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Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 8 March 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 March 2016

 

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Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street Randwick on Tuesday, 8 March 2016 at 6:00pm.

 

Committee Members:         The Mayor D’Souza, Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, Garcia, Matson, Moore (Deputy Chairperson), Nash, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos & Stevenson (Chairperson)

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:   At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 9 February 2016

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W7/16      Tree Removal - Outside 5 Tedwin Avenue, Kensington............ 1

W8/16      Walter Williamson Park, Maroubra.......................................... 9

W9/16      Bicentennial Park and Yarra Bay - Proposal for Beach Hire...... 13

W10/16    19 Dolphin Street, Randwick - Car Space Easement.............. 17

W11/16    Pesticides Use Notification Plan............................................ 25    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 March 2016

 

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Works Report No. W7/16

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 5 Tedwin Avenue, Kensington

Folder No:               F2015/07359

Author:                    Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer      

 

Introduction

 

In January 2014, Council’s Tree Gang arborists investigated and assessed a range of damage to the property at 5 Tedwin Avenue and adjacent public infrastructure being caused by the roots of a mature Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree.

 

Issues

 

There have been numerous service requests logged with Council by the owner of this property since July 1997 relating to ongoing problems associated with the canopy and roots of this tree. The issues include roots invading the sewer pipes and stormwater line on a regular basis, destroying the adjacent footpath and driveway and crossover and are now under the garage. During that nineteen year period, the entire adjacent footpath has been removed on two occasions, root pruning has then been undertaken and the footpath reinstated to allow retention of this important tree asset.  The driveway has also had to be replaced because of fig tree root damage.

 

The first major investigation and inspection of intruding tree roots and the damage they were causing was undertaken by Council’s Tree Gang in January 2009.  Tree root material was removed and the damaged footpath repaired at that time.

 

The subject tree is approximately fifteen meters in height with a canopy spread of around eight to ten meters.  It is in good health and contributes positively to the Tedwin Avenue streetscape.  However, previous root pruning will lead to eventual decline.  It is an important provider of habitat and food source for a variety of native birdlife and other fauna. It is one of two Hill’s Weeping figs located outside this property and its growth has been stunted as a result of competition between these two trees.

 

Council’s Tree Gang arborists advise that it would not be possible to remove the amount of damaging tree root material required to abate the damage being caused by the tree’s roots without seriously compromising its stability and long-term viability. Council’s Tree Preservation and Maintenance Officer (North) supports this assessment and recommends that no further works be undertaken on this tree until the issue of its removal or retention is resolved.

 

The tree has to be regularly pruned away from domestic service wires to maintain statutory clearances and branches have to be regularly pruned right back because they overhang the adjacent residence. A large root on the tree has crushed and damaged the underground Telstra cable outside the property but this root cannot be severed because it is a major support root.

 

Large fig tree roots are also evident inside the property and adjacent to damage along the entire length of the front brick fence. As a result of this property damage, Council’s insurers have had to pay out a claim made by the property owner and tree root damage will continue because further root pruning is no longer possible.

 

It is difficult to reinstate the driveway internally and externally with the tree roots protruding to the extent they are.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:   Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.
Key Action:       Develop and implement policies, programs and strategies to manage                         environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the Hill’s Weeping fig outside 5 Tedwin Avenue, Kensington, and its replacement with an advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) would cost approximately $3,500. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The mature Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree growing outside 5 Tedwin Avenue, Kensington has important visual significance and is part of an historic planting theme along both sides of the street. It is estimated to be approximately sixty years old and up until this point Council has been committed to retaining it, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity.

 

The tree has been assessed as having important scenic and amenity value and providing habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the damage being caused by its roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Using Australian Standard ASDR99307, the tree has been assessed as having an amenity value of $3,200. It has also been calculated that the tree has a medium hazard rating but because of the amount of tree root material that has had to be severed in the past and the resultant decay, this rating will inevitably increase as the tree ages. However, because of the size and amount of root material required to be removed to effectively deal with the damage being caused by its roots, further root pruning is no longer a viable option. This is supported by the findings and recommendations made by Council’s Tree Gang arborists when the footpath and driveway adjacent to the tree were demolished in January 2014 and a trench excavated adjacent to the front property alignment.

 

The only practicable long-term management option would be to remove the subject tree and to replace it with a more appropriate tree species as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan. The removal of this tree will certainly have a detrimental impact on the Tedwin Avenue streetscape that will not be mitigated in the shorter term by the planting of an advanced replacement tree. However, it is one of two trees of the same species located outside the front of this particular property and therefore its removal would not have a devastating effect on the streetscape.

 

Council has resolved that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year. However, the proposed removal of this street tree asset would not contravene that resolution and removal is only being recommended because there are no viable options available that would deal with the damage being caused by the roots of this tree in the longer term.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 5 Tedwin Avenue, Kensington, be removed and replaced with one advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs of the subject tree and the damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by its roots.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs of the subject tree and the damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by its roots.

