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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 28 February 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 28 February 2017 at 6.00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 December 2016

Extraordinary Council Meeting - 17 December 2016

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

MM1/17    Waiving of fees for Lycee Condorcet Sydney International French School at the Des Renford Leisure Centre................................................................. 1

MM2/17    Waiver of fees for Maroubra Swim Club's five Carnivals to be held in 2017 at the Des Renford Leisure Centre................................................................. 3

MM3/17    Proposed Use of Alison Park for Multicultural Celebrations.......................... 5   

Further Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

 

Urgent Business

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting required)

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act, the General Manager is required to keep a register of Councillor voting on planning matters. Planning matters are any decisions made in the exercise of a function of a council under the EP&A Act and include decisions relating to a development application, an environmental planning instrument, a development control plan or a development contribution plan under that Act. In addition, Randwick City Council has resolved (22 July 2008) that its register of voting include the voting on all tender matters.

CP1/17     3A Gordon Avenue, Coogee (DA/921/2015/A).......................................... 7

CP2/17     30 Frances Street, Randwick (DA/297/2016).......................................... 17

CP3/17     263-269 Clovelly Road, Clovelly (DA/566/2014/C).................................. 25

CP4/17     1 Meagher Avenue, Maroubra (DA/29/1990/B)........................................ 35

CP5/17     94 St Pauls Street, Randwick (DA/25/2015/A)......................................... 45

CP6/17     48 Dudley Street, Coogee - Interim Heritage Order.................................. 61

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting not required)

CP7/17     Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No. 1 and Clause 4.6 between 1 November 2016 to 31 January 2017................................. 67

CP8/17     Advisory Committee Minutes................................................................... 73

CP9/17     Temporary Alcohol Ban at Dunningham and Goldstein Reserves, Coogee. 83

CP10/17   Botany Cemetery Expansion Proposal...................................................... 85

General Manager's Reports

GM1/17    Merger Planning Update.......................................................................... 93

GM2/17    Review of the Randwick City Council 2016-17 Operational Plan - December Quarter................................................................................................. 107

Director City Services Reports

CS1/17     Light Rail - Parking Recovery Project - Kingsford South ......................... 141

Director Governance & Financial Services Reports

GF1/17     Quarterly Budget Review - December 2016........................................... 147

GF2/17     Investment Report - November 2016 .................................................... 169

GF3/17     Investment Report - December 2016 .................................................... 179

GF4/17     Investment Report - January 2017 ....................................................... 189  

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM1/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Bring Waverley Council’s 24 hour alcohol prohibition to Coogee Beach  ................................................................ 199

NM2/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Anzac Parade - Naming Anniversary... 201

NM3/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Garcia - Pollution at Coogee Beach.................. 203

NM4/17     Notice of Motion from Cr  Matson - Proposed Byron Street Resident Preferred Parking Scheme .................................................................... 205

NM5/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reconfiguring the Greening Randwick Committee ........................................................................................... 207

NM6/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Long Term Plan of Management for contaminated Bundock Street site......................................................... 209

NM7/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Housing Affordability .................... 211

NM8/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Protecting Solar Access - Parks in Randwick LGA. ..................................................................................... 213

NM9/17     Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed Street Libraries in Randwick LGA....................................................................................................... 215

NM10/17   Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Light Rail Capacity study - Call for Commission of Inquiry........................................................................... 217

NM11/17   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Review of City of Sydney Green Roofs and Walls Policy ................................................................................... 219

NM12/17   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Urgent review of Council's parcel of land at the end of Fisherman's Road............................................................. 221

NM13/17   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Review efficiency of current gross pollutant trap and discharge pipe at north end of Coogee Beach............ 223

NM14/17   Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Acknowledgement of the support of local democracy............................................................................................ 225

NM15/17   Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Upgrade of Stormwater run-off at beaches................................................................................................ 227  

Closed Session

Director Governance & Financial Services Report (record of voting required)

GF5/17     Tender Report Supply and Delivery of Ready Mixed Concrete

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil.  

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Mayoral Minute No. MM1/17

 

Subject:              Waiving of fees for Lycee Condorcet Sydney International French School at the Des Renford Leisure Centre

Folder No:                F2010/00214

Author:                     The  Mayor, Cr Noel D'Souza      

 

Introduction

 

Council has received a request from the Principal of the Lycee Condorcet Sydney International French School, Mr Phillippe Courjault, to waive hire fees for the use of the Des Renford Leisure Centre (DRLC) and Maroubra Beach for the French Asian Pacific Swimming Championships which will take place over 4 days in April 2017. 

 

Issues

 

The Lycee Condorcet Sydney International French School is a local school which, for many years, has utilised DRLC almost daily to conduct various levels of swimming training.

 

From 5-9 April the school will host the French Asian Pacific Swimming Championships which will include 13 international schools from the Asian Pacific region and over 350 athletes.

 

On 5 April the school wants to hold activities at Maroubra beach, including volleyball, learn to surf, Nippers’ activities and ocean education.  From 6-9 April, the school wants to host the French Asian Pacific Swimming Championships at DRLC.

 

There will be minimal impact on the local community with both Maroubra Beach and DRLC easily able to accommodate these events at this time of the year.

 

The school seeks the waiving of hire fees for DRLC from the 6-9 April and Maroubra Beach on the 5 April.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council accept the report recommendation, the direct financial impact to Council will be $9,640 to be funded from the 2016-17 Council Contingency Fund.

 

Conclusion

 

Council should support the French Asian Pacific Swimming Championships as it is considered a major event for the Lycee Condorcet Sydney International French School attracting 13 international schools and over 350 athletes.  The participants will utilise many local businesses and will showcase the Randwick LGA for ceremonies and other associated events.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council vote $9,640 from the 2016-17 Contingency Fund to cover the hire fees for Maroubra Beach and the Des Renford Leisure Centre.

 

b)     the organiser undertakes to appropriately and prominently acknowledge and   promote Council’s contribution prior to and during the event.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Mayoral Minute No. MM2/17

 

Subject:              Waiver of fees for Maroubra Swim Club's five Carnivals to be held in 2017 at the Des Renford Leisure Centre

Folder No:                F2010/00214

Author:                     The  Mayor, Cr Noel D'Souza      

 

Introduction

 

Mr Martin Connolly, Club Secretary of the Maroubra Swim Club, has requested assistance from Council with five swimming events to be staged at the Des Renford Leisure Centre (DRLC) throughout 2017.  

 

Issues

 

Maroubra Swim Club holds a number of events at DRLC each year which attract a large volume of swimmers from swim clubs around New South Wales.  These events are the major source of fundraising for the Club with all funds raised utilised by the Club for its ongoing operations throughout the year.

 

The Club has requested that Council waive the fees for DRLC to assist in improving the profitability of the events.  An assessment of the applicable fees to be waived are as follows:

 

 

Pool Hire Fee

 

 

 

 

2 events for the Indoor Competition Pool

$845

 

 

3 events for the Outdoor Olympic Pool

$1050

 

 

Total

$4,840

 

 

DRLC will receive spectator fees from all non-participants together with increased kiosk sales on the day.

 

Financial impact statement

 

In the event that Council accepts the report recommendation, the direct financial implication to Council will be $4,840 which will be funded from the 2016-17 Council Contingency Fund.

 

Conclusion

 

Maroubra Swim Club’s Carnivals are worthwhile local events which provide income to DRLC in the form of ‘secondary’ spend and entrance fees from spectators.  Events provide an opportunity for swimmers to compete against their peers, raise funds for the Club and provide ‘secondary spend’ income to the facility.  It is considered that Council should support Mr Connolly’s request to waive hire fees for DRLC to the value of $4,840 to assist in raising funds for the Maroubra Swim Club.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       Council assists Maroubra Swim Club to raise funds by voting $4,840 from the 2016-17 Contingency Fund to cover costs of hiring the Des Renford Leisure Centre; and

b)     Maroubra Swim Club undertakes to appropriately and prominently acknowledge and promote Council’s contribution to Club members.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Mayoral Minute No. MM3/17

 

Subject:              Proposed Use of Alison Park for Multicultural Celebrations

Folder No:                F2004/06281

Author:                     The  Mayor, Cr Noel D'Souza      

 

Introduction

 

As a Council made up of over one hundred different national groups, we should always be looking for ways to celebrate our diversity and acknowledge the invaluable contributions made by all our national groups. The purpose of this mayoral minute is to put forward a proposal to allow each national group to have a flag raising ceremony and celebrate its national day at Alison Park, with Council assisting to ensure all these events are a success.

 

Issues

 

During my time as Mayor I have been privileged to attend many multicultural events across our City and I have been asked on many of these occasions if Council could assist our national groups to celebrate their independence day or other days of national significance.

 

I am proposing to celebrate our inclusiveness and acceptance of multiculturalism by holding such events at Alison Park on the Sunday after each respective nation’s significant day of celebration. Events would include concerts by respective cultural groups and school children, a flag raising ceremony and stalls selling each nations’ cuisine and other market style goods.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council would contribute towards the success of these events by allowing the hire of Alison Park at no cost to our national groups. Council would also contribute towards erecting a stage for concerts and by providing waste collection services at no charge.

 

Conclusion

 

Council would support this initiative by advising all embassies, consulates and multicultural organisations of this initiative to celebrate their national days. Local businesses would also benefit from the visiting trade. A report will come back before Council outlining the feasibility and costs associated with this multicultural initiative.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council calls for a report on the feasibility and cost to Council of holding national days of celebration for all our respective nationalities at Alison Park, Randwick.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP1/17

 

Subject:              3A Gordon Avenue, Coogee (DA/921/2015/A)

Folder No:                DA/921/2015/A

Author:                     Tuong-Vi Doan, Environmental Planning Officer     

 

Proposal:                  Section 96 modification of the approved development including alterations and new window, door and skylight window openings, new fire place flue, changes to external colours, finishes and materials, relocate rainwater tank and removal of tree. Original consent: Alterations and additions to the existing dwelling house including associated site and landscaping works.

Ward:                        North Ward

Applicant:                Robinson Urban Planning Pty Ltd

Owner:                     Ms. T C LoobyTosca Looby

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 

Development Application Executive summary report

 

This application is referred to Council for consideration as the original was determined by Council.

 

Details of the Current Approval

 

Development consent was granted on 26 April 2016 for the alterations and additions to the existing dwelling house including associated site and landscaping works.

 

Details of the Proposed Modification

The subject application seeks to modify the approved development by including alterations and new window, door and skylight window openings, new fire place flue, changes to external colours, finishes and materials, relocate rainwater tank and removal of tree.

 

Site

The majority of the subject site sits at a lower level than the neighbouring residential sites. The site has a considerable slope to the south east towards Gordon’s Bay. The higher portion of the site is occupied by a dwelling which steps down the site over three levels, with one main roof line. The brick and timber clad dwelling was constructed in the 1970s. The lower portion of the site, closer to the coast, is occupied by a tennis court. The north-eastern corner of the site contains small to medium sized vegetation and a zig-zag walking track to the coast. A double garage is located within the south-western corner of the site. The site has driveway access but no street frontage to Gordon Avenue.   

 

Figure 1 Driveway entrance of subject site from Gordon Avenue.

 

Figure 2 View of subject site from Gordon’s Bay.

 

Section 96 Assessment

Section 96(2) Criteria

Comment

(a)  It is satisfied that the development to which the consent as modified relates is substantially the same development as the development for which consent was originally granted and before that consent as originally granted was modified (if at all), and

The proposal is considered to represent substantially the same development as it only relates to altering the colours, finishes and materials, minor external works involving a rainwater tank and tree removal and some opening changes, along with internal layout changes of the approved development.

(b)    It has consulted with the relevant Minister, public authority or approval body (within the meaning of Division 5) in respect of a condition imposed as a requirement of a concurrence to the consent or in accordance with the general terms of an approval proposed to be granted by the approval body and that Minister, authority or body has not, within 21 days after being consulted, objected to the modification of that consent, and

Not applicable.

(c)    It has notified the application in accordance with:

(i)     the regulations, if the regulations so require, or

(ii)    a development control plan, if the consent authority is a council that has made a development control plan that requires the notification or advertising of applications for modification of a development consent, and

The owners of adjoining and neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed modification in accordance with the DCP. No submissions were received for this application.

 

(d)    It has considered any submissions made concerning the proposed modification within the period prescribed by the regulations or provided by the case development control plan, as the case may be.

No submissions were received for this application.

 

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. No submissions were received as a result of the notification process.

 

Referrals

 

·      Environmental Health

Proposed Development:

Council has received a section 96 modification to a dwelling proposing to modify approved alterations and additions under DA/921/2015 which will include new fireplace flues at 3A Gordon Avenue, Coogee.

 

Comments:

Environmental Amenity

 

According to Council’s Interactive mapping system the neighbouring properties are greater than 25 metres away.

 

The potential for environmental impact has been considered and appropriate conditions have been included in this referral.

 

Recommendation:

Should the application be approved, it is recommended that the relevant Environmental Health conditions be included.

 

·       Engineering

 

An application seeking amendments to the approved landscape plan has been received for the subject site.

 

This report is based on the following plans and documentation:

·     Architectural Plans by Meacham Nockles McQualter, dwg EX01-11, rev C, dated 24.10.16;

·     Statement of Environmental Effects by Robinson Urban Planning Pty Ltd, ref 15034, dated 27/10/16.

 

Tree/Landscape Comments:

Part 3.0, page 3 of the SEE requests permission to remove an exotic, 6m x 4m Metrosideros excelsa (Pohutakawa, T16) from the northeast corner of the site, and replace it with an Angophora costata (Sydney Red Gum), which is an endemic species to this LGA.

 

While no justification has been provided for this, it can still be supported as this replacement species will be consistent with the naturally occurring flora within Gordon’s Bay, so will be of more benefit to the local environment and fauna along this harsh coastal strip.

 

No objections are raised to adopting this amendment (as requested on Page 4 of the SEE), with the assessing officer advised that condition 4 of the issued consent will now read as follows (changes in bold & italic)

 

Landscape Plan

4.        The Certifying Authority/PCA must ensure that the Landscape Plans submitted as part of the approved Construction Certificate are substantially consistent with the Landscape Plan & Proposed Plant Species by Meacham Nockles McQualter, dwg 13-14, revision A, dated 21.12.15, and Existing Site Plan/Tree Survey plan, dwg EX01, revision B, dated 25.10.16.

 

As part of this revised plan, consent now also needs to be formally provided to allow the physical removal of T16 from the site as part of the works, with the assessing officer advised that point ‘d’ needs to be added to the end of condition 29, Tree Management, which will read as follows:

 

29.      d)   The Metrosideros excelsa (Pohutakawa, T16) to the northeast of T22, towards the northeast corner of the site, so as to allow the planting of 1 x 25 litre/300mm (pot size at the time of planting) endemic species, Angophora costata (Sydney Red Gum), in this same area of the site, as approved by the S96A application.

 

Key Issues

 

·      Randwick Local Environmental Plan

Clause 6.6 Foreshore Building Line – RLEP 2012

A foreshore building line runs across the site. A rainwater tank is proposed to be moved within the foreshore area. The features on the site make it appropriate for a rainwater tank to be situated within the foreshore area. In particular, although the site is large, limited space is available outside of the foreshore building line area and that space is proposed to be occupied by the dwelling, paths, landscaping and flat usable outdoor living areas. Therefore, the proposed relocation of the rainwater tank will not be inconsistent with the objectives of the foreshore building line  (clause 6.6 of the RLEP 2012) as it will not impact on natural foreshore processes or affect the significance and amenity of the area.

                 

Clause 6.7 - Foreshore Scenic Protection Area

(1)  The objectives of this clause are as follows:

(a)    to recognise, protect and enhance the natural, visual and environmental qualities of the scenic areas of the coastline,

(b)    to protect and improve visually prominent areas adjoining the coastal foreshore,

(c)    to protect significant public views to and from the coast,

(d)    to ensure development in these areas is appropriate for the location and does not detract from the scenic qualities of the coast.

(3) Development consent must not be granted for development on land to which this clause applies unless the consent authority is satisfied that the development:

(a)    is located and designed to minimise its visual impact on public areas of the coastline, including views to and from the coast, foreshore reserve, open space and public areas, and

(b)    Contributes to the scenic quality of the coast foreshore.

 

Comments:

The subject site is located within a Foreshore Scenic Protection Area (Clause 6.7) under the Randwick LEP 2012. The consent authority may only grant consent to a building within the foreshore scenic protection area after it has considered the probable aesthetic appearance of the proposed building in relation to the foreshore.

 

The proposed modifications are not considered to be detrimental to the visual qualities and amenity of the foreshore and will not detract from the prevailing height, bulk and scale of the surrounding residences. Therefore, the proposal will satisfy the above objectives of the clause and is considered satisfactory in this regard. Overall, the proposed modification is considered to not be inconsistent with the relevant clause of the RLEP 2012.

 

·      Randwick Development Control Plan 2013 (DCP)

Part B10 - Foreshore Scenic Protection Area

The proposal is considered minor with mainly internal works and will not visible from the coast or the foreshore reserve areas located within the immediate vicinity of the subject site. The proposal is considered to meet the objectives of this clause as stipulated in the DCP.

 

Section 79C Assessment

 

The site has been inspected and the application has been assessed having regard to Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended.

 

Section 79C ‘Matters for Consideration’

Comments

Section 79C(1)(a)(i) – Provisions of any environmental planning instrument

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The site is zoned R2 – Low Density under the LEP and the proposal relates to the modification of the approved development which includes alterations and new window, door and skylight window openings, new fire place flue, changes to external colours, finishes and materials, relocate rainwater tank and removal of tree. These proposed modifications are permissible with Council’s consent and is consistent with the specific objectives of the zone in that the proposed activity and built form protects the amenity of the residents whilst enhancing the aesthetic character.

Section 79C(1)(a)(ii) – Provisions of any draft environmental planning instrument

Not applicable.    

Section 79C(1)(a)(iii) – Provisions of any development control plan

Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013 (DCP)

The proposal generally satisfies the objectives and controls of the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. 

Section 79C(1)(a)(iiia) – Provisions of any Planning Agreement or draft Planning Agreement

Not applicable.

Section 79C(1)(a)(iv) – Provisions of the regulations

The relevant clauses of the Regulations have been satisfied.

Section 79C(1)(b) – The likely impacts of the development, including environmental impacts on the natural and built environment and social and economic impacts in the locality

The proposed modification has responded appropriately to the DCP requirements and will not result in adverse impact upon the amenity of the adjoining neighbours.

 

The proposed development is consistent with the dominant residential character in the locality. The proposal is not considered to result in detrimental social or economic impacts on the locality.

Section 79C(1)(c) – The suitability of the site for the development

The site is considered to be suitable for the proposal.

Section 79C(1)(d) – Any submissions made in accordance with the EP&A Act or EP&A Regulation

There were no submissions for this application.

Section 79C(1)(e) – The public interest

The proposal promotes the objectives of the zone and will not result in any significant adverse environmental, social or economic impacts on the locality. Accordingly, the proposal is considered to be in the public interest.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed modification to the existing development has been assessed against the requirements of the relevant planning guidelines of the RLEP 2012, the relevant council policies including the DCP 2013 as well as in regard to Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended. The proposed modification will result in substantially the same development as that previously approved and will not result in unreasonable adverse impacts upon either the amenity of the adjoining premises or the character of the locality. The application is therefore recommended for approval subject to the attached conditions of consent.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. DA/561/2012/A of the approved development by  altering the internal layout of the rear outbuilding including pergola above patio area and increase the height of the outbuilding by 200mm, at 25 Bay Parade, Malabar, subject to the following conditions:

 

A.       Amend Condition No. 1 to read:

 

Approved Plans & Supporting Documentation

1.        The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans and supporting documentation listed below and endorsed with Council’s approved stamp, except where amended by Council in red and/or by other conditions of this consent:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

DWG No. 00, and 02 to 10

Meacham Nockles McQualter

21 December 2015

 

BASIX Certificate No.

Dated

A229843

17 December 2015

 

Except as amended by the Section 96 ’A’ plans

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

DWG No. 02 to 09 Revision C

Meacham Nockles McQualter

24 October 2016

 

BASIX Certificate No.

Dated

769776S

25 October 2016

 

Only in so far as they are highlighted and detailed below, and as may be amended by the following conditions and as may be shown in red on the attached plans:

 

B.        Amend Condition 4 and 9 to read:

 

Landscape Plan

4.        The Certifying Authority/PCA must ensure that the Landscape Plans submitted as part of the approved Construction Certificate are substantially consistent with the Landscape Plan & Proposed Plant Species by Meacham Nockles McQualter, dwg 13-14, revision A, dated 21.12.15, and Existing Site Plan/Tree Survey plan, dwg EX01, revision B, dated 25.10.16.

 

External Colours, Materials & Finishes

9.        The colours, materials and finishes of the external surfaces are to match those specified on the “Photomontage + Materials and Finishes” Drawing no. 11, Revision D, prepared by Meacham Nockles McQualter, and dated 30 January 2017.

 

C.        Add Conditions No. 29(d) and 48 to 60 to read:

 

Tree Management

29.      Approval is granted for removal of the following trees, subject to full implementation of the approved Landscape Plans:

 

d)   The Metrosideros excelsa (Pohutakawa, T16) to the northeast of T22, towards the northeast corner of the site, so as to allow the planting of 1 x 25 litre/300mm (pot size at the time of planting) endemic species, Angophora costata (Sydney Red Gum), in this same area of the site, as approved by the S96A application.

 

48.      The use of the premises shall not give rise to air impurities in contravention of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997. Waste gases released from the premises must not cause a public nuisance nor be hazardous or harmful to human health or the environment.

 

49.      The solid fuel heating appliance shall be designed and installed in compliance with the following requirements:

 

a)   The Environment Protection Authority’s Environmental Guidelines for Selecting, Installing and Operating Solid Fuel Heaters;

b)   Section G2 of the Building Code of Australia;

c)   The Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 and the Protection of the Environment Operations (Clean Air) Regulation 2010;

d)     Manufacturer’s specification, Installation of Woodheaters AS/NZS 2918:2001 Domestic solid fuel burning appliances-Installation; and

e)     Woodheater standards AS/NZS 4012:1999 and AS/NZS 4013:1999

 

50.      Where there is conflict between the manufacturer’s specifications and the Building Code of Australia, the more stringent standard shall apply. Details of compliance with relevant standards are to be prepared by a suitably qualified person and be submitted to Council after the installation of the chimney stack/flue.

 

51.      The chimney stack/flue must discharge vertically, which must be a minimum of one (1) metre in height.

 

52.      The chimney/flue must discharge vertically, which must be a minimum of one (1) metre above the height of any dwelling located within a 15 metre horizontal radius of the chimney stack/flue.

 

53.      The stack shall be protected by a rain excluder in accordance with the Environmental Protection Authority Guidelines and the stack/flue shall terminate in such a position that it does not pose a fire risk. Details of compliance with relevant standards are to be prepared by a suitably qualified person and be submitted to Council after the installation of the chimney/flue.

