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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 25 August 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 1300 722 542

Fax: 02 9319 1510

 council@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick on Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 6:00pm

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia. Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 28 July 2015

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Audio/video recording of meetings prohibited without permission;

A person may be expelled from a meeting for using, or having used, an audio/video recorder without the express authority of the Council.

Mayoral Minutes

MM38/15   NSW Police Force International Student Beach Soccer Day - waiving of fees..................................................................... 1

MM39/15   The Prince Henry Hospital Trained Nurses' Association Inc - Waiving of Fees................................................................... 3

MM40/15   Handball Australia - Waiving of fees..................................... 5   

Further Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

 

Urgent Business

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting required)

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act, the General Manager is required to keep a register of Councilor voting on planning matters. Planning matters are any decisions made in the exercise of a function of a council under the EP&A Act and include decisions relating to a development application, an environmental planning instrument, a development control plan or a development contribution plan under that Act. In addition, Randwick City Council has resolved (22 July 2008) that its register of voting include the voting on all tender matters.

CP31/15    67 Mooramie Avenue, Kensington (DA/73/2014/A)................. 7

CP32/15    47-53A Anzac Parade, Kensington (DA/414/2014/A)............. 15

CP33/15    6 Fox Street, Malabar (DA/301/2012/C)............................... 23

CP34/15    58-60 Arden Street, Coogee (DA/754/2014)........................ 33

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting NOT required)

CP35/15    Advisory Committee Minutes............................................... 49

CP36/15    Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad - Randwick Council's particpation ........................................................ 57

General Manager's Report

GM13/15   Review of the 2014-15 Annual Operational Plan - June Quarterly Report............................................................................... 61

Director City Services Reports

Nil

Director Governance & Financial Services Reports

GF29/15   Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures Act...... 71

GF30/15   Annual Review of Councillors' Expenses & Facilities Policy...... 85

GF31/15   Contingency Fund - Status as at 31 July 2015...................... 87

GF32/15   Proposed Shopfront Improvement Grants Program................ 89

GF33/15   Investment Report - July 2015............................................ 93

GF34/15   Ongoing Engagement of Event Performers and Sustainability Educators........................................................................ 101  

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM36/15   Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Proposed additional lighting usage at Pioneer Park....................................................... 103

NM37/15   Notice of Motion from Cr Smith - Proposed Removal of Weeping Fig - 75-77 Arden Street, Coogee ..................................... 105

NM38/15   Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Litter Education Campaign...................................................................................... 107

NM39/15   Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Sydney Water Emergency Power Supply................................................................... 109

NM40/15   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Council response to sewerage flow into Botany Bay ........................................................ 111

NM41/15   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Council response to Marriage Equality debate................................................................ 113

NM42/15   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Need to upgrade Bicentennial Park drainage from Laperouse Chinese Market Gardens........ 115

NM43/15   Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Proposed Chinese Market Garden Meeting................................................................ 117   


Notice of Rescission Motions

NR5/15     Notice of Rescission Motion from Crs Belleli, Bowen, Moore & Stevenson - Update to Precinct Committee Boundaries, Rules & Procedures....................................................................... 119

NR6/15     Notice of Rescission Motion from Crs Andrews, Nash, Roberts & Stavrinos - Botany Cemetry expansion proposal.................. 121  

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Mayoral Minute No. MM38/15

 

 

Subject:                  NSW Police Force International Student Beach Soccer Day - waiving of fees

Folder No:               F2015/00096

Author:                    The Mayor, Ted Seng      

 

Introduction

 

Correspondence has been received from Superintendent Commander Gavin Dengate, NSW Police, proposing a beach soccer day at the northern end of Coogee Beach on Sunday, 27 September 2015.  This is an opportunity for Police to engage with international students and promote student safety messages.

 

Issues

 

The purpose of the day is to engage with international students who are living, working and studying in Randwick City and beyond.   This event was held last year and Superintendent Dengate has advised that this event went a long way to establishing stronger and more united relationships.  Some low key entertainment and food stalls will be provided.

 

The Police are requesting support towards staging the event and other necessary infrastructure requirements.

 

The following support has been requested:

Type

In-kind/

Contribution

Amount

Waiving of fees to hire northern end of Coogee Beach

In-kind

$682.00

Application Fee

In-Kind

$412.00

Reserving of 10 car spaces for VIP’s in the Dolphin St Car Park for the day (10 spaces @ $21.40/day)

In-kind

$214.00

Provision of bins and event waste removal (5 bins/ $85.00 each)

In-kind

$425.00

Waiving of food stall application fee x 3 @ $100 each

In-kind

$300.00

Hire of staging, sound, power

Contribution

$2,500.00

 

TOTAL

$4,533.00

 

A council officer will contact the Coogee Beach Volleyball licensee and advise that the beach will be booked to NSW Police for the day.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The amount of $2,500.00 contribution and $2,033.00 in-kind is required to partner this event.  This amount will be funded from the 2015-16 Contingency Fund if the report recommendation is adopted.

Conclusion

 

This partnership is yet another best practice example of the local Police and Randwick Council working together in partnership, demonstrating mutual commitment towards a safer community.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council supports the 2015 NSW Police Force International Student Beach Soccer Day at Coogee Beach; and

 

b)     Council assists with funding the event by providing $2,500.00 in contributions and $2,033.00 in-kind sponsorship ($4,533.00) to be funded from the 2015-16 Contingency Fund.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Mayoral Minute No. MM39/15

 

 

Subject:                  The Prince Henry Hospital Trained Nurses' Association Inc - Waiving of Fees

Folder No:               F2015/08174

Author:                    The Mayor, Ted Seng      

 

Introduction

 

Correspondence has been received from Ms Lynette Smith, OAM, Secretary of The Prince Henry Hospital Trained Nurses Association Inc. Ms Smith is requesting the waiving of fees to collect trade waste on a regular basis from their site at 2 Brodie Avenue, Little Bay.

 

Issues

 

Ms Smith has advised Council that the Nursing and Medical Museum, 2 Brodie Avenue, Little Bay was always serviced by the hospital up until its closure. They then had to arrange a private contractor.  They do not generate a large collection of waste and have to pay the fees even when they do not put the bin out for collection.  Ms Smith has requested that Council provide the trade waste service.

 

Council collects waste from the Prince Henry Centre once a week.  As the Nursing and Medical Museum is a not for profit organisation and based in close proximity to the Prince Henry Centre this site can be added to the regular trade waste pick up service.  The cost to supply a 110 litre sulo bin to be collected once a week amounts to $540.80 per annum.

 

Ms Smith is also requesting that this fee be waived in support of the museum.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council accept the report recommendation, the financial impact to Council would be $540.80 per annum and this amount would be recognised as a donation and would be funded from the General Trade Waste operating budget.

 

Conclusion

 

As the Nursing and Medical Museum is a non-funded organisation, it is recommended that Council waive the fees for the removal of trade waste at 2 Brodie Avenue, Little Bay.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council vote to cover the associated fees for the removal of trade waste from the Nursing and Medical Museum at 2 Brodie Avenue, Little Bay when collecting waste from the Prince Henry Centre at a cost of $540.80 per annum and this costing be funded from the General Trade Waste operating budget.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Mayoral Minute No. MM40/15

 

 

Subject:                  Handball Australia - Waiving of fees

Folder No:               F2015/00096

Author:                    The Mayor, Ted Seng      

 

Introduction

 

Correspondence has been received from Ms Rikke Petersen, Manager Handball Australia, requesting Council to waive beach hire fees relating to the use of Maroubra Beach for handball training.

 

Issues

 

Ms Petersen has written to Council to advise that the Australian Women’s Beach Handball training squad of approximately 50 athletes would like to use Maroubra Beach to train for the World Games in Hungary in July 2016.  The dates required are:

 

·          29-30 August 2015

·          14-15 November 2015

·          12-13 December 2015

·          9-10 January 2016

 

This trip will be self-funded by the players and Ms Petersen has advised that the players are amateurs who do not receive government funding and do not have a sponsor to help with costs.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council accept the report recommendation, the financial impact to Council is $3,685.00.  This amount will be charged to the 2015-16 Contingency Fund.

 

Conclusion

 

It is considered that Council should support Handball Australia by waiving fees for the use of Maroubra Beach to train for the upcoming 2016 World Games in Hungry.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the Beach Hire Fee amount of $3,685.00 be waived and funds be allocated from the 2015-16 Contingency Fund;

 

b)     the activity organisers undertake to appropriately and prominently acknowledge and promote Council’s contribution prior to and during the activity.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP31/15

 

 

Subject:                  67 Mooramie Avenue, Kensington (DA/73/2014/A)

Folder No:               DA/73/2014/A

Author:                    Plandev Pty Ltd, Thomas Mithen      

 

Proposal:                 Section 96 modification of the approved development by increasing the size of the ground floor living area and changes to openings on elevations. Original consent: Demolition of existing structures, construction of two storey dwelling with double garage at front, swimming pool to rear and associated works

Ward:                      West Ward

Applicant:               Mr Theo Theol

Owner:                    Mr J K Murdoch & Mrs L Wilson

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

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Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 


Development Application Executive summary report

 

The development application has been assessed by an external consultant and referred to Council as a neighbouring property owner is related to a Council employee.

 

1.       Proposed Modification

 

The subject Section 96(2) application seeks approval to modify the approved development consent by:

 

Ground Floor

·      reconfiguring the internal living and dining areas;

·      enclosing the northern outdoor terrace, which becomes an internal living area;

·      reducing the rear setback by 2.5m and adding an outdoor terrace;

·      adding two new windows at the northern elevation, and a one new window on the eastern elevation adjoining the living area;

·      adding new windows and door openings on the northern and eastern elevation adjoining the dining room;

·      reducing the size of the west facing window in the study;

 

First Floor

·      increasing the window sill height for the east facing window in the master bedroom

·      reducing the size of the east facing window and deleting the south facing window in bedroom 2;

·      increasing the width of the northern window in the ensuite by 50 mm; and

·      extending the roofline above the ground level living area to the north by 1.2m.