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 March 2016

 

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Works Report No. W8/16

 

Subject:                  Walter Williamson Park, Maroubra

Folder No:               F2004/06876

Author:                    Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services      

 

Introduction

 

At the Works Committee Meeting of 8 September 2015, Council resolved:

 

(Andrews/Seng) that Council submits its proposal to rename Central Park, Maroubra as “Walter Williamson Park” to the Geographical Names Board for consideration.’

 

This report outlines the renaming of Central Park, Maroubra for the purposes of commemorating the late Walter Williamson OAM.

 

Issues

 

The proposal was considered by the Geographical Names Board at their Board Meeting held on 24 November 2015. The Board have advised that under the provisions of Section 10 of the Geographical Names Act 1996, Walter Williamson Park has been assigned as a geographical name.

 

The NSW Government Gazette notice was issued on 22 January 2016 and the naming proposal has been finalised.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 7:       Heritage that is protected and celebrated.

Direction 7a:     Our Heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of a new sign is estimated to cost $3,000.  The funding is available in the current Open Space Capital Works program.

 

Conclusion

 

The Geographical Names Board approved the proposal to rename Central Park for the purposes of commemorating the late Walter Williamson OAM.  Walter Williamson Park has been assigned as a geographical name for the reserve located on the corner of Cooper and Storey Streets, Maroubra.

 

A NSW Government Gazette notification has been issued and the naming proposal has been finalised.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     a new sign depicting the new name of Walter Williamson Park be installed at the park located on the corner of Storey Street and Cooper Street.

b)     a naming ceremony be held with the family of the late Walter Williamson OAM.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Copy of the NSW Government Gazette notification regarding Walter Williamson Park

 

 

 

 


Copy of the NSW Government Gazette notification regarding Walter Williamson Park

Attachment 1

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 March 2016

 

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Works Report No. W9/16

 

Subject:                  Bicentennial Park and Yarra Bay - Proposal for Beach Hire

Folder No:               F2016/00096

Author:                    Kerry Colquhoun, Coordinator, Open Space Assets; Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services      

 

Introduction

 

In mid-2015, the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council (LPLALC) approached Randwick City Council requesting to operate a beach equipment hire business at Bicentennial Park, Phillip Bay. As part of the assessment of this request, the existing unused kiosk at Bicentennial Park was identified as a potential location from which to operate the business. The LPLALC are seeking permission to distribute the equipment from Yarra Bay Beach.

 

The LPLALC have requested that the Council fees for this activity be kept to a minimum as this is a community initiative that has the primary aim of supporting the employment of local indigenous youth.

 

The purpose of this report is to establish in principle support for the licencing of the kiosk as a storage area and licensing of the activity on Yarra Bay Beach. 

 

Issues

 

Bicentennial Park Amenities Building

The Bicentennial Park amenities building comprises public toilets, storage areas and an unused beach inspector office on the north side.  There is a kiosk/store area on the south side of the building. The LPLALC has inspected the site and agreed that if Council supports their proposal that the kiosk to the south side of the building could be used for their activity (refer Attachment 1).

 

LPLALC Purpose and Proposal

Established in 1984, the LPLALC provides culturally appropriate, professional services to the La Perouse Aboriginal community and the broader community. The LPLALC has recently started looking to provide sustainable employment to service their members.

 

A business idea investigated by LPLALC is a beach/surf equipment hire business for the Botany Bay vicinity. This business would offer customers the opportunity to hire beach equipment (e.g. kayaks, stand-up paddles, snorkels, beach umbrellas, beach chairs, etc.) to enhance their day at the beach.

 

A Business Plan has been developed by the LPLALC for the proposed beach hire business. The business plan includes:

 

·        Business Idea

·        Market Analysis

·        Organisation & Logistics

·        Financial Feasibility

·        Risks

·        Recommendations

 

Benefits to the Community

The Business Plan nominates the following:

 

·        The beach hire business will employ on average two full time staff per weekend across the season. It is the intention that these workers come from the local Aboriginal youth community (ages 17-19) to help build up work-experience and prepare them for the workforce.

·        The LPLALC will support these employees with attaining their Bronze Medallion from the Royal Life Saving Society and any other training deemed appropriate (e.g. boating licence, etc.).

·        Pending risk assessments, it would be possible for the Youth Haven to utilise the equipment when beach hire is closed (e.g. after school, off-season, pupil free days, etc.).

 

Proposed Licences

It is proposed that Council enters into formal agreements with LPLALC to operate a beach hire equipment business from the kiosk at Bicentennial Park and operate on Yarra Bay Beach.

