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Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

Tuesday 10 November 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick on Tuesday, 10 November 2015 at 6:00pm

 

Committee Members:         The Mayor D’Souza, Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, Garcia, Matson, Moore (Deputy Chairperson), Nash, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos & Stevenson (Chairperson)

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:   At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 8 September 2015

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W30/15    Mahon Pool Amenities - Results of Public Consultation and Proposed New Building......................................................... 1

W31/15    Sports Committee Minutes.................................................. 55

W32/15    Pedestrian and cyclists safety in and around Pioneer Park, Matraville.......................................................................... 75

W33/15    Randwick City Swim Club................................................... 77

W34/15    Works Zone Policy.............................................................. 87

W35/15    Marjorie Crescent, Maroubra - Resident petition for proposed footpath construction.......................................................... 93

W36/15    Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ) and Alcohol Prohibited Zones (APZ) in the City of Randwick......................................................... 103

W37/15    High Cross Park, Randwick - Cook Pine............................... 119

W38/15    Tram Lane, Randwick - Acquisition of Lot 8 of DP 2556....... 143

W39/15    Bicycle Route Planning...................................................... 147    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W30/15

 

 

Subject:                  Mahon Pool Amenities - Results of Public Consultation and Proposed New Building

Folder No:               PROJ/10674/2013/4

Author:                    Sarah  Harmston, Buildings for our Community Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

As part of Randwick City Council’s Buildings for our Community program, a new building is planned to replace the existing amenities facilities servicing Mahon Pool. 

 

Mahon Pool was established in 1932, and has been greatly enjoyed by the local community since that time.  It enjoys a spectacular location on the ocean rock shelf of north Maroubra and is currently serviced by facilities located on the headland above in Jack Vanny Reserve.

 

This report outlines the community consultation activities and outcomes for the proposed new amenities building at Mahon Pool.  The proposal may be undertaken under State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007 as “development permitted without consent”, and does not require Development Approval.

 

Background

 

Existing Buildings

The existing structures on the Jack Vanny Reserve site consist of three buildings:

 

·       a male toilet block (built circa 1950s)

·       a female toilet block (built circa 1950s)

·       a larger building located to the east housing change rooms, winter swim club facilities, and RCC storage (built circa 1970, and extended circa 1976)

 

Due to their age and exposed location, the buildings are degraded and in need of replacement. The buildings also do not conform to current building codes or community expectations.

 

Winter Swimming Club

The Maroubra Seals winter swimming club was formed in 1958, and has had a continued association with the site since that time.  They currently have a clubroom with kitchenette and storage to support the club’s activities.  The proposed building includes replacement facilities to support this community group and the club was consulted during the concept design phase of the project.

 

Council resolution

When considering the draft 2014-15 Operational Plan and Budget at the Ordinary Council meeting of 29 April 2014, Council resolved to proceed with the planning and construction of new amenities for Mahon Pool.  This project would otherwise have been deferred as funds were not allocated in the draft 2014-15 budget submitted for consideration of Council. Refer to Attachment 1 for a timeline of Council resolutions regarding the site and café.

 

The resolution of the 29 April 2014 Ordinary Council meeting reads:

 

“Council proceed with the Mahon Pool toilet block and change room facilities, without the café, in this budget and that this be funded by the deferral of the Heffron Park Amenities Building.”  (GM12/14 Draft Randwick City Council Operational Plan and Budget 2014-15, Crs Andrews/Seng).

 

It should be noted that a previous scheme developed for the site in 2008 included a café and was the subject of strong community objection.   There are café facilities across the road from the site on Marine Parade, as well as nearby at Maroubra Beach. 

            

Planning approval

Jack Vanny Reserve is a Crown Reserve, managed by NSW Trade & Investment (Crown Lands Division). 

 

Randwick City Council is the appointed Reserve Trust Manager on 17 July 1959 of the Coogee Public Recreation (R81782) Reserve Trust.  Jack Vanny Reserve is managed by this Reserve Trust.  The purpose of the reserve is dedicated for public recreation.

 

Construction of a new amenities building in Jack Vanny Reserve may be undertaken as exempt development under the State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007.  Clause 65(3)(f) states:

 

“Development for any of the following purposes may be carried out by or on behalf of a council without consent on a public reserve under the control of or vested in the council:

(f)    amenity facilities”

 

A Review of Environmental Factors will be prepared for the proposal and lodged with Randwick City Council for consideration.  A Development Application for the proposal is not required.

 

Concept Plan Development

 

Site Analysis

A site analysis of Jack Vanny Reserve was undertaken to develop concept plans for a new building.  Site analysis information is found in Attachment 2.

 

As part of this analysis, the following elements were considered:

 

·      primary views within and to the site

·      existing vegetation

·      prevailing winds

·      cliff edge and overall site topography

·      localized contours

·      formal and informal pedestrian links to and within the site

·      existing services

·      wheelchair accessibility

 

A preferred site area was identified on the southern edge of Jack Vanny Memorial Park, with strengths of this site being:

 

·      ideal proximity to main carpark

·      best opportunity to maintain and improve primary views to the site

·      improvements to coastline views along the park and to Malabar Headland

·      ideal proximity to the main pedestrian circulation paths

·      ideal N-E aspect with some protection from the undesirable prevailing winds

·      services are already established in this area

·      minimal impact on the main natural features of the site

A number of layout configurations within the general siting area were then explored further for suitability, including basic block modeling of the building within the topography.  The pros and cons of each site were considered in selection of the final location.

 

Preferred site area

The final siting of the building was chosen for:

 

·      minimal impact on view corridors

·      ability to set the building back to achieve good integration into the landscape without disturbing the natural rock formation

·      ability to achieve wheelchair access from carpark and coastal walkway

·      proximity to existing water, power and sewer connections

·      linear form of the building to minimise its bulk

·      setback from the cliff to allow restoration of the rock platform, better public safety and flat gathering area for club activities and general visitors to the site

·      appropriate proximity to Mahon Pool to support this community facility

·      preservation of existing trees and vegetation.

 

Concept Plans

Concept plans were developed for a building at the site to replace the existing facilities.  The design featured:

 

·      male toilets and change rooms (2 pans, 2 urinals, 3 showers)

·      female toilets and change rooms (5 pans, 3 showers)

·      shared external washbasin area

·      an accessible toilet, shower and baby change facility

·      Winter Swimming Club facilities and storage

·      cleaners’ storage.

 

Concept plans exhibited for the proposal are appended to this report (Attachment 3).

 

Consultation Plan

 

Consultation Activities

A Consultation Plan was developed for the proposal, and the public consultation process commenced on March 9 2015.  The consultation was for a period of 23 days, closing on March 31 2015. 

 

The public consultation period included the following activities:

 

·      Flyer with details of proposal and link to website information distributed to approximately 2000 properties in Maroubra on March 9 (see Attachment 4 for distribution map and flyer);

·      Your Say website with details of proposal, and opportunity to post a question or comment, published March 9 and closed March 31 (Attachment 5);

·      On site information session with three Buildings for our Community officers and the project architect to discuss the proposal with interested residents on March 17;

·      On site signage on the existing buildings, adjacent to the carpark and on Marine Parade with details of the proposal and advertising an information session for the proposal;

·      eNews feature story with link to survey on March 11 (receiving 152 link clicks), and March 25 (receiving 207 link clicks);

·      Notification to Maroubra Precinct and Winter Swimming Club by email of upcoming consultation;

·      Email notification of consultation to parties who had previously contacted Council regarding the proposal;

·      Meeting with Winter Swimming Club on March 3;

·      Meeting with Maroubra Precinct Committee on March 23;

·      Facebook posting on March 11 (2,486 reached, 78 likes, 10 comments, 4 shares, 233 post clicks with 62 link clicks);

·      Flyers in Bowen Library; and

·      Phone and email enquiries regarding the proposal.

 

Submissions received

 

Aside from the social media activities (eNews and Facebook), approximately 886 people engaged in the consultation process in some way, being:

 

·      828 visitors to the website;

·      12 direct emails or phone calls to Council staff regarding the project;

·      4 representatives at the Winter Swimming Club briefing;

·      17 Maroubra Precinct meeting attendees; and

·      Approximately 20-25 people attended the on-site information session.

 

Some members of the community participated in several avenues of consultation, for example by attending both the Precinct Meeting and On Site Information session as well as posting a comment or question on the Your Say website.

 

Your Say website

A total number of 828 unique visitors viewed the Your Say website with information about the Mahon Pool proposal.

Of these website visitors:

 

·      828 were aware of the proposal, visiting the site but not undertaking any further activity (such as clicking through to the attachments, making a comment or asking a question);

·      Of those 828, 693 people were informed about the proposal, viewing additional information on one or more sections of the site; and

·      Of those 828, there were 39 people who engaged with the proposal by making a comment or asking a question. 

 

The themes raised most by the Your Say participants were:

 

1.    Support for a café (9 submissions)

2.    Opposition to including a café (8 submissions)

3.    Request for use of sympathetic and/or sustainable materials (6 submissions)

4.    Requests for BBQ facilities (6 submissions)

5.    Support for building into the hillside or reducing the prominence of the building (4 submissions)

 

It should be noted that less than 5% of those who viewed the proposal on the Your Say website made a submission.  A full record of the questions and responses may be found in Attachment 6. 

 

Direct email or phone comments

Twelve people contacted the Buildings for our Community team directly about the proposal.  These enquiries and comments were generally in line with those made on the Your Say website and are summarized in Attachment 7.

 

Precinct Meeting

Buildings for our Community staff presented the proposal to the Maroubra Beach Precinct meeting on March 23, 2015 to the 17 attendees.  Discussion on the night focused mainly on the location of the building, support for and opposition to a café and the desire for additional options to be presented.

The resolution from this meeting regarding the Mahon Pool amenities proposal was:

 

“The precinct would like to see more options for the location and design of the building and the comments made on the night being taken into consideration. (Burgess/Hamer:  For – 7, Against – 1, Abstain – 2)”

 

In addition, the Maroubra Beach Precinct resolved at its meeting on May 25, 2015:

 

“We request that before the Mahon Pool amenities block upgrade is approved it comes back to the precinct. We note that the Council will be revising its plans for the upgrade of the amenities at Mahon Pool and we would request that the precinct committee and the community be consulted before any final decision is made. (Burgess/Hogg)”

 

Minutes from these meetings appear in Attachment 8.

 

Consultation outcome

The proposal for the Mahon Pool amenities building has been amended in response to community feedback during the consultation period.

 

Ideas received through public comment were incorporated where appropriate and feasible.  Due to the high degree of comment centering on the relationship of the building with its context, a Landscape Architect was engaged to reassess the siting of the building and develop the design to be further embedded within the site.