 

54.      Solid particle emissions from any trade, industry or process and any fuel burning equipment or industrial plant must not exceed 250 milligrams of solid particles per cubic metre of the resulting gases or as otherwise specified by the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 and Regulations.

 

55.      The use and operation of the premises shall not give rise to an environmental health nuisance to the adjoining/nearby premises or environment.

 

56.      There are to be no emissions or discharges from the premises which will give rise to an offence under the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997.

 

57.      The installation and operation of the equipment must satisfy relevant requirements of the Environment Protection Authority.

 

58.      The flue, chimney and baffle must be checked regularly for a build-up of soot or creosote (a tar-like oily deposit.) This build up indicates that the fire is not burning properly, and can cause chimney fires.

 

Your wood heater must be serviced annually and flue cleaned regularly by a chimney sweep. It is recommended that you retain copies of all cleaning invoices and such records can be provided to Council’s Officers, upon request.

 

59.      When storing wood, stack it under cover in a dry ventilated area. Freshly cut wood needs to be stored for about eight to twelve months prior to use.

 

60.      If any complaints are lodged by neighbouring residents, Council may contact the Australian Home Heating Association Inc. to undertake an assessment on the solid fuel heater from the owner and affected neighbour’s premises. Following the Association’s assessment, a written report will be prepared for Council with written recommendations.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP2/17

 

Subject:                    30 Frances Street, Randwick (DA/297/2016)

Folder No:                DA/297/2016

Author:                     Anthony Betros, Planning Consultant - ABC Planning Pty Ltd      

 

Proposal:                  Refurbishment of Randwick Town Hall including internal reconfiguration, new entry lobby, public foyer, sanitary and back-of-house facilities, kitchen, single storey addition at western end of the building with central mechanical plant area on the roof, external alterations including re-roofing of the main building, repair/repaint external walls, changes to window/door openings on elevations, associated mechanical and hydraulic services upgrade and new landscaping to Avoca Street forecourt including removal of existing car parking  area (Heritage Item and Heritage Conservation Area)

Ward:                        North Ward

Applicant:                Randwick City Council

Owner:                     Randwick City Council

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

http://interactivemapping/Geocortex/Essentials/prod/REST/TempFiles/Export.jpg?guid=fce3c25e-790e-4db4-9653-28ff91b9301d&contentType=image%2Fjpeg

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan


 

Development Application Executive summary report

 

The application is assessed by external planning consultant and referred to Council for determination as the subject property is owned by Randwick City Council.

 

Proposal

 

The proposed development seeks to upgrade and refurbish the internal and external areas of the Randwick Town Hall. Such works are required to achieve compliance with the current BCA, fire and accessibility codes. The proposed works are to be undertaken in stages, with this application pertaining to stages 2, 3 & 4. The proposed works for each stage are categorised below:

 

Stage 1:

·     Refurbishment work undertaken as exempt development including new lift and essential roofing works (currently in progress).

 

Stage 2:

·     Repair and repaint the south, east and north facades of the historic component of the building;

·     Demolish the existing roof plant room

·     Re-roof the historic building, retaining salvaged slates where possible

·     Construction of new ‘back of house’ to the west of the Town Hall

·     Construction of open plant area above the ‘back of house’

·     Installation of new mechanical services to first floor Councillors’ offices and Council Chamber

 

Stage 3:

·     Landscaping to the Avoca Street forecourt, including removal of carparking and new hard and soft landscaping

·     Interior refurbishment of the Frances Street wing at ground floor, including new public foyer, WC amenities and kitchen

·     Exterior refurbishment of the Frances Street wing

 

Stage 4:

·     Refurbishment of the main hall, including provisions of new back-of-house facilities, lighting, mechanical services

·     Repair and repainting of interior finishes and new openings to the northern forecourt

·     Demolition of the ground floor storeroom and first floor WC annex

·     Repair affected parts of the north façade.

 

Site

The subject site is located at 30 Frances Street, Randwick and otherwise formally known as Lot 4 in DP758867. The subject site has a primary frontage to Frances Street in the south and a secondary frontage to Avoca Street in the east, comprising a total site area of 4,302m2.

 

Randwick Town Hall is located at the eastern most portion of the allotment, and has its primary frontage addressed to Avoca Street in the east. Adjoining the western side of the Randwick Town Hall is the Randwick Council Administration building, with its primary orientation being to Frances Street in the south.

 

Figure 1: Randwick Town Hall, as viewed from Avoca Street in the east

 

Figure 2: Randwick Town Hall as viewed from Frances Street in the south, with the Randwick Council Administration building beyond

 

Figure 3: Existing elevated walkway connecting the Randwick Town Hall to the Administration Building

 

Figure 4: Forecourt and existing parking / landscaping within the front forecourt of the Town Hall

 

Adjoining the northern boundary of the subject site is Randwick Public School, the Open High School and the KU Randwick Coogee Preschool. To the south of the site is St Jude’s Child Care and St Jude’s Anglican Church and cemetery. Together, with the subject site, these buildings combine to form a prominent setting reflective of the late nineteenth century.

 

Figure 5: St Jude’s Hall on the southern side of Frances Street, as viewed from the subject site

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. No submissions were received.

 

Key Issues

 

Parking

The proposed development seeks to remove a total of 13 – 14 car spaces (10 marked car spaces and 3 – 4 unmarked car spaces) which are currently located within the front / Avoca Street setback.

 

A Traffic and Parking Study has been undertaken by GTA Consultants and has been reviewed by the Manager of Integrated Transport.

 

The Traffic and Parking Study provides recommendations for offsetting the loss of car parking spaces as a result of the proposed modifications to the forecourt of the Town Hall.

 

The preferred option is providing additional car parking spaces by way of converting 15 of the existing parallel parking spaces to 28 angled car parking spaces, located on the northern side of Frances Street, between The Avenue and Church Street.

 

The Frances Street roadway is approximately 12m wide, which complies with the relevant Australia Standards and therefore the provision of parallel parking is suitable for the street.

 

This proposed layout is similar to the existing arrangement on the southern side of Frances Street, opposite the Administration Building, on the subject site. This change was recently approved by the Randwick Traffic Committee.

 

The other 2 options that have been proposed include converting the on-street car parking restrictions (option 2) or providing an additional car space within the existing council car park (option 3). Both of these options are considered unviable.

 

It is therefore considered that the proposed parking arrangements outlined in Option 1 are sufficient in offsetting the loss of car parking as a result of the proposed modifications to the forecourt.

 

The proposed development is therefore considered to be appropriate on parking / traffic grounds, subject to the implementation of the angled parking prior to the construction of works within the forecourt of the Randwick Town Hall. 

 

Heritage

In accordance with Schedule 5 of the Randwick LEP 2012, the subject site is identified as Heritage Item No. 375, being the Randwick Town Hall. Furthermore, the subject site is located within the St Jude’s Heritage Conservation Area.

 

The proposed development application was accompanied by a Statement of Heritage Impact prepared by Tanner Kibble Denton.

 

The architectural plans have demonstrated that, where reasonable and appropriate, the highly valued heritage components of the Randwick Town Hall will be retained, reused and reinstated. Only minor works are proposed to the historical component of the building, which includes repainting the front façade, re-roofing the existing deteriorated roof structure and replacing the damaged lead capping. Such refurbishment is required to ensure the safe ongoing operation of the Town Hall as a civic building.

 

Other works are proposed to the Frances Street wing which is considered to have moderate to little heritage significance.

 

The proposed works are therefore supported on heritage grounds.

 

Landscaping

The proposed works include demolition of the existing garden bed, sandstone edging and the two existing juvenile Eucalyptus Scoparia trees within the Avoca Street front setback. No objection has been raised from Council’s Landscape Officer in relation to the removal of the two existing trees.

 

The Town Hall forecourt will be converted into an aesthetically pleasing landscaped environment that is pedestrian friendly whilst also maintaining the existing ring road and thus allowing for the provision of vehicular access.

 

Council’s Landscape Officer has provided the following comments in relation to the landscaping aspect of the proposal:

 

“Along the northern site boundary, right in the northeast corner of the site, there is a mature, 15m Phoenix dactylifera (Date Palm), with a visibly raised root crown around its base, then to its west, a smaller, but still mature Butia capitata (Jelly Palm) of only around 5m in height.

 

Both are in excellent health and condition, are covered by the DCP, and more importantly, are also included in Volume 1 of Council’s Register of Significant Trees as items 5a-b respectively; due to their historical, social, cultural, commemorative, botanic, visual and aesthetic values, having been planted between 1915-40, so are 100 years + in age.

 

While the plans do not propose any major works in this area that would pose a direct threat, in recognition of their significance to the site, minimal protection measures need to be imposed to prevent against secondary impacts, with relevant conditions provided.

 

Further west again, located on the adjoining school grounds to the north, hard up against the common boundary, there is a mature Cinnamomum camphora (Camphor Laurel) whose southern aspect overhangs into the Town Hall site, so may require minimal clearance pruning to accommodate the new courtyard and associated works, and as the amount needed is minor, the relevant consent for this has been provided.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

At present, the subject site is currently deficient in providing essential facilities, services and amenities for both workers and users of the Randwick Town Hall. The proposed refurbishment and internal works of the building are therefore required to facilitate compliance with the current BCA, fire and accessibility codes and provide an adequate living of amenity.

 

Such works will enable equitable access throughout the building whilst also providing for new and improved amenities, including kitchen facilities, air conditioning, lighting and communication and other mechanical and hydraulic services, as required.

 

The proposed works are therefore required to support the ongoing use of the subject site as a civic building.

 

The development application is therefore recommended for approval, subject to the attached conditions of consent.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Sections 80 and 80A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. 297/2016 for the refurbishment of Randwick Town Hall including internal reconfiguration, new entry lobby, public foyer, sanitary and back-of-house facilities, kitchen, single storey addition at western end of the building with central mechanical plant area on the roof, external alterations including re-roofing of the main building, repair/repaint external walls, changes to window/door openings on elevations, associated mechanical and hydraulic services upgrade at No. 30 Frances Street, subject to the following non standard conditions and the standard conditions contained in the development application compliance report attached to this report:

 

Non standard conditions

 

2.        Prior to an occupation certificate being issued for works being undertaken within the Randwick Town Hall forecourt the on-street parking plan for the angled car spaces in Frances Street shall be implemented.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA Compliance Report - 30 Frances Street, Randwick

Included under separate cover

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP3/17

 

Subject:              263-269 Clovelly Road, Clovelly (DA/566/2014/C)

Folder No:                DA/566/2014/C

Author:                     Jonathan Blackmore, Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Proposal:                  Section 96 modification of approved development by alteration to eastern boundary fence, removal of window to meter room, demolition of existing eastern stairs, construction of new stairs, increase in part of the ground floor finished floor level, internal layout changes, and alteration to some materials.

                                  Original consent: Partial demolition, alterations and additions to the existing RSL building for the establishment of a child care centre catering for 90 children and new parking area fronting Susan Lane (Heritage Item).

Ward:                        North Ward

Applicant:                Hnl Properties Pty Ltd

Owner:                     Hnl Properties Pty Ltd

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 

 

 

Development Application Executive Summary Report

 

Proposal

The applicant proposes a modification of the approved development that includes:

 

-    Changing the approved masonry eastern boundary fence to a Colorbond construction and increasing its height from 1.8m to 2.1m

-    Removal of a window to the meter room due to a BCA non-compliance

-    Demolition of existing north-eastern stairs

-    Construction of new egress stairs within the north-eastern corner to service the ground floor

-    Increase in the finished ground floor level of the ground floor level play room by 650mm to create a level play area and improve sub-floor access

-    Changing roofing materials from metal to concrete due to BCA Compliance.

-    Level 1 internal arrangement changes, including a new staff area.

-    Level 2 arrangement changes, including a larger courtyard for the caretaker’s unit, internal wall changes to the caretaker’s unit, larger steps within the outdoor area and a 30mm lower floor level for the outdoor area.     

-    Light void changes at level 1 and 2 – change to a skylight-style system due to construction issues with the originally proposed glass floors.

 

Revisions

Post-lodgement, the applicant requested that the level 1 and level 2 arrangement changes be included within the application. It was deemed that these changes did not require re-notification as they did not increase the external built form and scale, or change the scope of the proposal.

 

Original Consent

Approved 14 April 2015. Partial demolition, alterations and additions to the existing RSL building for the establishment of a child care centre catering for 90 children and a new parking area fronting Susan Lane (Heritage Item).

 

DA/566/2014/A

Approved 24 November 2015. S96 for a modification of the approved development for a change of use of the approved training room of the child care centre to a caretakers unit, retention of the existing rock wall and removal of the approved basement store area.

 

DA/566/2014/B

Approved 5 January 2016. Section 96 modification to correct Council error in relation to the numbering of a condition.

 

Site

 

The subject site is located on the north-western corner of Clovelly Road and Knox Street. Both streets feature two traffic lanes, on-street parking, some grassed nature strips and street trees. Knox Road slopes up to the north of Clovelly Road and is subsequently raised relative to all but the front of the subject site. Susan Lane is a reasonably narrow laneway that borders the rear (north) of the site and is accessed off Knox Street and nearby Fewings Street. Susan Lane is significantly elevated above the subject site.   

Figure 1. The subject site and building (centre) pictured from Clovelly Road.

 

The surrounding area is predominately low density residential with a combination of detached and semi-detached dwellings within the surrounding area.  

 

The subject site is occupied by the former Kings Cinema built in 1939, and owned and occupied until recently by the Clovelly RSL and Air Force Club.  The building is listed as a heritage item under the Randwick LEP 2012.

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. The following submission was received as a result of the notification process:

 

27 Clovelly Road

No objection to the proposed fencing change from a 1.8m high masonry fence to a 2.1m high Colorbond fence.

 

SECTION 96 ASSESSMENT:

Under the provisions of Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended, Council may only agree to a modification of an existing Development Consent if the following criteria has been complied with:-

 

Substantially the Same Development:

The modification to the approved development does not alter the nature of the approved development. For the purposes of legislative requirements under Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, it is considered that the application remains substantially within the scope of the original development.

 

SECTION 79C ASSESSMENT

 

Heritage

The Council’s consultant heritage specialist makes the following comments concerning the proposal:

 

The Site

The subject site is located on the northern side of Clovelly Road at its intersection with Knox Street at 263-269 Clovelly Road. The site is occupied by the former Kings chain cinema built in 1939, and was recently owned and occupied by Clovelly RSL Sub-Branch. The site is surrounded by various single and two storey residential dwellings of various periods and types. Located further west along Clovelly Road is a small collection of shops.

 

The former cinema and club building is a landmark in the area and assessed as being rare due to being one of only three surviving Kings cinemas in Sydney. The building has a largely intact exterior but the interior has been largely removed and is currently a construction site according to the approved original DA. Most of its interior has been extensively modified with only scattered ceiling detailing evident in fragmented form around the former foyer area.

 

The Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prepared by Clive Lucas Stapleton and Partners in 2002 notes that the stage behind the curtain maintains its original form although has been completely lost its original stepped and elegant cinema stage form and design. CPH can confirm that the stage has been retained during construction works.

 

Heritage Status and Significance 

The site of the subject building is listed as a heritage item on Schedule 5 of the Randwick

LEP 2012 under item number I13 as Clovelly RSL and Air Force Club (formerly Kings

Theatre). The subject site is not located within a heritage conservation area or within the close vicinity (visual curtilage) of any heritage item. The heritage inventory form for the item provides only a description and short statement noting the following:

 

One of the few remaining examples of Inter War Art Deco style architecture surviving in the Sydney Region.

 

The Statement of Significance for the building as assessed in the CMP notes that:

 

The Clovelly RSL and Air Force Club is the last built and one of the very few surviving Kings Theatres, a Sydney chain which was part of the boom period of cinema building in New South Wales. It is one of few surviving works of Guy Crick and Bruce Furs whose work is very influential in Australian Cinema design. Although altered and internally greatly remodelled, in its setting it is a fair example of cinema architecture of the 1930s. It is socially important as the home of the Clovelly RSL and Air Force Club.

 

The Proposal

The proposal is for a variation (s96) to the development consent determination dated on 15 June, 2016.

 

The original proposal was for the partial demolition, alterations and additions to the existing RSL buildings for the establishment of a child care centre catering for 90 children and new parking area fronting Susan Lane. The Section 96 application under review here proposes the following adjustments and additions:

 

·    Construction of a Colorbond fence along the eastern boundary, instead of the masonry fence approved in the original application;

·    Infill of window to electrical meter room;

·    Demolition of existing eastern stair;

·    Relocation of egress stair 4.5m south, and construction of a new wall along the eastern elevation; and 

·    Floor to be raised by 650mm in the play area located at the north of the site; and 

·    Construction of concrete roof above level 2 rooms, instead of a metal-framed roof approved in the original application.

 

Background

City Plan Heritage was previously involved in the assessment of the original DA for the site.

 

The works approved under that DA are currently in progress. A site inspection was carried out by City Plan Heritage on 4 November 2016 in order to confirm the existing internal conditions and integrity of any original surviving fabric. The project architect, Joseph Toth of Bongiorno + Hawkins, was also in attendance.

 

Submission

The documentation provided by the Council for this application included:

·    Set of architectural plans, Revision E, 29 September 2016, Bongiorno Hawkins +

·    Associates Pty Ltd

·    Statement of Environmental Effects, 4 October 2016, Bongiorno Hawkins +

·    Associates Pty Ltd

 

Comments

Following the site inspection and a review of the submitted documentation, including the architectural plans and the SEE, the proposed amendments to the development are assessed here for their impact on the heritage item and its overall streetscape presentation. 

 

It is considered that the proposed amendments to the approved works will have no impact on the building’s presentation within the streetscape of either Clovelly Road or Knox Street. The Colorbond fence that is proposed to take the place of the approved masonry wall will only be visible from the neighbouring property at 271 Clovelly Road, immediately to the east, and will not be evident from the public domain. It has been understood from the project architect that the fence has been chosen instead of the wall so as to maximise space and therefore allow greater access to that eastern corridor, and also to remove the need to excavate for the installation of associated footings. The window to the electrical meter room, which is proposed to be infilled, faces north and is therefore not visible from Clovelly Road or Knox Street.

 

The approved egress stair is proposed to be relocated 4.5m south from the rock wall at the southern boundary of the site. As this does not relate to the original fabric of the building and will not affect its presentation from the public domain, it will have no impact upon the heritage significance of the site.

 

The new second level was approved to have a metal-framed roof under the DA. This roof is proposed to be replaced with a concrete roof. As this work is to be added to new fabric, it will have no impact on significant fabric of the building. No changes in size are proposed and the concrete roof will not be visible above the parapet from the street.

 

The external fire stair at the eastern side of the building is proposed for demolition. This stair was not assessed as part of the fabric of the building in the 2002 CMP by Clive Lucas Stapleton, but during the site inspection it was established that it is likely to be modern, made of concrete with a blue metal safety rail. As such, its removal will not adversely affect the heritage values of the building.

 

Proposed internal works include the raised floor area around the stage at the sides and rear. The stage is significant as one of the few remaining elements of the interior of the former cinema. The floor in front of the stage is substantially lower than the stage. As the proposed raised floor level is limited to the rear and sides, leaving the front of the stage clear, it will have no impact on its significance and will allow the continued legibility of the stage. Further assisting the legibility of the stage are its definition and separation from the surrounding floor level at the sides and rear by existing, original brick walls which are proposed to be retained.

 

This aspect of the proposal complies with the recommendation originally made in our assessment of the DA in 2015.

 

Conclusions and Recommendation

The proposed variations to the approved design under DA/566/2014/C are found to have no impact on the heritage values of the Clovelly RSL and Air Force Club (formerly Kings Theatre) and are therefore supported.

 

Environmental Planning Instruments

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

 

The following clauses of LEP 2012 are relevant to the proposed development:

 

Zone R2 – Low Density Residential

The site is zoned Low Density Residential R2 under the RLEP 2012 and the proposal is permissible with Council's consent. The proposed modification is not inconsistent with the aims of RLEP 2012 and the specific objectives of the zone in that the proposal will preserve the amenity of the surrounding environment and protect the amenity of adjoining residents. The proposed modification will comply with the development controls of the RLEP 2012.

 

Floor Space Ratio – Clause 4.4 of RLEP 2012

The proposed modification does not increase the site’s approved floor space ratio.

 

Development Control Plans

 

Building Design of Child Care Centre – Sub-Section 3.1 Part D11

The relevant building design controls of the DCP 2013 require the external built form to generally reflect a dwelling house when located in an R2 Low density Residential zone. The proposal generally preserves the approved external built form of the child care centre and further assessment of the approved bulk is not required. The proposed roofing materiality change will not be significantly visible from the surrounding area and will result in a comparable design to the approved.

 

Acoustic Amenity and Privacy – Sub-Section 4.1 Part D11

The proposed modification will not alter the approved acoustic and visual privacy situation

 

Fencing

The proposal seeks the modification of condition 2a, which currently reads:

 

The proposed lapped and capped timber paling fencing shown adjacent to the eastern boundary is to be replaced by a masonry wall of a minimum height of 1.8m above existing ground level. Details are to be shown on the Construction Certificate Plans.

 

A 2.1m high Colorbond fence is proposed instead of a masonry wall. The applicant’s reason for this change is that space and access restrictions will make construction of a masonry fence difficult.

 

It is considered that the proposed change will result in no adverse impacts on the amenity of the area. The fence will be generally obscured from view of the street and the wider area. The acoustic report prepared by Rodney Stevens Acoustics dated January 2015 for the original DA stated that Colorbond aluminium fencing in this location would provide suitable noise attenuation. The proposed 2.1m height is not necessarily a height increase on the approved fence as Condition 2a did not stipulate a maximum fencing height. Further, it is noted that the adjoining property owner, 271 Clovelly Road, has stated that they have no objection to the proposed Colorbond fence. 

 

The proposed 2.1m high Colorbond fence has been shown on the amended plans and, therefore, Condition 2a is recommended for deletion.

 

Other Environmental Impacts – Section 79C(1)(b)

 

The proposed modification will result in no adverse social, economic or environmental impacts. In particular, the proposed modification does not increase or significantly modify the approved external built form, and the scale and nature of the childcare facility remains unchanged. 

 

Site Suitability

 

The modification to the approved development does not alter the nature or scale of the approved development in relation to site suitability.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed modification to the approved development has been assessed against the requirements of the relevant planning guidelines of the RLEP and Council policies and plans as well as in regard to Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended. The proposed modifications are considered to result in development that is substantially the same nature as previously approved works. The modified development will not result in significant adverse environmental impacts upon the amenity and character of the locality and will be not inconsistent with the relevant objectives and criteria of the LEP 2012 and the RCDCP 2013.

