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Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 14 February 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                         14 February 2017

 

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Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 14 February 2017 at 6.00pm

 

Committee Members:          The Mayor D’Souza, Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, Garcia, Matson, Moore (Deputy Chairperson), Nash, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos & Stevenson (Chairperson)

 

Quorum:                             Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 6 December 2016

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W1/17      Upgrade of Green Street, Maroubra - Resident response to concept plan.... 1

W2/17      Resident Parking Scheme - Area RA6 Community Survey........................... 7

W3/17      Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee................................... 13

W4/17      Submarine Telecommunications Cable Works from Neptune Park to the West Coast of United States of America ........................................................... 41    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                         14 February 2017

 

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Works Report No. W1/17

 

Subject:              Upgrade of Green Street, Maroubra - Resident response to concept plan

Folder No:                F2016/00332

Author:                     Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services      

 

Introduction

 

In recent years, Council has received numerous requests from individual customers as well as from the Maroubra Central Precinct for this section of Green Street, Maroubra between Cooper Street and Garden Street to be upgraded and for a footpath to be constructed.

 

The 2016-17 Local Road Rehabilitation program includes an upgrade to this section of Green Street, Maroubra.

 

A concept design has been developed and community consultation undertaken with local residents.

 

Issues

 

The section of Green Street between Cooper Street and Garden Street was formerly a 6.25m wide rear lane between properties on Boyce Road and Maroubra Road.

 

The southern side of Green Street borders St Aidan’s School and two aged care facilities.  Twelve (12) of fourteen (14) residential properties on the northern side of Green Street have been subdivided under the provisions of Council’s Subdivision Code policy.  A requirement of subdivisions created under this policy is a dedication of 4.57m across the frontage of each property for future road widening.

 

The dedications for road widening have been made. However, there has been no formalisation of the dedicated land, primarily due to two (2) properties located mid-block and the 2 corner properties at the ends of this section which have not been subdivided.  The road reserve width is constrained to 6.25m at these locations.

 

Council’s Technical Services team made the following observations in their design analysis of the Green Street.

 

·     K&G is present on the south side of the street only;

·     There is a footpath on the south side in front of the new aged care facility at the eastern end of the street only. No footpath on the residential (northern) side of the street;

·     Narrow road pavement width with no opportunity for widening due to the boundaries of corner properties on both Cooper Street and Garden Street;

·     The narrow road pavement provides no opportunities for legal car parking within the street, with exception to two (2) spaces beside the corner property on Garden Street.

·     The general practice within the street is for residents to park on the grass verge in contradiction of the NSW Road Rules.

·     A narrow road way accommodating two way traffic;

·     Power poles are located in narrow strip behind the kerb on south side of the street.

 

A concept plan has been prepared by Council’s Technical Services Team.  See Attachment 2.  The concept plan includes the following main features;

 

·     Roll top kerb and gutter on the north side of the street;

·     Six (6) formalised parallel concrete parking spaces behind the kerb;

·     New footpath on the northern side of the street from Cooper Street to Garden Street in line with customer requests and Council’s resolution to ensure that every street has a footpath on at least one side where a footpath is feasible.

·     Conversion of the traffic flow in the street from two-way to one-way west bound.

 

The narrow width of the road reserve at each end and at the two (2) properties that have not been subdivided means that a footpath can only be accommodated by narrowing the carriageway between kerbs.  The already narrow road pavement means that a footpath can only be added at these narrow points by converting the traffic flow to one way.

 

The direction of the one way option was assessed by Council’s Integrated Transport Department.  Traffic Counts were also undertaken to assist in the decision making process.  The Cooper Street and Maroubra Road intersection was identified as having an accident history, making a one-way eastbound traffic direction unsuitable. The signalised Garden Street and Maroubra Road intersection was identified as being a safer alternative, making the conversion of Green Street to one-way westbound viable.

 

The conversion of Green Street to one-way westbound to accommodate the introduction of a footpath was endorsed by the Randwick Traffic Committee on 13 September 2016.

 

Community Consultation

 

A letter including a copy of the concept plan was sent to all properties bordering Green Street on 5 September 2016.  The letter invited residents to a consultation session that was held on site on 20 September 2016 at 5.30pm.

 

The consultation session was attended by approximately 30 people.  Council’s Technical Services team explained the concept in detail, including the proposed footpath, legal parking spaces and the resulting need to convert to one way traffic flow.  The reason for the westbound traffic direction was also explained.