 

Key changes to the building include:

 

·      extensive screen planting to the side and rear of the proposed building

·      floor level and pathways amended to provide better connection with Coastal Walkway

·      materials, colours and textures developed to respond to the sandstone cliff setting

·      incorporation of external seating areas, and sitting edge to forecourt

·      provision of external showers and bike racks

·      provision of a windbreak

·      internal planning changes to remove the open change area arrangement

 

The developed design proposal is found in Attachment 9, with comparative existing and proposed views of the facility shown in Attachments 10-13.

 

Themes

The issues raised in association with the proposal via all avenues (website, direct emails and phone calls, Facebook, on site information session, Winter Swim Club discussion and Maroubra Precinct meeting) are summarized below.

 

No

Issue

Proposal modified/ Feature included

Comments

REQUESTS FOR ADDITIONAL FACILITIES

1. 

Café

 

No

A café has not been included in the proposal in response to the GM12/14 resolution of April 29 2014.

 

Opinions were strongly expressed on both sides of the debate.

 

Note that the café located across the road at 94 Marine Parade Maroubra has now reopened offering this amenity close to the site.

2. 

Provide external showers

Yes

Two external showers are included on the walkway between the pool and new building.

3. 

Include BBQs and sitting shelters

No

These facilities are available at alternative locations along our coastline.

 

The natural headland character of Jack Vanny Reserve is to be preserved.

4. 

Include gym facilities

No

Following community consultation in 2012, Council decided not to have gym facilities in this area.  An outdoor gym was provided at Maroubra Beach instead.

 

The natural headland character of Jack Vanny Reserve is to be preserved.

5. 

Include bike racks

Yes

Bike racks will be provided adjacent to the carpark.

6. 

Provision of family change rooms

Yes

The accessible bathroom includes a shower and baby change table and is appropriate for family use.

7. 

Lockers

No

Inclusion of locker facilities will add to the footprint of the building.

8. 

Landscaping or viewing platform on roof

No / Yes

This will increase the height of the building by around 1.6m (600mm depth for planting plus 1000mm handrail height).  This will increase the visual impact of the building in the landscape.  Pebble ballast utilised on roof.

9. 

Additional pool needed

No

Creating an additional pool would have a major impact on the natural rock platform as is not part of scope of current works.

10.

Additional parking

No

The carpark was recently upgraded and additional street parking is readily available in the vicinity.

 

11.

Filtered water station

Yes/No

The existing easy access drinking fountain will be reinstated without the provision of filtered water.

12.

Building too prominent

Yes

 

Landscape design developed to provide extensive screen planting to the rear and side of the building, and to establish new seating areas in the vicinity of the building.

 

Paths amended to maintain the sweep of the coastal walkway.

 

Materials, colours and textures developed to respond to the sandstone cliff setting and reduce the prominence of the building:

·      Precast textured concrete walls;

·      Coloured concrete with abrasive blast finish to new forecourt area;

·      Edge of forecourt area designed to form seating edge, further emphasizing the landscape elements to help the building recede;

·      Use of pebble ballast to the roof to minimize visual impact from above.

13.

Building should be built further into the hillside, or even underground

No

The final siting of the building was chosen for:

·      Minimal impact on view corridors;

·      Ability to set the building back to achieve good integration into the landscape without disturbing the natural rock formation;

·      Ability to achieve wheelchair access from carpark and coastal walkway without the need for ramps with handrails;

·      Proximity to existing water, power and sewer connections;

·      Linear form of the building to minimise its bulk;

·      Setback from the cliff to allow restoration of the rock platform, better public safety and flat gathering area for club activities and general visitors to the site;

·      Convenience to pool, park and carpark; and

·      Preservation of existing trees and vegetation.

 

The design of the building has been developed to ensure that it visually sits within the site through landscaping and materials, without the associated negatives to underground construction, being:

 

·       Access to light and ventilation;

·       Significant earthworks and park regrading to accommodate an underground building;

·       Additional costs associated with excavation and services establishment.

14.

Building should be located further down the slope towards the pool

No

This would have a greater impact on the rock shelf and existing natural features of the site, being a major disturbance to the natural rock formation.

Accessible ramps with handrails provided to the building will be more prominent in the landscape.

15.

Views to Mahon Pool compromised for Winter Swimming Club – should be sited as close to cliff as possible

No

The developed design establishes a sitting edge to the forecourt that will enable views down to the pool below.

 

 

16.

Building sited too far north

No

The buildings are sited away from the cliff edge and arranged in a linear formation for public safety and surveillance.  The natural rock shelf at the cliff edge can be reinstated.

17.

Side wall too prominent and unsympathetic

Yes

Design modified to incorporate landscaping and colour and materials palette sensitive to location.

18.

Impact on popular shaded sitting area behind – views and outlook

Yes

The developed design features:

·      Reoriented paths to maximize the shaded sitting area;

·      New platform seating area;

·      Extensive planting to the rear of the new building to minimize impact on the park behind;

·      Establishment of new seating edge to building forecourt.

19.

Family friendly landscaping / tables

Yes/No

New platform seating areas and new seating edge to forecourt.

20.

Provision of wind protection

Yes

Windbreak seating now incorporated to east edge of forecourt.

21.

BBQ shelter not provided for Winter Swimming Club activities

No

Provision of a permanent shelter will increase the building bulk and scale, and its visual impact in the landscape.

 

22.

Additional or replacement seating

Yes

New platform seating areas, new windbreak seating and new seating edge to forecourt.

 

 

23.

Preservation of existing stone staircases

No

The existing stone staircases do not meet current building codes and will be replaced.

 

Reuse of the sandstone will be investigated in the design development stage of the project.

24.

Safer and more functional apron created

Yes

New forecourt area:

·      Is set back from cliff;

·      Features windbreak and perimeter seating;

·      Achieves equality of access to the building.

COMMENTS RE PUBLIC SAFETY AND FACILITY MISUSE

25.

Visibility of entries

Yes

Entries can be seen from Jack Vanny Reserve.

26.

Concern over toilet and change bench in same area

Yes

Shower cubicles are now included rather than the previous open changing bench arrangement to avoid exposure to changing patrons for those using the toilets only.

27.

Dividing of areas now linked (pool and park)

Yes

Pathway locations developed to re-establish link between park and pool, and to strengthen the coastal walkway.

28.

Public safety and surveillance

Yes

Shared hand washing facilities discourage loitering within the toilet facilities;

Linear design provides better surveillance than existing cluster of buildings;

Shower cubicles now included.

29.

Campervans will be attracted to the area

Yes

The toilets and change rooms will be locked off at night, and the sink will be locked down after hours.

 

Hot water to the showers will only be available during swim club meeting times as per the existing arrangements.

30.

Damage to park from service vehicles

No

Not desirable to establish hardstand vehicle access to the building. 

COMMENTS RE DETAILED DESIGN OR MATERIALS

31.

Inclusion of sustainable fittings

Yes

The following measures will be incorporated into the design:

·      Motion sensor low energy lighting;

·      Water efficient fittings and fixtures;

·      Robust materials with good thermal mass.

32.

Rainwater harvesting

No

Water harvesting not practicable at the site as water tanks will add to the building bulk, or require excavation. Excavation for underground tanks may be cost prohibitive to construct.

 

Council is currently investigating stormwater harvesting opportunities from Broadarrow Reserve to Jack Vanny headland. If successful there is the potential for the toilets to be connected into the harvested stormwater system.

33.

Solar panels

No

Photovoltaic cells not favoured in public parks due to risk of vandalism.  This site is especially vulnerable as the roof sits at a lower level to the carpark, enabling objects to easily be thrown at the panels.

34.

Use of visually sensitive, sustainable or Australian materials

Yes

Building materials have been selected to be visually sensitive to the rock-shelf location, be vandal resistant, and to be suitable in the harsh environment.

RCC uses local suppliers and / or Australian made products where possible, taking price, quality and other relevant considerations into account.

35.

Natural light

Yes

High level windows are provided around the building perimeter with translucent finish for privacy.

36.

Open roof

No

This is not desirable due to privacy issues associated with the change in site levels, and for all-weather use of the facility.

37.

Increased roof for shelter

No

This will increase the building bulk and its visual impact in the landscape.

GENERAL COMMENTS

38.

Ratepayer funding of Winter Swimming Club activities / use of facility only for a few / use of facility only in winter.

No

The facility is to replace the existing winter swim club facility which has been associated with the site since 1958.

 

This community group is open to the public for membership.

 

 

39.

Winter swim club payment towards the facility.

No

Randwick City Council, on behalf of the community, will maintain full ownership of the building and will fund it in its entirety.

40.

Building too large

No

The building is designed to meet current standards, including an accessible bathroom and shower.

41.

Opportunities for public art

No

There is no public art planned in association with the project at this time.

42.

Project budget queries

No

The funding for this project was adopted in the 2014-15 budget as outlined earlier in this report. Additional funding has been allocated in the 2015-16 budget for associated site and landscaping works.

 

43.

Leave the buildings as they are / no buildings required

No

The existing buildings do not meet current standards and are to be replaced.

 

Amenities are required to support the visitors to the park and to Mahon Pool.

44.

Upgrade La Perouse toilets

Yes

La Perouse toilets are included in the 2016-17 Buildings for our Community program.

45.

Requests for alternative design concepts/ project competition

No

The Architects were selected from Randwick City Council’s professional services panel.  This panel was established in 2014 after an open tender process which included an assessment of experience and quality of work.

 

The architects, Lahznimmo Architects, have extensive experience with public amenities buildings in sensitive locations, including five blocks at Centennial Park and the Tamarama Kiosk / Amenities building.

 

For the design development stage of the project, they have teamed up with landscape architects Sue Barnsley Design who have completed many public projects including Prince Alfred Park near Central Station.

 

An extensive site and options analysis was undertaken during the concept stage of the building.

 

Outcome

Jack Vanny Reserve is highly valued by the local community for its natural headland character and for the historic Mahon Pool below.  The new amenities building should reflect the outstanding quality of its context.

 

The comments and feedback received through the process have been assessed against the concept design with improvements made to the scheme as a result.  In particular, the design has been developed to better nestle within its context through close attention to landscaping and material selection.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 3:       An Informed and Engaged Community.

Direction 3c:     The community has increased opportunities to participate in decision making process.

Outcome 4:       Excellence in Urban Design and Development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.        

Outcome 5:       Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities.

Direction 5a:     Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active and passive open space uses.

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:     Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of services.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The Mahon Pool Amenities project has been allocated funding of $1,706,100. This includes $300,000 for associated site works which was approved in the 2015-16 Capital Works budget.

 

The public consultation process was funded through the project budget.


 

Conclusion

 

The existing buildings in Jack Vanny Reserve are outdated and have reached the end of their usable life.  The new structure is an opportunity to provide a public facility of the highest quality to serve visitors to this unique location.

 

Any intervention in Jack Vanny Reserve will be met with debate due to the unique character of its natural headland location, however the final proposal is an appropriate design approach underpinned by robust analysis. 