 

Two five (5) year licence agreements will be entered into between Yarra Recreation (R23068) Reserve Trust and the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council.  One Licence will be for the occupation of the kiosk premises for the hire office and equipment storage.   The second licence will be for the operation of beach equipment hire (the activity) on Yarra Bay Beach using the Standard Crown Lands Licence document template.  A list of equipment available and hire costs will be detailed in the agreement.  The agreements must be given approval in principle by the Minister for Primary Industries Crown Lands prior to execution of the agreements.

 

The agreements will require the LPLALC to have appropriate Public Liability insurances in place and indemnify Council from all actions, suits, claims and proceedings.  The agreements will incorporate necessary terms and conditions to ensure the business meets the Crown and Council’s operational and licensing requirements. 

 

The licence fees will be set in line with Council’s adopted Community Facilities Management Policy.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction 5a:     Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active                         and passive open space uses.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The approval of these activities will generate operational and property licence fees. As the LPLALC is a community organization, the licence fees would be subsidised in accordance with Council’s Community Facilities Management Policy.

 

Conclusion

 

Beach equipment hire is an appropriate activity to be conducted on the Yarra Bay Reserve and the adjacent beach.  Council can permit this activity to be undertaken by entering into formal licence agreements with the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council for a period of five years.  The licence fee will be calculated from Council’s Community Facilities Management Policy.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council agrees in principle to enter into formal licence agreement negotiations with the La Perouse Land Council to operate a beach hire business from the Bicentennial Park kiosk and beach at Yarra Bay Reserve for a period of up to five years.  The entering into any agreement will be subject to the compliance with Council's terms and conditions on operational, insurance and licence requirements.

 

b)     the annual licence fees be set in accordance with the Council’s Community Facilities Management Policy and indexed annually.

 

c)     the General Manager be authorised to execute the agreements on behalf of Randwick Council as Reserve Trust Manager of the Yarra Recreation (R23068) Reserve.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Bicentennial Park Amenities Floor Plan and Kiosk area

 

 

 

 


Bicentennial Park Amenities Floor Plan and Kiosk area

Attachment 1

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 March 2016

 

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Works Report No. W10/16

 

Subject:                  19 Dolphin Street, Randwick - Car Space Easement

Folder No:               F2014/00528

Author:                    Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Council has received a request from the owners of 19 Dolphin Street, Randwick to obtain an easement over public land for a car parking space in front of the property.

 

Issues

 

Due to the topography of the land along the section of Dolphin Street between St. Luke Street and Judge Street, the properties are much lower than the road carriageway.  The aerial view shows the layout of roads and property.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aerial View

 

The properties on the northern side of Dolphin Street along this section have pedestrian access via a footpath that is separated from the road carriageway by a sloping landscaped area and a sandstone retaining wall.  Photograph 1 shows a view west from the commencement of the split level arrangement.  The property at 19 Dolphin Street is the first property without vehicular access. Additional photographs of the site are provided in attachment 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dolphin St - View South 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Photograph 1 – View West

 

The owners have requested that Council consider granting an easement over the landscaped public land for a car space.  The owners have provided several reasons to substantiate the request as summarised below:

 

1.  There is high parking demand in the area and insufficient parking spaces.

2.  The landscaped area is poorly maintained and accumulates rubbish.

3.  The carriageway is narrow and is subject to traffic congestion including traffic safety concerns during drop off and pick up times for Claremont College.

4.  It is difficult to open the door of a parked car safely within the narrow section of Dolphin Street, especially for seating young children in the car.

5.  Any work to the landscaped area could potentially improve the streetscape.

6.  The proposed hardstand area would provide a location to place domestic waste bins for collection.

 

The owners are seeking the granting of an easement under section 146(1)(e) of the Roads Act,1993 to implement a proposal as shown below.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal Considerations

The Roads Act, 1993 permits Randwick Council as the owner of Dolphin Street to grant an easement or covenant over the public land. 

 

The area of public land in consideration is separated from the property by the footpath and therefore there is no direct link to the property.  The proposal constitutes creation of a parking space through the granting of an easement that will provide a direct benefit to an individual only.  An easement will ink the exclusive use of the public land to the land title of the property, thus adding considerable value to the property resale value.

 

Easements are a long term arrangement and for this location could potentially impact Council’s ability to widen the road carriageway.  An easement to support the parking proposal is of no benefit to the overall community, does not meet the principle of public land and therefore is not supported. Further, this would create an unacceptable precedent where public land would be under the care and control of private owners for long term periods.

 

Alternatively, a roads authority may consider a short term lease of unused public roads under section 153 of the Roads Act, 1993.   The short term lease can be granted to the owner of the adjoining land if it is considered that the road is not being used by the public. The lease does not permit the erection of any significant structures within the lease areas.  Public notice must be given of the proposed lease and the term of the lease would be limited to a 5 year period.  Under this short term lease arrangement, the Roads Authority can terminate the lease at any time and for any reason.