 

Resident comments during the meeting centred on the perceived loss of parking that would result by the introduction of a footpath and also the possible conversion to one way traffic.

 

Residents were provided with a feedback form and asked to formalise their comments to Council. 

 

Ten (10) written responses were received.  These responses are summarised in Attachment 3. 

 

·     All feedback regarding the introduction of kerb and gutter was positive;

·     There was both support and objection to the introduction of a footpath.  There were two (2) requests for a footpath on the southern side to be investigated.

·     Comments on parking included:

Support for concept;

Maintain existing illegal 90° parking;

Introduce small angled parking;

Creation of resident parking zone;

Change traffic flow direction so parallel parking is on left hand side;

·     Comments on traffic flow direction included:

Three (3) respondents requested that two way traffic be retained;

Support for concept;

Preference for eastbound traffic flow to avoid traffic signals at Garden Street;

 

The idea of introducing the footpath on the southern side of Green Street was investigated in response to community feedback.  The introduction of a footpath on this side was considered problematic because:

 

·     The presence of power poles on this side of the street means that the kerb location would need to extend further into the roadway to allow an accessible width path past the power poles;

·     Egress from the driveway of 117 Garden Street would become difficult;

·     The level of service offered by the footpath to the residents would be decreased by moving the footpath to the opposite side to the residential properties.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9a:     A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways                             linking major land uses and recreational opportunities.

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:     Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                           community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

This project is included in the 2016-17 Local Road Rehabilitation Program.

 

Conclusion

 

There is support for the proposed upgrade to Green Street between Garden Street and Cooper Street. However there are conflicting views regarding the need for a footpath and the resulting impacts to residents.

 

The need to connect Green Street to the surrounding footpath network is in line with Council’s long standing objective of ensuring that a footpath exists on one side of every Street. The main objection to the footpath being introduced is the perception that its introduction will reduce available parking.  The current concept increases the number of legal parking spaces from two (2) to six (6) spaces.

 

The other key objection by some residents to the introduction of a footpath relates to the street being converted from two-way traffic flow to a one-way street. Whilst this is likely to result in some inconvenience to residents at times, it is viewed as a necessary compromise to allow the footpath to be introduced to the streetscape.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That :

 

a)      the details of the resident submissions from 10 local stakeholders are noted.

 

b)      Council proceed with the proposal to construct a footpath on the northern side of Green Street between Cooper Street and Garden Street.

 

c)      the section of Green Street between Cooper Street and Garden Street be converted to one-way traffic in a westbound direction.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Green Street Locality Plan

 

2.

Green Street, Maroubra - Summary of Community Feedback to Proposed Kerb and Gutter, Footpath, Off Street Parking, One Way

 

3.

Link to the Concept Plan - Upgrade of Green Street from Cooper Street to Garden Street, Maroubra

 

 

 

 


Green Street Locality Plan

Attachment 1

 

 


Green Street, Maroubra - Summary of Community Feedback to Proposed Kerb and Gutter, Footpath, Off Street Parking, One Way

Attachment 2

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                         14 February 2017

 

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Works Report No. W2/17

 

Subject:              Resident Parking Scheme - Area RA6 Community Survey

Folder No:                F2010/00150

Author:                     Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

Following requests from a number of residents, Council undertook a resident parking survey in a northern part of Randwick from late November 2016.  The majority of respondents from most streets did not support the introduction of the resident parking scheme to their street.

 

There were, however, five individual streets where the majority of respondents indicated that they did support the introduction of the scheme to their streets.  With regard to these streets, it is recommended that small sections of each street have a 2 hour time limit imposed, with exemptions for resident permit holders. 

 

Background

 

In 2011, following requests from residents, Council undertook a community survey in a part of northern Randwick, seeking views on the introduction of the resident parking scheme to that area.  At that time the feedback from the community was that they did not support the introduction of the scheme to their area.

 

Since that time Council has received a number of requests from residents seeking relief from the parking pressures that they are experiencing - Eg:

 

·  the parking situation in the street has got out of control. I can never get a park in this street any more. I am a mother of 2 young children and I find it very strange in this lovely community that I cannot park in my street any more. There seems to be loads of people that don’t live here parking in the street.”

(Council document no. D02241009)

 

·  We continue to be hostage to non-residents parking out our streets….. and are stressed each day on returning home by car concerned as to whether we will be able to park in our vicinity until after 4.00pm.”