 

This analysis included:

 

·      primary views to the site from within Jack Vanny Reserve

·      impact on views from neighbouring properties

·      relationship with the existing topography, levels and rock platform

·      location of existing services

·      use of the facilities by varying stakeholders

·      current building code and equal access requirements

·      light and ventilation opportunities to the interior

·      sight lines into the interior

·      impact on existing vegetation

·      public safety and surveillance

·      way finding and legibility

·      prevailing winds

 

The resulting building responds to the complex set of parameters presented by the site.  It restores cliff edge views, preserves established ocean views, and has a harmonious relationship to the existing topography by hugging the existing contours and nestling into the vegetation behind.    The new paths enhance the connection with the Coastal Walkway, and in so doing, establish seating nodes and new gathering spaces in the building forecourt.  Importantly, the design provides equality of access to all members of our community, as well as ease of proximity to both the carpark above and the pool below. 

 

The community consultation process made over 840 people aware of the proposal through a variety of means and gave the opportunity to ask a question or make a comment about the concept.  A total of 51 people, representing 6% of participants, took the opportunity to make a submission in some form, with further numbers represented via the precinct meeting, Winter Swimming Club briefing or site information event.

 

Participants in the consultation process will be notified when this report is to be considered.

 

The comments or suggestions received through the consultation process have been included in this report, and were considered against the original design proposal.  This feedback from the public has led to a number of improvements to the design, most noticeably in “receding” the building into its setting through major landscaping and park regrading, internal adjustments for public comfort, and additional features such as the new seating areas, bike racks and external showers. 

 

The result is a building that is a sensitive addition to the landscape and a suitable replacement for the existing outdated and degraded facilities currently at the site.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the proposal proceed to documentation and construction under State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Timeline of council decisions regarding Mahon Pool amenities

 

2.View

Site Analysis

 

3.View

Public Exhibition material Your Say Randwick

 

4.View

Public Exhibition flyer and distribution area

 

5.View

Your Say Randwick website page

 

6.View

Your Say comments and responses

 

7.View

Phone and email comments

 

8.View

Maroubra Beach Precinct Committee - Minutes

 

9.View

Developed design

 

10.View

View 1 - Existing facility

 

11.View

View 1 - Proposed facility

 

12.View

View 2 - Existing facility

 

13.View

View 2 - Proposed facility

 

 

 

 


Timeline of council decisions regarding Mahon Pool amenities

Attachment 1

 

 

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Site Analysis

Attachment 2

 

 

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Public Exhibition material Your Say Randwick

Attachment 3

 

 

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Public Exhibition flyer and distribution area

Attachment 4

 

 

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Your Say Randwick website page

Attachment 5

 

 

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Your Say comments and responses

Attachment 6

 

 

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Phone and email comments

Attachment 7

 

 

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Maroubra Beach Precinct Committee - Minutes

Attachment 8

 

 

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Developed design

Attachment 9

 

 


 


 


 


 


View 1 - Existing facility

Attachment 10

 

 


View 1 - Proposed facility

Attachment 11

 

 


View 2 - Existing facility

Attachment 12

 

 


View 2 - Proposed facility

Attachment 13

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Works Report No. W31/15

 

Subject:                  Sports Committee Minutes

Folder No:               F2005/00446

Author:                    George Bounassif, Manager Infrastructure Services      

 

Introduction

 

The Sports Committee Minutes for the meeting held on 19 August 2015 in the Matraville Room, Randwick City Council Depot, 192 Storey Street, Maroubra are presented at the Council Community Committee.

 

Issues

 

As scheduled, the Sports Committee has met and the minutes of the meeting, which reflects discussions and outcomes, are attached.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities.

Direction 5a:     Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active and passive open space uses.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that Council acknowledges and accepts the minutes of the attached Sports Committee.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the minutes of the Sports Committee Meeting held on 18 August 2015 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Randwick City Council Sports Committee Minutes – 19 August 2015

 

 

 

 


Randwick City Council Sports Committee Minutes – 19 August 2015

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W32/15

 

Subject:                  Pedestrian and cyclists safety in and around Pioneer Park, Matraville

Folder No:               F2004/08338

Author:                    Robert Rosadi, Coordinator, Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

Council at its meeting held on 22 September 2015, resolved:

 

“(Belleli/Stavrinos) that, after a spate of near misses and accidents involving cyclists and pedestrians in the vicinity of Pioneer Park Malabar, Council:

 

a)     calls for a report on options available to Council to help reduce the very real danger to cyclists and pedestrians in the vicinity of Pioneer Park, Malabar;

 

b)     such options to include an inspection of the T-Junction at Cromwell Place and Franklin Street to see what can be done to make this danger spot safer, for example a Stop Sign at the corner so both cyclists and motorists will pause before turning left or right as well as other traffic calming devices such as speed bumps; and

 

c)     considers implementing a cycle safely education campaign to encourage both adults and children to obey both road and pathway rules so we can all enjoy the great outdoors together in harmony and without injury.”

 

Issues

 

A review of Council’s crash data shows that there have been no recorded crashes (tow away, injury or worse) at the intersection of Franklin Street and Cromwell Place.  This would suggest that the current intersection arrangement is providing the appropriate level of service for the existing pedestrian, cyclist and general traffic volumes.

 

Notwithstanding this, at the September 2015 meeting of the Traffic Committee a recommendation to change this intersection control from “Give Way” to “Stop” was approved.  This intention of the change in priority was to ensure vehicles and cyclists turning left from Cromwell Place into Franklin Street do not do so at speed.  This improves the safety for pedestrians using the pedestrian crossing to the east of the intersection.

 

Options to provide cycle safety training courses at the purpose built Heffron Park Pedal Park.  It is anticipated that these courses will encompass and address the issue of cyclist and pedestrian education. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport

Direction 9a:     A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycle ways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities

 

 


 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The available crash data for the intersection of Franklin Street and Cromwell Place suggests that the intersection is performing well from a safety perspective.  The change of intersection priority to a “Stop” control will serve to further improve the safety performance of the intersection. 

 

Planning is also underway to provide cycle safety and awareness training, which will include addressing the issue of pedestrian and cyclist courtesy on shared paths.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W33/15

 

Subject:                  Randwick City Swim Club

Folder No:               F2006/00408

Author:                    Reece Heddle, Manager Aquatic Services      

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Ordinary Council Meeting held on the 28 July 2015, Council resolved to form a new Swim Club affiliated with NSW Swimming.

 

Background

 

To gain affiliated with Swimming NSW, Des Renford Leisure Centre (DRLC) need to provide Swimming NSW with the Club Rules which are broadly aligned to the Swimming NSW constitution.

 

Issues

 

The Randwick City Swim Club rules (Attachment 1) have been designed to ensure that Club members have input into the direction and operation of the new Club.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities

Direction 5b:     A range of cultural, sporting and leisure activities

Key Action:       Recognise and promote opportunities for residents and visitors to engage in sports and other cultural pursuits.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no financial impact.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick City Swim Club needs to achieve affiliation with Swimming NSW so that members can participate in Swimming NSW and Swimming Australia events. The Randwick City Swim Club rules have been designed to ensure members involvement within the club whilst ensuring Randwick City Council maintains input. The Rules of the Randwick City Swim Club are broadly aligned to Swimming NSW’s constitution and will ensure affiliation is achieved. 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Randwick City Swim Club Rules be adopted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Randwick City Swim Club Internal Rules

 

 

 

 


Randwick City Swim Club Internal Rules

Attachment 1

 

 

Randwick City Swim Club Internal Rules

 

1        CLUB NAME

The name of the Club shall be the Randwick City Swim Club, hereafter referred to as the “Club”.

2        OBJECTIVES

The Club has been established with the following objectives:

(1)        To enhance the profile of the Des Renford Leisure Centre (DRLC) and the surrounding communities through strong and credible swimming programs that aspire to the highest level of competition;

(2)        To provide a swimming pathway that encourages participation, high performance and teamwork while promoting health, wellbeing and physical development in an inclusive Club community, celebrating sporting success;

(3)        To provide a program that values and promotes Integrity, Individual needs in a Team environment, Accountability, Respect and Excellence throughout every aspect of the organisation;

(4)        To produce a long term “family” of progressing swimmers/athletes receiving the benefits of lifelong health, productive work habits, character growth, social growth and successful academic and athletic performance.

(5)        To support performance at representative swimming events including state, national and international competitions;

(6)        To support the DRLC squad and ‘Learn to Swim’ program with Club nights and Events that partner with the seasonal coaching cycle.

(7)        To encourage teamwork, sportsmanship and camaraderie among Club members including participants, parents, Club Board and DRLC Management.

(8)        To teach, train and inspire individual swimmers to achieve their highest possible success in swimming within a team environment.

(9)        To respect the rich tradition and history of the competitive swimming community in the Randwick City Local Government Area.

3        CLUB MEMBERSHIP

3.1       Eligibility

Membership of the Club is open to all DRLC squad and ‘Learn to Swim’ participants, parents of participants and community members who accept the objectives and internal rules of the Club.Membership is available to:

(1)        families and partners of members;

(2)        such other persons as the Club Board may allow upon written application.

(3)        DRLC staff as determined to be appropriate by the Council appointed Manager responsible for the operation of DRLC.

A person eligible for membership becomes a member of the Club upon registration, and upon having paid all applicable fees and charges.

Membership will expire on 30 September of each year.

3.2       Termination of Membership

A member of the Club will cease to be a member on:

(1)        The expiration of the membership term, unless the membership is renewed;

(2)        Failure to pay membership fees and costs;

(3)        The Council Manager responsible for the operation of DRLC, giving the member notice of termination of membership on the grounds that the member has acted in a way which is detrimental to the Club, DRLC and/or Randwick City Council. The Council Manager responsible for the operation of DRLC, will not make a decision to terminate a person’s membership without giving the member the opportunity to give reasons why the membership should not be terminated; or

(4)        The Secretary receiving a written resignation from the member. 

No membership fees or charges will be reimbursed on termination of membership.

4        EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Randwick City Council is the owner of the Des Renford Leisure Centre.

The Randwick City Swim Club Executive Committee (Committee) has been established as a committee of Council for the purpose of managing the affairs of the Club in accordance with these Rules, Council’s adopted policies and guidelines and accepted recommendations from the Club Board (established in accordance with clause 6).

The Committee will consist of the following parties:

(1)        The DRLC Manager appointed by Council.

(2)        The DRLC Head Swim Coach responsible for the ‘Squad Program’ and appointed by Council.

(3)        The President of the CB as nominated and appointed pursuant to clauses 6.6 and 6.7.

It is not essential that the members of the Committee are members of the Club.

The term of office for the Committee will be the same as the current Council.

Committee members are required to adhere to Council’s Code of Conduct.

5        EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Committee meetings shall be held on a monthly basis and at other times as business may necessitate and shall be called by the President of the Club Board or the Council Manager responsible for the operation of DRLC.

Two (2) members shall form a quorum at such meetings.

6        RANDWICK SWIM CLUB MEMBERSHIP BOARD

The Club Board is established as an advisory committee to the Management of Council’s Des Renford Leisure Centre.