 

2.       Application History

 

On 22 July 2014, a development application (DA73/2014) was approved by Council for the demolition of existing structures, construction of a two storey dwelling with double garage at front, swimming pool at the rear and associated site works.

 

3.       Subject Site

 

The subject site is located on the eastern side of Mooramie Avenue between Day Avenue and Barker Street, Kensington. The site is currently under construction for a two storey dwelling house.

 

4.       Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed modification request in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. No submissions were received.

 

5.       Key Issues

 

Privacy

 

The proposed modification includes the enclosure of the approved northern terrace at ground level with solid a masonry solid wall to form part of the internal living space, which reduces the potential visual and acoustic privacy impacts to the rear of the property to the north at No. 65 Mooramie Avenue. This new section of wall contains two windows; however, these new windows would not result in any adverse visual privacy impacts as the view would be limited due to the narrow width of the opening being 300mm wide.

 

The proposed modification includes the construction of an east facing outdoor terrace 1 m above ground level at the rear of the dwelling. The approved solid wall along its southern edge is to be retained, which prevents direct overlooking to the rear of No. 69 Mooramie Avenue to the south.

 

The sill height for the east facing window in the master bedroom will be increased by 500mm, which reduces the potential for overlooking the adjoining property at No. 65 Mooramie Avenue to the north.

 

The window along the southern wall of bedroom 2 will be removed, which eliminates the potential for direct overlooking of the adjoining property to the south at No. 69 Mooramie Avenue. 

 

Overall, the proposed modification would reduce the potential for overlooking, and minimize visual and acoustic privacy impacts to the adjoining properties.

 

Solar Access

The proposed modification does not involve any changes to the approved building envelope at the first floor. The reconfiguration of the living spaces at the rear of the dwelling house alter the rear envelope at ground level and result in an extension to part of the lower level roof by 1.2 m to the north. However, there is no additional overshadowing impact to the adjoining property to the south at No. 69 Mooramie Avenue.

 

Streetscape

The proposed changes are mainly confined to the rear of the dwelling house, and are not visible from the street. The proposed modification therefore does not result in any adverse impact on the streetscape.

 

6.       Section 96 Assessment

 

Under the provisions of Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended, Council may only agree to a modification of an existing Development Consent if the following criteria has been complied with:-

 

6.1     Substantially the Same Development:

Prior to assessing the application in relation to the acceptability of any potential environmental impacts, it must be determined whether the proposed modifications result in a development that is "substantially the same" as that which was originally approved. The proposed modification seeks to reconfigure the living spaces and corresponding changes to the rear terraces and openings. The proposed modification would not change the overall built form or use of the building, and is therefore considered to be substantially the same as that approved under the original DA.

 

6.2     Notification and Consideration of Submissions:

The owners of adjoining and neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the DCP – Public Notification.  No public submissions were received.

 

6.3     Section 79C Assessment:

The site has been inspected and the application has been assessed having regard to Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended.

 

 

6.3.1  Environmental Planning Instruments

State Environment Planning Policy (Building Sustainability Index: BASIX) 2004.

SEPP: BASIX requirements came into force for all new dwellings, dual occupancies and some transient residential accommodation where development applications were lodged on or after 1 July 2004. A BASIX assessment is a mandatory component of the development approval process under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Building Sustainability Index: BASIX) Regulation 2004 and State Environmental Planning Policy (Building Sustainability Index: BASIX) 2004.

 

Clause 55A of the EP & A Regulation requires that a new BASIX certificate be lodged for amended plans or where a section 96 modification makes a material change to the BASIX commitments as originally approved.

 

The applicant has submitted a new BASIX certificate. The plans have been checked with regard to this new certificate and they are consistent with the requirements indicated for DA stage. Standard conditions of consent requiring the continued compliance of the development with the SEPP: BASIX were included in the original determination.

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The site is zoned R2 Low Density Residential under LEP 2012. The relevant objective of the R2 zone seeks to protect the amenity of existing residents. The proposed modifications would not result in any additional amenity impacts to the adjoining properties in terms of privacy or solar access (refer to the discussion under Key Issues in this report). The proposal is therefore consistent with the relevant objective of the R2 zone. There are no special provisions in LEP 2012, which are relevant to this proposal.

 

6.3.2  Development Control Plans

The DCP provisions are structured into two components, Objectives and Controls. The Objectives provide the framework for assessment under each requirement and outline key outcomes that a development is expected to achieve. The controls contain both numerical standards and qualitative provisions. Hence, where a DA does not comply with a control, Council must be flexible in its application and consider reasonable alternatives. Any proposed variations from the controls may be considered only where the applicant successfully demonstrates that an alternative solution could result in a more desirable planning and urban design outcome.

The relevant provisions of the DCP are addressed below. (Note: a number of controls that are not related to the proposal have been omitted)

 

Part C1 Low Density Residential

2.3 Site coverage

The approved dwelling house covers 35 per cent of the site, which complies with Council’s maximum site coverage control of 50 per cent. The proposed modification includes a new outdoor terrace, which extends 450 mm beyond the approved rear building alignment, and results in an additional 2.5sqm of site coverage. The proposed development (as modified) continues to comply with Council's maximum site coverage control.

 

3.1 FSR

The approved development has a floor space ratio of 0.46:1, which complies with Council’s maximum FSR control of 0.5:1. The proposed modification involves reconfiguration of the internal living spaces, and corresponding changes to the adjoining outdoor terraces at ground level. This results in a net increase of 6sqm of gross floor area, which equates to a FSR of 0.47:1. The proposed development (as modified) continues to comply with Council's maximum FSR control.

 

 

3.2 Height

A maximum building height of 9.5 m applies to the site. The proposed extension to the roof by 1.2m to the north over the rear single storey section is 4 m in height. The proposed development (as modified) continues to comply with Council's maximum height control.

 

3.3 Setbacks

The subject site has a frontage in excess of 12 m and a side setback of 1.2 m applies. The proposed wall along the northern elevation (enclosing the approved terrace) will be setback 1 m from the common side boundary with No. 69 Mooramie Avenue to the north, which represents a non-compliance with the side setback control. The objective of the side setback controls is to provide a separation between buildings, and minimize impacts to adjoining properties. Despite the variation to the numerical control, the proposed modification results in improved visual and acoustic privacy for the adjoining property to the north. The non-compliance with the side setback control is therefore acceptable.

 

C1 5.1 Solar Access and Overshadowing & C1 5.3 Visual Privacy

These issues have been addressed in Section 5 of this report.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed modification essentially reflects the natural evolution that occurs within the development process as the construction documentation is worked up and original assumptions about the functionality of the building designs are tested.

Importantly, the changes are of minimal environmental impact, and result in development that is substantially the same as originally approved, which satisfies Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979.

Accordingly, the application is recommended for approval.

 

Recommendation

Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Sections 80 and 80A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. DA/73/2014/A for reconfiguration of the ground floor living spaces and changes to outdoor terrace areas, window and door openings and an extension to the lower roof at the rear of the approved dwelling house, at No. 67 Mooramie Avenue, Kensington in the following manner:

 

Amend Condition 1 to read:

The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans listed below and stamped with Council’s approved stamp.

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Drawing No. /Revision

Received by Council

Site Plan

AADBuild

December 2013

DA/01B

19 May 2014

Landscape Plan

AADBuild

January 2014

DA/03

19 May 2014

Ground Floor Plan - Amended

AADBuild

March 2014

DA/04

19 May 2014

First Floor Plan – Amended

AADBuild

March 2014

DA/05

19 May 2014

Elevation – West (Street Elevation)

AADBuild

January 2014

DA/06B

19 May 2014

Elevation - South

AADBuild

January 2014

DA/07B

19 May 2014

Elevation - East

AADBuild

January 2014

DA/08B

19 May 2014

Elevation – North

AADBuild

January 2014

DA/09B

19 May 2014

Section – North to South

AADBuild

January 2014

DA/10B

19 May 2014

Section – West to East

AADBuild

January 2014

DA/11B

19 May 2014

 

BASIX Certificate No.

Dated

Received by Council

545465S

04/05/2014

05/05/2014

 

Except, as amended by the Section 96 plans and supporting documentation listed below, only in so far as they relate to the modifications highlighted on the Section 96 plans and detailed in the Section 96 application, except as may be amended  by the following conditions and as may be shown in red on the attached plans:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Drawing No. /Revision

Received by Council

Site Plan Existing and Proposed

Not provided

December 2013

S96/01A

19 June 2015

Ground Floor Plan - Amended

Not provided

March 2014

S96/04A

19 June 2015

First Floor Plan – S96 Amended

Not provided

June 2015

S96/05A

19 June 2015

Elevation – West (Street Elevation)

Not provided

June 2015

S96/06A

19 June 2015

Elevation - South

Not provided

January 2014

S96/07A

19 June 2015

Elevation - East

Not provided

January 2014

S96/08A

19 June 2015

Elevation – North

Not provided

January 2014

S96/09A

19 June 2015

Section – North to South

Not provided

June 2015

S96/10A

19 June 2015

Section – West to East

Not provided

June 2015

S96/11A

19 June 2015

 

BASIX Certificate No.