(D02680711)

 

·  “As a resident and rate payer experiencing a significant increase in congestion, I would like to request that resident parking signs with a two hour parking limit be placed in and around my street (and surrounding streets) to try to reduce this impact on residents. I am aware that there was a proposal about installing limited parking in these streets several years ago and that there was resident consultation. The parking congestion situation has become so significantly worse (especially the last two years) I believe it is now necessary for a review. I feel I speak on behalf of many of my neighbours who believe it is time to implement these restrictions for the benefit of Randwick rate payers and local home owners.”

(D02612034)

 

Given such resident views and noting that it had been more than five years since the community was last consulted, it was decided to undertake the current survey.  The survey was distributed to letterboxes.

Issues

 

The area surveyed is known as the proposed resident parking area “RA6”.  This arbitrary area is bounded generally by Cowper Street and Frenchmans Road in the south, Wentworth Street in the west and Clovelly Road in the north and east. See diagram below:

 

 

Of all the streets surveyed in RA6 there were only five streets where the majority of respondents indicated support for the introduction of the scheme to their streets. The five streets, all situated within the southern parts of RA6, are Gordon Street, Waverley Street, Randwick Street, Sydney Street and Ethne Avenue. These five streets are highlighted in the map above.

 

These streets are close to both Randwick Public School and Emanuel College as well as being close to the Randwick Council Administration Building and the major Cowper Street commuter bus stops.  Each of these facilities attracts commuter parking and there is likely a daily overflow of commuters’ vehicles into these residential streets.

 

In response to the feedback from the Council’s survey, it is proposed that small sections of each of these streets have a 2 hour time limit imposed - with exemptions for residents with permits.  This will improve the amenity for those residents who do not have sufficient off-street parking facilities. The introduction of the scheme will also give residents a priority in parking in their street, over and above others who would wish to use the street for their own ‘non-resident’ parking needs.  Such time limits will also improve the ability for short term visitors or service personnel (deliveries, cleaners etc.) to park in the street.

The actual number of ‘resident parking spaces’ currently proposed in each street is based on the number of vehicles which eligible residents, who voted in favour of the scheme, park on the street.  The following table details the approximate total number of parking spaces available in each of the five streets, the proposed number of resident parking spaces (based on the survey results) and the subsequent remaining number of unrestricted parking spaces in each street.

 

Street

Approximate no. of parking spaces

Proposed number of resident parking spaces

Remaining number of unrestricted spaces

Gordon Street

17

4

13

Waverley Street

18

3

15

Randwick Street

16

3

13

Sydney Street

15

5

10

Ethne Avenue

22

7

15

 

The preceding table and the plans below show the impact which the proposed introduction of the resident parking scheme would have upon parking supply within this area.  Whilst the proposed parking time limits would be ‘2 hour parking, 8:30am-6pm, Mon-Fri, Permit Holders Excepted’ it should be noted that there would still be many unrestricted parking spaces available for various other uses.

 

Figure 1 – Resident parking proposal for Ethne Avenue

 

Figure 2 - Resident parking proposals for streets near to Frank Doyle Park

 

If this resident parking proposal is endorsed by the Works Committee the matter would then need to be put to the Traffic Committee for formal consideration.  It should also be noted that each resident parking area is reviewed annually to assess the number of permits issued versus the number of parking spaces available on each street.  If additional residents choose to participate in the scheme then more resident parking spaces may be required to be installed, through the Traffic Committee processes, to meet this demand from local residents.

 

Door knock survey and petition objecting to the proposed introduction of the resident parking scheme to the RA6 Area

In response to Council’s survey of residents in the ‘RA6 area’, a number of residents submitted the results of their own survey as well as a petition opposed to the introduction of the scheme. 

 

For most of the RA6 area the results of the ‘door-knock’ interview survey (as undertaken by the residents opposed to the proposal) aligned very closely with Council’s own survey.  These two surveys confirmed that the majority of residents from most of the streets were not supportive of the introduction of the scheme to their street.  With regard to the five subject streets, some of the results from the two surveys aligned.  However, with a number of the results, there was a differing answer (i.e. some residents said ‘yes’ to Council in support of the proposal and ‘no’ to the door-knock survey undertaken by other residents). 