Maroubra Swim Club , Bayside Swim Club and all other Swim Club members are eligible to become members.

Club Members are eligible to become members of the Randwick Swim Club Club Board (CB).

The function of the Club Board will be to meet and make recommendations on behalf of Club Members to the Committee in relation to the affairs and objectives of the Club.

The Committee is not obliged to accept or act upon these recommendations.

6.1       Appointment to the Club Board

The Club Board is to be comprised of members who are elected from financial members of the Club at each Annual General Meeting (AGM) for a term which commences at the conclusion of the AGM and ends on the conclusion of the following AGM.

       All financial members of the Club are entitled to be appointed to the Club Board in accordance with these internal rules however, eligible members must be:

(1)        a squad participant over the age of 18 years, or;

(2)        a parent or caregiver of an active DRLC squad or ‘Learn to Swim’ participant.

No particular qualifications are necessary for appointment to the Club Board, however a demonstrable commitment to the Club, its activities and a willingness to be actively involved in Club issues is essential.

6.2       Club Board Membership

Club Board membership will number not less than four (4) and not more than twelve (12) Club members as appointed by the Committee, including office bearers.

The Club Board may form sub panels from Club membership for specific purposes to further the objectives of the Club.

6.3       Dissolution of the Club Board

The Committee may by resolution dissolve the Club Board at any time.

6.4       Vacation of Office

If a member of the Club Board ceases to be a member of the Club, or in the case of a parent or caregiver, their child or charge ceases to be a member of the Club, that person will cease to be a member of the Club Board and there will be a casual vacancy on the Club Board.

In addition, the office of a member on the Club Board will become vacant in any one of the following circumstances:

(1)        death of the member;

(2)        if the member becomes bankrupt, applies to take the benefit of any law for the relei of bankrupt or insolvent debtors;if the member becomes mentally incapacitated;

(3)        if the member resigns their membership by notice in writing to the Secretary;

(4)        if the member is absent for more than three (3) consecutive meetings without leave of the Club Board;

(5)        while serving a sentence, (whether or not by way of periodic detention) for a felony or other offence, except a sentence imposed for a failure to pay a fine;

(6)        the Committee resolves to remove the member from the Club Board;

(7)        If a member fails to disclose a pecuniary interst in a matter with which the Club Board is concerned and takes part in the consideration, discussion or votes on a question relating to the matter; or

(8)        If the member fails to comply with Council’s Code of Conduct.

A Club Board member may be removed by a resolution of the Committee at any time.

6.5       Procedure for obtaining new membership

When a position on the Club Board becomes vacant or the Committee determines the Club Board requires further members, the Club Board may:

(1)        for an urgent appointment put a recommendation to the Committee for the appointment of a known interested Club member and the reason for the urgent appointment;

(2)        request the Committee advertise to all Club members of the vacancy on the Club Board.

6.6       Office Bearers

The Club Board will at its first meeting and thereafter at each AGM elect its Club Board members, including its office bearers (except for the office of Secretary/Treasurer – see clause 6.8).

Office Bearers do not have a greater decision making powers than other Club Board members, other than the President, who has a casting vote in the event of a tied vote.

Office Bearers on the Club Board are:

(1)        President/Chairperson;

(2)        Vice President; and

(3)        Secretary/Treasurer.

Role of the President (also known as the Chairperson)

(1)        Oversee and coordinate the activities and administration of the Club Board and other Club functions as agreed or approved by the Committee.

(2)        Act as chairperson at all Club Board meetings.

(3)        Make recommendations to the Committee on behalf of the Club Board.

(4)        Represent the Club Board as a member of the Committee.

(5)        Represent the Club at official functions and meetings.

 

Role of Vice President (also known as Secretary):

(1)        Assist the President in any duties as required.

(2)        Act on behalf of the President where the President is unavailable.

(3)        Be responsible for Club publications, equipment inventory list and Club apparel.

(4)        Assist DRLC staff in maintaining a RCSC presence on the DRLC website.

 

Role of Secretary/ Treasurer:

(1)        Keep an updated list of Club members.

(2)        Deal with correspondence to and from the Club.

(3)        Issue the Agenda with instructions from the Chairperson.

(4)        Take and distribute meeting minutes.

(5)        Ensure there is a flow of information to and from the Committee.

(6)        Ensure that official files and records are kept and maintained.

(7)        Recording of income and expenditure of the Club.

(8)        Submit financial records of the Club to the Committee and/or DRLC for auditing and GST purposes (if required).

(9)        Prepare a budget and liaise with the Club Board and Committee in regards to expenses for the Club.

(10)      Ensure invoices are organised for approval by the Committee.

(11)      Present a financial report at the AGM and at other Club meetings as requested by the Club Board or Committee.

 

Club Board Members:

(1)        Assist the President and Vice President in any duties required.

(2)        Provide input and recommendations on the management of the Club.

(3)        Oversee, organise and enforce Club Members involvement in Club activities and events in line with the agreed ‘minimum expectations’ of member’s policy.

6.7       Procedures for Election

Nominations will be accepted in writing for positions on the Club Board (with the exception of the Secretary/Treasurer – see clause 6.8) by email to the Secretary and which are to duly seconded, and signed by the nominee to the Secretary prior to the AGM, all of whom are to be financial members of the Club.

A list of nominations for each position will be emailed to all members and posted on the DRLC website six (6) days before the AGM.

If the Secretary has not received a written nomination for a position on the Club Board, a nomination may be made by a member verbally from the floor at the AGM, subject to the written consent of the person nominated.

If two or more persons are nominated for a single position a vote must be taken.  Persons nominated for election are entitled to vote for themselves.  If a tied ballot occurs, the name of each candidate is written on a separate, identical piece of paper, and drawn ‘from the hat’ by the Returning Officer (or an impartial observer).  The first name drawn is elected to the office.

A list of elected office bearers must be recorded together with the names of nominators and seconders. 

Minutes of the AGM must be sent to the Committee for approval within five (5) working days.

6.8       Appointment of Secretary/Treasurer

The position of Secretary/Treasurer on the Club Board will be an appointment by the Council Manager responsible for the operation of DRLC.

7        MEETINGS

7.1       Annual General Meetings

Annual General Meetings of the Club shall be held in September at a time and place to be determined by the Club Board.

Notice of the AGM time, date and location shall be sent to all members no less than twenty-eight (28) days from the scheduled date.

7.2       Club Board Meetings

Club Board meetings shall be held monthly and at other times as business may necessitate and shall be called by the Secretary.

At least two (2)days’ notice is required on the time, place and objective of a meeting.

8        MEETING PROCEDURES

All meetings of the Club are to be conducted to standard Council guidelines and policies and include as a minimum requirement that:

(1)        a quorum be present.

(2)        appropriate notice of the meeting is given.

(3)        business on the agenda is properly conducted.

(4)        correspondence and minutes are recorded.

8.2       Quorum

For Annual General Meetings, the lesser of ten (10) members or half the membership base shall form a quorum.

For all other meetings of the Club Board, four (4) Club Board members shall form a quorum

If a quorum is not present at any meeting other than an AGM within half an hour after the appointed starting time, the meeting will be adjourned to a time fixed by the Chairperson; or those present can hold an informal meeting to discuss matters.

8.3       Minutes of Meeting

The Secretary is to record the motions/recommendations at all Club meetings in Minutes.

The motion/recommendation after being voted on should be recorded as ‘carried’ or ‘lost’.

8.4       Voting

Voting at meetings will be by way of a simple majority by way of a show of hands.

8.5       Club Board actions requiring prior approval

The Club Board must obtain prior written approval from the Committee before:

(1)        making any public statement or using the name of DRLC, Randwick City Council  and/or the name of the Club for any promotional, publicity or fundraising purposes including, but not limited to: issuing a media release and print or digital publications in relation to the Club or its activities;

(2)        making any financial commitment requests, payment requests must be co-signed by the Council Manager responsible for the operation of the DRLC;

(3)        any other decisiosn which the Committee and/or Council deems as requiring prior approval in respect of the operation of the Club by notice in writing to the Secretary.

9        FINANCE

The DRLC is responsible for all Club finances including collecting all revenue and payment of all approved expenditure.

The DRLC Management shall keep a financial budget of all income and expenditure.

The President or Treasurer of the Club Board may at any time request from Randwick City Council a list of financial transactions to assist with the management of the Club’s budget.

Goods/Services ordered must have prior approval in writing from the Council Manager responsible for the operation of DRLC.

Randwick City Council’s purchasing policy must be adhered to at all times. A minimum of three quotes on any future expense is expected before final approval will be given on amounts above $500.

Any or all funds or assets of the Club remain at all times the property of Randwick City Council.

10      RISK MANAGEMENT

The Club must undertake in consultation with the DRLC Program Officer as appointed from time to time, a risk assessment of all activities. The proper management and response of these risks must be actioned prior to an activity being held.

11      AMENDMENT OF CLUB RULES

These internal rules may be added to, repealed, or otherwise amended by:

(1)        the Director, City Services - Randwick City Council upon serving notice of its intentions to do so on all members not less than 28 days prior to the amendment having effect.

(2)        the Committee by way of a resolution, if the Committee has filed written submissions requesting such amendments with the Director, City Services – Randwick City Council and the Director, City Services – Randwick City Council has endorsed those amendments in writing.

12      DISSOLUTION OF CLUB

The Club may be dissolved and disaffiliated from Council and/or the DRLC by the Director, City Services of Randwick City Council giving notice to the President where the Director considers that:

(1)        the Club’s membership numbers are insufficient, falling below a minimum of ten (10) financial members

(2)        the Club and/or its members seriously or consistently engage in conduct which breaches Randwick City Council Code of Conduct, policies and procedures; club obligations, these Rules or is illegal.

If the Club is dissolved and disaffiliated from Council, it ceases to have any right to use the name or logo of DRLC or Randwick City Council and all funding and support from DRLC and Randwick City Council will immediately cease.  Any or all unspent funds of the Club are the property of Randwick City Council.

13      MISCELLANEOUS

The Club may affiliate with and remain affiliated with the New South Wales Swimming Association Inc. or such other bodies or corporations as may succeed that organisation. The Club shall to the extent permissible under these internal rules, act in accordance with all lawful and reasonable directions of that association.

The Colours of the Club shall be Black and Cyan Blue.

Club Members will be required to meet all of the obligations as detailed in the ‘Members Code of Conduct’ and the ‘Roles and Responsibilities of Club Members’.

Committee Members and Club Board Members must comply at all times with Council’s Code of Conduct.

 

 

        APPENDIX

Appendix A: Members Code of Conduct

Appendix B: Roles and Responsibilities of Club Members


 

APPENDIX A:

MEMBERS CODE OF CONDUCT

CODE OF CONDUCT FOR RANDWICK CITY SWIM CLUB MEMBERS GOVERNING PARTICIPATION IN THE PROGRAM THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE SWIM YEAR

PART I – GENERAL CODE OF CONDUCT RULES

(1)        As a member of the Randwick City Swim Club I will abide by the following code of conduct:

(2)        Randwick City Council’s Code of Conduct.