 

Therefore, the application is recommended for approval.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grant its consent under Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 as amended to modify Development Consent No. DA/566/2014/C for 263-269 Clovelly Road, Clovelly, by alteration to eastern boundary fence, removal of window to meter room, demolition of existing eastern stairs, construction of new stairs, increase in part of the ground floor finished floor level, internal layout changes, and alteration to some materials in the following manner:

 

·    Amend Condition No. 1 to read:

 

1.       Approved Plans & Supporting Documentation

The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans and supporting documentation listed below and endorsed with Council’s approved stamp, except where amended by Council in red and/or by other conditions of this consent:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Received by Council

DA02 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA03 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA05 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA06 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA07 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA08 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA09 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA 13 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA14 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA15 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA16 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

DA17 Issue E

Bongiorno Hawkins

12.01.15

15 January 2015

Landscape Plans 1 of 4 to 4 of 4

Tessa Rose

22 July, 2014

19 August 2014

Sample Boards 1 and 2

Tessa Rose

 

19 August 2014

 

As amended by the Section 96 “A” plans and supporting documentation listed below:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

CC01 Issue B

Bongiorno Hawkins

5 Nov. 2015

CC02 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

9 June 2015

CC03 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

9 June 2015

CC04 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

9 June 2015

CC05 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

9 June 2015

CC06 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

9 June 2015

CC07 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

9 June 2015

CC08 Issue B

Bongiorno Hawkins

20 Oct. 2015

CC09 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

20 Oct. 2015

CC10 Issue A

Bongiorno Hawkins

9 June 2015

CC11 Issue B

Bongiorno Hawkins

16 Sept. 2015

CC12 Issue B

Bongiorno Hawkins

16 Sept. 2015

 

As amended by the Section 96 “C” plans and supporting documentation listed below:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

CC02 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC10 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC11 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC12 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC13 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC14 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC15 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC16 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC19 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

CC20 Issue G

Bongiorno Hawkins

13 Feb. 2017

 

Only in so far as they relate to the modifications highlighted on the section 96 plans and detailed in the Section 96 application, except as may be amended by the following conditions and as may be shown in red on the attached plans:.

 

·    Delete Condition 2a

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP4/17

 

Subject:              1 Meagher Avenue, Maroubra (DA/29/1990/B)

Folder No:                DA/29/1990/B

Author:                     Tuong-Vi Doan, Environmental Planning Officer     

 

Proposal:                  Section 96 application to extend the trading hours of the existing service station and convenience store from 5am to 11pm, 7 days a week. Original consent: Continue to use existing 7-11 convenience store with self-service petrol

Ward:                        South Ward

Applicant:                Milestone Australia Pty Ltd

Owner:                     Kit Wahl Fung Chu & Stephanie Fung

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 

Development Application Executive summary report

 

The subject section 96 (2) application is referred to Council for determination as the original development application was determined by Council.

 


 

Proposal

 

The current application seeks to modify the consent granted under DA/29/1990 by extending the approved trading hours of the existing 7-Eleven Service Station and Convenience Store from 7:00am – 11:00pm to 5:00am – 11:00pm.

 

Current Approval

 

Development consent was granted on 21 March 1990 to allow for the continuation to use the existing Seven-Eleven convenience store with self-service petrol.

 

Site History

 

·     DA/253/1967 – approved 16 January 1967 for the use of the site as a service station.

 

·     DA/99/1985 – approved 11 June 1985 for the construction of a new convenience store with self-service petrol facilities.

 

·     DA/567/1997 – approved 26 November 1997 for upgrade of the existing 7- Eleven service station by replacing canopy, mansard, signage and lighting

 

·     DA/29/1990 – approved 21 March 1990 for the continued use of the site as a convenience/food with self-service petrol facilities.

 

·     DA/289/1999 – application for extension of trading hours to 24 hours, 7 days withdrawn on 24 May 1999. Condition No. 3 of the development consent for DA/29/1999 restricts the hours of operation of the site from 7am to 11pm, 7 days.

 

·     DA/617/2009 – approved 27 October 2009 for the removal of an existing pylon sign and replacement with new 7m high price board sign adjacent to Malabar Road entry.

 

·     DA/29/1990/A - refused 14 February 2012 for amending the proposed trading hours from 5.00am to 12 midnight, 7 days.

 

Site

 

The subject land is known as Lot 1 DP 234786, 1 Meagher Avenue, South Maroubra. The site has frontages to Meagher Avenue and Malabar Road of 32m and 27m respectively. The site has an overall site area of 1341m2. The site has vehicle access from both Meagher Avenue and Malabar Road.

 

The site currently contains an existing 7-Eleven service station and convenience store with associated canopy structure located over the fuel dispensers along the Meagher Avenue boundary and ten on-site car parking spaces

 

The subject site is located on the eastern side of Meagher Avenue directly north west of the South Maroubra Shopping Village and the Sands Hotel which is approximately 60m to the east of the site. Directly abutting the site to the north east is a public park. Properties to the west of Meagher Avenue comprise single storey detached residential dwellings. The wider area of Maroubra is an established residential precinct.

 

Figure 1 View of subject site from Meagher Avenue

 

Figure 2 View of subject site from Malabar Road

 

Section 96 Assessment

Section 96(2) Criteria

Comment

(a)  It is satisfied that the development to which the consent as modified relates is substantially the same development as the development for which consent was originally granted and before that consent as originally granted was modified (if at all), and

The proposal is considered to represent substantially the same development as it only relates to altering the hours of operation.

(b)    It has consulted with the relevant Minister, public authority or approval body (within the meaning of Division 5) in respect of a condition imposed as a requirement of a concurrence to the consent or in accordance with the general terms of an approval proposed to be granted by the approval body and that Minister, authority or body has not, within 21 days after being consulted, objected to the modification of that consent, and

Not applicable.

(c)    It has notified the application in accordance with:

(i)     the regulations, if the regulations so require, or

(ii)    a development control plan, if the consent authority is a council that has made a development control plan that requires the notification or advertising of applications for modification of a development consent, and

The owners of adjoining and neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed modification in accordance with the DCP. See Submissions section of this report for more information.

 

(d)    It has considered any submissions made concerning the proposed modification within the period prescribed by the regulations or provided by the case development control plan, as the case may be.

Submissions have been considered.

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. The following submissions were received as a result of the notification process:

 

·     Anonymous 1

 

Issues

Comments

The locality of the service station being near the beach and residential area raises concerns for noise if the hours of operation is to be extended from a 5am start. Noise of running cars and taxis will wake up the residents early morning.

 

Request for the hours to stay as existing.

The applicant is allowed to make an application to modify development consent and the proposed extension to trading hours has been subject to a comprehensive assessment process. It is considered that a trial period of three months placed on the application is appropriate in this circumstance.

 

Refer to Key Issues for further discussion regarding noise concerns.

 

·     8 Meagher Avenue

 

Issues

Comments

·    Not in the public interest

·    Likely adverse social and economic impacts on the locality

·    Noise Impact Assessment has not been prepared.

·    Should not rely on the outdated and deficient report from the previous application DA/29/1990/A

·    No Plan of Management has been provided

·    Should not rely on the old Plan of Management for DA/29/1990/A as it is deficient and does not adequately address the issues raised.

·    Council should refuse this application.

The applicant has provided an updated acoustic report (December 2016) along with an updated Plan of Management (September 2016) to address the existing and potential noise sources and emissions from the proposed development, and potential impact upon the amenity of the locality.

 

The proposed extension to trading hours has been subject to a comprehensive assessment process. It is considered that a trial period of three months placed on the application is appropriate in this circumstance.

 

Refer to Key Issues for further discussion regarding noise concerns.

 

·     Anonymous 2

 

Issues

Comments

The locality of the service station being near the residential area, the early start will cause a lot of noise to the area.

 

Will support if the hours were to start at 6:30am in summer.

While the site is opposite to residential development along Meagher Avenue, it should also be noted that the site is located in a neighbourhood centre, adjoining businesses and a public recreation area.

 

Refer to Key Issues for further discussion regarding noise concerns.

 

Key Issues

 

Noise

Noise impacts have been addressed in the acoustic report (prepared by Wilkinson Murray Pty Limited, Report no. 11107-AC, dated December 2016) which has been supplied to Council for review.

 

Council’s Environmental Health Officer has provided the following comments on the potential noise impacts:

 

Proposed Development:

Council has received a section 96(2) application to modify the hours of operation for the 7 Eleven Service Station and Convenience Store located at 1 Meagher Avenue, Maroubra.

 

Comments:

Acoustic Amenity

The current hours of operation are approved for 7:00am to 11:00pm, seven days and are proposing to extend the hours of operation to commence trading at 5:00am to 11:00pm, seven days.

 

It is noted that Council has received three (3) submissions with regards to noise concerns for the proposed hours. In March 2011 Council received a complaint in relation to the hours of operation and the time for deliveries. This matter was rectified and no further complaints with regards to noise from this development have been received since that incident.

 

An acoustic report was submitted to Council Prepared by Wilkinson Murray Pty Limited (Report no. 11107-AC) dated December 2016 to assess the potential noise impact for the proposed change in hours. The report includes recommendations to be adopted in any site management plant and concludes that the predicted levels of noise are conservative and the new proposed extended trading hours should not have an adverse impact on the acoustic amenity of surrounding residents.

 

A plan of management prepared by Milestone dated September 2016 was submitted with the application. The plan of management incorporates the recommendations in the acoustic report as well as other measures to minimise amenity impact.

 

The potential for noise disturbance has been considered and the appropriate conditions have been included in this referral.

 

The application was also referred to the Police. A Crime Risk Assessment was conducted for the site. The report provided various recommendations in order to ensure the safety of the members of the community and the security of their property.

 

Specific issues about the extended trading hours was discussed with Constable Andrew Carter. He advised Council that the Police don’t object to the proposed increase in trading hours to have an earlier start. However, if the proposal were to increase an additional two hours after the approved closing hour of 11pm then there would have been more potential risks associated with that proposal.

 

This site has a history of refusals based on increasing hours of trade, with previous applications proposing for 24/7 trading and another to operate until midnight. The most recent application, DA/29/1990/A proposed for the trading hours from 5.00am to 12 midnight, 7 days and was refused by Council. The applicant has provided the relevant documents required for the assessment of extending trading hours, being a Plan of Management and an acoustic report.

 

Based on the acoustic report prepared in December 2016, the information indicates that the noise generated by the activities on the site during the proposed extended hours would not have adverse impact on the acoustic amenity of surrounding residents. Using this assessment, along with the police comments it is considered that the proposed increased two hours should be acceptable in this instance subject to a trial period of twelve months. The trial period suggested acts as a precautionary measure to ensure that Council can monitor the effectiveness of the management regime in minimising any environmental amenity impacts.

 

Randwick Development Control Plan 2013 (DCP)

 

v Part D13 Late Night Trading

The objectives of this zone are as follows:

 

·     To protect neighbourhood amenity and property, particularly residential land uses.

·     To minimise opportunities for anti-social behaviour and crime, through the responsible management of late night trading premises and their surrounding environment.

·     To enable local economies that provide for the community’s diverse cultural, social and retail needs.

 

According to the DCP, the site activity is categorized as a low impact premises. The applicant has provided a Management Plan dated September 2016 to address any potential adverse impacts that may arise from the operation of the premises as well as an acoustic report to assess the potential noises that may arise from the vehicle movement during the proposed two hour increase. The main concerns that were raised by the adjoining residents were the potential noise that would occur during this period. Despite the site being opposite to residential development along Meagher Avenue, it should also be noted that the site is also located in a neighbourhood centre adjoining businesses and a public recreation area. Furthermore, it is not unusual for petrol stations to operate for longer hours. However, given the site’s history of refusal of extend trading hours and its proximity to neighbouring residential development, the application has been conditioned to have a trial period of twelve months.

 

Figure 3 Zoning map of the site and surrounding locations

 

Section 79C Assessment

 

The site has been inspected and the application has been assessed having regard to Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended.

 

Section 79C ‘Matters for Consideration’

Comments

Section 79C(1)(a)(i) – Provisions of any environmental planning instrument

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The site is zoned B1 - Neighbourhood Centre under the LEP and the proposal relates to the modification of the approved development to extend the hours of operation. This modification is permissible with Council’s consent and is consistent with the specific objectives of the zone in that the proposed activity provides a business that serve the needs of the people who live or work in the surrounding neighbourhood and protects the amenity of the residents in the zone and in the adjoining and nearby residential zones.

Section 79C(1)(a)(ii) – Provisions of any draft environmental planning instrument

Not applicable.    

Section 79C(1)(a)(iii) – Provisions of any development control plan

Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan 2013 (DCP)

The proposal generally satisfies the objectives and controls of the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. 

Section 79C(1)(a)(iiia) – Provisions of any Planning Agreement or draft Planning Agreement

Not applicable.

Section 79C(1)(a)(iv) – Provisions of the regulations

The relevant clauses of the Regulations have been satisfied.

Section 79C(1)(b) – The likely impacts of the development, including environmental impacts on the natural and built environment and social and economic impacts in the locality

The proposed modification has responded appropriately to the DCP requirements and will not result in adverse impact upon the amenity of the adjoining neighbours.

 

The proposed development is consistent with the dominant residential character in the locality. The proposal is not considered to result in detrimental social or economic impacts on the locality.

Section 79C(1)(c) – The suitability of the site for the development

The site is considered to be suitable for the proposal.

Section 79C(1)(d) – Any submissions made in accordance with the EP&A Act or EP&A Regulation

The issues raised in the submissions have been addressed in this report.

Section 79C(1)(e) – The public interest

The proposal promotes the objectives of the zone and will not result in any significant adverse environmental, social or economic impacts on the locality. Accordingly, the proposal is considered to be in the public interest.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed modification to the existing development has been assessed against the requirements of the relevant planning guidelines of the RLEP 2012, the relevant council policies including the DCP 2013 as well as in regard to Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended. The proposed modification will result in substantially the same development as that previously approved and will not result in unreasonable adverse impacts upon either the amenity of the adjoining premises or the character of the locality. The application is therefore recommended for approval subject to the attached conditions of consent.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. DA/29/1990/B of the approved development by  extending the trading hours of the existing service station and convenience store from 5am to 11pm, 7 days a week at 1 Meagher Avenue, Maroubra, subject to the following conditions:

 

A.       Add Condition 3a to read:

 

3a. The hours of operation of the service station and convenience store specified under Condition 3 of the Development Consent No. DA/29/1990 shall be extended to allow a 5:00am start on a trial basis for twelve (12) months from date of this consent. Prior to the expiry of the trial period an application must be lodged with Council for approval to continue operating the extended hours. Should an application not be received by Council prior to the expiry of the trial period, the hours of operation must revert to the previously approved times, that is 7:00am – 11:00pm, daily.

 

B.        Add Conditions No. 15 to 20 to read:

 

Environmental Amenity

15.      There are to be no emissions or discharges from the premises which will give rise to a public nuisance or result in an offence under the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 and Regulations.

 

16.      The proposed use of the premises and the operation of all plant and equipment must not give rise to an ‘offensive noise’ as defined in the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 and Regulations.

 

In this regard, the use and operation of the premises (including all plant and equipment) shall not give rise to a sound pressure level at any affected premises that exceeds the background (LA90), 15 min noise level, measured in the absence of the noise source/s under consideration by more than 5dB(A).  The source noise level shall be assessed as an LAeq, 15 min and adjusted in accordance with the NSW Office of Environment & Heritage/Environment Protection Authority Industrial Noise Policy 2000 and Environmental Noise Control Manual (sleep disturbance).

17.      The following recommendations in the acoustic report prepared by Wilkinson Murray Pty Limited (Report no. 11107-AC) dated December 2016 are to be implemented at all times:

·     Staff be trained to encourage patrons to respect the neighbours and leave the premises in an orderly manner.

·     Signs be erected to encourage patrons to respect the neighbours and leave the premises in an orderly manner.

 

18.      The Plan of Management prepared by Milestone dated September 2016 is to be implemented at all times.

 

19.      The use of the premises and the operation of plant and equipment shall not give rise to the transmission of a vibration nuisance or damage to other premises.

 

20.      Hours of deliveries are restricted to 7.00am to 10.00pm.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Director City Planning Report No. CP5/17

 

Subject:              94 St Pauls Street, Randwick (DA/25/2015/A)

Folder No:                DA/25/2015/A

Author:                     Louis Coorey, Senior Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Proposal:                  Modify the approved development by replacement of privacy screen to Unit 6 balcony with planter box, and delete requirement for reduction in length of balcony, alter car park allocation, addition of storage in basement, reduce ground floor setback of Unit 1, alteration to entry foyer, new car park exhaust, alteration to excavation and piling profile, addition of door to Unit 3, alteration to some windows, reduction in eastern, western and front setbacks, delete stair access to Unit 2, internal changes, expand lobbies, extension of third floor balcony and addition of planter box.

Ward:                        East Ward

Applicant:                Mr T A Mallam

Owner:                     Mr T A Mallam and Ms B B Mallam and Diva Developments Pty Ltd and BMDM Pty Ltd

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

http://interactivemapping/Geocortex/Essentials/prod/REST/TempFiles/Export.jpg?guid=b0532d29-5689-4cd3-90fd-817a2e669dcd&contentType=image%2Fjpeg

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 

Development Application Executive summary report

 

The Section 96 application is referred to Council at the request of Councillors Matson, Neilson and Bowen.

 

1.  Proposal

 

The section 96 application seeks to modify the original consent in the following manner (note: bold emphasis added to modifications deleted from the S96 application in amended plans received by Council on 7 June 2016):

 

Basement:

·     Additional storage area (8smq);

·     Allocate one visitor space to a two bedroom unit retaining one visitor parking space (requires amendment to condition 83)

 

Lower ground floor level:

·     Alter excavation supporting modifications above (subject to assessment of modifications above)

·     New exhaust duct and louvre at ground level within the existing store (below existing ground level); Noise and amenity of neighbour’s are a concern

·     Modify foyer entry to improve access and bring unit 1 entry into a secure foyer and provide weather protection (setback reduced from 5.2m eastern side setback down to 3m)

·     Reduce the building setback of unit 1 by 750mm from the front boundary (since deleted)

 

Ground floor level:

·     Expand stair and lobby area at the eastern middle part of the building for accessibility (reducing side setback from 5.2m down to 4.9m)

·     Add door to the south east of unit 3 to enable access to the rear courtyard (ground level)

·     Delete stair access along western side of unit 2

·     Modification of western windows of unit 2 (no objections to modified window openings)

·     Reduce front setback by 750mm (since deleted)

·     Reduce western side setback of unit 2 (at front of building) by 250mm (since deleted)

·     Reduce eastern side setbacks of units 2 and 3 by 250mm (since deleted)

·     Add study within unit 2 (since deleted)

 

First floor level:

·     Expand lobby area at the eastern middle part of the building for accessibility (reducing side setback from 5.2m down to 4.9m)

·     Reduce western side setbacks of unit 4 (at front of building) by 250mm (since deleted)

·     Reduce eastern side setbacks of units 4 and 5 by 250mm (since deleted)

·     Reduce front setback by 750mm (since deleted)

·     Add study within unit 4 (since deleted)

 

Second floor level:

·     Expand lobby area at the eastern middle part of the building for accessibility (reducing side setback from 5.2m down to 4.9m)

·     Delete condition 2d which requires a reduction in the depth of the balcony by 1.25m back to section 7 thus reducing the balconies front setback from 7.75m down to 6.5m at the north western corner.

·     Reduce western side setbacks of unit 6 (at front of building) by 250mm (since deleted)

·     Reduce eastern side setback of units 6  by 250mm (since deleted)

·     Reduce front setback by 750mm (since deleted)

 

2.  Amended plans

 

Amended plans received by Council on 28 November 2016 detail the following amendments:

 

·     Remove 250mm side extensions

·     Remove the 750mm extensions to the front building alignment

·     Revert back to the original bedroom designs for units 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

·     Delete condition 2c and replace the 1.6m privacy screen to the eastern edge of unit 6 with the proposed 1m wide planter box, noting that this condition effectively blocks the views from the apartments to the west (which were considered during the DA process)

·     Retain the top balcony extension for U6 as a roof over the unit below

·     Retain proposed modifications to the basement (which you have indicated that you generally support)

·     Retain the carpark exhaust relocation

·     Retain the stair and lobby extension on each level

·     Retain the duct deletion to U3,5,6 at stairwell

·     Retain extension of canopy and planter wall at the front

·     Retain modifications to the ground floor lobby and to the entrance of unit 1

·     Deletion of the western stairs adjacent to U1 boundary

 

The above amendments substantially address Councils issues. The key issues are the subject of assessment further below.

 

3.  Details of current approval:

 

DA/25/2015: Approved under delegated authority on 14 September 2015 the demolition of the existing buildings and construction of a part 3 and part 4 storey residential flat building comprising 6 dwellings (Gnd: 1 x 2 bedroom; Level 1: 1 x 1 bedroom and 1 x 2 bedroom; level 2: 1 x 1 bedroom and 2 x 1 bedroom unit; Level 3: 1 x 3 bedroom unit) and basement car parking for 8 vehicles plus a wash bay.

 

Non-standard conditions:

 

The original determination contained the following non-standard conditions (those of relevance to this application are bolded):

 

·     Amendment of Plans & Documentation

2.  The approved plans and documents must be amended in accordance with the following requirements and details are to be included in the Construction Certificate:

 

A.       The privacy screens to the central balconies to units 3 and 5 must be extended to cover the full eastern façade of the respective balconies. The privacy screen must be constructed of metal or timber and the total area of any openings within the privacy screen must not exceed 25% of the area of the screen. Alternatively, the privacy screen may be provided with translucent, obscured, frosted or sandblasted glazing in a suitable frame.

 

B.       The transparent glass balustrades to the eastern facades of the front balcony areas units 2 and 4 are to frosted or obscured glass for the section aligning with the northernmost point of the building at each respective level.

 

C.      A privacy screen to a minimum height of 1.6m above floor level must be provided to the eastern edge of the balustrade to the front balcony of unit 6. The screen must align with the northernmost outer face of the respective unit. The privacy screen must be constructed of metal or timber and the total area of any openings within the privacy screen must not exceed 25% of the area of the screen.  Alternatively, the privacy screen may be provided with translucent, obscured, frosted or sandblasted glazing in a suitable frame.

 

Planner comment: This section 96 application seeks to delete condition 2c, providing a planter box along the eastern side instead of the privacy screen. The units within No. 96 St Pauls Street have their own privacy screens and it is considered that the outlook from the balcony will predominately be cast towards the east rather than behind looking into the flats. In addition, the provision of privacy screens along the sides of front facing balconies adds unnecessary bulk that does not fit in well with the articulation of the built form.

 

D.      The front balcony to unit 6 is to be reduced in length from the northernmost edge by 1.25m. 

 

Planner comment: This section 96 application, seeks to delete condition 2d (which requiring a 1.25m reduction in the depth of the balcony which equated to a maximum depth of 3.8m from the front building line) thus seeking a 5.05m deep balcony. The applicant contends that the increase in depth is to align the upper level façade with the floor plate below as shown in figure below.

 

The main issue with this modification relates to view loss from east facing kitchen and lounge room windows in unit 4/92 St Pauls Street.