Dated

Received by Council

626849S

1 June 2015

19 June 2015

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP32/15

 

 

Subject:                  47-53A Anzac Parade, Kensington (DA/414/2014/A)

Folder No:               DA/414/2014/A

Author:                    Louis Coorey, Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Proposal:                 Section 96 modification of approved development by relocation of fire hydrant to southern wall, alterations to glazing on eastern, northern and southern facades, increase floor of unit 105 by reduction in size of lobby, new window on western facade, conversion of communal garden area, to private space and removal of gate at Balfour Lane

Ward:                      West Ward

Applicant:               Prosperity Thirdi Pty Ltd

Owner:                    Mr P Panopoulos & Mrs E Panopoulos

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

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Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 

Development Application Executive summary report

 

This application is referred to Council as the original application was determined by Planning Committee 2 December 2014.

Proposal

 

The Section 96 modification of approved development seeks the following:

 

·      Ground floor:

 

o   Relocate the ground floor fire hydrant form the Anzac Parade frontage to the southern wall facing the pedestrian access way

o   Reconfigure retail glazing along the Anzac Parade frontage and reduce size of length of window along southern elevation facing the Balfour Lane Pedestrian access way.

 

·      Change to windows along the northern and southern elevations

 

·      Communal open space and apartment 105

 

o   Remove communal open space in rear yard and allocate as private open space for apartments 104, 105, and 106

o   Convert western portion of communal lobby space into additional floor space for apartment 105 which is to be converted from a single bedroom into a two bedroom apartment

o   Replace west facing lobby doorway with window

o   Remove communal gate access between rear yard and Balfour Lane.

 

Site

 

The site is located on the western side of Anzac Parade. It has a 26.92 metre street frontage to Anzac Parade and is adjoined to the south by other commercial premises and to the north and west by residential premises. Along the sites southern side boundary a pedestrian walkway known as Balfour Lane, extends all the way through to Boronia Street to the west.

 

The site is generally rectangular and has total site area of 885sqm. The site is currently a bordered up construction site where pre-existing buildings have been demolished.

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013 (DCP). The following submissions were received as a result of the notification process:

 

8/45 Boronia Street Kensington

Issue

Comment

Cannot locate the plans illustrating the changes on the web site; - email received 16 July 2015

Email containing the notification plans and Statement of environmental effects explaining the changes were sent to the objector on 22 July 2015 and another set on 28 July 2015 advising that additional time would be afforded to them if requested.  No response has been received.

Loss of parking associated with the reduction of basement parking will add to congestion during construction and post construction

No change to parking is proposed as part of this application

Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act

Under the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended, Council may only agree to a modification of an existing Development Consent if the proposal remains substantially the same Development. In this respect, it is considered that the proposed changes will not result in a change to the nature of the original application and the changes will result in a development that is substantially the same as that for which the consent was granted. The scope of modifications will remain consistent with the original consent.

 

Key Issues

 

Randwick Development Control Plan 2013 (RDCP)

The DCP and parts within it adopt a performance based approach where the provisions typically consist of two components, being objectives and controls (such as a numerical standard). If a proposal does not meet the numerical controls in the DCP, it however may still be supported in so far as it successfully demonstrates that an alternative solution could result in a more desirable planning and urban design outcome.

 

Part D1 Kensington Town Centre

Part D1 - Kensington Town Centre of the Randwick Development Control Plan 2013 provides a framework for the redevelopment of the wider Kensington Town Centre and surrounds, containing development and design objectives and controls to guide built form, provide environmental and amenity standards, and give appropriate protection for local business, open space and residential development both on a block-by-block basis as well as a general overview. The proposed Section 96 application has been assessed against the relevant controls and objectives of the DCP. The issues elaborated upon below have been identified as key areas and areas of non-compliance with the controls during the assessment of the Section 96 application as well as those that bear a relationship to these areas.

 

Particular reference is made to Communal Open space section 4.8.1 of Part D1, Kensington Town Centre, of the RDCP 2013.

 

Communal open space

This Section 96 application seeks to remove communal open space in rear yard of the development, and to divide and allocate it into three areas of private open space for the individual use of three rear facing level 1 apartments (No. 104, 105 & 106).

 

The removal of communal open space does not meet Communal Open Space objectives and controls under Section 4.8.1 of Part D1 Kensington Centre DCP.

 

The objectives under Section 4.8.1 of the DCP seek:

 

·      To ensure that every development of more than 2 apartments has access to an area of communal open space of sufficient size and quality to enhance the development’s livability.

·      To provide residents with passive and active recreational opportunities.

·      To provide an area on site that enables soft landscaping and deep soil planting.

 

The proposed removal of the communal open space is inconsistent with the objectives of the Communal Open Space because:

 

·      The allocation of communal open space will not provide access to an area of communal open space and will worsen the developments livability of other units.

·      The reliance on balconies as areas of private open space reduces the areas capable of being used for passive and active recreation within close proximity to the other units on site

 

The applicant argues that the communal open space should be allocated to the individual units for the following reasons:

 

Noise and security:

The replacement of the communal area with 3 private garden terraces results in improved internal and external amenity outcomes including reduction in potential noise impacts previously associated with the approved communal entertaining areas, removal of internal privacy issues associated with the relationship between the communal area and western level 1 apartments and improved residential security associate with the removal of the southern access gate, which (as approved) provides access from Balfour Lane to the communal area.

 

Private open space

The approved upper level apartments are provided with expansive and generous private open space areas in balconies directly accessible form the main living areas and therefore do not need to rely on the ground floor communal areas for entertaining purposes.

 

Other areas available for passive and active recreational use:

 

The lack of communal open space areas is further reiterated by the sites location to nearby community facilities, parks and open space areas including:

 

·      Kokoda Memorial Park (includes children’s play equipment

·      Moore Park including golf course and athletics field

·      Centennial Park includes a number of opportunities for recreational activity for all ages.

 

In response to the applicants arguments the following assessment comments are provided:

 

Noise:

The noise impacts can be suitably managed by the owner’s corporation. The management of the communal open space may restrict the use of the communal open space during certain periods that may potentially result in sleep disturbance. The Level 1 private open spaces are elevated above the adjacent communal open space which serves to delineate and separate the private use form the communal use. To further assist in reducing potential noise disturbance and improving visual privacy between these uses a better planning outcome could be achieved by providing additional landscaping and privacy measures such as timber screens and gates between the two areas.

 

Security

The security of the gate providing access from Balfour Lane could easily be ameliorated by incorporating similar security access arrangement to those that would be required for the main access point off Anzac Parade. In relation to amenity, this gate provides an additional egress and ingress opportunity for future residents. In relation to amenity impacts on the rear facing level 1 units, it is considered that in a similar vain to the management of noise, the use of this gate could easily be managed by the owner’s corporation.

 

Balconies provide suitable areas of private open space

Whilst the balconies attached to each unit do provide sufficient areas for the purposes of private open space, however there are distinct differences in the amenity provided for by balconies and communal areas of open space. The most salient differences between balconies and communal open spaces include:

 

·      Communal open space areas provide deep soil landscaped areas larger in dimensions than those associated with balconies;

·      Communal open spaces areas receives solar access during longer periods than those that would be received by Balconies

 

The surrounding area provides suitable opportunities for communal open space

It is acknowledged that there are other areas in the locality capable of providing for passive and active recreational use. However, there are distinct differences between the provisions of communal open space provided on site as opposed to reliance on communal open space provided off site. These include:

 

·      Removing communal open space from the development reduces the capacity for occupant interaction;

·      Removing communal open space disadvantages occupants of other units within the development

·      Removing communal open space removes the convenience of providing an area of deep soil area within the site for the purposes of passive recreational use.

 

Overall, the proposed deletion of the communal open space does not comply with the objectives or controls under Section 4.8.1 Communal Open space – of Part D1 Kensington of the RDCP 2013. A condition is included requiring it to be deleted from the development. Other works associated with the sought deletion of the communal open space are also conditioned to be deleted from the development application including:

 

·      Convert western portion of communal lobby space into additional floor space for apartment 105 which is to be converted from a single bedroom into a two bedroom apartment

·      Replace west facing lobby doorway with window

 

Communal Open space - Apartment Design Guide (ADG)

The proposed deletion of the communal open space does not comply with the objectives and controls under the Communal and public open space (Section 3D of Part 3 Siting of Development) of the ADG.

 

This part of the application should be deleted from the development application because it unnecessarily reduces the importance of it as an environmental resource that provides outdoor recreation opportunities for residents; a connection to the natural environment, and their wellbeing. In particular, removing the communal open space access, will reduce the amenity of the occupants of the other units by reducing access to landscaped elements, opportunities for group and individual recreation and activities; opportunities for social interaction; and amenity and outlook for residents.

 

Having particular regard to the ADG controls for communal open space, the proposed development does not comply with the following controls:

 

·      The development is not able to meet the requirement for a minimum of 25% of the site being provided as communal open space;

·      The development is not able to meet the requirement for direct, equitable access should be provided to communal open space areas from common circulation areas, entries and lobbies

 

Notwithstanding, the ADG provide opportunities for developments that are unable to achieve the above design criteria due to constraints such as on small lots, sites within business zones, or in a dense urban area. It is not considered that the subject site falls within these constraints for the following reasons:

 

·      The site is not small when considered in the context of surrounding developments;

·      The originally approved development made arrangements for the provisions of communal open space that in the opinion of Council and as explained earlier, does  and is able to provide good and improved levels of amenity to the occupants of the Level 1 apartments;

·      The communal open space is at level 1 and adequately separated from the commercial uses at ground level

·      The development is not able to provide alternative areas of communal open space such as on podiums or roofs within the development

·      The applicant does not provide greater sized balconies than the minimum required under the RDCP 2013 or the ADG

·      Whilst the development is in close proximity to public open spaces and facilities it is considered that the subject site is capable of providing communal open space and there are no significant constraints exhibited within the site that are not able to be suitably ameliorated or require reliance on public open spaces for the purposes of passive and active recreational use.