 

Whilst it is difficult to fully analyse each resident’s outcome and to check with rigour Council’s results against the “door-knock survey” results, it has to be remembered that there has been a constant level of concern over many years, by a number of residents, about other people parking in these residential streets.  The streets near to Frank Doyle Park are approximately 175m from Randwick Public School, 260m from the major Cowper Street/Cook Street commuter bus-stop, only 460m from Randwick Council buildings and just 650m from the main Randwick shopping strip of Belmore Road.  Given the proximity of these facilities, these four streets are regularly under pressure from commuters parking in the street.  Ethne Avenue also experiences significant parking pressures – most especially from car parking associated with students and others from the nearby school.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:   Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9d: Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management

Direction 9e: Parking is managed to balance convenience against reduced car

                     reliance

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding is available to undertake procurement and installation of the required signage arising from this resident parking proposal.  The cost would likely be some $1,500 - $2,000.

 

Conclusion

 

Given the constant level of concern by residents, over many years, regarding non-residents’ vehicles parking in their streets, and, given the proximity of these streets to numerous facilities generating commuter parking pressures, and, given the results of Council’s resident parking survey, it is considered that the proposed resident parking arrangements, as detailed, should be referred to the Traffic Committee for consideration.  It is considered that such a referral should indicate that Council supports the implementation of the proposed resident parking controls.

 

 

Recommendation

That:

 

a)     the matter of the limited introduction of ‘2 hour parking, 8:30am-6pm, Mon-Fri, Permit Holders Excepted’ parking restrictions in Waverley Street, Gordon Street, Randwick Street, Sydney Street and Ethne Avenue, Randwick, as detailed within Figures 1 and 2 of this report, be referred to the Traffic Committee for consideration; and

 

b)     the Traffic Committee be advised that Council is supportive of the proposed resident parking restrictions.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 


Works Committee                                                                                                         14 February 2017

 

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Works Report No. W3/17

 

Subject:              Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee

Folder No:                PROJ/10323/2007

Author:                     Sebastien  Le Coustumer, Drainage Engineer      

 

Introduction

 

The prime responsibility for planning and management of flood issues in NSW rests with local government. Randwick City Council has committed to carrying out Flood Studies and preparing Floodplain Risk Management Studies and Plans. They are carried out in accordance with the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government) and will allow Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The first step in the floodplain management process is to complete a flood study. For the Maroubra Bay catchment, the study was adopted by the Council on 26 February 2013. The next step is to complete a Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan (FRMS&P) which determine options to reduce the flood risk.

 

The draft Maroubra Bay FRMS&P was presented to the 13 September 2016 meeting of Council’s Works Committee. It was resolved to place the document on public exhibition.

 

The Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee met on 7 December 2016 to consider the final report of the Maroubra Bay FRMS&P. The report incorporated amendments to the draft resulting from the public exhibition. A copy of the minutes, which reflects discussions and outcomes, is attached to this report.

 

The outcome of the meeting is as follows:

 

·         The Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee recommends that Council adopt the Maroubra Bay FRMS&P, Final Report;

·         That the options outlined in the plan be implemented.

 

Issues

 

Public Exhibition

The community was invited to comment on the draft Maroubra Bay FMRS&P via public exhibition of the document. The report was placed on public exhibition between 30 September and 28 October 2016. The public exhibition was advertised via the following methods:

 

·     On line via YoursayRandwick (including the draft FPRMS&P, map of the flood affected properties, summary map of the mitigation options, frequently asked questions);

·     An information letter including frequently asked questions was sent to all residents within the flood planning area (444 letters sent);

·     Advertisement in the Southern Courier;

·     All documents were made available in the reception area of the Council Administration Centre and at Council’s three libraries.

 

A community information session was held on Tuesday 18 October 2016 between 6-8pm at the Maroubra Surf Life Saving Club, Marine Parade, Maroubra. The purpose of the drop-in session was to enable the public to ask questions directly to the study team including Randwick Council staff and consultant.

 

The following summarises the key outcomes of the public exhibition period and the responses received:

 

·     432 persons visited the Maroubra Bay FPRMS&P page on Yoursay Randwick and 255 downloads occurred;

·     Residents from a total of 2 properties attended the drop-in session;

·     A total of 6 queries were lodged on the public exhibition website (refer to Attachment 1).

 

Study Finalisation

Following review of submissions from the public during the exhibition period, minor amendments have been made to this FRMS&P Report.