 

The Section 96 application referencing amended plans received by Council on 7 June 2016 shows compliance with conditions 2a, 2b & 2e:

 

·     Conditions 2a providing screening along the full eastern side of the middle balconies to units 3 & 5,

·     Condition 2b providing obscure glazing to units 2 & 4 balustrading and

·     Condition 2e providing weather protection to openings on the western elevation.

 

4.  Site

 

The subject site, 94 St Pauls Street, Randwick is formally known is Lot 2 DP523673 and Lot 1 DP524160.

 

The site is located on the southern side of St Pauls Street and forms a unique wedge-like shape, spanning 14.42m wide at the northern/street frontage and 5.75m wide at the rear/southern boundary. The site comprises an area of 528.9m2 and has a depth of approximately 45.6m.

 

The site is sloping down in a general direction to the north east at angles ranging from 7 to 15 degrees. The site falls by approximately 14 metres from the south down to the north, commanding coastal and valley views to the north-east.

 

The site is located in an established residential area within close proximity to shops, schools, child care centres and public transport. St Pauls Street is serviced by buses and a bus stop exists directly across the road from the site.

 

The site adjoins two large residential flat buildings to the east and west. Most of the buildings in the immediate neighbourhood are also residential flat buildings.

 

The site is located approximately 1km west of Coogee Beach, approximately 500m east of Prince of Wales Hospital, approximately 1km east of University of New South Wales and approximately 900m southeast of Royal Randwick Shopping Centre.

 

Figure 1 aerial photograph of the subject site (green outline).

 

5.  Submissions

 

Under the provisions of Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended, Council may only agree to a modification of an existing Development Consent if the following criteria has been complied with:-

 

·     4/96 St Pauls Street

·     18/96 St Pauls Street

·     Executive Committee Secretary 94 St Pauls Street

·     13/92 ST Pauls Street, Randwick

·     6/92 St Pauls Street, Randwick

·     12/92 St Pauls Street, Randwick

·     2/96 St Pauls Street, Randwick

 

Issue

Comments

The proposed 0.99:1 FSR is significant

The amended application reduces the FSR to a maximum of 0.91:1. This has been achieved by deleting the majority of the proposed setback reductions.

What is the resultant car parking allocation

The total number of parking spaces is not being altered, being 8 residential spaces and 1 shared visitor / carwash bay

Did the original approval not meet the minimum standards for access widths

Yes, the current National Construction Code requires continuous handrails on both sides of the stair flight, which has to be a min 1m clear width

The increase in size of the building will create loss of light and will be well above the standard.

The majority of modifications sought such as reduction in side setbacks by 250mm and front setbacks by 750mm have been deleted from this section 96 application.

Removing the privacy screen to unit 6 will result in considerable loss of privacy

Replacing the privacy screen at the eastern side of unit 6 balcony with a planter will achieve reasonable privacy protection. See key issues section of this report.

Proposed reduction of visitor space will not adequately service the development and result in increased demand for on-street parking.

See Development Engineering comment in the referrals section below. In brief it is considered that given the low number of units that one visitor parking space can adequately service the development.

The proposed increase in height will result in loss of sunlight, amenity and views

The approved development has a maximum height of approximately 11.8m and the proposed modifications do not alter the maximum height of the building

What does stairwell and lift enlarged to suit upper level access and expanded eastern section of roof.

The increases in area at the eastern side of the development relate to the common stairs, lift area and roof over. These elements will be setback at least 3m at ground level and 4.86m at the upper levels which are well above the minimum required under the RDCP. See discuss of setbacks in the key issues section of this report.

The proposed extension of unit 6 balcony towards the front will result in adverse impacts

The increase in depth of unit 6 is not approved as per the recommendation that condition 2d be retained.

This section 96 winds back amendments that were made in the original approval to achieve a desired form.

Noted, the applicant has amended their application removing the majority of the reductions in side and front setbacks.

No shadow diagrams have been provided

The proposed modifications mainly increase the bulk in the middle lobby area of the building which remains substantially setback from the side boundary and there will not be any appreciable difference in shadowing.

 

6.  Section 96 Assessment

 

Under the provisions of Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended, Council may only agree to a modification of an existing Development Consent if the following criteria has been complied with:-

 

Substantially the Same Development

 

The proposed section 96 application as originally sought was not considered to be substantially within the scope of the original approved development.

 

The applicant was advised that the side and front setbacks where key factors that contributed to the original approval being issued and that the proposed modifications would essentially negate these amendments made in the course of assessment of the original application and subsequent approval.

 

The applicant has since deleted the proposed reductions in the side and front setbacks.

 

The section 96 application as amended is considered to remain substantially within the scope of the original approval.

 

7.  Key Issues

 

The site has been inspected and the application has been assessed having regard to Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended.

 

SEPP 65 – Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development

SEPP No. 65 aims to promote quality design of Residential Flat Buildings. The proposal is subject to the policy as the original approval involved the development of a residential flat building being 3 storeys and more in height and containing four or more dwellings. An assessment of the key modifications has been carried out in accordance with Part 3: Siting the Development and Part 4: Designing the Building in the Apartment Design Guide (ADG). The key non-compliances to the design criteria include a merits based assessment as per the design guidance of the Apartment Design Guide. These include controls relating to visual privacy and setbacks.

 

Apartment design guide

 

Objective 3F - Visual Privacy and Objective 4H-1 Acoustic privacy

For the purposes of visual and acoustic privacy of neighbouring properties the ADG requires that habitable areas including attached balconies be separated by a minimum of 6m from boundaries and 12m combined separation from habitable areas (including balconies) on neighbouring properties as shown in figures 3 and 4 below. The design guidelines in the ADG for privacy seek to ensure that development be located and oriented to maximise visual privacy between buildings on site and for neighbouring buildings by providing adequate building separation from neighbouring buildings/adjacent uses.

Figure 3: ADG diagram figure 3F-3 showing the application of the visual privacy controls

 

The proposed modifications requiring an assessment of visual and acoustic impacts include:

 

·     Unit 6:

Front upper level balcony: replace privacy screen required at the eastern side with a planter box (the subject of condition 2c) and extend depth of balcony by 1250mm towards the front (the subject of condition 2d).

Increase width of the east facing doorway opening

·     Extension of unit 1 terrace wrapping around the western side boundary

 

Unit 6 Front upper level balcony

 

Replacing privacy screen with planter box to unit 6

The proposed replacement of the 1.6m high eastern side privacy screen with a planter is considered acceptable as it doesn’t allow for direct overlooking to the western side neighbour’s building. There will be an 11.85m distance from the trafficable balcony to the level 3 balcony at No. 96 St Pauls Street which is only 150mm short of the 12m minimum separation distance required under the Apartment Design Guide (ADG) for adequate visual privacy protection. The upper level balconies at level 4 and 5 of 92 St Pauls Street are further away than the level 3 balcony. The removal of the privacy screen will also remove the disjointed appearance of having a screen structure along only one side of the balcony ensuring better presentation along the street.

 

Having regard to the above, it is recommended that condition 2c be deleted.

 

Extension of unit 6 balcony depth

The proposed modification seeks to delete condition 2d and extend the balcony depth by 1.25m will result in a total balcony depth of 5.05m as opposed to the 3.8m balcony depth required by condition 2d. The increased depth of the balcony is not considered supportable for the following reasons:

 

·     A larger balcony in close proximity to neighbouring properties has the potential to be used by larger groups of people for entertaining purposes and therefore result in adverse visual and acoustic privacy impacts. It is considered that restricting the balcony size is the most appropriate measures in minimising visual and acoustic (Objective 4H-1of the ADG) privacy impacts on the neighbouring properties.

 

·     The approved balcony has a 3.8m depth and 24.7sqm area is larger than the ADG requirements for a three bedroom unit which only requires 12sqm minimum area and over three times the 2.4m minimum depth required for three bedroom apartments under Section 4E Private open space and balconies of the ADG minimum depth and area required under the ADG thus reducing whether there is a reasonable expectation of the proposed deletion of condition 2d.

 

·     The increase in the balconies depth increases massing opposite the lounge and kitchen windows of unit 6 at No. 92 St Pauls Street and has the potential to result in additional view loss above that occurring as a result of the approved development - see marked up elevation diagram below. Although it is acknowledged a hob will be required around in front of the balcony for the purposes of suitable stormwater protection.

 

Figure: Plan excerpt of the eastern elevation of the development showing the balcony extension (blue box), the location of windows to unit 6/92 St Pauls Street opposite and the required setback of the balcony by condition 2d imposed on the original consent.

 

Overall, the modification seeking to extend unit 6’s front balcony by way of deleting condition 2d does not satisfy the relevant design objectives under the ADG and therefore it is recommended that condition 2d be retained.

 

Increase width of the east facing doorway opening

The proposed increase in size of east facing doorway opening is not opposite any unprotected openings on the neighbouring property opposite at No. 96 St Pauls Street and does not result in any adverse visual or acoustic privacy impacts.

 

Extension of unit 1 terrace wrapping around the western side boundary

The proposed increase in size of unit 1 terrace does not result in any adverse visual or acoustic privacy impacts on the amenity of the neighbouring property opposite at No. 92 St Pauls Street as the terrace floor level is 3.28m below the window sill opposite.

Environmental Planning Instruments

State Environment Planning Policy (Building Sustainability Index: BASIX) 2004.

SEPP: BASIX requirements came into force for all new dwellings, dual occupancies and some transient residential accommodation where development applications were lodged on or after 1 July 2004. A BASIX assessment is a mandatory component of the development approval process under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Building Sustainability Index: BASIX) Regulation 2004 and State Environmental Planning Policy (Building Sustainability Index: BASIX) 2004.

 

Clause 55A of the EP & A Regulation requires that a new BASIX certificate be lodged for amended plans or where a section 96 modification makes a material change to the BASIX commitments as originally approved.

 

The applicant has submitted a new BASIX certificate. The plans have been checked with regard to this new certificate and they are consistent with the requirements indicated for DA stage. Standard conditions of consent requiring the continued compliance of the development with the SEPP:BASIX were included in the original determination.

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan (RLEP) 2012

The proposal is consistent with the general aims and objectives of the RLEP 2012.

 

The following clauses of LEP 2012 are relevant to the proposed development:

 

R3 Medium Density Residential zone.

•     To provide for the housing needs of the community within a medium density residential environment.

 

The proposed modifications do not alter the number of units on site.

 

•     To provide a variety of housing types within a medium density residential environment.

 

The variety of housing types is maintained

 

•     To enable other land uses that provide facilities or services to meet the day to day needs of residents.

 

Not applicable

 

•     To recognise the desirable elements of the existing streetscape and built form or, in precincts undergoing transition, that contribute to the desired future character of the area.

 

The proposed modifications at the front of the development include:

 

·     Lower ground level: Increase the height and size of planters across the front elevation and extend unit 1 terrace to the front and western side passageway (as a result of the deletion of access stairs along the western side);

 

·     Second floor level (unit 6): delete privacy screen and extend balcony to the front. The deletion of the privacy screen presents a more uniform presence along the front elevation which contributes to the streetscape character. The proposed extension of the balcony to the front by 1250mm is not supported due to visual and acoustic privacy concerns and it will result in greater massing along the front elevation reducing the level of articulation of the approved development.

 

•     To protect the amenity of residents.

 

The proposed modifications will not result in any unreasonable adverse impacts on the amenity of the neighbouring residents. The proposed balcony extension could result in additional loss of views from the east facing lounge room window of unit 6 at 92 St Pauls Street.

 

•     To encourage housing affordability.

 

Not applicable.

 

•     To enable small-scale business uses in existing commercial buildings.

 

Not applicable.

 

Notes:

 

Height of buildings

The approved development has a maximum height of approximately 11.8m and the proposed modifications do not alter the maximum height of the building. A submission has been received relating to the lift overrun, which has a height of 10.21m above the ground level (existing) which complies with the 12m maximum height limit under the RLEP and the 10.5m maximum wall height limit under Part C2 for medium density residential development in the Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan (RDCP) 2013.

 

The proposed building heights associated with the section 96 modifications are considered acceptable.

 

Floor space ratio

The originally approved development was indicated as having a floor space ratio (FSR) of 0.91:1. The applicant has indicated that the approved plans have an actual FSR of 0.897:1. On this basis, the proposed modifications result in an increase in floor area of 16.86sqm (comprising an 11.3sqm increase at the lower ground level and conversion of the redundant exhaust duct into floor area). This results in a floor space ratio of 0.91:1 (481.76/528.9). As this is a section 96 application there is no requirement for a Clause 4.6 exception to the development standard in the RLEP 2012. Notwithstanding, the relevant objectives of the FSR standard remain relevant and a merit assessment is carried out as follows:

 

a.   to ensure that the size and scale of development is compatible with the desired future character of the locality,

 

The proposed additional floor area is` contained in the middle of the development at lower ground level and within the existing approved building envelope at each level (associated with the replacement of the exhaust duct with floor area). The additional ground floor area is well setback from the street and will not be viewable from street level. As a result the proposed floor area will not result in any adverse impacts on the desired future streetscape character.

 

b.   to ensure that buildings are well articulated and respond to environmental and energy needs,

 

The proposed modifications as conditioned will remain well articulated retaining stepped in elements of the built form along the eastern elevation.

 

c.   to ensure that development is compatible with the scale and character of contributory buildings in a conservation area or near a heritage item,

 

The proposed modifications will not detract from the scale and character of any contributory buildings in a conservation area or near a heritage item.

 

d.   to ensure that development does not adversely impact on the amenity of adjoining and neighbouring land in terms of visual bulk, loss of privacy, overshadowing and views.

 

The additional floor area at the middle lower ground floor level has a 3m side setback opposite the neighbouring premises at No. 92 St Pauls Street which has a setback of around 2.6m from this side boundary. The 3m setback is considered an appropriate setback from the side boundary opposite 92 St Pauls Street ensuring commensurate access to daylight, visual amenity and ventilation to both premises. Given the location of the additional floor area within a stepped in element and at ground level there will be no additional loss of solar access to the neighbouring properties.

 

The additional floor area will not result in any view loss from neighbouring properties.

 

5.2   Development Control Plans

 

Randwick Comprehensive Development Control Plan (RDCP) 2013

The DCP provisions are structured into two components, Objectives and Controls. The Objectives provide the framework for assessment under each requirement and outline key outcomes that a development is expected to achieve. The controls contain both numerical standards and qualitative provisions. Any proposed variations from the controls may be considered where the applicant demonstrates that an alternative solution could satisfy the relevant objectives.

 

The key relevant provisions of the DCP are addressed below.

 

Part B7 Transport, Traffic, Parking and Access

Parking rates

The proposal seeks to alter car park allocation allocating one of the two visitor carspaces to a two bedroom unit. Council’s Development Engineer raises no objection to the re-allocation of the visitor space to a one of the two bedroom units. The shortfall in visitor parking is not significant, and it is considered that given the small number of units within the RFB that the single visitor parking space will adequately service the RFB. It is also noted that the total number of parking spaces is not being reduced.

Having regard to the above, in accordance with the Development Engineers recommendation the amendment to condition 83 is supported.

 

Part C2 Medium Density Residential

Visual and acoustic privacy

The proposed modifications relating to visual and acoustic privacy have been discussed and assessed in the SEPP 65 section of this report.

Building facade

The proposal seeks to modify the front ground level by raising the front wall canopy by 250mm and extend the structure further across the frontage.  This modification presents a more uniform development across the front of the ground level and will complement the streetscape which is a key objective under this section of the RDCP.

Setbacks

At the outset, the originally proposed reduction in side and front setbacks of the building between 250mm and 750mm respectively have been deleted from the proposal.

The remaining aspects of the proposed modifications seek to alter the side setback in the middle of the building, associated with the additional ground floor lobby area and additional corridor width on levels above.

At ground floor level, the side setback is reduced from 5.2m down to 3m and at upper floor level the side setback is reduced from 5.2m down to 4.8m. At ground level, the proposed side setback remains compliant with the 2.5m minimum side setback required under the RDCP. At the upper levels, the 4.8m side setback is substantially greater than the minimum required under the RDCP.

Overall the separations between the proposed development as sought to be modified and amended will provide adequate access to daylight and ventilation.

Relocation of exhaust duct

The proposal seeks to relocate the exhaust duct from the southern end of the stairs to the eastern middle part of the building. The relocated exhaust duct is located in the middle of the site and adequately shielded from view by a blade wall and planter box opposite.

Removal of stairs along the western side passageway

There are no objections to the removal of stairs along the western side passageway. The additional height of the development at the western side passageway will not result in any adverse impacts on the amenity of the neighbouring RFB opposite which are sited on a higher level.

Additional storage area in basement

There are no objections to the additional storage area provided at ground level as it is located below the existing ground level and will not result in any.

 

8.  Referrals:

 

Development Engineers

A Section 96(2), application has been received which seeks to modify the approved development by replacement of privacy screen to Unit 6 balcony with planter box, and delete requirement for reduction in length of balcony, alter car park allocation, addition of storage in basement, reduce ground floor setback of Unit 1, alteration to entry foyer, new car park exhaust, alteration to excavation and piling profile, addition of door to Unit 3, alteration to some windows, reduction in eastern, western and front setbacks, delete stair access to Unit 2, internal changes, expand lobbies, extension of third floor balcony and addition of planter box.

 

Original consent: Demolition of the existing buildings and construction of a part 3 and part 4 storey residential flat building comprising of 6 dwellings and basement car parking for 8 vehicles.

 

This report is based on the following plans and documentation:

·     Statement of Environmental Effects by ABC Planning dated June 2016

·     Architectural Plans by Architecture & Interiors dated 11th May 2016.

 

Parking Comments

Of interest to Development Engineering is the proposed amendment to condition 83 to reduce the number of visitor carspaces from 2 to 1.

 

The original development was approved with 9 basement carspaces and under Part B7 of Council’s DCP 2013, the proposed 6 unit development would require 1.5 visitor spaces. This was subsequently rounded up to 2 spaces and conditioned in the original development consent to achieve compliance although the original intention of the condition was to allocate the car wash bay as a second visitor space.  It should be noted that the number of dwellings within the development places it on the transition between the requirement for 1 or 2 visitor spaces.

 

The applicant is now proposing to reduce the visitor allocation to 1 space and reallocate the second visitor space as residential parking. There is no proposed decrease in the overall parking provision which will remain at 9 spaces. The reallocation will result in 2 spaces being allocated for the 3 bedroom unit, 2 spaces for one of the 2 bedroom units and 1 space for the remaining 1 and 2 bedroom units. One space will still be available for visitors and deliveries which is reasonable when considering the low number of units.

 

It is therefore considered the proposed parking re-allocation is reasonable and appropriate and will not create any unacceptable impacts especially when considering the low number of units and the small resulting deficiency in visitor parking (technically only 0.5 spaces). There are therefore no objections to the change in visitor parking allocation from Development Engineering.

 

The other proposed amendments will not affect engineering conditions and no comment is made on these changes.

 

Should the Section 96 application be approved the following engineering condition shall be amended (amendments shown in red).

 

83.      A total of one car space shall be continually dedicated as visitor parking to serve the development.

     

Note:  Car wash bays may be dedicated as visitor spaces

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed modifications meet the criteria for it to be considered under Section 96(2) of the Act in so far as the nature of the approval is not changing on the basis that the originally proposed modifications to the 250mm side and 750mm front setbacks have been deleted from the application.

 

The proposal has been assessed against the relevant assessment criteria notably the key sections of SEPP 65, the objectives of the height and floor space ratio standards and the RDCP 2013. The proposed modifications are assessed as satisfying the associated objectives of the assessment criteria.

 

The proposed modifications, as amended, will retain a bulk and scale that is generally consistent with the approved development and will not result in any appreciable adverse amenity impacts on the neighbouring properties.

 

The proposed modification considered to have an adverse impact on the amenity of the neighbour’s relates to the proposed extension of the unit 6 balcony additional which will have the potential for adverse visual and acoustic privacy impacts as well as potential view loss. As such a recommendation includes retention of condition 2d requiring a 1250mm reduction in the depth of this balcony.

 

Overall, the proposal modifications, as conditioned, are suitable for the site, they satisfy the relevant assessment criteria and will not result in any significant adverse impacts upon either the amenity of the adjoining premises or the character of the locality.

 

The application is therefore recommended for approval subject to the attached

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Sections 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to modify Development Application No. DA/25/2015 by replacement of privacy screen to Unit 6 balcony with planter box, alter car park allocation, addition of storage in basement, alteration to entry foyer, new car park exhaust, alteration to excavation and piling profile, addition of door to Unit 3, alteration to some windows, delete stair access to Unit 2, internal changes, expand lobbies and addition of planter box at 94 St Pauls Street, Randwick, subject to the following conditions:

 

·            Amend Condition 1 to read:

1.        The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans and documents listed below, the application form and on any supporting information received with the application,

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

DA 100 Rev E

ASA architects

24/8/2015

DA 101 Rev E

ASA architects

24/8/2015

DA 102 Rev E

ASA architects

24/8/2015

DA 300 Rev E

ASA architects

24/8/2015

DA 301 Rev E

ASA architects

24/8/2015

DA 302 Rev E

ASA architects

24/8/2015

 

BASIX Certificate

No.

Dated

 

601731M

14 January, 2015

 

as amended by the Section 96 plans and documents listed below, only in so far as they relate to the modifications highlighted on the Section 96 plans and detailed in the Section 96 application:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

DA 100 Rev 03

ASA architects

02/11/16

DA 101 Rev 03

ASA architects

02/11/16

DA 102 Rev 03

ASA architects

02/11/16

DA 300 Rev 03

ASA architects

02/11/16

DA 301 Rev 03

ASA architects

02/11/16

DA 302 Rev 03

ASA architects

02/11/16

 

BASIX Certificate

No.

Dated

 

601731M_ 02

6 June 2016

 

except as may be amended  by the following conditions and as may be shown in red on the attached plans:

 

·            Condition 2c shall be deleted

 

·            Condition 2d shall be retained

 

·            Condition 83 shall be amended to read:

83.      A total of one car space shall be continually dedicated as visitor parking to serve the development.

         

Note:  Car wash bays may be dedicated as visitor spaces

 

·            Add the following condition:

2g.      Only low lying shrub planting (at maturity) shall be installed within the planter along the western side of unit 6 terrace.

 

 

Attachment/s:

Nil


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP6/17

 

Subject:              48 Dudley Street, Coogee - Interim Heritage Order

Folder No:                F2005/00306

Author:                     David Ongkili, Coordinator Strategic Planning     

 

Introduction

 

An Interim Heritage Order (IHO) was placed on the building and site at 48 Dudley Street, Coogee, on 8 September 2016, following Council’s Heritage Planner’s view  that the subject building at 48 Dudley St, Coogee, warrants further investigation to determine its heritage significance. The IHO lasts for 6 months unless Council resolves to add the item to its LEP schedule, in which case, 12 months applies.