(3)        All Club Members will display proper respect and sportsmanship towards coaches, officials, administrators, competitors, teammates, and the public to include both their person and their property.

(4)        Disrespectful, indiscreet or destructive behavior will not be tolerated. Illegal or inappropriate behavior that will reflect negatively on the Randwick City Swim Club or that will be detrimental to performance objectives will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of each swimmer to make every effort to avoid guilt by association with such activities at any time during the year.

(5)        Refrain from conduct which could be regarded as bullying or as harassment, whether it is physical, mental or emotional, towards fellow athletes, members and coaches.

(6)        All athletes will participate in all coach designated championship carnivals they are qualified for as a member of the Club Program.

(7)        All participants in a team carnival or a team trip will attend all team functions (on time), to include meetings, practices and any other team sanctioned event unless otherwise excused or instructed by a coach.

(8)        Curfews at team travel events, as a member of the Club, Metsea, NSW or AUS Swimming sponsored events and at all related activities will be obeyed. Extension will only be granted by the Head Coach. Curfew is not enforced if participant is with parents.

(9)        All participants, parents and caregivers have a responsibility to use their best endeavors to ensure that this Code of Conduct is adhered to.

PART II- VIOLATION OF THE CODE OF CONDUCT RULES

At the discretion of the Head Coach any one or all of the following penalties will be applied:

(1)        a swimmer may be scratched from the carnival;

(2)        a swimmer may be sent home immediately from practice or a carnival at their own expense;

(3)        a swimmer may be suspended from the team until the swimmer and parents have had a conference with the Head Coach and appropriate disciplinary actions have been implemented; and

(4)        a swimmer may be suspended from ALL team trips for the remainder of the swim year and/or a specific period determined by the Head Coach.

APPENDIX B:

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF CLUB MEMBERS

 

PART I – GENERAL FAMILY SERVICE REQUIREMENTS

As a member of the Randwick City Swim Club each family will be responsible for Club service requirements. These requirements will be allocated by the Club Board to each training group on a seasonal basis. The success of the Club and Club sponsored functions (swim carnivals, club nights, banquets, etc.) depend on the support and commitment of member parents and families. 

(1)        Families with swimmers in multiple training groups are responsible for fulfilling the obligation of the highest-ranking swimmer.

(2)        Parents are required to fulfill work assignments at away carnivals. The Club will track which members work at away carnivals. Those who have not volunteered for work assignments will be specifically targeted to do so at the next available carnival or the next Club sponsored function.

(3)        Families who do not fulfil their service requirements will be subject to disciplinary action as determined in accordance with these internal rules and upon consideration by the Club Board in cooperation with the Committee. 

 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W34/15

 

Subject:                  Works Zone Policy

Folder No:               F2007/00658

Author:                    Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to introduce a proposed Policy for Works Zones.      

 

Background

 

Construction works at major development sites involve the use of various trucks, cranes and other large vehicles.  The positioning of such vehicles adjacent to these sites can cause significant problems for local residents or businesses. 

 

The introduction of Works Zones attempts to ensure that conflict between construction related vehicles and other vehicles is minimised.

 

This report proposes that Council adopt a formal policy for the establishment, maintenance and subsequent removal of Works Zones are required.

 

Issues

 

Without dedicated parking facilities the drivers of vehicles associated with construction sites may “double-park” causing problems for locals attempting to access their own vehicles.  The safety of pedestrians, cyclists and other road users may also be compromised as a result of such inappropriate parking; especially if it involves larger trucks.  Furthermore, damage could possibly occur to private vehicles as a result of construction activities (crane lifts over cars / splattering of cars with concrete residue etc…).

 

As a part of the Development Approval (DA) process, the Council may require construction sites to apply for Works Zones adjacent to their site.  Such zones facilitate parking and access to a site for vehicles associated with the construction activities.

 

Works Zones are usually required for larger scale developments as they generate a significant number of truck movements. These include multi-unit residential developments and larger commercial / retail or industrial developments. In addition, Works Zones may be required for smaller scale redevelopment / refurbishment projects in those areas where parking pressures are such that on-street parking is difficult to obtain.

 

Given that Works Zones impact directly on the availability of parking in an area, and, In order to actively encourage the operators of a site to complete their works in a timely manner, a substantial Council fee is applied to each Works Zone.  The application of such a fee can result in operators altering their construction timetables so that their use of the public road is much reduced.  Or it can encourage them to service their construction activities from within their own site as early as possible.

 

The introduction of Works Zones attempts to ensure that conflict between construction-related vehicles and other vehicles is minimised.

 

All Works Zone applications require Local Traffic Committee approval.

In order to best manage the installation of Works Zones it is considered that Council should adopt a formal Works Zone Policy.  Also, to ensure the appropriate management of Works Zones it is considered that prescribed procedures for the establishment, maintenance and subsequent removal of Works Zones are required.

 

A copy of the proposed Works Zone Policy is attached. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:   Integrated and Accessible Transport

Direction 9e: Parking is managed to balance convenience against reduce car reliance

 

Financial impact statement

 

Whilst there is some income generated as a result of the installation of Works Zones, the adoption of the proposed Policy will have no effect upon this income.

 

Conclusion

 

Adoption of the proposed Works Zone Policy will ensure continued appropriate, and transparent, management of the Works Zones process. 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council adopt the proposed Works Zone Policy.

 

b)     the General Manager be delegated authority to approve minor alterations to the Works Zone Policy as required.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Works Zone Policy

 

 

 

 


Works Zone Policy

Attachment 1

 

 

Works Zone Policy   (Draft)Effective Date:	01 October 2015
Review Date:	October 2017
Version:	         1                           (Adopted October 2015)
Contact Officer:	Manager Integrated Transport
TRIM Document Number:	D0XXXXXXX

              CITY SERVICES
Objectives

The purpose of the Works Zone Policy is to set out the principles and processes for the establishment of Works Zones within the Council area.

Aims of Policy

The Works Zone Policy enables Council to:

§ Identify the purposes for Works Zones

§ Establish the principles for the introduction of  Works Zones

§ Provide equitable, transparent and accountable processes in determining and installing Works Zones.

Policy Statement

This policy applies to the establishment of Works Zones as required within the Council area.

Definitions

§ Council means Randwick City Council.

§ Works Zone means an area, defined by parking control signs, which has been created to accommodate construction site related vehicles.  The rules applying to Works Zones are detailed within Rule no. 181 of the NSW Road Rules (as detailed within this Policy)

§ DA means Development Application

 

Context

Construction works at major development sites involve the use of various trucks, cranes and other large vehicles.  The positioning of such vehicles adjacent to these sites can cause significant problems for local residents or businesses. 

 

Without dedicated parking facilities these large vehicles may “double-park”, at their construction site, adjacent to residents’ vehicles; causing problems for locals attempting to access their own vehicles.  The safety of pedestrians, cyclists and other road users may also be compromised as a result of such inappropriate parking.  Furthermore, damage could possibly occur to private vehicles as a result of construction activities (crane lifts over cars / splattering of cars with concrete residue etc…).

 

As a part of the Development Approval (DA) process, the Council may require construction sites to apply for Works Zones adjacent to their site.  Such zones facilitate parking and access to a site for vehicles associated with the construction activities.

 

Works Zones are usually required for larger scale developments as they generate a significant number of truck movements. These include multi-unit residential developments and larger commercial / retail or industrial developments. In addition, Works Zones may be required for smaller scale redevelopment / refurbishment projects in those areas where parking pressures are such that on-street parking is difficult to obtain.

 

Given that Works Zones impact directly on the availability of parking in an area, and, In order to actively encourage the operators of a site to complete their works in a timely manner, a substantial Council fee is applied to each Works Zone.  The application of such a fee can result in operators altering their construction timetables so that their use of the public road is much reduced.  Or it can encourage them to service their construction activities from within their own site as early as possible.

 

The introduction of Works Zones attempts to ensure that conflict between construction related vehicles and other vehicles is minimised.

 

All Works Zone applications require Local Traffic Committee approval.

Pricing

The pricing structure applying to the establishment of Works Zones is set down in the annual Pricing Policy and Statement of Fees & Charges.

 

The fees for Works Zones have two components:

·      A Security Deposit, and

·      an ongoing fee for the use of the Works Zone

 

Works Zone fees are reviewed and approved annually by Randwick City Council as part of the annual budget process. All fees and charges (including any proposed variations) are publicly advertised twenty eight days prior to implementation.

Hours of Operation

The standard hours of Works Zone operation are generally in line with the approved construction activity hours for a DA.  These are usually:

·      7:00am – 5:00pm, Monday – Friday and

·      7:00am – 1:00pm Saturday

 

Note that Works Zones in high traffic areas  (especially where Clearway or other AM or PM peak parking prohibitions apply) will likely have reduced time periods imposed.

Locations

Usually a Works Zone will only be approved for the roadway (excluding the footpath / nature strip areas) in existing time limited or unrestricted parking areas. Generally approval will not be given to the creation of a Works Zone in areas where parking is currently prohibited (eg existing No Stopping or No Parking zones).

Use of the Works Zone - NSW Road Rule no 181

The Works Zone must be used in accordance with NSW Road Rule no 181.

 

Road Rule 181 states that:

 

(1)  A driver must not stop in a Works Zone unless the driver is driving a vehicle that is:

(a)  engaged in construction work in or near the zone, or

(b)  dropping off, or picking up, passengers.

 

(2)  A works zone is a length of a road to which a works zone sign applies.

 

Works zone sign

http://www.industroquip.com.au/shop/images/958.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note that a Works Zone sign may have an arrow pointing in a different direction and anything on the sign may be differently arranged—see rule 316 (4).

 

(The above extracts were correct as at September 2015)

 

 

Accordingly, drivers stopping in the Works Zone must be either engaged in construction works in or near the zone, or, setting down or picking up passengers.

The use of the Works Zone shall not interfere with or compromise the safety of pedestrians, cyclists or motorists.

 

Note: If standing plant is required within the Works Zone area, a separate Standing Plant Application must be submitted with Council. Additional fees and charges will apply.

 

 

Applications for Works Zones

Applicants for Works Zones must submit a completed Works Zone application form. A Council Transport Engineer will then process the application, refer the matter to the Traffic Committee’s Technical Members  (Police and RMS) and inform the applicant of the success, or not, of the application. 

 

The Transport Engineer will also inform successful applicants of the exact location, the approved length and the fees payable for the Works Zone.

 

Following the applicant’s payment of the required fee the Transport Engineer will arrange for the installation of the Works Zone signs. Note that, where possible, existing signs, stems or power poles will be used.

Ongoing management of the Works Zone

The use of Works Zones may be enforced by Council’s Parking Patrol officers or Rangers or by Police Officers.  The penalty for illegally parking in a Works Zone exceeds $175.