 

Implementation Program

The options to be implemented are presented in Attachment 2. Each option is presented based on priority with indicative costs, responsible stakeholder and time frame.

 

Structural Measures in the Plan

Five structural measures are identified in the plan:

-    High priority:

Option A: Further investigation of the lowering of the promenade at Maroubra beach;

Option N: Further investigation of drainage upgrade at White Avenue (between Bennet Place and Farthing Place);

Option C: Further investigation of flood retarding basin in John Shore Park.

-    Low Priority:

Option D: Further investigation of duplication of drainage network from John Shore Park to the beach outlet;

Option B – Further investigation of flood retarding basin in Muraborah Reserve (Wride Street).

 

Non Structural Measures in the Plan

Eight non-structural measures including flood emergency management, flood warning and evacuation, community awareness programmes, and planning and development control are identified:

-    High priority:

Option 1: Council undertakes regular community awareness campaigns, for example every two years and severe weather warnings and thunderstorm warnings should be provided on Council’s website or through the Australian Emergency Alert System;

Option 2: Council prepares a local disaster plan and/or the SES should prepare a Local Flood Plan for the Maroubra Bay catchment;

Option 3: Enforce Flood Planning levels (see explanation below);

Option 4: Ensure appropriate development control planning including consideration of anthropomorphic climate change induced rainfall increase and safety inspection of Coral Sea Park basin to meet the Dam Safety Committee (DSC) requirements;

-    Low priority:

Option 5: Flood Proofing - The aim of this recommendation is to ensure that non-habitable buildings such as commercial or industrial developments are flood proof where existing or proposed floor levels are below the Flood Planning Level (FPL);

Option 6: Management of Blockage;

Option 7: Residents have Flood Insurance;

Option 8: Enforce On Site Detention policy.

 

The Flood Planning Area (FPA) is used to identify properties which are flood affected so that development controls can be applied to future development. The NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual typically defines the FPA by the 100 year ARI flood level + 0.5m freeboard. This approach is currently in place for properties within the Maroubra Bay catchment.

 

The FPA defined in the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual typically relates to areas prone to flooding due to rising water levels in lakes and rivers. The manual does not offer guidance in the case of overland flow scenarios as experienced with the Maroubra Bay catchment. An analysis of the flooding characteristics within the catchment has identified that the use of 0.5m freeboard is excessive because it will burden a large number of property owners whose properties are not prone to flooding in even the most severe of storms.

 

The approach recommended in the Floodplain Risk Management Plan is to tag properties based on the 100 year ARI event where more than 10% of the lot is flooded to depths more than 150mm. There are 221 properties within the catchment that meet this set of criteria. For comparison, there are currently 1,126 properties tagged based on the 100 year ARI +0.5m freeboard criteria.

 

Development controls will apply to tagged properties to ensure that the habitable floor level of developments is above the level of the flood. The Flood Planning Level (FPL) can vary depending on the use and vulnerability of the building/development to flooding. The controls that currently exist within Section B8 of the DCP apply to developments within the Maroubra Bay Catchment.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable City.

Direction 6a:     Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                           community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The overall capital cost of implementing the flood mitigation options is estimated between $5.5 and $11.5 million. Costs will be estimated more accurately following the completion of the investigation study. Costs of the non-structural options have not been estimated but will be low as many options can be conducted in house.

 

All options may potentially receive funding through grants from government agencies such as the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. Council can also contribute to funding via the Stormwater Service Charge as funds become available. Options within the plan may also be carried out by the SES.

 

Where necessary any additional funding of projects can be sourced through Council’s general revenue and planned subject to budget priorities.

 


 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Maroubra Bay Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan has been placed on public exhibition and has now been finalised to the satisfaction of the Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee.

 

Options are proposed to be implemented on a priority basis as funds become available.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)  Council adopts the Maroubra Bay Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

b)  options outlined in the plan be implemented on a priority basis as funds become available.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Queries lodged during public exhibition

 

2.

Options to be implemented

 

3.

Minutes of the Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 7 December 2016

 

4.

Presentation of the Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 7 December 2016

 

5.