 

Assessment

There are many areas throughout the Randwick LGA where there is a high parking demand.  Randwick Council aims to create parking spaces to meet this demand for the general benefit of the community.  Parking spaces are not created for the benefit of individuals.  There is a resident parking scheme in the street.

 

The granting easement for a parking space over public land to an individual or the owner of a private property is unprecedented in the Randwick LGA and is therefore not desirable.  It would potentially add thousands of dollars of value to the property.

 

The precedent could lead to inequity amongst the community and a potential loss of open space where similar opportunities would be sought where soft landscaping would be replaced with a form of hardstand surface that can withstand vehicular traffic.

 

For this site, there is a council heritage sandstone wall along the northern side of the landscape area that would be subjected to additional loading and pressure caused by the parked vehicle.  Any proposal will require a structural assessment to ensure that the proposal does not cause damage to the wall or shorten the current life of the structure.

 

The proposal will have sightline problems and considerable vegetation will need to be removed to accommodate it. 

 

In this section of Dolphin Street, there appears to be an opportunity to create 2 or 3 additional parallel parking spaces by widening the road into the landscaped area.  These new parking spaces would be for the benefit of the general public.  This will require a widening of the road pavement at the expense of the greenspace.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:     Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                                community expectations and defined levels of service..

 

Financial impact statement

 

The report also identifies an opportunity to investigate civil works to create parking spaces.  At this stage, this option has not been costed.

 

Conclusion

 

The owners of 19 Dolphin Street have requested the granting of an easement over the public road adjacent to their property to create a private parking space.  This will add considerable value to their property.

 

The Roads Act, 1993 allows for the granting of an easement or short term lease over a public road subject to the meeting of relevant criteria.

 

The assessment concluded that this would create an undesirable precedent involving the creation of private parking spaces on public land.  This precedent creates inequity amongst the community and will have an impact on existing open spaces.

 

On this basis, the request is not supported and it is recommended that the request be refused.

 

The option to create additional parallel parking be investigated to determine the feasibility of the proposal.  Council would need to consult with the community prior to any works, as it will have impacts on the streetscape.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the request for the granting of an easement or lease over public road adjacent to 19 Dolphin Street, Randwick be refused.

 

b)     the feasibility to create additional parallel parking spaces within the landscaped area be investigated and costed.

 

c)     these works be included in future capital works program once the community has been consulted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Additional site photographs

 

 

 

 


Additional site photographs

Attachment 1

 

 


 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 March 2016

 

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Works Report No. W11/16

 

Subject:                  Pesticides Use Notification Plan

Folder No:               F2007/00035

Author:                    George Bounassif, Manager Infrastructure Services      

 

Introduction

 

In accordance with the Pesticides Regulations 2009, Council is required to draft a Pesticides Use Notification Plan and invite comments from the general public. Council received three (3) comments, where one (1) raised a concern regarding the use of Glyphosate (commonly known as Roundup) and its reference in a report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) which questions the safety of the chemical. Council has considered all the feedback and investigated the safe use of Glyphosate.

 

Issues

 

Council is required under the Pesticides Regulations 2009 to draft a Pesticides Use Notification Plan (Attachment 1) and invite comments from the general public prior to being finalised. Council publicly notified the Pesticides Use Notification Plan from 28 August 2015 to 29 September 2015.

 

The notification included advertising in The Southern Courier, Council’s website, Randwick eNews, notification to precincts and an email to 2,600 YourSayRandwick subscribers. Council records show 162 people visited the consultation website, 30 people downloaded the document and 3 people lodged a submission.

 

The submissions included:

 

1.     A request for additional and more visible signage when spraying is carried out in open space areas, particularly Dunningham Reserve.

 

This request has been assessed and additional signage will be installed when spraying open space areas. Larger and brighter signs have been ordered to address the visibility concern of the residents.

 

2.     A general comment was made regarding identifying the chemicals used in the notification plan.

 

The new signs will clearly identify the chemical being used.

 

3.     A concern was raised about the use of Glyphosate with reference to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which questions the safety of Glyphosate.

 

In response to this concern Council engaged an industry expert to investigate the IARC report into the use of Glyphosate. The investigation incorporated an overview of Council’s herbicide and pesticide application procedures, the impact of the application method to staff and the general public, an in depth analysis of the IARC report, the current Australian regulatory body’s (Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority) position on the use of Glyphosate and whether Glyphosate is a safe chemical to use.

 

The report titled “Use of Glyphosate in the City of Randwick” (Attachment 2) was provided to council addressing this brief. The report states that:

 

1.   Randwick City Council applies and follows the essential elements and principles of safe application and work practices, when applying the chemical glyphosate.

2.   Randwick City Council applies all glyphosate application through knapsacks and does not apply this product with vehicle mounted boom sprays.