·      The communal open space as originally approved is located at least 3m away from bedrooms thus complying with the requirements under Section 4H-1 of the  ADG.

 

Note: The refusal of the sought removal of communal open space at the rear requires the refusal of the enlargement of unit 105 (and associated changes) and reinstatement of the originally approved lobby access and western doorway from the main lobby area to the rear communal open space areas.

 

Modifications to window openings

The proposed modifications to windows openings as a whole are generally considered acceptable and will not result in any appreciable impacts on the visual or acoustic of the neighbouring properties.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Overall, the essence of the application is not changing and it complies with the relevant RDCP 2013 controls relating to privacy of neighbouring properties satisfying the relevant assessment criteria and will not result in any significant adverse impacts upon either the amenity of the adjoining premises or the character of the locality. However, the proposed reallocation of communal open space to the individual use of level 1 west facing units does not satisfy the controls or objectives under the Section 4.8.1 of Part D1 Kensington Town Centre of the Randwick Development Control Plan 2013. The proposed reallocation of communal open space for private use does not satisfy the objectives or controls for Communal Open space under Section 3D of Part 3 Siting of Development of the Apartment Design Guide.

 

Consequently, subject to a condition being included requiring the reinstatement of the communal open space inclusive of communal access the remaining aspect of the proposed modifications are suitable for the site, and the application is, therefore, recommended for approval.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Sections 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. 414/2014 for Section 96 modification of approved development by relocation of fire hydrant to southern wall, alterations to glazing on eastern, northern and southern facades at No. 47-53 Anzac Parade, Kensington subject to the following non standard conditions and the standard conditions contained in the development application compliance report attached to this report:

 

Non standard conditions

 

Approved Plans & Supporting Documentation

1.       The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans and supporting documentation listed below and endorsed with Council’s approved stamp, except where amended by Council in red and/or by other conditions of this consent:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Received by Council

DA1.01 Rev B

Fox Johnson

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.02 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.03 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.04 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.05 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.06 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.07 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.08 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.09 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA1.10 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA2.01 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA2.02 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA2.03 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA2.04 Rev B

 

29/10/14

31 October 2014

DA4.01 Rev A

 

17/09/14

16 October 2014

 

BASIX Certificate No.

Dated

Received by Council

556751M_02

21 November 2014

21 November 2014

 

as amended by the following Section 96 plans and documentation:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Received by Council

CD1.01 Rev A

Fox Johnson

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.02 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.03 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.04 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.05 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.06 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.07 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.08 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.09 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD1.10 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD2.01 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD2.04 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD2.05 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD2.06 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

CD2.07 Rev A

 

16/06/15

30 June 2015

 

BASIX Certificate No.

Dated

Received by Council

556751M_03

18 May 2015

30 June 2015

 

An amended BASIX certificate must be consistent with the plans referenced in Condition 1 of this determination and a copy shall be submitted to Council and the Principal Certifying Authority prior to an occupation certificate being issued for the development.

 

Amend condition 2 to include:

c.     The following elements of the Section 96 A application shall be deleted from the development:

 

·      Increase floor of unit 105 and associated changes (reinstate lobby access),

·      New window on western façade (reinstate western doorway,

·      Conversion of communal garden area to private space (reinstate communal open space areas approved under DA/414/2014)

·      Deletion of gate access off Balfour Lane (reinstate gate access to Balfour Lane)

 

This condition requires all plans to be amended to delete these works from the development. Details shall be submitted to Councils Manager Development Assessment for approval prior to an amended Construction Certification incorporating the approved section 96 A modifications being issued.

 

d.     Additional timber screening (inclusive of gate) and landscaping may be provided between the end Level 1 west facing apartments and communal open space areas in the rear yard. Details showing additional landscaping or screens (gates) must be submitted to Councils Manager Development Assessment for approval prior to an amended Construction Certificate incorporating this change is issued for the development.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB 

Director City Planning Report No. CP33/15

 

 

Subject:                  6 Fox Street, Malabar (DA/301/2012/C)

Folder No:               DA/301/2012/C

Author:                    Matthew Choi, Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Proposal:                 Section 96(2) application to delete condition 2(b) in relation to the height of the fence 

Ward:                      South Ward

Applicant:               Mr. George Katrib

Owner:                    Mr. George and Irene Katrib

Summary

Recommendation:   Refusal

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Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 

Development Application Executive summary report

 

The application is referred to Council for determination at the request of Councillors Andrews, Belleli, D’Souza, Nash and Stavrinos. 

Proposal

 

The subject Section 96 modification seeks approval to delete condition 2(b) with regards to the height of the front boundary fence.

 

Condition no. 2(b) reads as follows:

The solid portion of the fence on Fox Street boundary adjacent to the north eastern side of the driveway shall be amended so that the upper 2/3(1200mm) of the fence is provided with infill vertical metal slats that is at least 30% open when viewed from the street.

 

The front boundary fence has been constructed without development consent.

 

Site

 

The subject site is known as 6 Fox Street, Malabar and formally described as Lot 8 DP 21919. The site is a rectangular shaped allotment with a frontage width of 12.955 metres, a depth of 35.965 metres and a total area of 465.9m2. The subject site is located on the corner of Fox Street and Victoria Street, Malabar.

 

Neighbouring to the east and south of the site are existing free standing single storey dwelling houses. Further to the east are Long Bay and the Malabar Headland. The subject site comprises of a recently constructed two storey dwelling house and is characterized by a relatively flat development with minimal slope across the width of the site. The immediate locality is primarily low scale residential in nature containing predominantly free standing single and two storey dwelling houses.

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. No submissions were received as a result of the notification process.

 

Section 96 Amendment

 

Substantially the same development:

The proposed modifications to the front fence form are considered to be substantially the same development.

 

Notification and consideration of submissions:

The owners of adjoining and neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed Section 96 modifications in accordance with the DCP for Public Notification.  

 

Consultation with relevant public authorities:

No referrals to other public authorities are required.

 

Key Issues

 

·        Randwick Development Control Plan 2013

 

Part C1: Low Density Residential

 

Clause 7.2: Front Fencing

The Council controls for front fencing specify the following:

 

i)    The maximum height of front fencing is limited to 1200mm, as measured from the footpath level, with the solid portion not exceeding 600mm, except for the piers.

 

The maximum height of front fencing may be increased to 1800mm, provided the upper two-thirds are partially open, except for piers.

 

ii)   Construct the non-solid portion of the fence with lightweight materials (such as timber panels slats or the like) that are at least 30% open and evenly distributed along the full length of the fence.

 

iii)  Solid front fence of up to 1800mm in height may be permitted in the following scenarios:

 

o   Front fence for sites facing arterial roads.

 

o   Fence on the secondary street frontage of corner allotments, which is behind the alignment of the primary street façade. The fence must be tendered down to match the height of the primary street fence once past the front façade alignment.

 

In addition to the above, the relevant objectives of front fencing include:

 

·      The alignment, configuration, rhythm of bays, height, materials, colours and texture of new fences complement the building on the site and the streetscape. 

 

·      Fences are designed to achieve a balance between privacy, safety and security for the building occupants and visual interaction with the public domain, without adversely affecting the amenity of the pedestrian environment.

 

·      To ensure ancillary development do not present as prominent features and detract from the streetscape character.

 

The northern portion of the proposed front fence is approximately 1.86 metres in height and is of a solid construction. The front fence design does not comply with Council’s controls within the RDCP2013 in that the upper two thirds of the front fencing is not constructed of a lightweight material and does not provide the minimum required 30% opening within this portion of the fence form.

 

Council previously advised the applicant within the Section 96 (DA/301/2012/B):

 [The fence] already constructed with solid materials and having a height of 1.86m could not be substantiated and will result in further unwanted precedent in the locality. To ensure that the objectives of the DCP could be satisfied and maintained, the solid part of the front fence adjoining the north eastern corner must be modified to coherently complement with the integrated design of bay and rhythm of the fences forward the building by providing openings to match the finished facade of the north eastern boundary fence.

 

IMG_5524

Location of the unauthorised front fence adjacent to the adjoining front fence

 

IMG_5526

Location of the unauthorised front fence and the low lying fence heights of the adjacent dwellings

The Statement of Environmental Effects submitted by the applicant raises the following points in support of the non-compliant portion of the front fencing:

 

The proposed development achieves compliance with the overarching DCP objectives in particular that “fences must be designed to promote high quality streetscapes, adequate privacy and security protection for dwellings and appropriate surveillance and interaction with the public domain”.

 

Council comment: The intention of the above objective is to ensure that any new front fence design achieves a balance between providing a high quality of visual amenity, adequate privacy to the occupants, allows for casual surveillance and interacts positively to the existing streetscape. The applicant advises that “this portion of the fence provides for a high degree of privacy and security for the subject dwelling”. The extended height of the proposed front fence does not offer any additional privacy to the subject site to that of which was recommended as part of condition 2(b) within the Section 96/B application. The fencing is located directly adjacent to a non-trafficable soft landscaped area which is inaccessible given the significant height of the retaining wall and the steep sloping nature of the driveway at subfloor level. Beyond this, the height of the fencing does not improve privacy to the habitable room areas given there is an existing blank wall opposite the front fencing and the separation from the pedestrian pathway to the ground floor office room window is approximately 9 metres which is an ample distance in minimising opportunities of overlooking from the streetscape. Therefore the non-compliance to the front fence does not contribute to any additional privacy impacts than one that provides an opening of 30%.