Maroubra Bay Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan - Final

Available on request

 

 

 


Queries lodged during public exhibition

Attachment 1

 

 


Options to be implemented

Attachment 2

 

 


Minutes of the Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 7 December 2016

Attachment 3

 

 

 


Presentation of the Maroubra Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting held on 7 December 2016

Attachment 4

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Works Committee                                                                                                         14 February 2017

 

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Works Report No. W4/17

 

Subject:              Submarine Telecommunications Cable Works from Neptune Park to the West Coast of United States of America

Folder No:                F2010/07352

Author:                     Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council has been notified by Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd that they have obtained approval to install a submarine optic fibre cable from Neptune Park, Coogee to New Zealand and the West Coast of the United States of America.  The works associated with the installation of the cable will necessitate the construction of a Beach Man Hole positioned within Neptune Park and underground cabling from the Beach Man Hole to a data centre in Alexandria.

 

The Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd project is not related to the proposal by a Licenced Telecommunications Carrier, Subpartners Pty Ltd for a submarine telecommunications cable that was to come ashore at the northern end of Coogee Beach.  The Subpartners Pty Ltd proposal was considered at the September 2014 Works Committee meeting.  The Subpartners Pty Ltd project has not yet progressed.

 

Issues

 

Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd is a licenced Telecommunications carrier under the Telecommunications Act, Licence Number 384.  The Telecommunications Act contains a specific schedule (3A) that covers the installation and operation of submarine telecommunications cables. The Act is managed by the Australian Media and Communications Authority (ACMA). The ACMA states that submarine cables are essential components of Australia's national communications infrastructure. Submarine cables carry the bulk of Australia's voice and data traffic linking Australia with other countries.

 

One function of Schedule 3A of the Telecommunications Act is to provide submarine cable protection zones to facilitate and protect submarine cables in shallow water. Off Sydney, there are two zones.  The Northern Zone is located near Narrabeen, and the Southern Zone extends from Bondi to South Coogee. Seabed cable routes within these zones must be carefully planned to secure the approval of the ACMA.  Obstacles such as shipwrecks, reef outcrops and sensitive environmental areas are to be avoided. In addition, separation needs to be maintained from other previously installed and operating submarine cables. These constraints mean that the Northern Sydney Protection Zone is now full.

 

In the Southern Sydney Protection Zone (SSPZ) there are already a number of operational cables: Australia-Japan Cable, Southern Cross Cable System, Telstra Endeavour and TASMAN2. These cables are installed between Bondi and Clovelly, effectively locking out the shoreline from landing any other cables. In addition, the Bronte-Coogee Marine Reserve also produces additional restrictions on the remaining available space within the SSPZ.

 

The approvals obtained by Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd are as follows:

 

1.     Telecommunications Carrier Licence (Licence number 384)

2.     Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act

3.     ACMA Protection Zone installation permit

 

Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd advise that these three (3) permits provide the Federal approvals to conduct the works required to install the cable on the seabed and include approvals under the Native Title Act 1993, Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984. The seaward cable route also avoids places of World, Commonwealth or National heritage significance along with other environmentally sensitive areas.

 

The Horizontal Directional Drilling works from Neptune Park to the shoreline are consistent with the requirements of a Low-Impact Facility under Schedule 3 of the Telecommunications Act 1997.  In addition, the chamber lid is less than 2 metres squared at the surface. Additionally, Horizontal Directional Drilling works will be undertaken in the road reserve between the Beach Man Hole and the data Centre in Alexandria.  A number of jointing pits will be installed along the way.  With exception to the approaches to the jointing pits, the cable between the Beach Man Hole and the Data Centre will be installed at approximately 3m below ground level.

Schedule 3 of the Telecommunications Act 1997 provides carriers with powers to enter land to inspect land maintain facilities and install certain types of facilities, and immunity from some state and territory laws, including planning laws, when carrying out those activities. The Act facilitates the expeditious and efficient rollout of infrastructure by enabling it to be done nationally under a uniform streamlined process, rather than multiple states, territory and local government requirements. This assists carriers meeting consumer demands for services while reducing the administrative burden on these tiers of government and carriers.

The Commonwealth regime primarily covers the installation of low-impact facilities. The regime also applies to temporary facilities for use by a defense organisation and facilities for which the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has granted a Facility Installation Permit (FIP). The Act does not provide land entry rights or immunity from state and territory law if a facility does not belong to one of these classes. If this is the case, carriers will need to comply with state and territory laws and planning regulations. Although only limited types of facilities may be installed under these powers and immunities, the Commonwealth regime provides carriers land access powers for the inspection of land and the maintenance of telecommunications infrastructure generally

Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd confirms that the cable will be installed using a directional drilling process from within Neptune Park.  The location of the Beach Man Hole within the park is currently being discussed with Council’s Technical Services staff. During construction, Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia will occupy a fenced compound within the park for the purposes of cable drilling and installation. The works include the construction of a chamber within the works compound below the surface of Neptune Park.  This chamber will remain accessible after the completion of the project via a manhole at the surface, which is less than 2 square metres.