3.   This method of application (knapsack) significantly reduces the risk factors impact on staff, community members and the environment.

4.   The application via a knapsack significantly reduces the risk of spray drift to non-targeted plants.

5.   Randwick City Council’s area covers approximately thirty-eight (38) square kilometers of area and the total amount of glyphosate used within the Council’s boundaries is negligible.

6.   The alternatives herbicides available as a replacement to the use of glyphosate, (in the author’s opinion) pose a much higher degree of risk to staff, community and the environment.

7.   Glyphosate is the only chemical product within the Australian market that controls such a wide range of broad-spectrum of both broadleaf and grass weeds. When applied within the safety instructions, poses minimal risk to the applicator, community members and the environment.

8.   The Australia regulatory body’s (APVMA) position is that users should always adhere to the product’s label safety directions and this will provide adequate protection for users.

9.   Further training of new employees and up skilling of current staff from time to time, would be beneficial for all parties, to improve knowledge and minimize risk to other community members and the environment.

10. Randwick City Council follows the correct use and application of the chemical glyphosate.

11. The applicators use of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) was observed and correctly use by the staff.

12. The councils have numerous work, health and safety (WHS) procedures that significantly reduce any risk to the wider community. This includes but are not limited to, signage of spraying, time restrictions prior and after spraying, notifications to the public.

13. In general, Glyphosate is a safe chemical to use as long as it is applied correctly in accordance with the product safety directions and instructions.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable City.

Action 6a.2:      Conduct programmed infrastructure and asset maintenance in accordance with the adopted service levels.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of the “Use of Glyphosate in the City of Randwick” report was $9,000. This was funded from the Open Space Operational Budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Pesticides Use Notification Plan has been exhibited and received three (3) comments. All comments were considered and some changes were implemented as a result of the community feedback. An investigation into the safe use of Glyphosate has been undertaken as a result of the community feedback and its use has been considered safe when it is applied correctly in accordance with the product safety directions.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)   the Pesticides Use Notification Plan be adopted.

 

b)   community notification is placed in the Southern Courier in accordance with the requirements of the legislation that a Pesticides Use Notification Plan has been adopted by Randwick City Council.

 

c)   a notice be published in the NSW Government Gazette advising that a Pesticides Use Notification Plan has been prepared in accordance with the relevant legislation.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Pesticides Use Notification Plan

 

2.

Link to the use of Glyphosate in the City of Randwick Report

 

 

 

 


Pesticides Use Notification Plan

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

Original Prepared: December 2006

Prepared by

OTEK Pty Ltd

 

Review: July 2015                                                                   Version 2

Reviewed by

Randwick City Council

 

 

1. Introduction

1.1 Summary of pesticides use by Council   

 

2. Outdoor Public Places Covered by this Plan 

 

3. Indoor Spaces             

 

4. Pesticides Notification Matrix       

 

5. Notification Arrangements           

        5.1 Emergency pesticides application      

        5.2 Sensitive places                        

        5.3 When notification will not be given            

 

6. Information Provided in the Notification

 

7. Record Keeping   

 

 

8. Training                      

 

9. Chemical Use and Container Disposal          

 

10. Future Reviews of the Plan

 

11. Contact Details  

 

12. References

        

 


Pesticides Use Notification Plan

Attachment 1

 

 

1. INTRODUCTION

This Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Pesticides Regulation 1995. This document produces the latest legislative updates and supersedes the previous Pesticides Use Notification Plan dated 11 December 2006. This Plan sets out how Randwick City Council (Council) will notify the community regarding various pesticide applications. The aim of the plan is to set up a frame work for the Council notification process regarding pesticide applications made to outdoor public places that are owned or controlled by Council. The plan allows members of the community to take action to avoid contact with pesticides. Council ensures that pesticides are applied to public places in a safe and responsible manner in accordance with relevant legislation (Pesticide Act 1999 & Pesticides Regulation 2009) to minimising harm to the community or the environment.

The plan also serves as a field resource document for Council staff and contractors that apply pesticides within the Randwick Local Government Area.

In addition, the plan details how the community will be notified of pesticide use by the Council and its representatives in public places. The plan describes the following:

     what public places are covered by the plan;

     who regularly uses these public places and an estimate of the level of use;

     how and when Council will provide the community with information about its pesticide applications in public places (i.e. what notification arrangements will be used);

     how the community can access this plan and get more information about Council’s notification arrangements;

     how future reviews of the plan will be conducted;  and

     contact details for anyone wishing to discuss this plan with Council.