 

Works Zone signage can only be adjusted by the Council.  The applicant, their contractors or sub-contractors MUST NOT move or adjust any Works Zones.  If signage needs adjustment (eg for a new driveway, or, for the erection or removal of hoarding uprights etc..) the applicant, or their representative, must contact the Council.  Please note that internal Council procedures (Council document no.   D02495996) provide processes whereby Works Zones are checked for alignment with the approval and with the fees paid.

 

Any person found guilty of interfering with and / or removing parking signage may be dealt with under Section 123 of the Road Transport Act 2013.  The maximum penalty under this Act exceeds $2,150 per offence.

 

Removal of Works Zones

The applicant must contact the Council within the time frame specified in the approval.   This is usually at the conclusion of all construction, fit-out and landscaping activities. The final fee payments will be calculated once the removal date is agreed upon. Note that any outstanding fees may be deducted from the security deposit.


 

 

References

·        Randwick Council website:

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

·        Randwick Council’s Fees & Charges – including Works Zone fees

http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/services/rates-fees-and-charges/fees-and-charges

 

·        RMS link for NSW Parking Rules – including Works Zones:

http://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/roads/safety-rules/road-rules/parking.html

 

·        Section 123 of the Road Transport Act 2013:

http://www5.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/nsw/consol_act/rta2013187/s123.html

 

 

(Please feel free to inform the Council if any of these suggested links no longer provide direct access to the suggested  websites)


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W35/15

 

Subject:                  Marjorie Crescent, Maroubra - Resident petition for proposed footpath construction

Folder No:               F2004/07382

Author:                    Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services      

 

Introduction

 

In response to a proposal to construct a footpath in Marjorie Crescent, Maroubra, Council received a resident petition opposing the construction.  The matter was considered at Council’s Works Committee meeting with the following resolution.

 

“(Matson/Shurey) that this matter be deferred for an onsite meeting between Councillors and Council officers to determine the configuration of the proposed footpath to preserve the maximum number of trees and to assess which side of the street the footpath should be constructed.”

 

Issues

 

Accordingly, a site meeting was held in May, 2015.  The meeting was attended by Mayor Seng and Councillors Neilson, Stevenson and Matson.  Council’s Manager Technical Services, Mr Joe Ingegneri and Coordinator Engineering Services, Mr Stephen Audet were also in attendance.

 

The issues and merits of footpath construction were considered for both the eastern and western sides of the street.

 

The construction of a footpath on the western side was recognised as being the most logical pedestrian route, however, the construction would require the removal of six street trees.  The six trees to be removed were assessed as providing important screening, habitat and food source but of being in reasonably poor health.  The construction of a footpath on this side would need to include a tree replacement program.

 

The construction of a footpath on the eastern side was recognised as being a less desirable pedestrian route.  The construction of this footpath would require the removal of the tallest tree in the street as well as numerous other trees, shrubs and succulents.  The construction of the path of the eastern side will also require the construction of a retaining wall to support the corner property at an estimated cost of $50,000.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:     Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                                community expectations and defined service levels.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 


 

Conclusion

 

The site meeting highlighted the challenges and contentious nature of constructing a footpath along Marjorie Crescent.

 

In 2004 Council previously supported the sentiment of residents to not remove trees for the purpose of constructing a footpath in Marjorie Crescent. 

 

A 2014 survey demonstrates that the sentiment within Marjorie Crescent and nearby Storey Street has not changed with twelve of the fourteen respondents objecting to the construction of a footpath. The community in adjacent Eastmore Place is however in support of a footpath in Marjorie Crescent. A total of twenty nine residents responded to Council’s survey with eighteen objecting to the construction of a footpath in Marjorie Crescent.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council not proceed with the footpath in Marjorie Crescent.

 

b)     the residents of both Marjorie Crescent and Eastmore Place to be advised accordingly.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Marjorie Crescent Locality Plan

 

2.View

Resident Petition for footpath - May 2014

 

3.View

Copy of Council survey and cover letter

 

 

 

 


Marjorie Crescent Locality Plan

Attachment 1

 

 


Resident Petition for footpath - May 2014

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


 


Copy of Council survey and cover letter

Attachment 3

 

 


 


 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W36/15

 

Subject:                  Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ) and Alcohol Prohibited Zones (APZ) in the City of Randwick

Folder No:               F2005/00834

Author:                    Kerry Colquhoun, Coordinator, Open Space Assets      

 

Introduction

 

Council’s existing Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ’s) and Alcohol Prohibited Zones (APZ’s) expire in November 2015. Due to the ongoing support for the restrictions, it is intended that Council re-establish the zones. (Refer Attachment 1 for the maps and schedule)

 

Council established Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ’s) and Alcohol Prohibited Zones (APZ’s) in 2008. Council then re-established and extended them in 2011 for a further four years. Due to the upcoming expiration, they need to be re-established in 2015.

 

As required by Section 632A & 644A&B of the Local Government Act 1993, community consultation was undertaken to seek comment from the key stakeholders and the community. This input provides the necessary evidence to allow Council to re-establish these zones for a further four years.

 

Issues

 

Background

Alcohol Free Zones (AFZs) are established and operate under Sections 642-646 of the Local Government Act, 1993. AFZ’s established by Council prohibit the drinking of alcohol in public places that are public roads or carparks under the care and control of Council.  AFZ’s do not encompass parks and reserves.

 

Alcohol Prohibited Zones (APZs) are established and operate under Section 632A of the Local Government Act 1993. The APZ extends from Coogee to Clovelly and includes beachside parks and reserves for Australia Day. The zone operates from sunset on 25 January to sunrise on 27 January.

 

Community Consultation

On the 15 September 2015, Council commenced community consultation. Council sought to inform and solicit submissions through a variety of means including Local Newspaper advertisements, Council’s website and use of the “Your Say Randwick” application.  Copies of the proposal were made available and direct mail used to inform stakeholder groups. These included NSW Police, Precinct Committees, Chambers of Commerce, Licensed premises, Anti-Discrimination Board, Aboriginal Land Council and other interested parties.

 

Council received 59 submissions in relation to the AFZ’s. Of these, 53 (90%) supported re-establishment. Council received 51 responses in relation to APZ’s of which 44 (86%) supported re-establishment.

 

Of the key stakeholders, their submissions were as follows:

 

1.     Eastern Beaches Licensing NSW Police support the re-establishment of existing zones.

2.     Anti-Discrimination Board has no objection to the proposal to re-establish AFZ’s in the Randwick Local Government Area

3.     Coogee Precinct Committee Resolutions 38/15 and 39/15 resolved that the Precinct supports the re-establishment of the AFZ’s and APZ’s.

 

Education

Council has undertaken alcohol awareness education campaigns within the areas affected by AFZ’s and APZ’s. These include partnering with the Community Drug Action Team and Local Area Command to provide information sessions and outreach events. Council also partner with organisations such as the La Perouse Health Centre and Youth off the streets as part of a larger effort to reduce excessive alcohol consumption and its social consequences. Due to education efforts around our iconic beaches, Council has been successful in engaging not only local residents but also the large contingent of seasonal visitors to our City.

 

A summary of the submissions received are tabled in Attachment 2.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2c:     Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and                             Government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

New regulation signs will be required to cover the re-established Alcohol Free Zones and Alcohol Prohibited Zones.  Funds are available in the 2015-2016 Capital Works Budget to cover the costs of these signs.

 

Conclusion

 

The submissions received display community support for the proposal to re-establish the AFZ’s and APZ’s in Randwick City.  The submissions provide sufficient evidence that the zones have had a beneficial effect upon the incidence of alcohol related disturbance and crime. Therefore, under the conditions set out in the relevant sections of the Local Government Act the existing zones are recommended for re-establishment.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the existing Alcohol Free Zones be re-established for four more years, until November 2019.

 

b)     the existing Alcohol Prohibited Zones be re-established for four more years, until November 2019.

 

c)     the Police Local Area Commander, the Anti-Discrimination Board of NSW and all other stakeholders be notified of the re-established zones.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Maps 1-8 showing AFZ's and APZ's and schedule

 

2.View

Summary of Submissions

 

 

 

 


Maps 1-8 showing AFZ's and APZ's and schedule

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Summary of Submissions

Attachment 2

 

 


 


 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W37/15

 

Subject:                  High Cross Park, Randwick - Cook Pine

Folder No:               F2004/07359

Author:                    Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services;

                                Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer      

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Works Committee meeting held on 8 September, 2015 considered a report recommending the removal of a diseased Araucaria columnaris (Cook Pine) located on the south-west side of High Cross Park.  The Committee resolved as follows:

 

“(Bowen/Shurey) that this matter be deferred to allow for Council to seek a heritage landscape report to consider the viability of the affected tree and to identify suitable sites for the planting of an established replacement Cook Pine, if necessary, and to consider the planting of further Cook Pines in High Cross Park. The report to also provide advice on how to protect the other trees in the park into the future as well as the erection of appropriate signage.”

 

Issues

 

Arboricultural Assessment

An independent arborist, Fiddlehead Landscape Design was engaged to:

 

·          Independently assess the four arboricultural reports previously prepared by         Australian Tree Consultants for Council and specifically the recommendations         made;

·          Assess the actions taken by independent consulting arborists, Council and         contractors engaged by Council to manage the health of the Cook Pine between         January and July 2015; and

·          Provide an opinion on the sustainability of the tree and recommendations in         relation to management options.

 

Fiddlehead Landscape Design was selected because the arborist is highly regarded within the arboricultural industry and is a current member of a number of professional organisations, including the Institute of Australian Consulting Arboriculturists (IACA), Arboriculture Australia and the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA).

 

The arborist has an AQF 5 Diploma of Horticulture (Arboriculture), is ISA TRAQ qualified and has prepared a number of Street Tree Masterplans, Development Control Plans and Urban Forest Management Plans for local government including Manly Council, City of Ryde and City of Sydney.

 

The report on the peer review, dated 15 September 2015 (attached), advises that the method of assessment for the Cook Pine, undertaken by Australian Tree Consultants is considered to be industry best practice within Australia.  The report also states that the recommendations in relation to the treatment of the tree were reasonable.

 

The report concludes that the tree is unlikely to recover and is likely to continue to decline or die. The report recognises that failure of the tree could be severe with serious risk to persons and/or property.  The report recommends that the tree be removed as soon as practicable.

Soil Assessment

To asses any fungal soil infestation and the extent of any such fungal spread within the park, Australian Tree Consultants were engaged to undertake soil sampling from the base of the existing Araucaria columnaris (Cook Pines).

 

Australian Tree Consultants undertook this testing in conjunction with Sydney Royal Botanic Garden’s Plant Pathology scientist, Dr Matthew Laurence.

 

Soil samples were taken in September 2015 at various sites within the park from soil surrounding the remaining Cook Pines. The samples were tested to detect the existence of any major Oomycete plant pathogens.  Only one soil test showed positive. This was for the relatively benign plant pathogen Pythium, which is not considered to be a serious pathogen of mature, woody plants.