 

With regards to the quality of the front fence design the solid masonry design, the applicant argues the following: “is a minor component of the development extending for only 13% of the front boundary with the remaining 73% being well within compliance of the DCP numeric controls” and “the overall design of the fence is of a high quality nature that complements the approved and constructed dwelling”. The applicants’ justifications are unsubstantiated and that whilst the portion of the front fencing is mainly restricted to the northern portion of the front fencing - it does not respond to the dominant front fence form within the immediate locality. The front fences along Fox Street are of a low-lying nature and forms part of the streetscape character. The height of the proposed fence is inconsistent with the appearance of the front fences and creates a prominent feature on the streetscape given its design of a 1.8 metre solid front fence is out of character with the immediate locality. 

 

In addition to this, the streetscape view vista from a standing position on the intersection of Fox Street and Victoria Street to a north-easterly aspect comprises of open front setbacks and characterised by low fence heights. Therefore in terms of compliance with the existing streetscape the appearance the solid front fence is not an appropriate response to the existing form of the locality or the specific conditions of the site and the surrounds within Fox Street and Victoria Street.

 

The increased height and solid portion of the proposed front fence does not significantly improve visual privacy or offer any additional security protection to the dwelling and the height of the front fencing is inconsistent and does not respond to the local site particulars. In considering the merits of a balanced approach to the objectives for front fences - the subject section 96 modification is not supported.

 

Finally, the applicant has identified a number of front fences with extended front fence heights and requests that Council maintain a similar stance including the following:

 

 

 

140 Prince Edward Street, Malabar:

The increased height of the front fence along the southern elevation was approved given that the fence is located directly in front of a principle outdoor recreation space to the subject dual occupancy development. Therefore it is reasonable to expect that privacy should be afforded to the private open space areas of the occupants. The position of the fence is also located on the subject sites secondary street frontage.

 

IMG_5532

Front fence form of the immediate adjoining neighbour at no. 4 Fox Street, Malabar

 

IMG_5533

Front fence form of the neighbour at no. 2 Fox Street, Malabar

 

IMG_5535

Front fence form of the neighbour at no. 3 Fox Street, Malabar

 

IMG_5536

Front fence form of the neighbour at no. 1 Fox Street, Malabar

 

6 Howe Street, Malabar:  

The increase to the height of the front fence along the south-eastern elevation of no. 6 Howe Street has been constructed without Council consent. The front fence has not been constructed in accordance with the approved Section 96 modification of DA/134/2000/A and therefore should not be considered as a precedent given no consent was granted in the first instance. Furthermore, the subject site is not located within the immediate locality or within view of the proposed subject Section 96 application and therefore should not be considered as part of the existing streetscape character.

 

61 Victoria Street, Malabar:

The height of the front fencing was appropriately conditioned to include that the fence be limited to a maximum height of 1.5 metres to maintain a reasonable level of amenity to the adjoining residential development and the streetscape. The subject site is not located within the immediate locality or within view of the proposed subject section 96 application and therefore should not be considered as part of the existing streetscape character.

 

33 Bay Parade, Malabar:

The height of the fence at no. 33 Bay Parade fronting Fox Street is the subject sites rear boundary fence and is located directly adjacent to the rear principal open space of the neighbouring dwelling. Therefore this is not considered to be an appropriate example of a front fence precedent and it should be noted that the front fencing located forward of the building alignment is a low-lying front fence form.

 

67 Victoria Street, Malabar and

98 Victoria Street, Malabar:

The increase to the height of the fence along the south-western portion of the site at no. 67 Victoria Street and the front fence at no. 98 Victoria Street was granted consent during the previous development control plan – the Randwick Development Control Plan – Dwelling Houses and Attached Dual Occupancies 2002. No. 67 and 98 Victoria Street was approved in 2005 and 1977, respectively.

 

The applicant argues “the proposed front fences are not recent approvals, they contribute to the existing/approved streetscape of the immediate locality. Furthermore, it is reiterated that regardless of these fences not being recently approved, the DCP control in relation to front fences has been retained throughout both the superseded DCP and the current DCP”.  

 

It should be noted that the abovementioned examples are not located within close proximity of the subject site and are not visible to form part of the dominant visual streetscape appearance. With regards to nos. 67 and 98 Victoria Street it is considered that these examples do not provide any significance in satisfying Council’s objectives to the front fence form. These developments do not form the prevailing rhythm and consistency of front fence forms along Fox Street and Victoria Street. It is clear that the dominant front fence form are of low lying front fences, all of which, contribute to the streetscape character of the immediate locality. Therefore, it is considered that the excessive height of the proposed front fence is not an established built form element within the existing streetscape and therefore should be refused development consent.

 

Recommendation:

Condition no. 2(b) reads as follows:

 

2(b)    The solid portion of the fence on Fox Street boundary adjacent to the north eastern side of the driveway shall be amended so that the upper 2/3(1200mm) of the fence is provided with infill vertical metal slats that is at least 30% open when viewed from the street.

 

Council does not support the deletion of condition no. 2(b) and shall remain as an open design fence and remain compatible with the appearance of the existing streetscape as required by condition 2(b) of the consent.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The increase to the height of the northern portion of the proposed front fence does not comply with the controls and objectives of Clause 7.2: Front Fencing under the RDCP 2013 and the relevant objectives of the RLEP2012. Therefore the deletion of condition no. 2(b) is not supported by Council.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, refuses development consent under Sections 80 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. DA/301/2012/C for the deletion of condition 2(b) at No. 6 Fox Street, Malabar, for the following reasons:

 

1.     The proposed development is not consistent with objectives of the R2 zone under the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 in that the proposal will adversely impact the environment of the locality by compromising the established streetscape. 

 

2.     The proposed development does not satisfy the controls and relevant objectives of Section 7.2: Front Fencing, under the RDCP 2013 in relation to the height and finish of the front fencing.  

 

3.     The height of the proposed front fencing will set an undesirable planning precedent given the local streetscape character.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Director City Planning Report No. CP34/15

 

Subject:                  58-60 Arden Street, Coogee (DA/754/2014)

Folder No:               DA/754/2014

Author:                    Mark Swain, Senior Environmental Planning Officer      

 

Proposal:                 Alterations and additions to an existing presbytery building adjacent to St Anthony's Church, and conversion of the presbytery building to a childcare centre for 95 children (Heritage item)

Ward:                      North Ward

Applicant:               Platinum Pre School

Owner:                    RC Trustees Church Archdiocese

Summary

Recommendation:   Approval

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Subject Site

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

 

 

Ù

North

 

Locality Plan

 


Development Application Executive summary report

 

The application is referred to Council for determination by the request of Councillors Neilson, Smith, Shurey, Bowen and Matson.

 

Proposal

 

The proposal involves alterations and additions to an existing presbytery building adjacent to St Anthony's Church, and conversion of the presbytery building to a childcare centre for 95 children from 2 -5 years of age (Heritage item).

 

The facility will comprise ground and first floor internal and external play areas and include ancillary areas including a staff room, sick bay, baby change room, amenities, kitchen and laundry areas.

 

The proposed child care centre will provide for a total of 13 staff.

 

A total of 10 spaces are provided for the proposed child care centre.

 

The proposal as originally submitted raised traffic, parking, acoustic amenity and heritage issues in relation to both internal changes to the existing presbytery building and the integration of the new building works with the existing building.

 

Additional traffic survey information was submitted and the most recent amended plans incorporate the following changes which are summarised in the applicant’s submission and seek to address the heritage and acoustic amenity issues:

 

 

It is in relation to the most recent amended plans that this report relates.

 

Site

 

The following extract from the Statement of Environmental Effects submitted by the applicant aptly describes the site and surrounds:

 

 

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the DCP – Public Notification. As a result of this notification, the following submissions were received:

 

·      43 Arden Street, Clovelly

·      45 Aden Street, Clovelly

·      Flats 1 and 2/56 Arden Street, Clovelly

·      62 Arden Street, Clovelly

·      16 Fewings Street, Clovelly

·      35 Greville, Street, Clovelly

·      39 Greville Street, Clovelly

·      41 Greville Street, Clovelly

·      43 Greville Street, Clovelly

·      43A Greville Street, Clovelly

·      45 Greville Street, Clovelly

 

Issue

Comment

Insufficient parking for staff and parents pick up and drop off areas for parents.

It is recommended that there be a reduction to a maximum of 80 children. Council’s Development Engineer has assessed the traffic and parking impacts as acceptable subject to this reduction in numbers. See Traffic and Parking in Key Issues section of the report.

The proposal represents an overdevelopment of the site which will have serious traffic congestion implications on the surrounding locality.

The built form impacts associated with the amended plans have been assessed by Council’s Heritage Planner as acceptable. The poprosal is consistent with the requirements for Child Care Centres under Council’s DCP and will not have significant traffic and parking impacts. See Traffic and Parking and Heritage in Key Issues section of the report.

Impact on privacy associated with set down and pick up of children in Greville and Arden Streets.

No set down/pick up areas are to occur in Greville Street. The properties in Greville and Arden Streets are separated respectively by a 20m road reserve width which will provide adequate separation in relation to living and private open space areas of those properties. Also having regard to the short term nature associated set down/pick areas, no unacceptable visual privacy impacts are envisaged to surrounding properties.

The proposed centre will cause unreasonable noise impacts during set down/pick up periods and from outdoor play areas.

The acoustic report submitted with the application demonstrates that compliance with the relevant noise limitations is achievable. Provision of an acoustic buffer to Greville Street included as a requirement in the recommendation will further ensure acceptable acoustic levels. The report has been assessed as acceptable by Council’s Environmental Health officers and a further requirement for a validation report 3 months after commencement of the use is included as a requirement in the recommendation.

The area is used as a parking lot for commuters into the city. The proposed child care centre will worsen the availability of parking on surrounding streets.

Based on a recommended reduction from 95 to a maximum of 80 children, the child care centre will include adequate provision for staff parking and set down/pick up areas.  As such, the on street parking availability on surrounding streets would not be impacted. See also Traffic and Parking in the Key Issues section of this report.