 

1.1 Summary of pesticide use by Council

The majority of pesticide use consists of applying herbicides for weed control and applying insecticides to manage certain insects and pests.  The frequency of programmed applications range from weekly to monthly for bush regeneration areas; 6-8 times per year for sports fields; 2-5 times per year for parks and gardens; and 2-4 times per year for public thoroughfares. Insecticides are used for termite and cockroach control to protect structures and public safety if it is determined to be an effective measure. Other pesticide uses include fungicides, and rodenticides. Further information on Council’s pesticide use can be obtained by visiting the Council website www.randwick.nsw.gov.au

RCC’s internal contacts for pesticides usages are noted below;

For public places and open spaces:

·          Co-ordinator Open Space Services Chris Hunter on (02) 9399 0727;

For Council’s Childcare, Community Centre, Library and other Council building facilities:

·          Co-ordinator of Buildings Services Craig Mullins on (02) 9399 0943.

2. OUTDOOR PUBlic Places covered by this plan

The Council proposes to use, or allow the use of pesticides in the following categories of outdoor public places within  the Randwick Local Government Area (LGA):

·          parks and public gardens;

·          playgrounds;

·          bushland reserves;

·          sand dunes;

·          picnic areas;

·          sporting fields and ovals;

·          road verges and reserves;

·          laneways and pathways;

·          easements accessible to the public; and

·          drains.

3. INDOOR Spaces

This plan will also provide information on how notification will be provided, when pesticides are used in the following Council buildings:

·          Council Chambers;

·          libraries;

·          community halls/centres; and

·          childcare facilities.

4. PESTICIDE notification matrix

The Pesticide Notification Matrix (Table 1) outlines the analysis pathway that determines what type of notification will be given to the community about pesticide use in Council controlled public places. This basic risk analysis was dependent on the identified public places, community user groups, an estimate of public space use, the type of pesticide used and its application.

Where the pesticide application is proposed to be used will influence the type of notice given. The type of public place will determine what type of interaction the public is having with the environment. Public places where  individuals are more likely to expose themselves to pesticides will have more comprehensive notice arrangements than a public place where public interaction will bring them into little or no contact with pesticides.

The frequency with which the community uses a public space directly affects the level of exposure the community has to pesticides. Public places which are frequented more often by large numbers of people will expose a high number of people to pesticides and will thus have more comprehensive notice arrangements compared to public places that do not.

Integral to the decision on the type of notification to be given is the distinction between the following:

·          spot pesticide application by which the Council undertakes pesticide application by hand or by a hand-held applicator;  and

·          broad scale pesticide application by which the Council undertake the pesticide application from a moving vehicle or an irrigation / watering system.

The above considerations are presented in Table 1 to demonstrate that the Council has considered the likely risks of pesticide exposure to the community in Randwick City.

 


Pesticides Use Notification Plan

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

table 1: pesticide notification matrix

 

Public places

 

Regular user groups

 

Level of use of public place

 

Type of pesticide use

e.g. Spot/Broad scale herbicides or insecticides

 

Notification Arrangements

 

Public gardens, parks and beachside parks

 

 

 

· Children and young families

· Seniors

· General recreational users (e.g. joggers, dog-walkers, picnickers)

· School groups

· Pets

· Casual hirers for special events

Very High (frequent use by multiple users, with short to medium length stays)

· Spot  spray /injection of herbicides, fungicides or insecticide

 

· Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides

 

 

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

table 1: pesticide notification matrix – (Cont’d)

Public places

 

Regular user groups

 

Level of use of public place

 

Type of pesticide use

e.g. Spot/Broad scale herbicides or insecticides

 

Notification Arrangements

 

Bushland reserves

(including sand dunes and beachside reserves)

· Children and young families

· Seniors

· General recreational users (e.g. joggers, dog-walkers, picnickers)

· Beach goers

· School groups

· Pets

Bush care and bush regeneration groups

Medium to Very High in summer (used by multiple users, with short to medium length stays)

· Spot spray /injection of herbicides, fungicides or insecticides

 

· Broad scale selective herbicides

 

· Rodenticide baits

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Picnic areas

 

 

 

· Children and young families

· Social / recreation groups (e.g. religious or sporting clubs)

· Seniors

· School groups

· Pets

High (particular on weekends, public holidays and school holidays)

· Spot spray /injection of selective herbicides

 

· Rodenticide baits

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Playgrounds

 

 

 

· Children and young families

· Seniors

· School groups

· Social / recreation groups (e.g. religious or sporting clubs)

 

 

 

High (particular on weekends, public holidays and school holidays)

· Spot spray /injection of selective herbicides

 

Section 5.3

 

Sporting fields and ovals

 

 

 

 

· Sporting clubs and associations

· School sports groups

· General recreational users (e.g. joggers, dog-walkers)

· Children and young families

· Pets

· Casual hirers for special events

High to medium

· Spot spray /injection of selective herbicides

 

· Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides and insecticides

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Road verges, road reserves,  footpaths and easements accessible to the public (e.g. road)

· Local residents

· People who work in the area

· Joggers and walkers

· Pets

· Children and young families

 

Medium to low (not actively used by community)

· Spot spray /injection of herbicides

 

· Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Laneways, pathways and drains

 

· Local residents

· People who work in the area

· Joggers and walkers

· Children and young families

· Pets

Medium

 

· Spot spray /injection of herbicides

 

· Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Council Nursery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·    Local Residents

·    Building occupiers / workers

·    General public

·    Families

·    Seniors

 

 

High use for Building occupiers/workers,

controlled use for the general public.