 

Dr Laurence advised that tree health could be improved with the application of an organic fertiliser and root growth promoter (such as a seaweed based fertiliser) combined with deep-watering whenever it was considered necessary.  Appropriate mulching to improve soil moisture and texture was also recommended.

 

This soil sampling results provide assurance that there is no immediate risk to the health of the remaining Cook Pines and with the recommended soil treatment, tree health could be improved.

 

Heritage Assessment

Council’s Register of Significant Trees recognises that the group of Cook Pines original planted in High Cross Park has special significance at the Randwick LGA and regional (metropolitan) levels in terms of representative and rarity values as a single species grove of Cook Pines. The pines are an outstanding landmark specimen. Their prominent position, exaggerated vertical height and combined group impact create a dramatic sense of scale to this civic space.

 

It is considered that there is scope for the planting of an additional (in addition to the replacement Cook Pine) Cook Pine within High Cross Park to complement the original planting theme.  Any other additional pines will likely erode the significance of the original planting theme.

 

In order to retain the heritage significance of the original planting theme within the park, the replacement Cook Pine should be planted as closely as possible to the tree that is to be removed and any planting of this species should be confined to replacement tree including the one that was previously hit by lightning.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:   Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the diseased Cook Pine and the planting of two 400-litre Araucaria columnaris (Cook Pine) would be approximately $15,000. 

 

Conclusion

 

An eminently qualified independent arborist, Fiddlehead Landscape Design was engaged to address the viability of the subject Cook Pine and to undertake a peer review of the assessment and management of the tree undertaken by Council since signs of decline first appeared in January 2015.

 

Soil samples were taken from the area surrounding the bases of the three remaining Cook Pines to ascertain whether the soil contained any sort of pathogens that may adversely impact on the health and long-term viability of the three healthy trees. The soil sampling results provide assurance that there is no immediate risk to the health of the remaining Cook Pines and with the recommended soil treatment, tree health could be improved.

 

An assessment on the suggestion for the planting of further Cook Pines in High Cross Park was undertaken.  It is considered that there is scope to replace the diseased Cook Pine and also plant an additional Cook Pine to compliment the original planting theme and heritage value of the arboricultural components within the park. 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the diseased Cook Pine be removed as soon as practicable in the interests of public safety;

 

b)     all Phytophthora contaminated soil surrounding the tree be removed and replaced with a high quality loamy sand soil mix;

 

c)     two 400-litre advanced Araucaria columnaris be planted.  The  replacement to be located as close to the original removed tree as possible and that planting of this species be confined to two trees only;

 

d)     the regular and ongoing application of an organic fertiliser and root growth promoter combined with deep watering be undertaken throughout High Cross Park and that all trees within the park be mulched on a regular basis to improve soil moisture and texture.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Peer Review of the assessment and management of an Araucaria columnaris (Cook Pine), High Cross Park, Randwick - 15 September 2015

 

 

 

 


Peer Review of the assessment and management of an Araucaria columnaris (Cook Pine), High Cross Park, Randwick - 15 September 2015

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W38/15

 

Subject:                  Tram Lane, Randwick - Acquisition of Lot 8 of DP 2556

Folder No:               F2004/06325

Author:                    Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Council has been working on acquiring privately owned land that forms a private road to the west of Tram Lane, Randwick. In accordance with Council’s previous resolution:

 

“RESOLUTION: (Andrews/Neilson) that Council:

 

a)     contact all owners of the privately owned portions of Tram Lane with the objective of seeking agreement for acquiring the lane under Section 30 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 on a no cost voluntary basis.

 

b)     acquire the lane under Section 30 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 once all agreements are in place at no cost to Council (other than legal fees).

 

c)     makes budget provision to renew the section of Tram Lane that is currently privately owned upon completion of the acquisition process.”

 

There is a small strip of land that is separate to the other properties being considered, located at the eastern end adjacent to the Tram Lane road reserve.  This strip is known as Lot 8 of DP 2556.  The owners of this land have agreed to Council acquiring the land at no cost.  This report outlines the process to voluntarily acquire this land.

 

Issues

 

Tram Lane, between Church Street and the rear of 122 Alison Road is a Council owned public road.  The prolongation of this laneway between the rear of 122 Alison Road and Prince Street is privately owned road with rights of way over private land. See the cadastre layout below.

 

 

Lot 8 of DP 2556 is a 300mm wide parcel of land running along the northern side of Council’s Tram Lane.  Lot 8 is owned by Broken Hill Investments.  After selling a nearby property, Broken Hill Investments does not own any other land in the vicinity of Tram Lane. Therefore, Lot 8 is an unusable parcel of land. 

 

Lot 8 is being considered independently to the remainder of land to be acquired at the western half of Tram Lane.  It is proposed that the acquired land will be used as road reserve, forming part of Tram Lane.

 

An agreement has been reached with Broken Hill Investments for Council to acquire the land at no cost subject to following a process of voluntary compulsory acquisition.

 

The process for the compulsory acquisition of land requires that a submission be made to the Office of Local Government for approval.  The submission cannot be made until there is a Council resolution that authorises:

 

1.     The acquisition of the subject land by compulsory process; and

2.     The making of an application to the Minister/Governor for the publication of an acquisition notice in the New South Wales Government Gazette under the Roads Act 1993 (NSW) (Sections 177 and 178); and

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:     Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and                           funded to meet community expectations and defined levels of                             service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of legal negotiations, survey and adjustments to land titles relating to the acquisition of all privately owned parcels of land to the west of Tram Lane was estimated at $40,000 and approved by the Works Committee in April 2015. The acquisition of Lot 8 of DP 2556 falls under this approval.

 

Conclusion

 

Council has previously resolved to acquire privately owned land to the west of Tram Lane.  A further resolution is required to satisfy the Office of Local Government’s requirements for the making of an application to Governor for the placing of a notice in the Government Gazette in relation to Lot 8 of DP 2556.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council proceed with the compulsory acquisition of the land known as Lot 8 of DP 2556 for the purpose of public road by agreement with landowner in accordance s.30 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act, 1991.

 

b)     Council make an application to the Governor for approval to acquire Lot 8 of DP 2556 by compulsory process under sections 177 and 178 of the Roads Act, 1993.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Cadastre image showing the privately owned properties forming the private road

 

 

 


Cadastre image showing the privately owned properties forming the private road

Attachment 1

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                               10 November 2015

 

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Works Report No. W39/15

 

Subject:                  Bicycle Route Planning

Folder No:               F2010/00077

Author:                    Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport     

 

Introduction

 

The Council currently has an adopted Bicycle Plan for the City of Randwick.  A component of the endorsed plan was the establishment of a north / south route generally utilising the central island of Anzac Parade; from La Perouse to Centennial Park.  This route was envisaged to be located in the central median island of Anzac Parade, from Little Bay to Kingsford.  Further north, however, given the width constraints (and, now, the introduction of the light rail service), it was recognised that there was no road space available to continue an Anzac Parade bike path.  Accordingly, between Kingsford and Centennial Park, the route must be diverted to utilise the parallel side streets of Houston Road and Doncaster Avenue.

 

Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) has informed the Council that they will consider initial funding for the most southerly component of the Anzac Parade route (from Bunnerong Road to Little Bay Road), as this forms part of the Sydney strategic network as outlined in Sydney’s Cycling Future.  In addition, RMS has also offered funding for the design two of the east/west routes connecting to the light rail termini at Kingsford and at Randwick.[R1] 

 

This report details the proposed routes and makes recommendations as to their implementation.

 

Issues

 

A key component of the NSW Government’s Transport Master Plan is the ‘Sydney’s Cycling Future’ strategy.  The government’s strategy is consistent with our 20 year City Plan objective of ‘the implementation of a network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreational opportunities’.  

 

The Council’s adopted Bicycle Route Construction Priority list and the NSW Government’s ‘Sydney’s Cycling Future’ strategy have each identified the need for a safe north-south route for bicycle riders to travel from La Perouse to Kensington (and then to/from the Sydney CBD). 

 

Sydney’s Cycling Future

The government states that its “Sydney’s Cycling Future” strategy presents a new direction in the way bike rider facilities are planned, prioritised and provided for in Sydney. “This supports the change in culture being seen in Sydney with more people choosing to ride a bike for transport.”  They advise that their future focus is on the 70 per cent of NSW residents who tell them that they would like to ride a bike more for everyday transport – and would do so if cycling was made a safer and more convenient option for them.

 

The government also states that they will make bicycle riding a feasible transport option by:

 

•      investing in separated cycleways and providing connected bicycle networks to major centres and transport interchanges;

•      promoting better use of our existing network; and

•      engaging with our partners across government, councils, developers and bicycle users.

 

Furthermore, they indicate that they will focus on solutions that provide safe separation from motor vehicles and pedestrians wherever possible. They will prioritise their investment on projects that have the greatest potential to get the most people to shift their short transport trips to a bicycle:

 

 “We will prioritise bicycle infrastructure investment to ensure the projects that will have the biggest impact on encouraging more people to ride a bike are completed first…. We will invest in state priority corridors to safely link inner Sydney customers to Sydney’s CBD from the north, east, south and west…. We will work with councils to connect networks within five kilometre catchments of Sydney’s other major centres.”

 

Fig 1: Extract from ‘Sydney’s Cycling Future’

 

Randwick Council Bike Plan

In 2008 the Council undertook significant consultation regarding a review of our bicycle routes.  This review identified the need for three strong north/south routes extending through the Randwick LGA.  One of these is completed (the “Easterly Route” -  ‘Malabar Road etc’), one is being progressively implemented (the “Westerly Route” - ‘Dangar St to Wassell St etc’) and the third north/south spine (the “Central Route”) is only partially implemented. 

 

Between La Perouse and Kingsford it was identified that the Central Route would be located within the centre island of Anzac Parade.  However, it was recognised that the route through Kingsford and Kensington was problematic given the traffic volumes and limited space available.  Also, this northern part of the Anzac Parade route will soon be constrained even further with the introduction of the light rail service.

 

The streets most frequently utilised by bike riders, as an alternative to Anzac Parade, are Houston Road, Day Avenue and Doncaster Avenue.  Surveys indicate that some 300 riders currently travel along Doncaster Avenue each morning peak period.  

2015 Review of Bike Plan Priorities

In February 2015 The Council resolved (Matson/Andrews) inter alia, that:

 

1.     the Council undertake community consultation with regard to a review of the bicycle route construction priority list;

 

2.     the results of this consultation be reported back to the Council;

 

A six week community consultation process was undertaken giving participants the opportunity to comment on the Council’s proposed priorities for the construction of new cycle routes. The consultation process involved an online survey and an interactive online map where participants could ‘drop a pin’ to provide comments for a specific location.  More than 350 participants filled out the online survey and contributors dropped 193 comments on the map.

 

The majority of participants (70%) stated that they agreed with Council’s proposed construction priority list.