There is a conflict of interest for the church as the owner of the property including St Andrews School having regard to the adverse impacts on the school associated with the proposed child care centre.

Council’s DCP in relation to Child Care Centres prefers that they be co-located with existing educational establishments.

Parking within the school should be used to provide for staff parking.

Based on a recommended reduction from 95 to a maximum of 80 children, the child care centre will include adequate provision for staff parking and set down/pick up areas. The provision of parking for child care staff is not considered necessary in the circumstances. See also Traffic and Parking in Key Issues section of the report.

The proposed development will create safety concerns for children walking on surrounding roads and laneways including along Greville Street.

Based on a recommended reduction from 95 to a maximum of 80 children, the child care centre will include adequate provision for staff parking and set down/pick up areas. The size and operation of the drop off/pickup area will adequately deal with the demand generated and provides a safe and convenient access to the child care centre. See also Traffic and Parking in Key Issues section of the report.

The proposal will create additional hazard to an already dangerous intersection on the corner of Arden and Greville Streets.

Based on the recommended reduction from 95 to a maximum of 80 children and the likely associated traffic generation no adverse additional traffic safety issues are expected. See also Traffic and Parking in Key Issues section of the report

The proposal will result in an excess in supply of this type of land use already available in the locality.

The number of child care centres within a given locality is not a relevant consideration under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979.

Additional congestion will be caused by waste collection vehicles associated with the use.

The low frequency of movements in this regard is not expected to generate any significant delays.

 

Support

The following submissions were received in support of the proposed childcare centre.

 

·      4/9 Barry Street, Clovelly

·      202 Oberon Street, Coogee and 202 Rainbow Street, Coogee (received in 1 submission)

 

Key Issues

 

Permissibility and consistency with zone objectives

SEPP (Infrastructure) 2007

The Infrastructure SEPP contains provisions in respect of development with and without consent for educational establishments on land within a prescribed zones including the SP2 (Educational Establishment) zone, applicable to the subject site.

 

Clause 28 of the SEPP provides:

 

Development permitted with consent

(1)  Development for the purpose of educational establishments may be carried out by any person with consent on land in a prescribed zone.

(1A), (1B)  (Repealed)

(1C)  Development for a purpose specified in clause 31A (1) may be carried out by any person with consent on land on which there is an existing school or TAFE establishment.

 

(2)  Development for any of the following purposes may be carried out by any person with consent on any of the following land:

(a)  Development for the purpose of educational establishments—on land on which there is an existing educational establishment,

(b)  development for the purpose of the expansion of existing educational establishments—on land adjacent to the existing educational establishment.

 

(3)  An educational establishment (including any part of its site and any of its facilities) may be used, with consent, for any community purpose, whether or not it is a commercial use of the establishment.

 

(4)  Subclause (3) does not require consent to carry out development on land if that development could, but for this Policy, be carried out on that land without consent.

 

In relation to clause 3 above, given the existing St Anthony’s Primary School as part of the wider site, the use of part of the land for the purposes of a child care centre which will benefit the local community is consistent with the intentions of this clause. In any case, the permissibility of the proposed use is not reliant on this clause as addressed as follows.

 

Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012

The site is zoned SP2 Special Infrastructure (Educational Establishment) under Randwick Local Environmental Plan. The zoning objectives are as follows:

 

1   Objectives of zone

•       To provide for infrastructure and related uses.

•       To prevent development that is not compatible with or that may detract from the provision of infrastructure.

•       To facilitate development that will not adversely affect the amenity of nearby and adjoining development.

•       To protect and provide for land used for community purposes.

 

The proposed development as recommended to be reduced in capacity to allow for a maximum of 80 children is consistent with the zone objectives as:

 

•       The proposed use of the site for a child care centre will contribute to the provision of infrastructure and related facilities and will not detract from the ongoing provision of infrastructure.

 

•       The amenity impacts associated with the reduced number of children are assessed in the body of this report as acceptable.

 

•       The proposal is consistent with the intention of the zone to provide land for community purposes.

 

The zone permits the following with consent.

 

3   Permitted with consent

Environmental protection works; Flood mitigation works; Roads; The purpose shown on the Land Zoning Map, including any development that is ordinarily incidental or ancillary to development for that purpose.

 

The proposed care centres represents an ancillary component to the wider use of the site as an educational establishment. Child care centres are complementary and integral to the functioning of a modern school. As such the proposal is permissible with consent.

 

Traffic and Parking

The application as submitted included a Traffic Impact Assessment Report prepared by Varga Traffic Planning. This report was reviewed by Council’s Development Engineer and additional information was requested to substantiate the assertions in the document. The following comments were provided by the Development Engineer in relation to the most recently amended plans and documentation:

 

General Comments

The assessing officer is advised that following detailed traffic and parking assessment Development Engineering recommends the proposed development be approved with a reduced capacity of 80 children and subject to the conditions provided in this report.

 

This reduced number has been determined by restricting the parking demand (including staff and pickup/drop-off) to within the site and along the site frontage on Arden Street in a proposed pickup and drop-off zone and will result in minimal impacts on the surrounding availability of on-street parking.

 

PARKING COMMENTS

Parking Requirements for childcare centres are assessed as per the rate specified in Part B7 of Randwick Council’s Development Control Plan 2013 being;

 

1 Space per two staff plus 1 space per 8 children for pickup and drop-off

The proposed childcare centre development comprises of 13 staff and 95 children.

 

Parking Provision Required         = 13/2 (staff) + 95/8 (pickup/drop–off)

                                       = 6.5 (staff) + 11.8 (pickup/drop-off)

                                       = 18 spaces (total)

 

Parking Provision Provided = 3 (staff) +7 (pickup/drop-off) + 2 motorbike spaces (staff)

                                       = 10 car spaces (total) + 2 motorbike spaces

 

Parking Deficiency             = 3.5 (staff) + 4.8 (pickup and drop –off)

                                       = 8 spaces (total)

 

The proposed off-street parking provision of 10 spaces will not be sufficient to accommodate the parking demand generated by staff and patrons for a 95 place childcare centre.  The applicant is therefore relying on the availability of on-street parking to accommodate any overflow demand that cannot be met within the site.

 

The submitted traffic and parking assessment Report and addendum by Varga Traffic Planning acknowledges the deficiency and attempts to justify this by providing parking survey data demonstrating the suitable availability of on-street parking. The parking surveys indicate that there is on-street parking available within 100m of the site be it limited. To minimise the impact on kerb side parking it has been recommended in this report to reduce child numbers to 80 and establish a on-street pickup and drop-off zone on Arden Street (see below). This will assist in ensuring any overflow parking is mainly restricted to the site frontage. Further breakdown of staff and pickup/ drop-off parking is provided as follows.

 

Staff Parking

Development Engineering generally requires that all staff parking for childcare centres be provided within the site (as was required with a similar proposal at 263-269 Clovelly Road) and hence the 3.5 space deviancy from the control is not supported.

 

To address this issue a minimum of 1 and a maximum of 2 additional spaces (total of 4 or 5) shall be dedicated for staff within the internal carpark. Bicycle parking shall also be required (minimum 4 spaces). A reduction in child numbers to 80 as recommended in this report would also likely reduce the staff numbers by approximately 2 staff thereby reducing the staff parking demand by 1 space.  It would also be assumed that the motorbike spaces would generally be used by staff rather than patrons given the nature of the business.

 

Council’s Transport Engineers have also requested that the applicant submit a ‘Travel Plan’ to ensure the demand for parking is minimised. This can be incorporated into the Plan of Management and shall include but not be limited to measures such as support for walking and cycling, car sharing, management of workplace parking spaces, & incentives for public transport use. A condition has been included in this report requiring the Travel Plan to be prepared and submitted and approved by Council’s Department of integrated Transport prior to the issuing of an Occupation certificate.

 

When combined it is considered the above measures will generally ensure that all staff parking demand will be able to be met within the site.

 

On Street Pickup and Drop-off zone on Arden Street

As the number of proposed pickup and drop-off carspaces is deficient by about 5 spaces (or 6-7 spaces after additional space allocation to staff) it will not be sufficient to meet the expected demand from a 95 place centre. It was therefore recommended by Council’s Development & Transport Engineers that a timed pickup and drop-off zone be established on the Arden Street frontage to accommodate any overflow parking demand.

 

The length of the proposed pickup and drop-off zone on the Arden Street frontage is approximately 24m long which will be long enough to accommodate 4 on-street carspaces. Additional pickup and drop-off parking in Greville Street would not be supported to minimise the impact on local residents and maximise the availability of on-street parking to other users.

 

In consideration of the above the resulting parking allocation would follow

 

Staff Parking = 4-5 car spaces + 2 motorbike space + bicycle parking 

Pickup & Drop-off = 9-10 spaces (5-6 on-site + 4 on Arden Street)

 

For the pickup and drop-off parking to be totally catered for without impacting into Greville or surrounding streets the number of places within the childcare centre should be restricted to a maximum of 80 children being derived from the parking rate of 1 space per 8 children (max 10 spaces available x 8 = 80). 

 

Details of the proposed pickup and drop-off zone are to be approved by Randwick Traffic Committee.

 

Parking  layout

The carpark layout appears to comply with the requirements of Australian Standard 2890.1:2004 and is satisfactory. The driveway opening and vehicle crossing shall be a minimum of 3.5m wide to ensure adequate vehicle access.