·    Spot herbicides, insecticides and fungicides

·    Snail baits

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Interiors of public buildings the Council owns or has control over

· Building occupiers / workers

· Children

· Families

· School Groups

· Seniors

Casual hirers for special events

Very High

Controlled Use

· Fumigation Insecticide

· Spot insecticide and bait insecticide

· Rodenticides and bait bird control

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Swimming pool buildings and grounds

· Building occupiers / workers (e.g. council chambers)

· Children

· Families

· School Groups

· Seniors

 

Very High in summer

Low in winter

Controlled Use

 

· Fumigation Insecticide

· Spot insecticide and bait insecticide

· Rodenticides ait

· Spot herbicides or fungicides

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2


Pesticides Use Notification Plan

Attachment 1

 

 

5. NOTIFICATION arrangements

This section describes how and when Council will provide notification of pesticide use in public places, including special measures for sensitive places, arrangements for emergency pesticide applications and circumstances where notification will not be given. This section details further considerations regarding pesticide application and provides what type of notification is to be given (Table 2).  In Table 2 public places with the same notification arrangements are merged together to reduce repetition.

Table 2 will also serve Council staff and Council appointed sub-contractors with a usable document when applying pesticides within the Council LGA.

It must be noted that if a pesticide label states a timeframe of safe re-entry into a pesticide application area longer than what has been outlined in Table 2, then the notification arrangements should be changed accordingly.

5.1 Emergency pesticide application

Cases where emergency pesticide applications are required include:

·                      nuisance biting insects;

·                      dangerous/venomous  insects;

·                      rodents (that pose an immediate health hazard); or

·                      aesthetic / maintenance pests, which are destroying sporting fields, council gardens or council timber infrastructure.

5.2 Sensitive Places

Clause 18 of the Pesticides Regulation 2009, defines a sensitive place to be any of the following:

·                      school or preschool, kindergarten, childcare centre;

·                      hospital, community health centre or nursing home; and

·                      a place declared to be a sensitive place by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) .

If any pesticide application is to occur in a Council controlled area that is in or adjacent to any of the above listed places then the notification arrangements for Sensitive Places (Table 2) is to be implemented.

5.3 When notification will not be given

Notification will not be given by the Council, appointed contractors or approved volunteer groups for following:

·                      minor controls for indoor and outdoor insects and pests using domestic (e.g. from a local supermarket) baits or aerosol spray cans;

·          minor spot weed control measures using domestic herbicides that includes hand held spray bottles with 10 Litres or less of ‘ready to use’ product;

·          cut-and-paint or stem injection techniques for:

o      removal of pest trees;

o      trees at risk of falling; or

o      tree branches that need to be removed as  they pose a risk to people and/or property.

·          A public place in which persons or organisations hold an existing lease of Council land. For these places, Council will not provide notification of pesticide use, but it will request the lessee to carry out notification of the lessee pesticide use in a manner consistent with this plan. Where possible, Council will require the lessees to comply with this plan as a condition of their lease.

·          Maintenance herbicide use by residents that apply herbicide on Council footpaths / verge areas in front of their properties.

 


Pesticides Use Notification Plan

Attachment 1

 

 

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGEMENTS

 

Public Places

 Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Public Gardens, Parks and Beachside Parks

 

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 48 hours prior for broad scale application event.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48 hours for broad scale application.

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

·    Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council co-ordinator open space services (refer Section 11).

·      If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

·      The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

 

Picnic Area and Playgrounds

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

 

·    Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council co-ordinator open space services (refer Section 11).

·      If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

·      The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGEMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

 Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Sports Fields and Oval

·      Install a Pesticide Use Notification sign with the details prescribed in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48 hours after application.

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

·    Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council co-ordinator open space services (refer Section 11).

·      Sport teams / Schools can register with the council contact to be added to the mailing list

·      If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

·      The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

Bushland Reserves including Sand Dune Reserves

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usage area 24 hours prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 24 hours after application.

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

 

·      Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council co-ordinator open space services (refer Section 11).

·      If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

·      The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGEMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

 Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Road Verges,

Road Reserves,

Footpaths, and

Accessible Easements / Drains

Onsite Notification will not be given

 

·      Advertise map of planned usages area monthly in the local Newspaper with details on Council’s website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/

·      If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

Council Nursery

·      Install a permanent Pesticide Use Notification sign with the details prescribed in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan. The sign will also have changeable dates that will detail a week in advance the pesticide use in the public placed. The sign will also detail the previous week pesticide use.