 

Based on the feedback from the consultation process and taking into account the construction timetable for the light rail project, the following new construction priority list is recommended:

 

Priority

Name

Description / Rationale

1

Anzac Bikeway - North

Doncaster Avenue, Day Avenue (completed), Houston Road, General Bridges Circuit (to be confirmed with Botany City Council), Sturt Street to Anzac Parade median.

 

To provide a protected bike lane along one of the Council’s busiest and most supported bike routes.

2

Anzac Bikeway – Mid “A”

Anzac Parade median island, bike and pedestrian paths between Fitzgerald Avenue and Sturt Street.

 

To extend a protected bike lane along one of the Council’s busiest bike routes and provide north south bike access to the Kingsford light rail terminus.

3

Todman Avenue and Lenthall Street

To provide a protected bike lane between the densely populated ‘Green Square’ area and the light rail stop at Todman Avenue – providing prospective Green Square area light rail passengers an alternative to driving to the light rail stop.

4

South Coogee to Kingsford

Bundock Street, Sturt Street.

 

To provide a bicycle link between South Coogee and the Kingsford light rail terminus – providing prospective light rail passengers an alternative to driving to the light rail stop.

5

Coogee to Randwick and UNSW

Dolphin Street, Judge Street, Coogee Bay Road, High Street

 

To provide a bike link from Coogee to the Randwick light rail terminus and to UNSW etc. – providing prospective light rail passengers an alternative to driving to the light rail stop.

6

Anzac Bikeway – Mid “B”

Anzac Parade median island, bike and pedestrian paths between Bunnerong Road and Fitzgerald Avenue.

 

To extend a protected bike lane along the centre of the Council’s “Grand Boulevarde” and provide an extension of the north south bike access to the Kingsford light rail terminus.

7

Centennial Park - Gordons Bay

From Gordons Bay via Clovelly Road, Burnie Street, Winchester Road, Brandon Street, Knox Street, Varna Street, Leichhardt Street, MacPherson Street (to be confirmed with Waverley Council) to Darley Road thence Queens Park and Centennial Park

 

To provide a bicycle link between Centennial Park and Gordons Bay.

8

Irvine St, Royal St & Paine St

 

This is the second section of the Centennial Park - Kensington - Yarra Bay route.

 

This section provides a bike link between the Anzac Parade bike path and Heffron Park.

9

Coogee Beach to ‘the Spot’

 

 

From Coogee Beach via Carr Street to St Pauls at The Spot

 

Provides a bicycle link between The Spot and Coogee Beach linking to Randwick light rail terminus.

10

Hillsdale – Maroubra Beach

 

Donovan Avenue, O’Sullivan Avenue, Haig Street, Mons Avenue

 

Provides an east/west bike link between Eastgardens / Hillsdale and Maroubra Beach- including a link to the Anzac Parade bike route.

11

Clovelly Road

Proposes to provide a protected bike lane between Centennial Park and Clovelly Beach.

 

It will be recommended that the above construction priority listing be generally used as a guide for the implementation of bike routes in Randwick LGA.  This priority may alter if offers of funding are received from other sources (e.g. RMS, Transport for NSW etc.)

 

Types of Bike Lanes

Randwick Council has been progressively implementing the adopted bike plan.  This includes the previously mentioned north/south routes.  These have, in the past, generally been created through the introduction of painted bike logos, painted ‘bike/parking’ lanes and with some signage.  However, with recent developments in the provision of facilities for bike routes in Australia, it has been generally realised that physically separated facilities should be installed on busier routes within urban areas.

 

These separated facilities are also known as protected bike lanes.  Protected bike lanes provide a physical separation of bike riders from motor vehicles on a road. The physical separation makes the bike lane more appropriate for a wider range of people who want to ride their bikes than simply a painted bike lane.  Roads with traffic speeds above 40km/h and carrying more than 3000 vehicles per day are considered as being intimidating for many potential bike riders, unless a separate space is provided for them to ride.  In addition, protected bike lanes reduce significantly the likelihood of a bike rider being struck by the opening of a car door.  Many potential riders do not have the confidence or traffic skills to ride on busier roads shared with motor vehicles.

 

Randwick Council recently implemented a protected bike lane in Day Avenue, between Anzac Parade and Doncaster Avenue.  This was implemented without any problems and is being well utilised.

 

The ‘Anzac Parade’ walking and bike riding route

Anzac Parade is a pivotal strategic corridor in Randwick. It is a major thoroughfare that connects, feeds, sustains and contributes to the character of our community. The Anzac Parade walking and bike riding route would be an effective ­transport route into the city connecting and running past Little Bay, Malabar, Maroubra Junction, Kingsford and Kensington centres. It would also provide direct links to a number of schools.

 

The whole route consists of two types of bike path.  The majority of this route would be provided within the very wide Anzac Parade median island and the remainder would use some local streets.

 

 

 

 

·      The Anzac Parade median island facility for walkers and riders

Following previous offers of funding from RMS, some early concept designs have been prepared for Anzac Parade median island walking and bike riding paths. 

 

This median island part of the route extends for more than 7.5 kilometres from Little Bay to Kingsford.  Within the median island this facility would consist of two separated paths – one for people who are walking, jogging or running; and one for people who are riding a bicycle.  It would be a high quality, physically separated facility with path users having priority at most cross roads along the route.  The following image shows such a facility in Melbourne which is installed on a road with similar characteristics to Anzac Parade.  This could perhaps be the style of facility which could be envisaged for installation along Anzac Parade:

 

https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/jelliscraig-imgs/propertyimages/source/21878/6329407ho.jpg

Possible style of Anzac Parade’s proposed median island facility showing a single path only (St Georges Road, Northcote, Melbourne)

 

It should be noted that, given that the NSW Long Term Transport Master Plan has nominated Anzac Parade (between Kingsford and Maroubra or Malabar) as a strategic transit network corridor, our early concept plans have taken into account a possible extension of the currently proposed light rail lines. Our concept plans have also taken into account early designs of a possible carpark adjacent to St Spyridon’s College (south of Beauchamp Road). 

 

·      The local street protected bike lane facilities

From Kingsford north the facility would consist of a protected bike lane.  Protected bike lanes are provided by narrowing the effective roadway and installing a length of kerb, separating a two-way bike lane from traffic.  Generally protected bike lanes have minimal effect upon the amount of parking in the street. The proposed protected bike lanes would have a similar configuration to the City of Sydney’s George Street, Waterloo, treatments (see images below).

 

Separated Bike Facility - CofS - 4 +

View from traffic lanes

 

 

Separated Bike Facility - CofS - 3 +

View from alongside the footpath

 

 

 


 

Proposed style of local streets option for Kingsford / Kensington

General arrangement; 2-way protected bike lane in typical 12.8 metre wide road

 

Protected bike lanes are proposed to link from Anzac Parade, via Sturt Street (westerly), General Bridges Crescent (following consultation with Botany Bay City Council), Houston Road, Day Avenue (existing) and Doncaster Avenue, to Alison Road, opposite Centennial Park.  It should be noted that, in general, these roads would likely retain the same number of parking spaces and the existing parking layout.  This is achieved by narrowing slightly the travelled part of the road, in order to install the protected bike lane.  Where such facilities have been introduced commuter periods are also the peak cycling times, indicating that the protected bike lanes are being used as viable, alternate, get-to-work transport options. 

 

Such a route would attract current and potential commuter cyclists and would likely become a major Sydney recreational bike route; from the family friendly Centennial Park to the La Perouse tourist destination. Given the significant pressure on other Sydney arterial roads it is unlikely that a similar “grand cycling boulevard” could be created elsewhere within the metropolitan area. 

 

East/West linkages for bicycle riders to access the light rail termini

As detailed in the construction priority list, there are also east/west bike links proposed to both the Kingsford and the Randwick termini.  The link to the Kingsford terminus is proposed along Bundock Street (from South Coogee), across Avoca Street, then westerly along Sturt Street to the terminus.  The link to the Randwick terminus will extend from the Coogee Beach area to the High Street terminus; there is also proposed to be a link from the terminus to UNSW.  Where possible it would be proposed that these links be designed as protected bike lanes.

 

Each of these new cycle routes will be planned to:

 

·          provide a high-quality commuter corridor that provides a safe, fast and direct cyclist access to the termini

·          improve cycling connectivity and accessibility for all user groups

·          provide cycle infrastructure to encourage active transport such as cycling and walking

·          help to ease congestion on roads, reduce parking pressure and reduce carbon emissions.

 

Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) Funding

The government’s “Sydney’s Cycling Future” strategy identifies a Priority Cycleways program which has the aim of improving cycling access on major routes within 5km of major centres. Up to 100 per cent NSW Government capital funding is available to bicycle infrastructure projects that are identified in the NSW Government plan as a Priority Cycleway (eg. Sydney’s Cycling Future).  Accordingly, RMS has offered Randwick City Council funding to assist with numerous bike facilities in the Randwick council area.  RMS has offered funding for the Council to undertake the following:

 

·      Detailed design of the Sturt Street, General Bridges Crescent, Houston Road, Doncaster Avenue route.

·      Detailed design of the link to the Kingsford terminus proposed along Bundock Street then westerly along Sturt Street to the terminus

·      Detailed design of the link to the Randwick terminus from the Coogee Beach area, past the High Street terminus and through to UNSW

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9a:     A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreational opportunities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Roads and Maritimes Services have offered full funding as detailed previously in this report.  Council’s costs for these projects would basically be only the contract management of the consultants and of the contractors involved in plan preparation and construction.  The acceptance of the RMS offer of funding, for the projects near to the light rail, will result in the Council not having to fund these bike linkages itself.

 

Conclusion

 

In conclusion it is considered that the Council should undertake the bike facility designs and the construction proposed to be funded by Roads and Maritime Services. An improved cycling network in the local area would have the following benefits:

 

·          reduced congestion

·          improved health

·          greater liveability

·          reduced parking pressure

·          a cheaper way for people to get around

·          a safer cycling network.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council:

 

1.  accept the offer of funding from Roads and Maritime Services to undertake the following with regard to bike facilities in the Randwick council area:

 

a.  Detailed design of the Sturt Street, General Bridges Crescent, Houston Road, Doncaster Avenue bike route;

b.  Detailed design of the bike route proposed along Bundock Street then westerly along Sturt Street to the Kingsford terminus;

c.   Detailed design of the bike route from the Coogee Beach area, past the High Street Randwick terminus and through to UNSW; and

 

2.  Consult with Botany Bay City Council with regard to the proposed improvements to bicycle facilities proposed in General Bridges Crescent; and

 

3.  Note that the construction priority listing detailed within this report will be generally used as a guide for the implementation of bike routes in Randwick LGA (this priority may alter, especially if offers of funding are received from other sources such as RMS, Transport for NSW etc..)

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

    

 


 [R1]RMS will consider funding for this link. This would need to be approved through ATIC once final estimates have been provided by council. The route does form part of the Sydney strategic network as outlined in Sydney’s Cycling Future