 

TRAFFIC COMMENTS

Using the applicable rates provided in the document  ‘RMS Guide to Traffic Generating Developments’ the following vehicle trip generation has been calculated during the peak times associated with the proposed 95 place child care centre;

 

Time                                               Number of Trips

7:00-9:00am                                    0.8 x 95 = 76

2:30-4:00pm                                   0.3 x 95 = 28.5

4:00-6:00 pm                                  0.7 x 95 = 66.5

 

This indicates that the proposed 95 place child care centre would generate a total of 171 vehicle trips per day. The morning 7-9am period would generate the most intense peak with a vehicle arriving or departing the childcare centre once every 1.6 minutes on average.

 

With a reduced capacity of 80 children the above peaks would reduce by approximately 15% resulting in a total of 144 trips per day and a vehicle arriving or departing the childcare centre approximately once every 2 minutes during the morning 7-9am peak . This is considered a significant improvement and a reasonable compromise to assist in addressing surrounding resident’s traffic concerns. It should also be noted that a number of these trips would be expected to be shared with the neighbouring school.

 

Council’s Transport Engineers have also assessed the traffic generation associated with the proposal and have determined the impacts to be acceptable. There is therefore no further objection to the proposal on traffic grounds.

 

TRANSPORT ENGINEERS COMMENTS

The application was referred to Council’s Department of Integrated Transport for comment. The following response was received:

 

Following a review of the documentation presented for the above DA, the Integrated Transport department has no objections to the proposal provided that the following conditions are considered for inclusion in the approval:

 

·      Provision of secure, covered cycle parking for staff, parents & visitors

·      Provision of trip end facilities for staff i.e. showers/lockers

·      Inclusion of a storage area for parents to leave prams/childrens scooters etc

·      A detailed Travel Plan for staff and users to be submitted to Council for approval prior to opening

·      The installation of P10minute 7am-9.30am, 4pm-6pm Mon-Fri on the western side of Arden Street, 10m south of Greville Street, to the existing No Parking 8am-9.30, 2.30-4pm School Days Only restriction (to be approved by Council’s traffic committee)

·      Works zone & CTMP requirement

 

The above points are generally supported by Development Engineering and have been incorporated into the recommended conditions provided in this report. The following comments are also made.

 

·           It is noted shower facilities have been provided on the ground floor (within laundry) and on the first floor (staff bathroom). This is satisfactory.

 

·           A storage area for prams/ scooters is not explicitly provided however this could possibly be provided beneath the stairs in the main entrance hallway. This can be addressed within the plan of management.

 

Planning officer comments:

The reduced number of children and the resultant lessening in demand for parking will allow the operations of the child care centre to be contained on site and on Arden Street and does not require the provision of set down/pick up areas in Greville Street.  

 

Acoustic Privacy

The application was accompanied by an acoustic report prepared by SLR Consulting which was referred to the Environmental Health Section and the following comments were received:

 

Proposed Development:

The development application for 95 children within the 2-5 year old age bracket. The proposed hours of operation are 7.30am – 6.00pm weekdays only. It is also proposed for the centre to be closed during weekends and public holidays.

 

Noise Concerns:

Acoustic information was received in the form of acoustic report dated 11 September 2014 from SLR Environmental Solutions:

 

In summary the acoustic report confirmed compliance with noise criteria noting a high background noise level from urban road at Arden Street.

 

The assessment has advised noise emission compliance can be achieved will achieved project specific noise goals with the boundary treatment in section 6 of the report requiring a barrier fence

 

·      Noise impacts from site related traffic on public roads comply with the NSW Road Noise Policy and are acceptable.

 

Music is not recommended to be played in outdoor areas and a condition of consent to that effect should be included.

 

With regards to noise, after reviewing the acoustic report and statements provided by the acoustic consultant it is considered that the proposed development will comply with the relevant noise criteria pending implementation of the mitigation measures outlined in the acoustic report.

 

It is also recommended that an acoustic validation assessment is undertaken three month after occupation to confirm the operation of the childcare centre is operating in accordance with the requirements of the acoustic report supporting the development application.

 

A condition requiring the plan of management for the centre be provided to Council and reviewed by the acoustic consultant is recommended as part of this report.

 

It should be noted that developments of this nature may from time to time have some amenity impact regardless of reports received from acoustic consultants confirming compliance.

 

Planning officer comments:

Having regard to the comments made and appropriate controls included as conditions in the recommendation, the acoustic impacts are considered acceptable.

 

Heritage

The existing presbytery which is proposed to be altered and converted to the child care centre is a heritage item of local significance under the RLEP as are the existing church and primary school buildings. The application as submitted was referred to Council’s heritage planner and significant concerns were raised regarding both internal treatment of the existing heritage item and the compatibility of the proposed new works. As a consequence, the plans have been amended in several respects as outlined in the proposal section of this report. The following comments were received in relation to the most recently amended plans:

 

The Site

St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, school and presbytery are listed as heritage items under Randwick LEP 2012.  The Randwick Heritage Study Inventory Sheet considers that the Classical Revival church building has architectural as well as local historical and cultural interest, and together with the school and presbytery is part of a good streetscape grouping.  The Inventory Sheet notes façade features including the columned portico, with circular feature window and large moulded arch above. 

 

Background

A pre-lodgement application (PL/11/2012) was received in March 2012 for alterations and additions to use the existing presbytery as a child care centre for 56 children which included a single storey rear addition.  Concerns were raised in relation to the heritage impact of a number of proposed internal and external changes. 

 

The original development application proposed alterations and additions to use the existing presbytery as a childcare centre for 95 children.  At ground floor level it was proposed to make internal and external changes to provide playrooms, office and staff areas, amenities, and disabled access.  At first floor level a number of internal changes were proposed to provide play areas and amenities.  Externally, a number of changes were proposed to the front elevation and a two storey rear addition was proposed.  The existing garage was to be adapted for use as a kitchen and laundry.  Outdoor play areas were proposed to the front, rear and north of the building and new car park for 10 vehicles to the south.  Signage was also proposed to the Arden Street frontage.  Concerns were raised that in relation to the heritage impact of proposed external changes, internal changes, rear addition, play areas and carparking.  A meeting was held to discuss these issues and amended drawings were been received.  As compared to the original drawings, amended drawings made further changes to the envelope of the rear addition.  changes to the front entry and play deck and to the form and detailing of the rear addition. 

 

Concerns remained that the dominance of the addition will be accentuated by the cantilevering of the first floor level beyond the line of the existing building and the ground level walls, and the cantilever of the high verandah roof.  Concerns also remained that the proposed exposed truss system and the heavy fascias and spandrels will give the addition an industrial appearance inappropriate for an addition to a heritage building.  It was considered there was further scope for reduction in building bulk and improved detailing for the rear addition to address these concerns.  A meeting was held to discuss these issues and further amended drawings have now been received. 

 

Proposal

As compared to the original drawings, amended drawings have made further changes to the building envelope of the rear addition. 

 

Submission

The current application has been accompanied by a Heritage Impact Statement prepared by Heritage Solutions.  In terms of significance the HIS considers that the building is a well-crafted, simple and intact example of the Inter-War Georgian Revival style, and that its corner location and setting of brush box and figs enhances the building and setting of the group. 

 

The HIS recommends externally that the principal form of the building and its fenestration to the two street frontages be conserved, and not concealed or dominated by new elements, with the south and east faces able to be altered, provided new elements are respectful in terms of form, materials and finishes.  The HIS recommends internally that the entry spaces and the stair, joinery and doors are important in revealing the character and use of the building.  The HIS recommends that the setting be conserved, including brick fencing and wrought iron gates.  The HIS addresses concerns raised in relation to the heritage impacts of the proposed external changes, internal changes, rear addition, play areas and carparking. 

 

Controls

The Heritage section of Randwick Development Control Plan 2013 provides Objectives and Controls applying to development in a heritage conservation area, including Design and character; Scale and form; Detailing; and Materials, finishes and colour schemes.  In relation to Design and character, the DCP includes an Objective of ensuring that new development does not adversely impact on the setting, streetscape or views associated with the heritage item and that additions respect the original built form, architectural style and character.  In relation to Scale and Form, the DCP includes Controls that additions must not visually dominate, compete with or conceal the original form and massing of the existing buildings, and must not contain any major or prominent design elements which compete with existing architectural features or detailing. 

 

Comments

The building retains much of its original character and detailing internally and externally including face brick walls, arched recessed entry porches, timber windows, brick fence to Arden Street, sandstone fence to Greville Street, plasterwork, timber skirtings, architraves and doors, and tiling to kitchen and bathrooms. 

 

        External changes

The proposal generally retains the original elevations of the building to Arden and Greville Streets, with the exception of a new door provided in the east (Arden Street) elevation.  It is noted that the existing entries from both Arden Street and Greville Street comprise brick stairs on the axis of the brick arched recessed entry porches.  The proposed new entry from Arden Street including new stair and ramp will partially obscure original detail.  The new stairs are to be built over the top of existing stairs however avoid demolition.  Amended drawings propose dark grey vertical metal railings instead of glass railings to allow better visibility of the façade.  A consent condition should be included requiring the submission of detail of the metal railings to ensure maximum visibility of the building façade is maintained.  Amended drawings have also centred the entry steps on the entry arch, improving the relationship between new and original fabric. 

 

        Internal changes

At ground floor level, the proposal maintains the original layout at the northern and southern ends of the building, including the entry and stair halls allowing the understanding of original spaces and the retention of original detailing including timberwork and plasterwork.  At first floor level, the proposal maintains the original layout at the northern end of the building, but a number of original walls are to be removed at the southern end of the building associated with the provision of open plan play areas.  While the extent of proposed removal of walls will allow only a limited number of nib walls to be retained, the HIS advises that beams to door head height and provision of timber strips within the timber flooring will express the location of original walls.  An appropriate consent condition should be included. 

 

Rear addition

The proposed two storey addition is located to the rear of the existing building, and will be visible from both Arden Street and Greville Streets.  The HIS acknowledges that the large cubic addition will be a strong contrast to the existing brick building, but notes a number of changes which will ensure that the addition is recessive, quiet and subservient against the Presbytery. 