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

·      Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council co-ordinator open space services (refer Section 11).

·      Put Pesticide Use notification sign on staff notice board at the time of application and to remain for 24 hours afterwards.

 

Interiors of Public Buildings.

(library, Council Building etc)

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 24 hours prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48 hours after application.

·        Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council co-ordinator open space services (refer Section 11).

·      Details for scheduled pesticide will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

·      Put Pesticide Use notification sign on staff notice board at the time of application and to remain for 24 hours afterwards.

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGEMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Swimming Pool and Building Grounds

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

·    Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council co-ordinator open space services (refer Section 11).

·      Place Pesticide Use notification sign on staff notice board 24 hours before any pesticide application and to remain for 24 hours afterwards.

 

 

 

Any of the above Locations adjacent to a Sensitive Place

School or Preschool

Kindergarten

Childcare Centre

Hospital

Community Health Centre

Nursing Home

Place declared to be sensitive by DEC.

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, in the immediate vicinity of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

 

·      The above on site notification will not be applicable for footpath.

·      Contact the controller or occupier of sensitive places by telephone, email or a posted letter. The controller / occupier will be instructed of the nature of the pesticide application and all information detailed in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan at least 72 hours prior to pesticide application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGEMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Emergency Application Area in Public Places EXCEPT Sensitive Places

 

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, in the immediate vicinity of the proposed usages area 1 hour prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48hours after application.

 

·      NONE

Emergency Application Area in Public Places adjacent to Sensitive Places

School or Preschool

Kindergarten

Childcare Centre

Hospital

Community Health centre

Nursing Home

Place declared to be sensitive by DEC.

·      Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan, in the immediate vicinity of the proposed usages area 2 hours prior to any pesticide application.

·      Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

·      Contact the controller or occupier of sensitive places by telephone or a council officer visiting the premises. The control / occupier will be instructed of the nature of the pesticide application and all information detailed in Section 6 of the Pesticide Notification Plan. 

 


Pesticides Use Notification Plan

Attachment 1

 

 

6. INFORMATION Provided in the notification

In accordance with clause 20(h) of the Pesticide Regulation (2009), notices of pesticide use must include all the following information:

·        the full product name of the pesticide to be used;

·        the purpose of the use;

·        the proposed dates of use;

·        the place of use;

·        a contact telephone number or email address of the  Council officer of the public authority whom the affected persons can contact to discuss the notice;

·        any warnings regarding limitations on the subsequent use of or entry into the land;

7. RECORD Keeping

Any individual using pesticide applications must complete and save the Pesticides Usages Recording Sheets in TRIM Folder Environmental Management Reporting F2007/00035.

 

8. Training

The pesticides users must have current training qualification, such as ChemCert, SmartTrain and Formcare. The qualification lasts for 5 years and must be renewed before it lapses.

 

9. CHEMICAL Use and Container Disposal

The pesticides users must use APVMA approved products. Any products that are unlabelled or not registered should be disposed of through the ChemClear Program or Council’s Depot weekly chemical disposal program. Products containing Atrazine cannot be used in any turf applications.

 

Container Disposal Procedures;

·      Rinse empty containers 3 times with water;

·      Cut a hole in the empty container;

·      Crush it; and

·      Take the containers to the DrumMuster site at Hawkesbury Tip for disposal.

 

10. FUTURE reviews of the plan

Council will review the Pesticide Use Notification Plan every five years. The review will include the following:

·      placing the plan on public exhibition with any proposed changes and calling for public submissions; and

·      making recommendations for alterations if appropriate to the plan from the public submissions.

Once the review has been finalised, Council will undertake the following:

·      place a notice in The Southern Courier that a Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been reviewed and a copy of the plan can be viewed by visiting the Council website www.randwick.nsw.gov.au or calling Council call centre on 1300 722 542.

11. CONTACT details

Anyone wishing to contact Council to discuss the notification plan or to obtain details of pesticide applications in public places should contact Council Call Centre on 1300 722 542 or e-mail council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

Council’s internal contacts for pesticides usages are noted below;

For public places and open spaces:

·      Co-ordinator Open Space Services Chris Hunter on (02) 9399 0727;

For Council’s Childcare, Community Centre, Library and other Council building facilities:

·      Co-ordinator of Buildings Services Craig Mullins on (02) 9399 0943.

12. REFERENCES

Australian/New Zealand Standard 4360:2004 Risk Management, Standard Australia.

NSW Government Amended Pesticide (1995) Regulation.

NSW Government Pesticide Act (1999).

NSW Government Pesticide Regulation 2009.

NSW Department of Environment and Conservation, Environmental Protection Authority Website: (accessed 08/07/15). http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/pesticides/