 

In January 2017, following the preparation of a heritage assessment of the premises by GML Heritage for Randwick Council, Council’s legal representatives, Norton Rose Fulbright, requested Colin Brady Architecture & Planning, to undertake a further assessment including a peer review of the GML Assessment. 

 

This report provides a summary assessment of the main approaches and contents of the GML and Colin Brady assessments having regard to the assessment provisions of the NSW Heritage Assessment Criteria under the NSW Heritage Manual (as amended, 1999) and the principles contained in the Burra Charter Australia ICOMOS. This report concludes that the residence at 48 Dudley Street has local significance under a number of heritage assessment criteria and, accordingly, qualifies for inclusion in the Randwick Local Environmental Plan as an item of local heritage significance. It is recommended that the Randwick LEP 2012 be amended by placing the above item on the heritage schedule of the Randwick LEP.

 

The LEP amendment process will involve the submission of a planning proposal, which will essentially address the strategic merit of the proposed amendment, to the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) for a Gateway determination. Once the planning proposal is submitted to the DPE the proposal is assessed by the DPE and if it is determined that a proposal should proceed, a Gateway determination will be issued and the matter will be returned to the Council as the relevant planning authority (RPA) to finalise in accordance with any conditions imposed by the Gateway process and also proceed to public consultation.

 

This report also assesses the comments contained in the GML and Colin Brady reports pertaining to the relationship of the subject site (48 Dudley Street) to the nearby Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area (HCA) to the west and vice versa. This assessment notes that the subject residence is set within a local area particularly on its western side towards the Dudley Street HCA that currently contains other residences with similar intact architectural character and historical development. In view of this, it is recommended that the heritage schedule and heritage map of the Randwick LEP be amended to incorporate the extension of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to include the subject site at 48 Dudley Street and properties in between along the southern side of Dudley Street, between Byron and Mount Street.

 


 

Issues

 

Heritage Assessment of 48 Dudley Street

An assessment of the GML and Colin Brady studies highlights a number of differing perspectives and conclusions regarding the significance of the subject property. The key findings of this assessment are summarized below:

 

·     The GML report defines the setting and streetscape significance of the subject property predominantly in terms of the existing residential flat developments immediately surrounding the property, particularly on the eastern side as the subject residence “marks the point which the substantial late nineteenth and early twentieth century development of Coogee meets, and gives way to the more prosaic flat buildings of the latter part of the twentieth century” (page 26). In noting this, Colin Brady’s report emphasises that the setting, more appropriately, should also include the area of Federation and Inter-War housing forms extending from the subject residence to the north and north-west to the existing Dudley Street Conservation Area. In summary, the residence at No 48 Dudley Street has a wider setting and significance than that defined by GML to include other large scale residences from the period including those in the Dudley Street HCA as identified by Colin Brady (page 30). Accordingly, the residence is considered to have local significance in relation to the heritage assessment criterion: “an item’s potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of NSW’s cultural or natural history” (NSW Heritage Office, Assessing Heritage Significance, 2001). As such, there would be merit in considering its listing as a heritage item under the Randwick LEP.

 

·     Colin Brady’s assessment emphasises the significance of the relationship of the subject residence to its expansive grounds which is referred to as a “… rare aspect of Inter-War construction in Coogee where narrow subdivisions and accelerated development of the period limited opportunity for grand residences with comparable grounds” (page 28). The residence represents a unique example of “a large gentleman’s residence” with accompanying grounds acquired through the acquisition of remnant lots from earlier surrounding subdivisions. In this regard, Colin Brady states that the subject residence demonstrates “… a rare ability to gain prominence by inclusion of extensive private grounds in contrast to reliance on elevation above surrounding streets” (page 28). In contrast, while the GML report provides a detailed history of the sub-division and consequent redevelopment of the original larger allotment, it places minimal heritage significance on the relationship of the residence to its grounds. Rather, the GML report views this sub-division and its attendant redevelopment process as largely indicative of the “varied physical context which vividly reflects past, present and potential future development characteristics of the Randwick Municipality”.  Consistent with the Colin Brady assessment, the residence is considered to have local significance in relation to the heritage assessment criterion: “an item’s importance in the course, or pattern, of NSW’s cultural or natural history” (NSW Heritage Office, Assessing Heritage Significance, 2001). As such, there would be merit in considering its listing as a heritage item under the Randwick LEP.

 

·     The Colin Brady assessment notes that the erection of the residence at No. 48 Dudley Street occurred during a transition period in architecture at the beginning of the Inter War period essentially marked by the declining use of Federation architecture and its replacement with evolving revival styles and the introduction of the California Bungalow style. Referring to its architecture, Colin Brady states that “the confidence displayed in the planning and detailing of the residence, responding to varying outlook from each elevation and the interface of exterior and interior detailing, demonstrates the work of a mature designer skilled in the language and principles of Federation housing. The design incorporates aspects of Arts and Crafts and Queen Anne styles in a cohesive design” (page 29).  The GML report provides a detailed analysis of the key architectural elements and characteristics of the subject residence. However, while it considers the integrity/intactness of these elements and characteristics to be high, it views it only as relevant to an evaluation of its “potential heritage values” stating that “… the potential rarity of early features of its layout, fabric and detailing can only be identified as worthy of further consideration and assessment” (page 48). In contrast, the Colin Brady report clearly states that, “as a well detailed and skilfully resolved design in the late Federation Style, the residence is considered of local significance …” (page 29). Accordingly, the residence has local significance in relation to the heritage assessment criterion: “an item’s importance in demonstrating particular aesthetic characteristics valued by a community or cultural group” (NSW Heritage Office, Assessing Heritage Significance, 2001). As such, there would be merit in considering its listing as a heritage item under the Randwick LEP.

 

·     The GML assessment states that research on the work and professional role of Arthur F Pritchard, the architect of the subject residence, “is not sufficiently advanced at this stage to inform this (heritage) study, other than to highlight his importance, provide an initial list of known works and flag the importance of appropriate assessments for works of significant early architects” (page 48). Similarly, limited assessment has been made of the social status of Samuel Edward Sibley, the original owner of the land allotment, following its sub-division in 1898.  The Colin Brady assessment considers the social standing of Sibley and the professional reputation of Pritchard as significant in that they were “…both members of Sydney society of the early 20th Century and representative of the client-architect relationships that provided prominent gentleman’s residences of the Federation and Inter War years” (page 32). This association between the local owner and the wider established architect is considered by Colin Brady to be significant.  Accordingly, the residence has local significance in relation to the heritage assessment criterion: “an item’s strong or special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in NSW's cultural or natural history (NSW Heritage Office, Assessing Heritage Significance, 2001). As such, there would be merit in considering its listing as a heritage item under the Randwick LEP.

 

·     The GML report includes a detailed description of the external and internal features and fabric of the residence but provides limited assessment of the relationship of the detailed interior to associated external features. The Colin Brady report notes that there is a skilful relationship between the interior and exterior of the residence and therefore, this relationship is significant especially because “… the quality of craftsmanship evident in the remaining fabric and recorded in images of recently removed interior detailing support the increasing rarity of such residences” (page 31). Accordingly, the residence has local significance in relation to the heritage assessment criterion  : “an item’s importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of NSW’s:

-    cultural or natural places;

-    or cultural or natural environments” (NSW Heritage Office, Assessing Heritage Significance, 2001).

 

As such, there would be merit in considering its listing as a heritage item under the Randwick LEP.

 

Extension of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area

The heritage assessment of the residence at No 48 Dudley Street, highlighted, among other things, its suburban setting and context particularly in relation to the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area and existing residential development to the west and north-west. The GML assessment clearly describes this setting in the following extract from the report:

 

 

 

 

In summary, the Dudley Street HCA contains residences of a similar style and scale to the subject residence at 48 Dudley Street with a number listed as heritage items under Schedule 5 of the Randwick LEP. In addition, a number of properties outside of the HCA, in between the subject site and the Dudley Street HCA (that is, the block on the southern side of Dudley Street between Mount and Byron Street) contain a number of similar houses of early twentieth century residential styles characterised by the popular Queen Anne and Arts and Crafts architectural styles. These properties comprise 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 Dudley Street and 122 Mount Street as shown in Figure 4 below.  

 

 

Figure 4 : the block on the southern side of Dudley Street between Mount and Byron Street.

 

In view of the significance of the suburban setting of the subject residence in the immediate locality adjoining the existing Dudley Street HCA, consideration should be given to extending the HCA to include this area as described above. Both the GML and Colin Brady assessment support the extension of the Dudley Street HCA to include the subject site at 48 Dudley Street and the adjoining properties fronting the southern side of Dudley Street in the block between Mount and Byron Street.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

Outcome 4: Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a: Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter, however following Gateway process, should the DPE endorse the proposal, there will be costs associated with public consultation.

 

Conclusion

 

The Colin Brady assessment of the heritage significance of No 48 Dudley Street indicates that, on a number of heritage assessment criteria, the residence at No 48 Dudley Street is an item of local significance. Accordingly, it is recommended that the item be placed on the heritage schedule of the Randwick LEP. In summary, the Colin Brady heritage assessment provides a sound finding for Council to form the opinion that the item at No 48 Dudley Street is of local significance.

 

Additionally, the extension of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to include the subject site at 48 Dudley Street and the properties fronting the southern side of Dudley Street in the block between Mount and Byron Street is recommended as these properties are consistent in architectural style and history to the existing HCA to warrant protection.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)       the item at No 48 Dudley Street be placed on the heritage schedule of the Randwick        LEP, with the appropriate provisions for protection and management of the item. 

 

b)       the heritage schedule and heritage map of the Randwick LEP be amended to include the proposed extension of the Dudley Street Heritage Conservation Area to include the site at 48 Dudley Street and the properties fronting the southern side of Dudley Street in the block between Mount and Byron Street.

 

c)       Council commence preparation of a planning proposal for submission to         the Department of Planning and Environment concerning both the above-mentioned amendments.

 

d)       Subject to the Gateway review and outcome, commence the exhibition of the LEP and community consultation.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP7/17

 

Subject:              Report for Variation to Development Standard under SEPP No. 1 and Clause 4.6 between 1 November 2016 to 31 January 2017

Folder No:                F2008/00122

Author:                     Kerry Kyriacou, Manager Development Assessment      

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)     Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

2)     Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)     Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

4)     Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP 1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all SEPP1s and Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 1 November 2016 to 31 January 2017 – Eight (8) were approved during this period by Planning Committee Meeting or under Delegation Authority.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b:     New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SEPP 1 & Clause 4.6 Between 1 November 2016 to 31 January, 2017

 

 

 

 


SEPP 1 & Clause 4.6 Between 1 November 2016 to 31 January, 2017

Attachment 1

 

 

 

SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 1 NOVEMBER 2016 TO 31 JANUARY 2017

Council DA reference No.

Lot No.

DP No.

Apart-ment/ Unit No.

Street No.

Street name

Suburb/Town

Post-code

Category of develop-ment

Environ-mental planning instru-ment

Zoning of land

Development standard to be varied

Justification of variation

Extent of variation

Concur-ring authority

Date DA determined dd/mm/yyyy

Appro-ved by

DA/780/2015

1

122133 SUBJ OF ROW DP 1080495

 

18

Dundas Street,

COOGEE

2034

3: Residential - New second occupancy

 

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.3  - Building height of 9.5m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Building height is 9.87m increased by 370mm or 4%

NSW Dept of Planning

25-Oct-16

OCM

DA/189/2016             

LOT 5 SEC 2

2907

 

5-7

Stark Street

COOGEE

2034

 4: Residential - New multi unit < 20 dwellings

RLEP 2012

R3 - Medium Density Residential

Clause 4.4  - FSR = 0.9:1

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

FSR increased to 0.98:1  or 8.88% 

NSW Dept of Planning

08-Nov-16

PCM

DA/107/2016

Lot 2 & Lot 1

1088669 & 1088669

 

4

Neptune Street

COOGEE

2034

 4: Residential - New multi unit < 20 dwellings

RLEP 2012

R3 - Medium Density Residential

Clause 4.3  - Building height of 9.5m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Height - eastern elevation 11.035m or 16.15% (rear) western elevation:2.57% (rear)

NSW Dept of Planning

08-Nov-16

PCM

DA/501/2016             

29

245581

 

7

 Meehan Street                     

MATRAVILLE

2036

 3: Residential - New second occupancy

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.4  - FSR = 0.5:1

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

FSR increased to 0.538:1  or 7.62% 

NSW Dept of Planning

19/12/16

Delegated

DA/542/2016             

17

5426

 

34

 Victoria Street                                       

MALABAR

2036

 2: Residential - Single new dwelling

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.4  - FSR = 0.65:1

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

FSR increased to 0.695:1  or 6.9% 

NSW Dept of Planning

20/12/16

Delegated

DA/371/2016             

2

15969

 

4

 Anthony Street                

 MATRAVILLE

2036

 1: Residential - Alterations & additions

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.3  - Building height of 9.5m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Building height is 10.44m increased by 940mm or 9.89%

NSW Dept of Planning

02/12/16

Delegated

DA/559/2016              

2598

 752015

 

51

Garrett Street                     

 MAROUBRA

2035

 1: Residential - Alterations & additions

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clauses 4.1(3) - minimum allotment sizes = 400m2

Consistent with the urban character of the locality and predominant subdivision pattern. Site contains existing semi detached dwellings

Lot A Lot size 286.7 m2  or  28% (113.3 m2)  shortfall, and Lot 2 Lot Size 303.2m2  or 24.2% (96.8m2)  shortfall (Existing semis).

NSW Dept of Planning

06/12/16

PCM

DA/361/2016

4

984197

 

10

10 Paton Street

KINGSFORD

2032

 2: Residential - Single new dwelling

RLEP 2012

R2 - Low Density Residential

Clause 4.4  - FSR = 0.75:1

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

FSR increased to 0.817:1  or 8.97% 

NSW Dept of Planning

12/01/17

Delegated

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Director City Planning Report No. CP8/17

 

Subject:              Advisory Committee Minutes

Folder No:                F2006/00216

Author:                     Gary Ella, Coordinator Community Programs & Partnerships      

 

Introduction

 

At the 10 March 2009 Community Services Committee meeting, it was resolved that the minutes of the Advisory Committees are to be presented to the Community Services Committee. This report brings together, for Council’s acceptance, the minutes of the previous meetings adopted by the respective Advisory Committees.

 

Issues

 

As scheduled, the Advisory Committees (listed below) have met and the minutes of the meetings, which reflect discussions and outcomes, are attached.

 

The minutes will also be available on Council’s website after each meeting. This report includes minutes from:

 

·     The Access Advisory Committee Meeting – 8 September 2016 (endorsed at November meeting)

·     The Older Persons Advisory Committee – 2 November 2016 (endorsed at February meeting)

 

Relationship to City Plan

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  An informed and Engaged Community.

Direction:  Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide services.

 

Financial impact statement

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The minutes of these Advisory Committee meetings are now in order and are submitted to Council for acknowledgement and acceptance.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council acknowledges and accepts the minutes of the Access Advisory Committee – September 2016 and the Older Persons Advisory Committee – November 2016.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Access Advisory Committee Meeting  September Minutes 2016

 

2.

Older Persons Advisory Committee Meeting November Minutes 2016

 

 

 

 


Access Advisory Committee Meeting  September Minutes 2016

Attachment 1

 

 

MINUTES

Randwick City Council

Access Advisory Committee

Meeting held on Thursday 8 September 2016, Randwick Room

 

 

Present

Frida Kitas                            Randwick City Council

Cr. Kathy Neilson                   Randwick City Council

Vince Bates                          Headeast

Kim Tipoki                            Holdsworth Community

Melinda Ross                         Sunnyfield

Nadia Samperi                      Ability Links – East Sydney

Ron Wood                                   Community Representative

Sharon Lee                           Aftercare Eastern Suburbs

Judy Nicholas                        Community Representative

Juliette Walker                      Community Representative

George Gergely                     Community Representative

Sue Mayerhofer                    Community Representative

Marie Tsigaropoulos               Junction Neighbourhood Centre      

 

 

Apologies

Cr. Murray Matson                 Randwick City Council

Chris Donnellan                     Randwick City Council

Tess Protey                          Community Representative

Patricia Garvie                      Aftercare Eastern Suburbs

Donna Shrubsole                   Buckingham House

 

3.     Introductions: Frida welcomed everyone to the meeting

 

4.    Minutes

The minutes of the meetings held on Thursday 14 July were confirmed.

 

5.    Business Arising from Minutes

 

5.1     Amalgamation update

Cr. Neilson gave on update on the proposed Council merger with Waverley and Woollahra Councils.

 

Action:  For information.

 

5.2  Memory Information Days

The next Memory Information Day will be held on Saturday 29 October from 10am – 3pm at the Margaret Martin Library, Randwick.  The Committee was informed that the Memory Drop in Days are attracting older CALD Seniors and their family members and Carers.  The Memory Drop in Days are a discreet and informal way for people with Dementia and their Carers to access information on available services and support programs in Eastern Sydney and surrounding areas.

 

Action:  For information.

 

5.3     Your Brain Matters Presentations

Over 90 people attended the Your Brain Matters presentation on the 6th August at the Prince Henry Nursing & Medical Museum. The presentations are organised in conjunction with the Alzheimer’s Australia NSW and continue to meet local community need.  The final presentation for the year will be held on Saturday 24 September from 11am – 3pm at the Nursing and Medical Museum, Little Bay.

 

Action: For information.

 

5.4     Across the Water free play reading.

The play reading of Across the Water by Noel Hodda was a great success, with over 100 people in attendance. However, the lift at Bowen Library broke down, creating an issue for people in wheelchairs who were unable to gain access to Level 3 of the building. Cr. Neilson reported the incident to City Services and will be investigating a possible upgrade of the lift to improve access for all community members.  RCC will also be organising an additional free play reading in November to increase community participation for elderly and socially isolated residents.

 

Action:  For information

 

5.5     Access issues from previous meetings

Juliette raised the issue of the increasing number of trailers in Danger St., Randwick North and asked if the rangers could patrol the area more regularly.  Ron noted that there are now two accessible parking spaces near the Juniors at the Junction, and one at Garden Street Maroubra.  The additional spaces are much needed to facilitate access to the club for older people.

 

Action:  Frida to provide an update at the November meeting.

 

6. General Business

 

6.1   World AIDS Day planning meetings

Frida informed the Committee that she is attending the SESLHD HIV/AIDS and Related Programs Unit, planning meetings.  RCC will be organising events in partnership with the HARP Unit to raise awareness in Randwick City and surrounding areas about HIV and AIDS.  Council staff will be applying for a Red Ribbon Grant from SESLHD HARP Unit to screen a documentary at the Ritz Cinema Randwick on World AIDS Day, Thursday 1 December 2016. Proceeds raised from the screening will be donated to local and overseas charities. The national World AIDS Day theme this year is HIV is still here – and it’s on the move.

 

Action: Frida to provide an update at the November meeting.

 

6.2   Chifley Reserve Playground

RCC will host a grand opening of Chifley Reserve Playground on Saturday 17 September from 10am to 12pm.  The playground has been specifically designed with the input of various professionals to meet a range of physical, emotional and intellectual abilities, and includes fun, play features and equipment which challenges people of all abilities from toddlers through to adults.  Chifley Reserve playground features a variety of components, including a central mound area, sensory space, swings, play units, flying foxes, seating, picnic facilities, shade and shelter.  The playground also incorporates adjacent accessible parking and toilet facilities and will be an asset for all members of the community.

 

Action:  For information.

 

6.3   SAFE Talk

RCC in partnership with Carers NSW will present Safe Talk – suicide prevention awareness training on Saturday 5 November from 11am to 3pm at the Randwick Town Hall.  The presentation aims to increase suicide alertness by teaching participants to recognise when someone may have thoughts of suicide and how to link them to further help.  Participants will learn how to apply the basic TALK Steps (Tell, Ask, Listen and Keep Safe). Safe Talk is delivered by Lifeline facilitators and has been very well attended by Carers and family members of people with a mental illness living in the local government areas of Botany and Randwick.

 

Action: Frida to electronically circulate flyer to members.

 

6.4   NSW Accessible Toilet Project

Spinal Cord Injuries Australia (SCIA) is working with the NSW Government to update information about accessible toilets both private and public in NSW into the National Public Toilet Map (NPTM), thereby providing people with information of where to find an accessible toilets and the features it has such as grab rails, the approach to the toilet, transfer direction and turning space.  If the toilets are listed on the NPTM people will easily find where they are located within the area they are visiting and ascertain whether the features of the toilets will suit their requirements. 

 

RCC has been approached by SCIA to participate in the project as many of our accessible toilet facilities have not been recently updated.  Frida spoke about the choice and independence the project will offer residents and visitors and also about hoping to engage a volunteer to undertake the project on the behalf of Council.  Nadia from Ability Links offered to assist Frida with the project.

 

Action:  Frida to liaise with Nadia and provide an update at the November meeting.

 

6.5   New access issues

Juliette reported that the floor at Totem Hall in South Coogee is grubby and the lighting is poor, making it difficult for older users.  Ron requested that a community transport bus stop be installed near the Kingsford Family Medical Centre located at 502-508 Anzac Parade, as three surrounding streets have been closed due to construction work for the Light Rail.

 

Action: Cr. Neilson to liaise with City Services and provide an update at the November meeting.

 

7.  Guest speaker:  Matthew Gluyas | Corps Leader | Salvation Army.

Matthew gave an overview of the Salvation Army community meal program.  The Salvation Army have been providing free community meals for around two years.  Meals are provided three times a week - breakfast on Monday and Tuesdays at 9am and lunch every Wednesday at 12pm. The Salvation Army have a long history of providing financial support and other forms of assistance for people who are financially disadvantaged, and or socially isolated. The Salvation Army have created a culture where people can give back and build a sustainable life and also acquire skills. Clients contribute through, cooking, cleaning and serving meals, they are also taught how to plan and cook meals on a budget. 

 

Matthew noted that clients are socially isolated or rough sleepers.  People can come from a number of areas including Maroubra, Botany and Eastlakes.  The program aims to build community connections and give people hope and purpose and other outcomes such as employment.  The Salvation Army receives a grant of $15,000 per year to operate the program and they also fundraise and receive donations towards the program. The majority of people who access the program are aged and some are in their 30s and early 40s.  There is no eligibility criteria to access the program and you don’t need to have a pension card.

 

Ability Links have partnered with the Salvation Army to link people to further services and support programs.  Matthew noted that there has been an increase in people from CALD backgrounds accessing the meal program.  The Salvation Army have just installed a commercial kitchen and ramps at their premises to provide access for clients with a disability.  There is also a community garden and Matthew advised that the Salvo’s can provide meals for just over 63 people per session.  The Salvation Army is located at 100 Boyce Road Maroubra. Tel: 9314 2166.  Flyers tabled.

 

Action:  For information.

 

8. Information Share:

·     Headeast have obtained a community grant from Randwick Council to run a healthy eating program in partnership with My Big Kitchen.