 

Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia advise that their program for cabling between the Beach Man Hole and the Data Centre commences in February 2017.  The works between the Beach Man Hole and a point off shore is scheduled to commence in the second half of 2017, with the cable scheduled to be operational in mid-2018.

 

Work hours will be limited to 7am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and Saturday mornings with no work on Sundays or public holidays. Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd has also agreed to communicate directly with surrounding residents.

 

Council’s Technical Services department has written to the Coogee Precinct to inform them of these upcoming works in the area.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

A damage deposit of $15,000 will be charged to ensure that the reserve is restored to a proper condition.

 

Conclusion

 

Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd has obtained approvals as required under federal legislation to install submarine cables commencing at Neptune Park.  Randwick City Council is not the approving authority for these works.  Whilst they require the use of a portion of Neptune Park to install the cables, they have agreed to restore the area upon completion.  Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd  have also agreed to engage appropriately with the local community.

 

At the end of these works the only visible infrastructure will be a manhole lid in Neptune Park and a number of jointing pits in the road reserve between the Beach Man Hole and the Data Centre in Alexandria.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report advising Council of the details of the proposed submarine cable to be brought ashore by Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd at Neptune Park, South Coogee be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Coordinator Engineering Services letter to Coogee Precinct advising that Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia P/L is proposing landing a submarine telecommunication cable at Neptune Park

 

2.

Hawaiki Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act Approval

 

3.

Hawaiki ACMA Submarine protection zone installation permit

 

4.

Link to the HAWAIKI -Land Cable Duct  Route Submission plans

 

 

 

 


Coordinator Engineering Services letter to Coogee Precinct advising that Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia P/L is proposing landing a submarine telecommunication cable at Neptune Park

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

File No:    F2010/07352

Doc No:   D02823229

 

 

02 February 2016

 

 

Coogee Precinct

c/- Unit 4/138 Beach Street

COOGEE  NSW  2034

 

 

Dear Coogee Precinct,

 

RE:

Submarine Telecommunications Cable Works from Neptune Park to the West Coast of United States of America

 

 

We take this opportunity to inform you of some upcoming works in Coogee that may result in some level of community interest.

 

Randwick City Council has been notified by Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd that they have obtained approval to install a submarine optic fibre cable from Neptune Park, Coogee to New Zealand and the west coast of the United States of America. 

 

The works associated with the installation of the cable will necessitate the construction of a manhole positioned within Neptune Park and underground cabling from the manhole to a data centre in Alexandria.

 

The approvals obtained by Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd are as follows:

 

·  Telecommunications Carrier Licence (Licence number 384)

·  Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act

·  ACMA Protection Zone installation permit

 

Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd advise that these three (3) permits provide the Federal approvals to conduct the works required to install the cable on the seabed and include approvals under the Native Title Act 1993, Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984. The seaward cable route also avoids places of World, Commonwealth or National heritage significance along with other environmentally sensitive areas.

 

The horizontal directional drilling works from Neptune Park to the shoreline are consistent with the requirements of a Low-Impact Facility under Schedule 3 of the Telecommunications Act 1997. 

.

Horizontal directional drilling works will be undertaken in the road reserve between the Neptune Park Manhole and the data centre in Alexandria.  A number of jointing pits will be installed along the way.  With exception to the approaches to the jointing pits, the cable between the manhole and the data centre will be installed at approximately 3m below ground level.

 

Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia advise that their program for cabling between the manhole in Neptune Park and the data centre commences in February 2017.  The works between Neptune Park and a point off shore is scheduled to commence in the second half of 2017, with the cable scheduled to be operational in mid 2018.

 

Work hours will be limited to 7am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and Saturday mornings with no work on Sundays or public holidays. Hawaiki Submarine Cable Australia Pty Ltd has also agreed to communicate directly with surrounding residents impacted by the works.

 

Should you require additional information please contact me on 9399 0906.

 

Yours sincerely

 

 

Steve Audet

Coordinator Engineering Services


Hawaiki Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act Approval

Attachment 2

 

 


Hawaiki ACMA Submarine protection zone installation permit

Attachment 3