression of the following proposals (“Proposals”):

 

a.   The rebuilding of the Allianz Stadium at Moore Park and encroachment and expansion into Moore Park open and green space on at an anticipated cost to taxpayers of $705 million.

b.   The Alexandria to Moore Park road widening -  The Roads and Maritime Services’ (RMS) ‘preliminary concept design’ for the Alexandria to Moore Park Connectivity Upgrade includes the redesign of the Anzac Pde, Dacey Ave and Alison Road intersection. Estimated to cost $500 million, the continuous flow intersection will be largest non-motorway intersection in NSW, bringing thousands of more cars into the area and likely resulting in more compulsory parkland acquisitions and the loss of a further 100 trees and greater traffic congestion into our municipality.

 

3.     Calls for a  moratorium on the Proposals to remain  in place until, in consultation with the affected councils and the community, each of the above proposals are fully and adequately assessed for their impact on:

 

·       Open public green space, trees and heritage

·       The implications on Driver Ave and Kippax Lake and the implications on our ANZAC memorial

·       Local traffic congestion and carparking facilities and flow on impact into our municipally and on the Waverley local community

·       Public transport capacity

·       Community amenities, especially those located in the surrounding parklands of Moore Park and Centennial Park parklands

·       The long-term effect of further commercialisation of public land

·       Any other issues that may impact on the area's character, amenity and sustainability

 

4.   Calls on the NSW Upper House to hold an Inquiry into the Proposals, specifically focusing on the appropriateness of the NSW Department of Planning decision-making processes with regard to long-held community standards of transparency and accountability of the use of public monies.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM81/17

 

Subject:             Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy

Folder No:                   F2009/00291

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

That Council:

 

a)     Supports and recognises an urgent need for a transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy as soon as possible, and that government support and funding for new coal mines such as the Carmichael Mine and others render farcical any sensible discussion about a transition to renewable energy;

 

b)     Objects in the strongest terms possible to government support and funding for any new coal mines as well as the extensions of existing coal mines;

 

c)     Will support other Councils communicating objections to government support and funding for new coal mines; and

 

d)     Resolves to prepare and send a letter to the federal MP’s for Kingsford Smith and Wentworth detailing this resolution.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                             12 December 2017

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR9/17

 

Subject:             Notice of Rescission Motion submitted by Crs Matson, Shurey (Mayor) and Neilson - Development Application report - 4/199-203A Malabar Rd, South Coogee (DA/153/2015/A)

Folder No:                   DA/153/2015/A

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward; The Mayor, Cr Lindsay Shurey; Councillor Neilson, North Ward     

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 28 November 2017 reading as follows:

 

That Council, as the consent authority, amends development consent under Section 80 (10B & 10D) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended to the operation for the food premises, at No. 4/199-201 Malabar Road, South Coogee, by amending DA/153/2015 in the following manner:

 

·           Delete Condition No. 33

 

·           Amend Condition No. 35 to read:

Operational Hours

 

35.  The operating hours of the café including the footpath dining area must be restricted to the following:

 

Sunday to Thursday:    7:00am – 8.30pm

Friday & Saturday:      7:00am – 9:30pm

 

All food services to customers in footway dining area shall only be provided within the abovementioned hours of operation and all patrons must vacate the area and all outdoor furniture is to be removed within 30 minutes of the specified hours.

 

·           Condition 73 is amended to read:

73.  The plan of management dated February 2016 shall be amended and submitted to and approved by the Manager of Development Assessment within one week of the commencement of operations associated with this consent. The plan of Management shall detail the measures to be implemented to:

 

ensure compliance with the relevant conditions of approval (hours of operation, deliveries, and waste management); ,

ensure compliance with relevant noise criteria and minimise noise emissions and associated nuisances,

minimise the potential environmental and amenity impacts upon nearby residents,

effectively minimise and manage anti-social behaviour,

effectively manage and respond to resident complaints and Council directions,

ensure responsible service of alcohol and harm minimisation,

ensure that the maximum number of patrons within the premises and footpath seating does not exceed the authorised capacity, in accordance with Council’s consent.

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That the recommendation on the business paper be adopted with the new condition that the acoustic testing be carried out by a Council appointed expert.”

 

Staff recommendation – Council meeting 28 November 2017:

That Council, as the consent authority, amends development consent under Section 80 (10B & 10D) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended to the operation for the food premises, at No. 4/199-201 Malabar Road, South Coogee, by amending DA/153/2015 in the following manner:

 

·              Amend Condition No. 33 to read:

Environmental Amenity

33.     An acoustic report from a suitably qualified and experienced consultant in acoustics for the subject development shall be provided to Council within 2 months of the date of this determination (covering a four week period) and from time to time as reasonably requested by Council, which demonstrates and certifies that noise from the use and operation from the development during the extended hours contained in Condition No. 35and when the premises is at or near capacity complies with the relevant provisions of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997, NSW EPA/DECC Noise Control Manual & Industrial Noise Policy and conditions of Council’s consent.

 

The acoustic report is to include (but not be limited) to:

 

·      Noise emission from the proposed development (e.g. operational noise, mechanical noise, monitoring from nearest affected residential premises during the use and operation of the premises when at or near capacity occupancy to satisfy intrusiveness and amenity criteria),

 

·      Monitoring and assessment during the use and operation of the premises when live entertainment is being provided and greater occupancy is present,

 

·      Break out of any internal noise complies with the set criteria. If not, nominate the necessary and required measures to ensure compliance (this may include controlling live entertainment; controlling internal noise; provision of sound locks; other management practices as deemed appropriate and necessary),

 

·      Patron noise from the development having regard to the footway dining (at or near maximum capacity) and the hours of operation (across the hours of operation),

 

·      Background noise levels shall be in the absence of any other businesses operating in the area,

 

·      The validation acoustic report shall be conducted at the nearest sensitive receivers including but not limited to residential occupancies above 199-203A Malabar Road, South Coogee and in the vicinity of the site. A copy of the report is to be forwarded and approved by Council.

 

·              Amend Condition No. 35 to read:

Operational Hours

35.     The operating hours of the café including the footpath dining area must be restricted to the following and are subject to a review period in accordance with Section 80A (10B) of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979 and Division 14 of the Environmental & Assessment Regulation 2000:

 

·      Sunday to Thursday:              7:00am – 8.30pm

·      Friday & Saturday :        7:00am – 9:30pm

 

All food services to customers in footway dining area shall only be provided within the abovementioned hours of operation and all patrons must vacate the area and all outdoor furniture is to be removed within 30 minutes of the specified hours.

 

The operating hours will be reviewed by Council within 6 months of the date of determination of this application. The operator of the premises must advise Council in writing of the date of commencement. Appropriate supporting evidence (including but not limited to, relevant acoustics measurements) must be provided at the end of the review period to demonstrate compliance with all conditions of this consent as part to the review.