·     Sunnyfield are holding vacation care programs during the school holidays commencing from 26th September. There will be one program at Campsie and the other at Sutherland.  The programs are only available to people living in South East Sydney who have a current respite package.

·     Holdsworth Community are waiting to get referrals for their Travel Training program.  They have volunteers and paid staff to assist eligible clients.

·     Aftercare are planning events and activities for Mental Health Month.

·     National Seniors – Sydney East Branch have moved their meetings to the Juniors in the Junction due to traffic problems.

·     The DA for the hydrotherapy pool at Green Square has gone to tender – the facility will include a universal change room, adult hoist and access to the change room from the playfield.  The hydrotherapy pool will be stand-alone.

 

9. Correspondence:  Nil

 

 

Date of Next Meeting: Thursday 10 November 2016.

 


Older Persons Advisory Committee Meeting November Minutes 2016

Attachment 2

 

 

MINUTES

Randwick City Council

Older Persons Advisory Committee

Meeting held on Wednesday 2 November, Randwick Room

 

 

Present

Frida Kitas                            Randwick City Council

Cr. Kathy Neilson                   Randwick City Council

Jane Moffat                          Randwick City Council

Billee King                            Community Representative

Lee Barwick                          Coast Centre for Seniors

Andrea Szanto                      Holdsworth Community

Andrew Blair                         Community Representative

Lindsay Harden                     Community Representative

Sue Mayerhofer                    Community Representative

Suzanne Bryant                     Community Representative

Mike Cornell                         National Seniors – Sydney East

Ben Whitehorn                      Randwick Waverley Community Transport

Warren Reid                         Dementia Advisory Service – Eastern Sydney &                                        City of Sydney

 

Apologies

Cr. Noel D’Souza                   Randwick City Council

Megan Bowyer                      Community Representative

 

3.     Introductions: 

Cr.Neilson opened the meeting and welcomed everyone.

 

4.    Minutes

The minutes from the meeting held on Wednesday 7 September to be confirmed.

 

5.    Business Arising from Minutes

 

5.1     Memory Information Day

Warren Reid provided an update on the Memory Information Day held on Saturday 29 October at Margaret Martin Library from 10am to 3pm. Frida thanked Warren for facilitating the drop in days on behalf of Council throughout 2016.  Warren also noted that Little Sisters of the Poor is currently undergoing renovations and that the Dementia Seminars will not commence until July 2017.

 

Action:  For information.

 

5.2     Chifley Reserve Playground Grand Opening

The Chifley Reserve Playground grand opening was an outstanding success, over 1500 people attended the local community event on Saturday 17 September from 10 – 12pm.  Chifley Reserve is the largest playground in Randwick City and includes fun play features and equipment that challenge people of all abilities from toddlers to adults.  The playground also incorporates adjacent accessible parking and toilet facilities.  Council staff received positive feedback at the opening about the various components of the playground which meet a range of physical, emotional and intellectual abilities.

 

Action:  For information.

 

5.3     Suicide TALK Information Session

RCC in partnership with Carers NSW held Suicide TALK an information session exploring issues in suicide prevention on Wednesday 19 October at Margaret Martin Library from 7-9pm.  Over 45 people attended the session which was facilitated by Gerald Haslinger, Psychologist & Mental Health Educator.  The aim of the session was to reduce the stigma and taboo surrounding suicide and examine a range of things people can do to help prevent suicide.  The session generated a great deal of conversation about suicide as a serious mental health problem in the wider community.  Participants requested that Council consider holding another information session in 2017.

 

Action:  Frida to schedule a Suicide TALK information session for 2017.

 

5.4   Safe TALK

RCC in partnership with Carers NSW and Lifeline will provide Suicide Awareness Training for Carers and community members on Saturday 5 November at the Randwick Town Hall from 11am to 3pm.  The training aims to increase suicide awareness and will teach participants to recognise when someone may have suicidal thoughts and how to respond in ways that will link them to further help. Participants will learn how to apply the basic TALK steps – Tell, Ask, Listen and Keepsafe.  The seminar is designed for family members, Carers and supporters of people with a mental illness who live in the Randwick and Botany Local Government areas.  Flyers tabled.

 

Action:  For information.

 

5.5     Grandparents raising Grandchildren Information Expo

RCC held the Grandparents raising Grandchildren and Kinship Carers Information Expo on Thursday 27 October at Lionel Bowen Library from 10 – 2pm.  The Expo was designed for grandparents and Carers who are raising grandchildren on a full-time or part-time basis, formally or informally.  Key agencies gave presentations on available support programs and the Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Service Directory was officially launched.  The number of grandparents in attendance was lower than expected, however the expo was a niche event and RCC will investigate the possibility of holding additional events to promote available services and support programs for grandparents from CALD and other hard to reach communities.  Cr.Neilson asked Frida to thank Melinda Leves, Community Project Officer on behalf of the Committee for organising the Expo.

 

Action:  For information.

 

5.6     Access issues

Cr.Nelson provided an update on the customer service lift at Lionel Bowen Library, Maroubra. 

 

Action:  For information

 

6. General Business

 

6.1   The Spirits of Prince Henry Twilight Tour

RCC in partnership with the Prince Henry Hospital Trained Nurses Association will host the Spirits of Prince Henry Twilight Tour on Saturday 12 November at the Nursing and Medical Museum Little Bay from 6.30 – 9.30pm. The Tour will explore the paranormal history of the Prince Henry from a nursing perspective.  Participants will learn ghost hunting techniques with Eastern States Paranormal and take part in a paranormal investigation.  Entry is a $15 donation to the museum.  Flyers and poster tabled.

 

Action: For information.

 

6.2   The Touch of Silk | Free play reading

RCC has organised a play reading of The Touch of Silk by Betty Roland on Saturday 19 November from 12.30pm at Lionel Bowen Library Theatrette.  The Touch of Silk is a sensitive portrayal of the troubled relationship between an Australian World War One veteran and his French wife set against the background of drought-stricken rural Australia.  The play reading will be directed by Lex Marinos, who will also facilitate a Q&A session with the cast following the reading.   No bookings required and afternoon tea will be served.  Lindsay Harden noted that the reading occurs at the same time as the Randwick & District Historical Society meeting and many of their members attend the Actors’ Forum play readings.  Cr.Neilson asked Frida to be mindful that the meeting dates do not clash for future readings.

 

Action:  For information.

 

6.3   NDIS Readiness Forums

RCC in partnership with Inner Sydney Regional Council will host a forum to prepare people for the roll-out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in Eastern Sydney in July 2017.  The Forum will be held on Wednesday 23 November from 7 – 9pm at Randwick Town Hall.  The forum will include a range of guest speakers from My Choice Matters, Ability Links NSW, Sylvanvale and Inner Sydney Regional Council.  Participants will learn how to get ready and make the most of the NDIS.  The Forum is designed for people with a disability, their family members and Carers and Disability and other community service providers.  Council will also organise additional sessions in 2017 to provide information about the NDIS to people living in the Southern Suburbs of Randwick City.  Flyers and posters tabled.

 

Action:  Frida to provide an update at future meetings.

 

6.4   Seniors’ Christmas Concerts

The 2016 Seniors’ Christmas Concerts will be themed Christmas Supper Club. Artists will include Boys in the Band and the Diamonds. The 90 minute concerts will be held on Wednesday 30 November from 10am to 11.30am and 3pm to 4.30pm. An additional concert has been approved for Thursday 1 December from 10am to 11.30am to allow for Seniors from the Eastern Suburbs to attend.  Bookings are required.

 

Action:  For information.

 

 

6.5   Christmas Cheer Donation & Gift Program

As part of its annual Christmas Gift Program, RCC provides a budget of $2,400 for Christmas Cheer donations which is divided up between a range of local Senior Citizens Clubs, organisations and groups.  The donation is a contribution towards a Christmas party for members, this year there are 13 recipients.  In addition, Council has provided a gift of an on-site concert performance for residents and staff at 10 Aged Care facilities in Randwick City.  The concert performances have proven to be extremely popular, particularly with frail aged residents who are unable to participate in activities.

 

Action:  For information.

 

6.6   Mindfulness Communication Seminar

RCC in partnership with Carers NSW will hold a Mindfulness Communication Seminar on how to ‘Survive the Festive Season’ on Saturday 17 December at Lionel Bowen Library from 10am to 1pm.  The seminar aims to provide Carers and community members with the tools to effectively communicate while under stress and pressure and help participants understand, tolerate and deal with their emotions in healthy ways.

 

Action:  Frida to circulate flyers to members.

 

6.7   2017 meeting dates

Committee members agreed to reconvene in February 2017, the scheduled meetings will be held on a bi-monthly basis on the first Wednesday of the month from 10 to 11.30am.  Frida & Cr.Neilson thanked the Committee for their participation and contributions to the meetings.

 

Action:  Frida to circulate 2017 meeting dates to members in January.

 

6.8   Mayor’s Christmas Party

Frida provided an update at the meeting.

 

Action:  For information

 

7.  Guest speaker:  Nil

 

8. Information Share: members provided an update on their respective services and programs.

 

9.  Correspondence:  Nil

 

Date of Next Meeting: Wednesday 1 February 2017

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Director City Planning Report No. CP9/17

 

Subject:              Temporary Alcohol Ban at Dunningham and Goldstein Reserves, Coogee

Folder No:                F2005/00834

Author:                     Allan Graham, Coordinator Regulatory Projects      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this Report is for Council to determine its position in respect to the current temporary total ban on the consumption of alcohol at Dunningham and Goldstein Reserves, Coogee that was implemented on the 29 December 2016, for the summer duration.

 

Issues

 

Relevantly, at its Ordinary Meeting held on the 13 December 2016, Randwick City Council resolved, on the Motion by Councillors Matson and Neilson, that:

 

“(Matson/Neilson) that:

 

(a)    Council resolve to amend the current alcohol restrictions in Dunningham Reserve and Goldstein Reserve so that the consumption of alcohol can only take place between midday and 4:00pm daily…”

 

The above Resolution brought about a reduction in the hours whereby alcohol could be consumed in Goldstein and Dunningham Reserves by extending the existing time in which the consumption of alcohol was prohibited from 6pm till 8am the following day, to 4pm till midday the following day, permitting the consumption of alcohol only between midday and 4pm. At that time it was viewed that tightening the permitted consumption times would strike a balance in providing a reasonable time period for the public to drink responsibly in the Reserves, at the same time addressing growing concern with the increase in alcohol related anti-social behaviour occurring in the public domain.

 

As a result of the incidents that took place at Goldstein Reserve on Christmas Day, Council in consultation with Police imposed a temporary total ban on the consumption of alcohol at Goldstein and Dunningham Reserves for the duration of the summer period.

 

Between Christmas and New Year, Council received more than 30 written correspondence expressing concerns with the events of Christmas Day at Coogee. The letters indicated their support for the implementation of a total alcohol ban at Coogee.

 

However, since the introduction of the total ban on alcohol there is a degree of concern, largely from the business community at Coogee, that the temporary ban has negatively affected business.

 

The summer period will conclude on the 28 February 2017 and as such it is appropriate for the Council to determine its position in respect to the temporary ban. In this regard, Council may either extend the ban, or revert to the previous restrictions as resolved by Council on 13 December 2016, or resolve to implement different restrictions for the consumption of alcohol in Goldstein and Dunningham Reserves. 

 

It should be noted that there already exists a total prohibition on the consumption of alcohol in both Grant and Trenerry Reserves which are unaffected by the current temporary ban.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  A livable city

Direction:  6c:  The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programs and strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Subsequent to Council’s Resolution of the 13 December 2016, to reduce the period whereby alcohol can be consumed at Goldstein and Dunningham Reserves, a temporary ban for the summer period was imposed on the 29 December 2016, prohibiting the consumption of alcohol in the Reserves.

 

The summer period will conclude on the 28 February 2017 and it is appropriate for the Council to determine whether to extend the operation of the ban or otherwise. Should Council determine to continue the total alcohol prohibition at Goldstein and Dunningham Reserves, it would be necessary to follow the process set-out in s. 632A of the Local Government Act 1993, relating to the public exhibition and notification requirements.  

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council resolves to determine its position in respect to the alcohol restrictions in Dunningham Reserve and Goldstein Reserve.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Director City Planning Report No. CP10/17

 

Subject:              Botany Cemetery Expansion Proposal

Folder No:                F2004/07905

Author:                     David Ongkili, Coordinator Strategic Planning      

 

Introduction

 

In a letter dated 9 December 2016, the Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust (SMCT) advised Council that a deed had been signed and executed between the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council (LALC) and SMCT in relation to the Cemetery’s expansion proposal on Lot 4858, a portion of Crown land at Bumborah Point Road (see attached Aerial Map). The Deed essentially removes the Aboriginal Land Claims from the Bumborah Point land in exchange for an Aboriginal Cemetery on a section of the subject land. In the same letter, SMCT advises that it has relinquished its licence for cemetery use over the Chinese Market Gardens land - a supporting letter from the Department of Industry granting approval in principle to the termination of the licence has been provided which advises that termination of the licence will only take effect when “alternative management arrangements for the subject Market Gardens land have been confirmed”.

 

Accordingly, SMCT advises that, as it had met its obligations by signing a Deed of Agreement with the Local Aboriginal Land Council and relinquishing the licence over the market garden land, it requests Council’s in principle support to rezone the subject land for Cemetery use. Such a rezoning process will require the preparation and submission of a planning proposal by SMCT.

 

In a further letter dated 13 February 2017, SMCT reiterated its request for Council’s in principle support as well as advising that it is also offering a strip of land along the foreshore of Lot 4858 to Randwick Council to allow for future foreshore access and recreational use. Specifically, SMCT’s letter states that “Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust has fulfilled all of Council’s obligations and requests an in-principle letter fulfilling its commitment and acknowledging support of SMCT’s expansion plans and specifically that Bumborah Point is zoned as cemetery land.”

 

It should be noted that the expansion plans for the Botany Cemetery was considered by Council at its meeting on 28 July 2015, where it was resolved, as follows:

“a)    Council commence discussions with all stakeholders including Crown Land, OEH, LALC, utility agencies, service providers and SMCT to identify all issues affecting the proposed Botany Cemetery expansion into Military Road and the unformed Crown Road and the feasibility of addressing these issues;

 

b)     Council commences consultations with Crown Lands Department on the future operation and ownership of the Chinese Market Gardens site and the proposed transfer of the unformed Crown road on the southern side of Botany Cemetery to form part of the Cemetery; and

 

c)     the findings on the discussions/consultations with the stakeholders and agencies be reported to Council for Council to consider its in-principle support for the Botany Cemetery expansion proposal as detailed in the SMCT Briefing Document.

 

d)     that Council initiate, as a matter of urgency, discussions with the relevant State authority with the intent of stabilizing the de-vegetated northern slope of Hill 60 to better protect the historical and agricultural value of the Chinese market gardens

 

e)     Mr Fred Haskins be invited to make a submission to Council on the feasibility and advantages of using mechanical de-weeding techniques on the Chinese Market Gardens site rather than herbicide based techniques; and

 

f)      Council arrange a forum between the Councillors and the Farmers’ Association on the issue of the Chinese Market gardens.”

 

A number of meetings with stakeholders and SMCT have been held on-site to address the subject matters of the above-listed resolutions. The outcome of these meetings is that resolutions d) and e) have been satisfactorily resolved with input from, and discussions with, representatives of the Farmers Association. Discussions on the subject matters contained in resolutions a), b) and f) (concerning closure of roads and future use of the Chinese market gardens land) were required to be deferred (with SMCT’s acknowledgment) pending the outcome of SMCT’s discussion with Crown Lands Department regarding the feasibility of expanding into Lot 4858 at Bumborah Point Road. In this regard, a significant issue that was identified in the previous report to Council, and one that has been acknowledged by SMCT as a significant determinant of which expansion option it would adopt for the Botany Cemetery, is the issue of Aboriginal Land Claims over Lot 4858 at Bumborah Point Road. As indicated in this report, SMCT now advises that the issue of Aboriginal Land Claim has now been resolved through the signing of subject Deed of Agreement between SMCT and the LALC. Accordingly, the subject matters of resolutions a), b) and f) can now be properly investigated through the strategic merit assessments required for any future planning proposal for Lot 4858 at Bumborah Point Road.

 

Issues

 

As indicated above, the expansion plans for the Botany Cemetery was last considered at the Council Meeting on 28 July 2015 where it was resolved, among other things, that:

 

 “the findings on the discussions/consultations with the stakeholders and agencies be reported to Council for Council to consider its in-principle support for the Botany Cemetery expansion proposal as detailed in the SMCT Briefing Document”

 

Accordingly, this matter is now returned to Council for consideration, following advice received from SMCT in December 2016 and more recently in February 2017.

 

A major issue that arises as part of any cemetery expansion into the Bumborah Point land is that the land is currently zoned Public Recreation (RE1) under the Randwick LEP in which cemetery use is prohibited. A planning proposal to rezone the land will be required to allow any cemetery expansion into the subject land. The planning proposal will need to address a range of planning and environmental issues to assess the merits of the proposal prior to it proceeding through the relevant stages of the rezoning process. 

 

In this regard, SMCT advises that it has engaged a consultant to prepare a master plan/planning proposal for the Bumborah Point land to address all planning and environmental issues with a view to a future submission of the proposal to Council. Prior to finalizing this work, SMCT seek Council’s in principle support for this process.

 

No clear plan has been provided with the request but SMCT’s letter date 13 February 2017 indicates that foreshore access will be maintained.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5: Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities    

Direction 5c: Create new open space as opportunities arise.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

SMCT has advised of three actions it has undertaken to facilitate the preparation and future submission of a planning proposal for cemetery use in the Lot 4858 at Bumborah Point, namely, (1) the signing of a Deed of Agreement with the Local Aboriginal Land Council to remove Aboriginal Land Claims in exchange for an Aboriginal Cemetery over the land; (2) the relinquishing of SMCT’s licence for cemetery use over the market garden land; and (3) the offer to Council of a strip of foreshore land for access and recreational use. In view of this, SMCT has requested Council’s in principle support for a rezoning of Lot 4858 for cemetery use.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council consider its in principle position regarding the Botany Cemetery expansion in the light of the information provided by the Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

SMCT Letter to Council 9 -12-2016

 

2.

SMCT letter to Council - 13-2-2017

 

3.

Aerial Map - Botany Cemetery & adjoining lands

 

 

 

 


SMCT Letter to Council 9 -12-2016

Attachment 1

 

 


SMCT letter to Council - 13-2-2017

Attachment 2

 

 


 


Aerial Map - Botany Cemetery & adjoining lands

Attachment 3

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM1/17

 

Subject:              Merger Planning Update

Folder No:                F2016/04004

Author:                     Caroline Foley, Manager Business Performance Projects     

 

Introduction

 

On 14 Feb 2017 the NSW Premier confirmed the five remaining merger proposals for Sydney councils will proceed, pending the outcome of court action. This includes the proposal to merge Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils.

 

This report provides an update on the work to date and the process undertaken to prepare for a merger of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils.

 

·     On 8 Dec 2015 Randwick City Council resolved to form a Randwick Transition Group consisting of the Mayor Clr D’Souza, Deputy Mayor Clr Moore and Councillors Matson, Andrews, Seng and Nash (GM2/16)

·     On 12 May 2016 the Minister for Local Government announced the merger of numerous councils into 19 new councils, including 6 within the Sydney metropolitan area. The Minister also declared his “in principle support for the merger of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils, subject to the decision of the courts”.

·     In May 2016 the NSW Government released merger guidance documents outlining key responsibilities, clear targets and implementation actions new Councils were required to achieve by Oct 2017. This included 117 actions required within the first month of a new Council.

·     With the release of the guidance material, along with insight into the proclamation requirements, it was clear significant planning and preparation was required to ensure the NSW Government’s targets could be met along with ensuring the Council could continue to provide high quality and uninterrupted services.

·     During 2016 over 500 staff from Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils worked together to prepare for the proposed merger, improving processes, policies and systems and forming new relationships between the 3 organisations.

 

Issues

 

1.  Local Government Reform Background

Randwick City Council has been an active participant in local government reform for many years. The Council worked with Waverley and Woollahra Councils to research the impact of reform across the eastern suburbs, and more recently in preparing for the proposed merger.

 

The Council’s first preference has always been to stand alone. Randwick is in a strong financial position, has been debt free for almost two decades, and consistently delivers significant capital works programs and high quality services for the community.

 

While the Council is strong enough to stand alone, the Government’s position has consistently been that no change is not an option. This was supported by IPART’s conclusion in Oct 2015 that no Sydney council recommended to merge by the Independent Local Government Review Panel was fit to stand alone.

 

The Council took the view that if mergers were to happen, it needed to protect residents, the community and staff. After extensive due diligence and one of the largest community consultations in the history of the Council, the Council resolved to merge with Waverley and Botany Bay Councils. As Botany Bay Council did not support the proposal to merge, Randwick and Waverley Councils prepared a joint merger proposal. The Randwick-Waverley Merger Proposal was successful in defeating the Government’s initial preference for a ‘Global City’ council through a merger of City of Sydney, Randwick, Waverley, Woollahra and Botany Bay Councils.

 

In October 2015 IPART declared the joint merger proposal from Randwick and Waverley Councils fit, however noting there would be “significantly higher benefits if neighbouring councils are included”. In December 2015 the NSW Premier and Minister for Local Government announced their proposal to merge Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils, creating Sydney’s 3rd largest Council.

 

Acknowledging the importance of undertaking due diligence and being merger prepared, the Council formed the Randwick Transition Group in December 2015, consisting of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and four councillors. In February 2016 the Council delegated responsibilities to the RTG including representing the community’s interests in key transition decisions; approving the funding of transition activities within the Council’s adopted budget; acting as a conduit to the Council; leading the transition process; and ensuring the community and staff are informed and engaged in the process.

 

Figure 1 provides a detailed chronology of Local Government reform over the past 6 years.

 

Figure 1 Timeline of merger events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Local Government Reform History -

Aug 2011

Destination 2036 Conference – Vision and Action Plan for Local Government

Mar 2012 to Oct 2013

Independent Local Government Review Panel (ILGRP) investigates options to strengthen local government, releasing 4 reports and recommending the creation of a ‘Global City’ council by merging City of Sydney, Randwick, Waverley, Woollahra and Botany Councils

 

Sept 2014

 

 

Fit for the FutureNSW Govt ‘Fit for the Future’ response released, asking Councils to submit an Improvement Proposal “superior” to the ILGRP’s Global City merger recommendation or an alternative broadly consistent Merger Proposal

 

Nov 2014 to Apr 2015

Randwick undertakes comprehensive due diligence, analysing various merger options and carrying out one of the largest single community consultations in the history of the Council  

 

 

9 Apr 2015

Randwick signs the first MOU with the peak industry unions to provide staff with 5 years protection from forced redundancy

 

26 May 2015

After careful consideration of the options, the Council rejected the ‘Global City’ merger proposal and resolved “that a merger of Randwick City with Waverley and Botany Bay Councils is considered the optimum outcome”. As Botany opposed the proposal, an alternative merger proposal of Randwick and Waverley Councils is prepared

June 2015

 

Randwick and Waverley Councils submit a joint merger proposal to IPART

          

 

 

 

Oct 2015

IPART release their report, concluding the Waverley and Randwick merger proposal is fit. No Sydney council recommended to merge by the ILGRP was found ‘fit’ to stand alone.

 

NSW Government asks Councils with submissions assessed not fit due to scale and capacity, or with neighbouring council/s assessed as not fit, to identify their council’s merger preferences.

 

Nov 2015

Randwick advises the NSW Government the Council’s preferred merger partners are Waverley and Botany Councils and that transition planning has commenced on the “fit” Randwick and Waverley merger proposal

 

8 Dec 2015

Randwick Council resolve to establish a Randwick Transition Group (RTG) comprising the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and four councillors

 

 18 Dec 2015

The Premier of NSW and Minister for Local Government announce 35 merger proposals affecting 79 Councils across NSW. This includes a proposal to merge Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils

 

Jan 2016

Minister for Local Government’s Merger Proposal is formally referred to the Chief Executive of the Office of Local Government.

 

Dr Rob Lang is appointed as the Chief Executive’s delegate to review and comment on the Minister’s proposal.

 

Feb 2016

The delegate conducts community consultation on the Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Merger Proposal.

 

The Mayor of Randwick, Clr Noel D’Souza, speaks at the public inquiry on 4 Feb at Rose Bay Sailing Club and the Council makes a submission to the Delegate on the proposal.

 

Mar to May 2016

Delegate’s report provided to the Minister.

Boundaries Commission appointed by the Minister to provide comments on the Delegate’s report.

12 May 2016

The Minister for Local Government announces in principle support for the merger of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils, subject to the decision of the courts. 19 new councils are created across the state.

Delegate’s report released, recommending the merger proposal be implemented. The Boundaries Commission report is also released, stating the Delegate adequately considered all the factors and followed the process set out in the Local Government Act.

 

The Minister also acknowledges the work of Waverley and Randwick Councils in “preparing for change and ensuring the community benefits”

 

The NSW Government releases guidelines for new Councils including mandatory due dates and actions. This, along with the proclamation issued to the new councils, determines priorities for Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils’ transition planning work. 

 

April to May 2016

500 staff from across Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils form 69 Project Action Teams to connect, exchange and compare information

 

May to June 2016

Randwick and Waverley Councils ask eastern suburbs residents, ratepayers, business owners and students to suggest a name for the proposed merged Council. Of the 349 entries, Eastern Beaches Council is the most popular choice.

 

June 2016 to Dec 2016

32 Working Groups formed to analyse the work of the Project Action Teams and formulate recommendations for the new Council

14 Feb 2017

NSW Premier announces remaining Sydney mergers will go ahead, pending legal action, including the merger of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils

 

 

2.  Merger transition planning overview

 

As reported to Council in November 2015(GM22/15), Randwick and Waverley Councils have been proactive in preparing for a proposed merger for over a year. Woollahra Council has also participated in transition planning since April 2016. Important preparation was undertaken for the proposed merger to ensure the Council could continue to provide high quality and uninterrupted services and the residents, businesses and ratepayers would not be disadvantaged by the merger.

 

Merger preparation escalated on 12 May 2016, with the Minister for Local Government announcing his “in principle support of the merger of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils, subject to the decision of the courts”. At the same time, the NSW Government released merger guidance documents along with the proclamations for 19 new Councils.

 

The merger guidance documents outlined key responsibilities, clear targets and implementation actions new Councils were required to achieve by Oct 2017. This included 117 actions required within the first month of a new Council, including a new single point of entry website for the new Council. Within the first week Councils were required to put in place any interim ICT arrangements needed to ensure functionality.

 

With the release of the guidance material, along with insight into the proclamation requirements, it was clear significant planning and preparation was required to ensure the NSW Government’s targets could be met along with ensuring the Council could continue to provide high quality and uninterrupted services.

 

Working in partnership with staff from Waverley and Woollahra Councils, preparatory work on the proposed merger is well advanced. Staff have undertaken extensive reviews of plans, processes and systems with a strong focus on customers and the protection of the community. Over 500 staff across the 3 Councils have been engaged in the process of planning for the merger.

 

This report provides an update on the work to date and the process undertaken to prepare for a merger of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils.

 

2.1 Randwick Transition Group

Randwick Council established a Randwick Transition Group (RTG) in Dec 2015 to ensure the protection of the community, services, staff and way of life of Randwick City during the merger process with the least possible disruption. The Mayor Clr D’Souza, Deputy Mayor Clr Moore and Councillors Matson, Andrews, Seng and Nash were appointed as members. The RTG has led the transition process, with their actions including:

 

·     established a Transition Leadership Framework

·     set merger principles to guide the process

·     prepared community representation options under a merger

·     considered options and recommended a name for the merged Council

·     prepared the Council’s submission to the Delegate on the Minister’s Merger Proposal

·     prepared a submission on the Local Government Act proposed amendments

·     provided guidance on the Terms of Reference for forming Project Action Teams with Waverley and Woollahra Council staff

·     endorsed the Implementation Plan

·     oversight of development of the brand, website, day 1 preparations and the progress of the Project Action Teams and Working Groups

·     participated in focus groups to develop and endorse a new brand

·     met with the Minister for Local Government

 

2.2. Project Action Teams and Working Groups

In April 2016 every staff member was offered the opportunity to be a part of planning for the merger. Over 500 staff from Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils volunteered to be part of 69 Project Action Teams (PAT) looking at every council function including libraries, lifeguards, child care, road maintenance and planning.

 

Over 4 weeks staff held over 100 PAT meetings, connected with each other, shared over 1,900 documents, prepared over 200 status reports, agreed on 150 actions and prepared 189 recommendations for the merged Council.

 

 

Figure 2 Project Action Teams Thank You Cards – Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils

 

Following the outstanding success of the Project Action Teams and the release of the NSW Government’s merger guidance material, 200 staff from Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils formed 32 Working Groups in June 2016. Working Groups have held over 400 meetings since their formation. The groups have worked closely together to prepare for the new Council, including reviewing the work of the PATs, preparing recommendations for the General Managers on policies, plans, processes and the continuity of services for the merged Council.

 


 

Figure 3 Working Groups Terms of Reference – Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils

 

The General Managers of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra have held 110 joint meetings with Working Groups to provide direction and their endorsement on recommendations. Such recommendations include aligned policies for financial management, insurance arrangements, IT network access and aligned emergency management procedures. 

The directors of the 3 Councils have provided guidance and support to Project Action Teams and Working Groups, along with meeting as a combined executive group to further advance holistic planning and provide oversight of the merger planning process.

 

A Transition Unit was formed with representatives from the 3 Councils to coordinate the preparation, monitoring and reporting of merger planning activities. A Merger Partner from the Transition Unit was assigned to each Working Group to provide support, guidance and facilitate communication with other groups, directors and General Managers, along with ensuring interdependencies were considered.

 

With the exception of some specialist consultants in areas such as information technology, the PAT and Working Group members undertook merger planning tasks in addition to their business-as-usual activities. Staff volunteered and were not paid overtime for this work meaning they delivered business-as-usual operations as well as merger preparation work at no additional cost to the community.

 

This enabled the Council to provide all staff with the opportunity to be part of the process and develop leadership, project management and negotiation skills across the Council. Staff were given a sense of ownership and control of the process. Council staff demonstrated positive attitudes, high quality work and dedication to the Randwick community.

 

The Project Action Teams and Working Groups provided over 500 staff with an in depth insight into the way other Councils work and encouraged a best practice approach towards planning for the new Council. Ideas have been exchanged, resulting in innovative recommendations.

 

Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra staff worked together cooperatively and forged stronger ties which will serve the community well in the future delivery of projects and services.

 

 

 

3.  Benefits

 

3.1   Staff development

Managing a project with people from different organisational structures and cultures requires a variety of project management skills to achieve the outcomes required. This unique cross-council process has expanded the experience and skills of many staff. Junior staff, in particular, were given the opportunity to host workshops and coordinate groups, enhancing their level of skill and expertise in people and task management.

 

During the merger proposal period it is essential to keep staff informed, committed, motivated and engaged. The Councils not only focused on the systems, processes and operational aspects of the merger, but on ensuring staff from across the three organisations felt respected and valued, and that their experiences and skills were recognised.

 

Randwick has built a resilient workforce that responded exceptionally well to the complexity of planning for the change. This resilience enables staff to quickly respond to change, and to cope and continue to perform despite disruptions and distractions that any change may cause.

 

The Council’s change work for the proposed merger has allowed the organisation to apply and develop the skills, capability and leadership of Randwick employees in areas such as following areas policy development and problem solving.

 

 

3.2     Engaged workforce

Staff were empowered and engaged in the process of preparing for the proposed merger. This fostered a positive and progressive attitude and commitment from staff. When staff involved in planning for the merger were asked how they felt about the proposed merger, 84% of those surveyed said they felt acceptance, happiness or were moving forward.

 

Figure 4 Change Curve Survey of Working Groups – November 2016

 

 

‘Caring for staff’ is an important principle of the Council’s Implementation Plan. A team of staff from across the three councils was formed to provide support and information to staff on the first day of a merged Council.  This team of energetic, positive and professional staff, self-named the “PIT Crew”, will play an important role in engaging and communicating with 2,000 staff consistently, simultaneously and clearly.

 

Figure 5 PIT Crew Workshop – “how we would like staff to feel on the first day of the proposed merged Council”

 

 

3.3 Sharing information and building relationships

Staff at the three councils in similar roles have formed strong relationships through the transition planning process.  The connections made will allow for easier sharing of ideas and cooperation into the future.

 

These relationships contribute to the Council demonstrating best practice and leadership in Local Government and maintaining a high performing workforce that is responsive to the needs of the organisation and community. In many areas staff found the review process confirmed their procedures and processes are of a high standard and that the Council is performing to a high level with a strong workforce culture.

 

The exchange of information between the three Councils will have ongoing benefits for Randwick. Some examples of these benefits include:

 

·     Parking permit for carers – opportunity to explore partnering to develop a carer’s parking permit to cover all of the eastern suburbs or together join the Inner West and City of Sydney scheme.

·     Waste education - further opportunities to work together on waste initiatives such as improvements in commercial and food waste and beach littering.

·     Lifeguards – planning for the merger has strengthened the relationship of lifeguards along the coast, with advantages ongoing in planning for events like the Coogee to Bondi Swim and in responding to emergency situations.

·     IT infrastructure support solutions - the best infrastructure support solutions from across the three Councils were seen and evaluated in similar “real-world” scenarios.  As contracts expired the products that were considered best were chosen to be the replacement, e.g. email filtering and antivirus products

·     Rates mail house similar to improvements in IT solutions, Randwick changed its rates mail house to a provider which offers a better service

·     IT - Technical staff learnt from the process through exposure to staff outside Council and specialists, with different ideas and experiences shared. Sharing knowledge and expertise about business application administration and processes has led to improvements in Randwick’s processes

·     Cemetery management – opportunity to further pursue cemetery management arrangements with Waverley Council

·     Asset management principles – the Asset Management Working group have undertaken work on aligning their asset management principles. There is an opportunity to have a consistent framework across the eastern suburbs.

3.4 Processes, plans and systems

Preparing a combined website was the catalyst for many improvements and ensured a strong focus on the experience of our customers. Some improvements have already been implemented and further updates and improvements are planned.

 

·     Website - Upgraded functionality and enhanced Content Management System to make it easier to do business with the Council online and ensure great customer experiences. Improvements include:   

Improved homepage and website structure

New and improved interactive maps

New customer service centre locator function

New look facilities maps and the waste calendar

New search box

New menu hover

New photos

New customer forms

·     Website content - The opportunity allowed for the website content, pages and documents to be reviewed. Staff had the opportunity to work with experienced website copywriters and were exposed to new ways of structuring or presenting complicated information in a user friendly manner.

·     Email communication – A more cost efficient email distribution system was identified through the working groups providing future cost savings for the Council.

·     Forms – 300 customer forms have been reduced to less than 100 forms with a new clean and easy to follow format

·     Customer letter templates and information sheets – information sheets and letter templates have been reviewed and refreshed to ensure they are easy to understand

·     Lifeguards radio network – the Lifeguards upgraded to digital radios, aligning their equipment with emergency services equipment.

·     Improved Waste Calendar – the 2017 waste calendar was enhanced after joint work on the design by the Waste Management Working Group

·     Fit for the Future Options Analysis – this comprehensive review of 6 merger options involved extensive research and comparison of councils across the eastern suburbs and the City of Sydney. The 500+ page Options Analysis document has become a reference source for strategic planning staff.

·     Fees and charges – the process of preparing the fees and charges schedule has been enhanced and fees re-structured so they are easier for customers to understand.

·     s149 certificate – changes have already been implemented to streamline the language on this popular property certificate and introduce electronic certificates.

·     New policies and procedures – A number of new and refreshed policies and procedures are being considered by staff including in areas such as emergency management, financial management, governance and asset management.

·     Delegations of Authority – Improvements are being considered to ensure delegations address business requirements.

·     Local Traffic Committee – improvements to the LTC are being considered following the work of the Parking and Transport Working Group.

·     IT technical environment - The technical environment was upgraded and consolidated in a shorter timeframe than otherwise would have been achievable. This delivered a more a reliable and capable platform sooner for Randwick staff.

·     Phone system - A new phone system, while already planned to replace the 20 year old end-of-life system, was prioritised and its compatibility considered with the other Councils. Many new capabilities have been introduced with the new system particularly in the call centre.

·     Service desk support processes and network monitoring – The challenge of managing a larger scale organisation encouraged the Networking Working Group to design more streamlined processes, which have been implemented across Randwick. 

·     Maps - The opportunity has allowed for the improvement of cartographic map templates and standards focusing on high quality output with new base maps and more consistent look and feel. For example, a new off-leash dog park map has been created.

·     Spatial data - A review of spatial data classification and naming standards have been implemented promoting better administration practices.

·     Advance GIS skills - With more challenging tasks, staff were provided the opportunity to expand their knowledge with a cloud based GIS system by utilising a number of the more advanced features.

·     Online interactive mapping - Major improvements were made to the architecture of the online interactive mapping systems enabling seamless integration into a new website.

·     New job tracking system - New job tracking system implemented for mapping requests enabling better management of tasks.

·     Business process mapping and online forms - Improved documentation of existing business processes and online forms. Improvements have been incorporated when compared with the other councils.

·     SharePoint - New SharePoint site to enable people to collaborate on projects and share documents both within and outside the Council.

·     Financial operations – the Commonwealth Bank’s Advisory Team provided a comprehensive analysis of both Randwick and Waverley’s financial operations. This service was provided free to councils subject to a merger proposal. Recommendations from this review have already been implemented at Randwick, including improvements to online banking processes.

·     HR Self Service – HR and Payroll staff were provided with an insight into the operation of self-service HR systems.

·     Plant and fleet management system – through the new finance system project, improvements the plant and fleet management system will be implemented to streamline the process for staff.

·     Procurement system – the preparation of a new finance system also identified enhancements to the configuration of the purchasing system.

·     Finance system – the new finance system project increased the knowledge of staff in the integration of system modules. With this knowledge expanding beyond specialist systems staff, finance staff now have the ability to undertake basic trouble shooting of system issues and have a greater understanding of how to ensure the system is configured to optimise their work. Such changes include introducing restrictions on costing to improve accountability and reduce the number of mis-costed transactions. 

4.  Risk Management

 

Working groups were responsible for a number of projects to address risk management issues. These projects included:

 

·     Financial management system – with a combined procurement spend of $227m per year across the 3 councils it is essential that a central system to manage expenditure could be in place as soon as possible under a merged council. The three Councils worked together to prepare a new instance of the finance system.

·     Emergency management procedures – to ensure no confusion in the event of an emergency in the early days of the new council

·     WHS Policy, procedures and insurance arrangements – to ensure the safety of staff and contractors was prioritised and any problems identified

·     Network security – such as firewalls, back-ups, email filtering and anti-virus products

·     Insurance – investigating the insurance requirements of the proposed larger organisation

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:      1b. Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities

Direction:      1b.1 Demonstrate best practice and leadership in local government

1b.3 Maintain a high performing workforce that is responsive to the needs of the organisation

1b.5 Effectively and efficiently manage financial operations, systems, performance and information

1b.6 Be recognised as providing quality customer service, customer focus and call centre services

1b.7 Continue to improve and implement business process systems and information technology infrastructure to support the organisation’s objectives

1b.9 Support the community and organisation through the improvement and expansion of online systems and GIS mapping

 

Financial impact statement

 

On 16 August 2016 the RTG committee members, acknowledging the importance of undertaking due diligence and being merger prepared, endorsed the General Manager’s expenditure of funds for the purpose of implementing the Transition Action Plan.

 

The Council has spent $463,635 to date on projects, where, if the Council did not merge, it would not receive a return on investment. These costs relate to expenditure on branding and websites ($216k) and IT systems ($247k).

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Premier has confirmed the merger of Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Council’s will proceed, pending the outcome of Woollahra’s legal action in the High Court. Merger planning and preparation work is well progressed, with the Council in a strong position to meet the NSW Government’s requirements for merged councils while ensuring there is no disruption to service delivery to our community.

 

The benefits flowing from the transition planning work undertaken by staff from Waverley, Woollahra and Randwick Councils has already strengthened all of our organisations and provides a strong foundation for the future.  

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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General Manager's Report No. GM2/17

 

Subject:              Review of the Randwick City Council 2016-17 Operational Plan - December Quarter

Folder No:                F2016/03001

Author:                     Karen Hawkett, Coordinator Integrated Planning & Reporting     

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2016-17 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on 28 June 2016. In this report, achievement and status comments are provided for each action in the 2016-17 Operational Plan. Highlights are also provided where appropriate.

 

Issues

 

This is the December 2016 Quarterly Report and second review of the 2016-17 annual Operational Plan.

 

All projects are proceeding as planned and overall all services were delivered to agreed standards.

 

During the December report period key projects completed included Wylie's Baths cottage upgrade, irrigation and flood automation works at Chifley Reserve, the draft Planning Strategy for Kingsford and Kensington Town Centres, installation of a new audio-visual system at the Lionel Bowen Library, the 2016 Architecture on Show talks, and delivery of the School Beach Safety Program to over 20 local schools.

 

Council held several key events during the period, including the Lexington Place Busking competition, Bali Memorial ceremonies, Sydney's White Ribbon Walk, Kingsford Noodle Markets, Coogee Carols and NYE Coogee Sparkles.

 

From the activity undertaken by Council during the quarter there were many highlights. The following table lists our significant highlights:

 

City theme

City Plan Outcomes

Action code

Highlight

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1a. Vision for Randwick City Council

 

 

P001

 

The 2015-16 Annual Report was completed. Council’s achievements during the year include construction of the Chifley Skate Park, an outdoor gym at Frenchmans Bay and new synthetic sports fields at Heffron Park, the refurbishment of the Lionel Bowen Library and introduction of a queue management system at the Customer Service Centre.

 

 


 

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1b. Leadership

 

 

P004

 

 

39 staff were presented with Length of Service Awards to mark the anniversary of their 10, 20 and 30 year service milestones.

 

 

Length of Service Awards

 

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1b. Leadership

 

 

S012

 

 

The Investment Policy was reviewed and adopted by Council in December 2016.

 

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1c. Continuous Improvement

 

 

P014

 

 

Emergency evacuation procedures and practices have been tested and reviewed.

 

 

2.A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2a. Meeting Community Needs

 

S029

 

 

The Salvation Army held its Christmas event for 220 guests at the Prince Henry Centre.

 

 

2.A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2a. Meeting Community Needs

 

S039

 

 

Council supported a number of community cultural events including the Guriwal Breast Cancer Morning Tea and the Matraville Family Day.

 

 

                                                                             

 

                Matraville Family Day                                                        Guriwal Breast Cancer Morning Tea


 

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

 

2c. Community facilities

 

 

P023

 

 

The first meeting of the newly formed La Perouse Museum Building and Heritage Sub-Committee was held.

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

 

2d. Cultural diversity

 

PO24

 

The 2016 Twilight Concert Program was successfully delivered with the last concert held in November featuring Emma Pask.

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3a. Communicating Effectively

 

S049

 

SMS alerts for Council’s scheduled household clean-up were set up for 2017.

 

 

Household clean-up SMS alert

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3b. Promoting Services

 

 

 

S054

 

 

Through the Library, Council delivered 18 writing workshops, 5 chess club sessions, 5 bridge club sessions, 2 HSC related workshops and 111 technology related classes and sessions during the quarter.

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3c. Community Involvement

 

 

 

S055

 

 

Council commenced ten new consultations during the quarter including the Birds Gully and Bunnerong Road Floodplain, the Resident Parking Scheme Survey, Randwick Junction Town Centre Review and the Spot Pedestrian Access and Mobility Plan.

 

 


 

 

4. Excellence in Urban Design and Development

 

 

4a. Improved Design

 

 

P028

 

 

The K2K Urban Design Competition awarded to JMD Design, Hill Thalis and Bennet and Trimble.

 

 

K2K urban design competition winners

 

 

4. Excellence in Urban Design and Development

 

 

4b. Robust Development Framework

 

 

 

P030

 

Following a tender process, members have been appointed to the new Design Excellence Panel.

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

 

5a. Maximise Open Space Use

 

 

 

P032

 

 

Tenders have been received and are being evaluated for the extension of the Coastal Walkway in the western section of the Malabar Headland National Park.

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

 

5b. Range of Activities

 

S058

 

Des Renford Leisure Centre attracted over 256,000 visits between October and December.

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

 

5c. Open Space Creation

 

P036

 

Meeks Street, Kingsford has been closed to traffic as planned and temporary urban plaza created.

 

 

Temporary urban plaza at Meeks Street, Kingsford


 

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

 

5d. Innovative Library Programs

 

S059

 

A lending collection of tabletop games and HSC study lab e-resource has been newly added to the Library.

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

 

5d. Innovative Library Programs

 

S063

 

Council presented four reading and information literacy sessions as part of a new partnership with the Special Needs Unit at Matraville Sports High School.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

 

 

6a. Public Asset Management

 

 

P042

 

 

 

The design for upgraded drainage at Cottenham Avenue, Kensington has been completed.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

 

 

6a. Public Asset Management

 

 

P042

 

 

 

Repair of the Coogee Beach Promenade, significantly damaged during the super storm in June, was completed.

 

 

New Pavers, Coogee Beach Promenade

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6c. Community Safety

 

S078

 

Council delivered Kindergarten Road Safety Orientations to parents of children starting school in 2017.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6e. Housing Diversity

 

P049

 

 

The draft Kensington and Kingsford Town Centres Planning Strategy proposes a new affordable housing contributions scheme to deliver more than 200 affordable housing dwellings.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6f. Distinctive neighbourhoods

 

P050

 

 

Community engagement for the Randwick Junction Town Centre Strategy and Public Domain Study drew 491 survey responses.

 

 

7. Heritage that is Protected and Celebrated

 

7a. Heritage

 

P052

 

The Kingsford Town Centre Heritage Review was incorporated into the draft Planning Strategy for Kensington and Kingsford Town Centres and considered by Council.

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

8a. Vibrant commercial centres

 

 

 

S007

 

 

Nine new outdoor dining licence agreements were prepared.

 

 


 

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

8a. Vibrant commercial centres

 

 

 

P054

 

 

The Win Dinner on Us competition was run again at the Kingsford Noodle Markets to promote local food businesses who have achieved a food safety star rating.

 

 

Kingsford Noodle Markets 

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

8b. Hospital and university precincts

 

 

P055

 

 

A review of the draft Central District Plan which includes updated employment forecasts for the Health and Education precinct, is underway.

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

 

8c. Effective partnerships

 

 

P056

 

Planning for two Business and Economic Leadership Forums on innovation grants and creative industries, and new opportunities for local tourism is underway.

 

 

9. Integrated and Accessible Transport

 

 

9a. Active Transport Network

 

 

P059

 

 

Council has received RMS funding to complete a Wayfinding Strategy, focused on improving pedestrian signage around light rail stops.

 

 

9. Integrated and Accessible Transport

 

 

9b. Sustainable transport

 

S085

 

An evaluation of traffic control signals has been undertaken for the Avoca Street/Sturt Street intersection, which is a key component to the cycleway link from Kingsford to South Coogee.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10a. Leader in Environmental Sustainability

 

 

P065

 

 

Funding has been distributed to 11 of the schools approved for school food and native garden projects.

 

 


 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10b. Management of Environmental Risks

 

P067

 

 

The Coogee Bay Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan was adopted by Council in December 2016.

 

 

Coogee Bay Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10c   Biodiversity and natural heritage

 

S092

 

Volunteer hours for Council's Bushcare program reached a record high in 2016.

 

 

 

Bushcare Volunteers

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10d. Sustainable Waste Technologies

 

P070

 

 

Council removed and disposed of 297 tons of illegally dumped material.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10e. Water conservation

 

P073

 

Irrigation upgrading works have commenced at the Randwick Community Centre.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10f. Energy conservation

 

 

P074

 

 

Energy consumption by Council during the December quarter was 6,880 GJ and down marginally from the previous quarter (8,189 GJ).

 

 

In acknowledgement of our efforts, Randwick City has recently received a number of awards.

 

Randwick City Council was highly commended in the New or Improved Techniques category of the IPWEA NSW Engineering Excellence Awards for its audit of Special Schedule 7.

 

Mitchel Woods, Randwick City Council Manager Corporate and Financial Planning was a finalist for the Rising Star of the Year at the 2016 Australian Accounting Awards.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:     Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the December Quarterly Review is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2016-17 Annual Operational Plan. In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20-year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the December quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the December Quarterly Review of the 2016-17 Annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

2016-17 Randwick City Council Annual Operational Plan - December Quarter Report

 

 

 

 


2016-17 Randwick City Council Annual Operational Plan - December Quarter Report

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director City Services Report No. CS1/17

 

Subject:              Light Rail - Parking Recovery Project - Kingsford South

Folder No:                F2016/00195

Author:                     Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport     

 

Introduction

 

With the imminent removal of two of the three car parks within the central island of Anzac Parade, adjacent to Souths Juniors Rugby Leagues Club (Souths Juniors), it is proposed to construct a new car park.

 

Issues

 

The Council has instigated a Light Rail parking recovery plan because the Light Rail project permanently removes parking from parts of its route.  The objective of the parking recovery plan is to regain as much parking as possible close to the Light Rail route in order to support local businesses.  This is generally being achieved by introducing angle parking in the side streets in close proximity to the town centres.

 

A number of the parking recovery projects have already been completed in Kingsford, Kensington and Randwick, and, have been well received by the community.  Additional works are currently proceeding in Kensington and parts of Randwick.  Delivery of the new parking arrangements have been timed to coincide with the Light Rail project’s construction timetable.

 

Transport for NSW recently informed the Council that it was bringing forward its construction timetable for the commencement of light rail works adjacent to Souths Juniors.  This was originally intended to commence in May/June 2017 but is now identified to commence toward the end of March 2017.  As a result there will be more than 150 parking spaces permanently removed from the local parking supply.   

 

Wallace Street - Angle Parking Proposal

Plans are currently being finalised for the introduction of 90° angle parking on one side of Wallace Street; which is the street that runs along the northern boundary of the club.

 

At this stage it is estimated that the introduction of angle parking would result in an additional 33 parking spaces.  Given the change in Transport for NSW’s construction timetable, it is proposed that once the design is completed, plans be immediately distributed to the Voting Members of the Traffic Committee.  It is further proposed that, if such plans are endorsed by the Voting Members of the Traffic Committee, the design be deemed as approved for construction by the Council. 

 

Anzac Parade carpark extension

In addition to the proposed Wallace Street angle parking, plans are also being finalised for the implementation of an extension to the existing Anzac Parade carpark, south of Sturt Street.  Currently, within this carpark there are 91 parking spaces.  There is the possibility of constructing a car park further to the south, between Sturt Street and Botany Street, in order to accommodate approximately 85 more parking spaces. 

 

This project would require removal of the existing grassed area, the laying of a new bitumen hardstand area, associated kerb and guttering, carpark line marking and additional public lighting.  It would also require the removal of approximately 5 trees from along the north-eastern edge of this space.

 

The estimated cost of this car park extension would be approximately $450,000.  It is proposed that this funding be provided from the current allocation for the Light Rail parking recovery plan.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport

Direction 9e:     Parking is managed to balance convenience against reduce car reliance

 

Financial impact statement

 

The Council has previously allocated $7M for implementation of the Light Rail parking recovery plan. The above elements can be funded from this allocation.  The likely costings are:

 

·     Wallace Street - Angle Parking Proposal     $  80,000

·     Anzac Parade carpark extension                         $450,000

 

Conclusion

 

It is considered that, to best meet the parking needs of the southern parts of Kingsford, the introduction of the proposed Wallace Street angle parking and the proposed extension to the Anzac Parade / Sturt Street carpark be approved.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     The Wallace Street angle parking proposal be approved for construction, once the plans are endorsed by the Voting Members of the Traffic Committee, and

 

b)     The existing Anzac Parade / Sturt Street car park be reconstructed further south, toward Botany Street. 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Locality plan

 

2.

Plan of proposed extension to the Anzac Parade car park, existing south of Sturt Street

 

 

 

 



Plan of proposed extension to the Anzac Parade car park, existing south of Sturt Street

Attachment 2

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF1/17

 

Subject:                    Quarterly Budget Review - December 2016

Folder No:                F2016/00402

Author:                     Mitchel Woods, Manager Corporate and Financial Planning      

 

Introduction

 

As part of the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework for NSW Local Governments, the Office of Local Government has a set of minimum reporting requirements for Councils, in order for them to facilitate progress reporting against the original and revised annual budgets at the end of each quarter.

 

Collectively, these documents are known as the Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) and are reported to council in accordance with the relevant legislation at the end of each quarter.

 

Section 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that at the end of each quarter, a Budget Review Statement be prepared and submitted to Council that indicates the latest estimates of income and expenditure for the 2016-17 year.

 

The regulation (Section 203 (2)) also requires that the budget review statement must include, or be accompanied by:

 

I.      A report as to whether or not the Responsible Accounting Officer believes that the Statement indicates that the financial position of the Council is satisfactory, having regard to the original estimate of income and expenditure; and

II.     If that position is unsatisfactory, recommendations for remedial action.

 

Issues

 

This report is a review of the Council’s 2016-17 current budget and recommends adoption of a revised budget for the 2016-17 financial year.

 

It proposes variations to Council’s adopted budget, which will result in a projected budget surplus at year end of $16,474.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:     Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:     Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial & operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The proposed variations in this report and listed in the attachment will result in a projected budget surplus at year end of $16,474.

 


 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Manager Corporate and Financial Planning, as the Responsible Accounting Officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the report in relation to the December 2016 Budget Review be received and noted; and

 

b)     the proposed December 2016 budget variations shown in the attachment to this report be adopted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Quarterly Budget Review Statements (QBRS) - December 2016

 

 

 

 


Quarterly Budget Review Statements (QBRS) - December 2016

Attachment 1

 

 

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Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF2/17

 

Subject:              Investment Report - November 2016

Folder No:                F2015/06527

Author:                     Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

 Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – November 2016” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of November 2016. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 30 November 2016, Council held investments with a market value of $75.444 million. The portfolio value increased during November by ~$1.952 million. The increase is representative of a positive cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from December 2015 to November 2016. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio                          

 

The portfolio has sufficient levels of liquidity with 7% of investments available at call and a further 20% of assets maturing within 3 months. Council also currently has a number of senior FRNs as additional cover for liquidity requirements (accessible within 2 business days)

 

 

The investment portfolio is marginally directed towards fixed term deposits ahead of liquid FRNs and is spread across the higher rated ADIs. The various investment types may include term deposits, floating rate notes, on-call accounts and covered notes.

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of November 2016. The portfolio includes term deposits (53% of the portfolio) with the higher rated ADI’s. Credit assets (FRNs) are around 40% of the portfolio.

 

 

The entire investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher).

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

The portfolio is of very high quality from a ratings perspective. Credit quality is entirely directed amongst the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher), in compliance with Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Council’s Investment Policy restricts allowable investments to only Prime, High Grade and Upper Medium Grade Investments. This will result in all new investments having a minimum Standard and Poors long term credit rating of A-. Council no longer invests in any products with a credit rating of BBB+ or less.

 

 

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

All of these are within Policy limits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy.

 

Individual counterparty exposures comply with the Policy.

 

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period November 2013 to November 2016.

 

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.77% compared with the benchmark index of 1.75%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, deposits accounted for 53% of the total investment portfolio.

Three deposits totaling $4 million matured and were withdrawn in November. There were six new term deposits taken up during November totaling $6.5 million.

As at the end of November, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.91%, down 2bp from the previous month or around +95bp over bank bills.

This remains relatively attractive as it is higher than most deposits in the marketplace out to 2 years.

    

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $30.4 million in floating rate notes.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 30 November 2016 decreased by ~$35k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·         Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·         Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·         And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2016-17 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The current budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,648,000.00. Investment income to 30 November 2016 amounted to $841,548.08.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 30 November 2016 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for November 2016 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - November 2016

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - November 2016

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF3/17

 

Subject:              Investment Report - December 2016

Folder No:                F2015/06527

Author:                     Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

 Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – December 2016” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of December 2016. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 December 2016, Council held investments with a market value of $75.248 million. The portfolio value decreased during December by ~$183 thousand. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from December 2015 to December 2016. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio                          

 

The portfolio has sufficient levels of liquidity with 7% of investments available at call and a further 17% of assets maturing within 3 months. Council also currently has a number of senior FRNs as additional cover for liquidity requirements (accessible within 2 business days)

 

 

The investment portfolio is marginally directed towards fixed term deposits ahead of liquid FRNs and is spread across the higher rated ADIs. The various investment types may include term deposits, floating rate notes, on-call accounts and covered notes.

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of December 2016. The portfolio includes term deposits (53% of the portfolio) with the higher rated ADI’s. Credit assets (FRNs) are around 40% of the portfolio.

 

 

The entire investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher).

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

The portfolio is of very high quality from a ratings perspective. Credit quality is entirely directed amongst the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher), in compliance with Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Council’s Investment Policy restricts allowable investments to only Prime, High Grade and Upper Medium Grade Investments. This will result in all new investments having a minimum Standard and Poors long term credit rating of A-. Council no longer invests in any products with a credit rating of BBB+ or less.

 

 

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

All of these are within Policy limits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy.

 

Suncorp is slightly above capacity limits. Upcoming deposit maturities will be recalled and directed to other ADIs to rebalance the portfolio.

 

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period December 2013 to December 2016.

 

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.77% compared with the benchmark index of 1.74%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, deposits accounted for 53% of the total investment portfolio.

Five deposits totaling $6 million matured and were withdrawn in December. There were three new term deposits taken up during December totaling $5.5 million.

As at the end of December, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.81%, down 10bp from the previous month or around +80bp over bank bills.

This remains relatively attractive as it is higher than most deposits in the marketplace out to 12 months.

    

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $30.4 million in floating rate notes.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 December 2016 decreased by ~$14k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·         Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·         Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·         And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2016-17 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The current budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,648,000.00. Investment income to 31 December 2016 amounted to $1,017,121.39.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 December 2016 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for December 2016 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - 31 December 2016

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - 31 December 2016

Attachment 1

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF4/17

 

Subject:              Investment Report - January 2017

Folder No:                F2015/06527

Author:                     Gail  Johnston, Financial Operations Accountant     

 

 Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – January 2017” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of January 2017. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 January 2017, Council held investments with a market value of $71.613 million. The portfolio value decreased during January by ~$3.699 million. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from February 2016 to January 2017. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio                          

 

The portfolio has sufficient levels of liquidity with 8% of investments available at call and a further 20% of assets maturing within 3 months. Council also currently has a number of senior FRNs as additional cover for liquidity requirements (accessible within 2 business days)

 

 

The investment portfolio is marginally directed towards fixed term deposits ahead of liquid FRNs and is spread across the higher rated ADIs. The various investment types may include term deposits, floating rate notes, on-call accounts and covered notes.

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of January 2017. The portfolio includes term deposits (50% of the portfolio) with the higher rated ADI’s. Credit assets (FRNs) are around 42% of the portfolio.

 

 

The entire investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher).

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

The portfolio is of very high quality from a ratings perspective. Credit quality is entirely directed amongst the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher), in compliance with Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Council’s Investment Policy restricts allowable investments to only Prime, High Grade and Upper Medium Grade Investments. This will result in all new investments having a minimum Standard and Poors long term credit rating of A-. Council no longer invests in any products with a credit rating of BBB+ or less.

 

 

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

All of these are within Policy limits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy.

 

Suncorp is slightly above capacity limits. Upcoming deposit maturities will be recalled and directed to other ADIs to rebalance the portfolio.

 

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period January 2014 to January 2017.

 

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return of 2.77% compared with the benchmark index of 1.79%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained at the historical low of 1.50%.

 

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, deposits accounted for 50% of the total investment portfolio.

Four deposits totaling $4 million matured and were withdrawn in January. There were no new term deposits taken up during January.

As at the end of January, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 2.83%, up 2bp from the previous month or around +85bp over bank bills. This remains relatively attractive as it is higher than most deposits in the marketplace out to 12 months.

    

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $30.4 million in floating rate notes.

 

Floating Rate Notes are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRN’s as at the 31 January 2017 increased by ~$64k.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·         Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·         Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·         And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2016-17 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The current budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,648,000.00. Investment income to 31 January 2017 amounted to $1,183,325.69.

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 January 2017 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for January 2017 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - 31 January 2017

 

 

 

 


Statement by Responsible Accounting Officer - 31 January 2017

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM1/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Bring Waverley Council’s 24 hour alcohol prohibition to Coogee Beach 

Folder No:                F2005/00873

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

That Council adopt for Coogee Beach and its reserves the current alcohol bans prevailing at nearby Bondi, Bronte and Tamarama beaches as a permanent arrangement.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM2/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Anzac Parade - Naming Anniversary

Folder No:                F2004/07140

Submitted by:          Councillor Bowen, East Ward     

 

 

That:

a)     This council formally gives it support to the Daughters of ANZAC project.

 

b)     Commits to working with all relevant stake-holder to endeavor to restore and re-create the ANZAC Parade corridor as intended with the 1917 dedication of ANZAC parade,         inducing the construction of an appropriate monument at La Perouse.

 

c)     Council commit to constructing an appropriate monument at La Perouse to mark 100         years of the naming of Anzac Parade.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM3/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Garcia - Pollution at Coogee Beach

Folder No:                F2004/06144

Submitted by:          Councillor Garcia, South Ward      

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     note the Southern Courier report that Sydney Water has admitted that ‘a leak in either the sewerage network or a private residence is polluting Coogee Beach’;

 

b)     note community concerns about water pollution at Coogee beach;

 

c)     note that signs erected by Sydney Water warning residents about water quality is an insufficient and unsatisfactory response to Sydney Water’s findings on the source of water pollution at Coogee beach;

 

d)     direct the General Manager to commence discussions with Sydney Water about ways in which Council and Sydney Water might work together to resolve concerns about water pollution at Coogee beach; and

 

e)     create and fund a working group of council officers, relevant experts and local residents tasked with examining ways in which water pollution stemming from storm water drains at Coogee beach might be reduced.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM4/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr  Matson - Proposed Byron Street Resident Preferred Parking Scheme

Folder No:                F2004/07236

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That council conducts a survey of residents in Byron Street and relevant adjacent streets to judge support for the implementation of a resident preferred parking scheme.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM5/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Reconfiguring the Greening Randwick Committee

Folder No:                F2007/00646

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

That:

 

a)     Council notes that the Greater Sydney Commission will not finalise its individual District Plans and revised Greater Sydney Region Plan until the end of 2017 so that newly elected council officials can have their say;

 

b)     Accordingly, Council will reconfigure the Greening Randwick Committee to     provide community input on the Plan’s ‘Green Grid’ concept which is to be a      key component based on the successful London model;

 

c)     Council will augment this significant environmental task by adopting a policy         position that the Greening Randwick Committee be appropriately continued        under any new merged Council entity.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM6/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Long Term Plan of Management for contaminated Bundock Street site

Folder No:                F2006/00653

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That a deed of agreement  be sought for a mutually binding Plan of Management (POM) between the Federal Government and Randwick City Council (and any successor council entity) for the long-term stabilization of the contaminated Bundock Street site in Randwick. This POM will have as its objectives:

 

·         the long-term stabilization of the site as recommended by the Hon Judi Moylan MP (Ret);

 

·         replacement of existing fencing fronting residential streets with an aesthetically pleasing non-barb-wire but still secure alternative design; and

 

·         the repeat of the past successful and locally popular Defence Force revegetation program in which the site was sprayed with a native grass and native wattle seed emulsion mix.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM7/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Housing Affordability

Folder No:                F2004/07991

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That in light of the extreme pressures being placed on Local Councils by State & Federal Governments, to meet housing supply targets and in light of the housing affordability crisis affecting many Australians, Council write to the Federal Treasurer of Australia, the Hon. Scott Morrison MP, requesting that the Federal Government conduct an immediate and urgent review of immigration policy, foreign investment policy and general taxation policy, aimed at making housing more affordable for all Australians and to curb the 3 main factors, which have contributed to the Housing Affordability Crisis in Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM8/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Protecting Solar Access - Parks in Randwick LGA

Folder No:                F2004/00961

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That Council incorporate into its Development Control Plan, a strategy aimed at protecting the solar access of public parks in the Randwick LGA.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM9/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Proposed Street Libraries in Randwick LGA

Folder No:                F2004/08383

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That Council bring back a report investigating the feasibility of introducing street libraries in the Randwick LGA. As part of the report, Council write to Local Schools to determine, if they are interested in promoting such a scheme.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM10/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Light Rail Capacity study - Call for Commission of Inquiry

Folder No:                F2013/00263

Submitted by:          Councillor Bowen, East Ward      

 

 

That:

 

a)     Council notes the EMM report Anzac Parade Corridor future light Rail station and system capacity (dated 20 January 2017) analysis states:

 

6.1 It is a significant concern that the proposed Light Rail system capacity will actually be lower than the capacity of the existing peak hour bus services which are currently using Anzac Parade and Todman Avenue and the future corridor public transport system will effectively be operating at full capacity from the commencement of operations in 2019. This will require a significant number of existing peak hourly bus services (mainly the existing express bus service) to be retained if the system is to provide adequate public transport capacity for all the relevant areas of Randwick LGA in the future.

 

b)     Council further notes Randwick Council has committed to support the light rail project through the development agreement requiring expenditure of $69M of Randwick Council funds.

 

c)     Council further notes community anger at the destruction of the local environment of Randwick LGA, including the route re-alignment of light rail at Alison Road, Centennial Parklands and the Tree of Knowledge, overall project cost blow-out and the ongoing concerns about the impact of CSLER project on parking and local businesses, in conjunction with the calls by Urban Taskforce for even greater density along the Anzac Parade corridor.

 

d)     As such, Council resolves to immediately call upon the NSW state government to agree to full commission of inquiry into the light rail project with power to receive evidence and investigate fully the costs and benefits of the project.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM11/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Review of City of Sydney Green Roofs and Walls Policy

Folder No:                F2005/00176

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council brings back a report to Councillors on the City of Sydney’s Green Roofs and Walls Policy assessing adoption of our own version of the Policy along with possible amendments to our Development Control Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM12/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Urgent review of Council's parcel of land at the end of Fisherman's Road

Folder No:                F2005/00887

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council responds to the recent request from the Friends of Malabar Headland for an urgent review of Council’s parcel of land at the end of Fisherman’s Road, Malabar, east of the car park, by convening an onsite meeting with the group and interested Councillors to generate suitable capital works programs for consideration in the draft budget.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM13/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Review efficiency of current gross pollutant trap and discharge pipe at north end of Coogee Beach

Folder No:                F2004/06144

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

That Council monitors gross pollutant, bacterial and  faecal contamination in discharges from the north Coogee Beach storm water pipe after both high rainfalls and during periods of dry weather and reports the data back to a Council meeting along with an assessment of corrective options that shall include;

 

a)     Assessment of the immediate need to improve, replace or duplicate the Dolphin Street gross pollutant trap;

 

b)     Assessing extending the stormwater pipe’s discharge point further off the beach by diverting the pipe through the adjacent northern headland;

 

c)     The reducing of dry weather contamination flows by plans for a vigorous search for illegal or accidental sewage entry points into the storm water pipe itself;

 

d)     Adopting a Council policy point of negotiating with local Members of Parliament and appropriate State Government authorities for a deed of agreement with Sydney Water to achieve reductions in the necessity of deliberate wet weather sewage overflow releases into the local stormwater system;

 

e)     Adopting a Council policy point of working with the State Government to implement new infrastructure solutions including re-routing parts of the sewer system away from Coogee beach and more directly connecting to the Malabar STP; and

 

f)      Plans for a special rate levy to fund relevant capital works programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM14/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Acknowledgement of the support of local democracy

Folder No:                F2016/04003

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Randwick City Council commends Woollahra Council for its fight to save local democracy for its residents and;

 

a)     inform Woollahra Council and the NSW Premier, Gladys Berijiklian, and the Minister for Local Government, Gabrielle Upton, of this Councils acknowledgement of the support of local democracy; and

 

b)     send a framed Certificate of Merit designed by our Communications team to Woollahra Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                            28 February 2017

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM15/17

 

Subject:              Notice of Motion from Cr Neilson - Upgrade of Stormwater run-off at beaches

Folder No:                F2007/00082

Submitted by:          Councillor Neilson, North Ward      

 

 

That Council writes to the NSW Premier requesting the urgent upgrade of storm water run-off at our beaches.