 

Amended drawings have reduced the cantilever of the first floor over the carpark beyond the line of the existing building and the ground level walls from 3.5m to 3m.  The footprint of the first floor has also been reduced adjacent to the south west corner of the existing building.  Amended drawings have reduced the height of the higher roof form of the rear addition from 4m to 3.2m above the level below.  The overhang of the verandah roof beyond the rear upper level has also been reduced from 7m to 5m.  The reduction in building height and bulk will reduce the dominance of the rear addition in relation to the original building.  Amended drawings have also provided an enlarged lower roof to separate the main roof of the original building and the main roof of the rear addition.  The lower roof form will avoid the unsympathetic collision of the roof forms of the original proposal and will provide a better transition between the rear addition and the original building. 

 

The garage roof form has now been retained in full and the overhang of the upper level upper level roof has also been reduced in this area.  These changes will better retain the existing relationship between the forms of the garage and the main building.  Previously amended drawings have reduced the thickness of the roof plane from around 600mm to around 400mm and confirmed that clear glazing is proposed.  The proposed framing system, fascias and spandrels will give the addition a contemporary appearance which will not compete with the forms or detailing of the original building.  A consent condition should be included requiring the submission of a larger scale edge detail of the fascias and spandrels. 

 

        Play areas and car parking

The proposed front play area for the ground floor level will be raised around 1m above existing ground levels and will impact on the symmetry and existing setting of the building.  Amended drawings have stepped the play deck from the south elevation of the original building to provide a planter box to articulate the scale of the deck and increase planting.  The proposed side play area of the ground floor level will be close to the existing ground level beside the garage.  While the proposed rear play area will require the removal of a number of substantial trees, a number of trees within the site, as well as the existing street trees to Arden and Greville streets are to be retained.  Existing landscaping to the south elevation enhances the setting of the building and views from the direction of the church.  Removal of existing planting and provision of an entirely paved area occupying the full width of the area between the school building and the childcare centre, will have somewhat impact on the setting of the church. 

 

The heritage consultant confirmed the existing brick fence to the Arden Street and Greville Street boundaries are to be retained.  The existing wrought iron gates to Arden Street and Greville Street are to be replaced with vertical timber slat gates and the existing openings are to be widened.  A consent condition should be included in relation to the modification of the existing fences and the design of new gates.  The application proses a 2.8m high by 1.5m wide (4.2m2) pylon sign to the corner of Arden Street and Greville Streets.  The size of the sign is generally appropriate for educational establishment signage.  It is unclear whether or not the sign is to be illuminated.  An appropriate consent condition should be included. 

 

Planning officer comments:

Having regard to the design improvements incorporated into the amended plans, the favourable comments from Council’s Heritage Officer and appropriate conditions of consent which will further refine the detailing of materials, colours and finishes, the application will not adversely impact on the heritage significance of the site.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:     Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposal as amended and subject to conditions in the recommendation including a reduction to permit a maximum of 80 children within the facility, will not result in unacceptable adverse traffic, acoustic privacy or heritage impacts upon either the amenity of the adjoining premises or the character of the locality.

The application is therefore recommended for approval subject to the attached conditions of consent.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Sections 80 and 80A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. 754/2014 for alterations and additions to an existing presbytery building adjacent to St Anthony's Church, and conversion of the presbytery building to a childcare centre for 80 children at No. 58–60 Arden Street, Coogee subject to the following non standard conditions and the standard conditions contained in the development application compliance report attached to this report:

 

Non standard conditions

 

Amendment of Plans & Documentation

2.       The approved plans and documents must be amended in accordance with the following requirements and details are to be included in the Construction Certificate:

 

a)     The child care centre is limited to a maximum of 80 children.

 

5.       The layout of the ground, first and second floors of the existing building are to incorporate 300mm nib walls and beams projecting below ceiling level timber and/or strips within the timber flooring, as evidence of the original layout of the building and facilitate patching of plasterwork.

 

6.       Larger scale drawings are to be provided for the edge detail of the fascias and spandrels.  Drawings are to be submitted to and approved by Council’s Director City Planning, in accordance with Section 80A (2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 prior to a construction certificate being issued for the development.

 

7.       Details of the design of the vertical timber slat gates to the Arden Street and Greville Street frontages are to be submitted to and approved by Council’s Director City Planning, in accordance with Section 80A (2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 prior to a construction certificate being issued for the development.  The timber pickets to the front fence are to have a maximum gap of 50mm in order to be sympathetic to the historic fencing styles in the area. 

 

8.       Details are to be provided of any proposed illumination of the proposed sign on the corner of Arden Street and Greville Street. 

 

19.     Plans submitted for the construction certificate shall indicate provision for bicycle parking large enough to accommodate a minimum of 4 spaces in accordance with the requirements of Australian Standard 2890.3 at a suitable accessible location within the site to the satisfaction of the PCA.

 

66.     The Plan of Management of the childcare centre shall include a Workplace Travel Plan which endeavours to minimise the parking and traffic generation of the proposed development; The plan may include but not be limited to aspects such as support for walking and cycling, car sharing, management of workplace parking spaces, & incentives for public transport use.

 

The Travel Plan shall be submitted to and approved by Council’s Department of integrated Transport prior to the issuing of an Occupation certificate.

 

87.     A validation report must be obtained from a suitably qualified and experienced consultant in acoustics three (3) months after the business commences trading and from time to time as reasonably requested by Council. The report must demonstrate and certify that noise and vibration from the development satisfies the relevant provisions of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997, NSW Office of Environment & Heritage/Environment Protection Authority Noise Control Manual & Industrial Noise Policy and conditions of Council’s development consent.

 

The report is to be forwarded to and approved by Council. This report must address (but not limited to) the accumulation effect of mechanical plant and equipment and noise generated from all children in the outdoor play area. Any recommendations outlined in the acoustic report are to be implemented in accordance with the report.

 

88.     Music is not to be played in the outdoor play areas at any time.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA Compliance Report - 58-60 Arden Street, Clovelly

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB 

Director City Planning Report No. CP35/15

 

 

Subject:                  Advisory Committee Minutes

Folder No:               F2006/00216

Author:                    Gary Ella, Coordinator Community Programs & Partnerships      

 

Introduction

 

At the 10 March 2009 Community Services Committee Meeting, it was resolved that the minutes of the Advisory Committees are to be presented to the Community Services Committee. This report brings together, for Council’s acceptance, the minutes of the previous meetings adopted by the respective Advisory Committees.

 

Issues

 

As scheduled, the Advisory Committees (listed below) have met and the minutes of the meetings, which reflect discussions and outcomes, are attached.

 

The minutes will also be available on Council’s website after each meeting. This report includes minutes from:

 

·       The Aboriginal Advisory Committee – February 2015 (endorsed June 2015).

·       The Youth Advisory Committee – May 2015 (endorsed June 2015).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  An informed and Engaged Community.

Direction:  Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide services.

 

Financial impact statement

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The minutes of these Advisory Committee Meetings are now in order and are submitted to Council for acknowledgement and acceptance.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council acknowledges and accepts the minutes of the Aboriginal Advisory Committee – February 2015 (endorsed June 2015) and the Youth Advisory Committee – May 2015 (endorsed June 2015).

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

The Aboriginal Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - February 2015.

 

2.View

The Youth Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - May 2015.

 

 

 


The Aboriginal Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - February 2015.

Attachment 1

 

 

 

MINUTES

Randwick City Council Aboriginal Advisory Committee

 Meeting 6 February 2015

Yarra Bay House, La Perouse

 

Present:  

Cr Noel D’Souza – Randwick City Council

Michael Ingrey (Chair)

Cr Murray Matson - Randwick City Council

Sharron Smith – Randwick City Council (Minutes)

Carrine Liddell – La Perouse LALC

          Dean Kelly – National Parks & Wildlife Service

          Adrian Hansen – Aboriginal Affairs NSW

Melodie Gibson – Australia Council for the Arts

Robyn Murphy – ADAHC

Peter McKenzie – Community Member

Peter Cooley – First Hand Solutions

 

Guest:    

 

 

   Guest:          

 

 
Apologies: 

Susan Bryant – Community member

Cr Tony Bowen - Randwick City Council

Cr Scott Nash – Randwick City Council

 

 

Acknowledgement: Michael Ingrey chaired meeting in Cr Nash’s absence as per Terms of Reference. 

 

 

1.     Confirmation of Minutes

 

Previous minutes and outcomes discussed and noted.

 

Proposed: Melodie Gibson              Seconded:  Adrian Hansen

 

 

2.     Business arising from previous Minutes

 

             2.1 Survey of food scraps collection service   

Residents of the RCC LGA have received notice of a Survey on food scraps collection service. Council plans to introduce this food scraps collection service to all unit blocks from July 2015 and will seek feedback from Community.

 

Aunty Suzanne Bryant flagged her concerns the service may not be suitable for residents living in multi-story buildings, in particular for less mobile elderly residents having to walk up and down stairs if there is not a  collection bin on each level of unit block.

 

UPDATE: Cr Matson reports that the Council has not yet resolved whether this project will move forward as no formal decision has been made.

 

Action: Cr Nash to raise this issue with the Coordinator of Waste Services.  Carried over in Cr Nash’s absence.

 

2.2 Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) for Council

Randwick City Council met with Reconciliation Australia (RA) to discuss RAP Planning. RA advised there are 4 RAP Modules including Reflect, Innovate, Stretch and Elevate.  RA advised that Randwick City Council is at the Innovative stage.  All RAPs include actions, timelines and deliverables under four headings: ‘Relationships’, ‘Respect’, ‘Opportunities’, and ‘Tracking Progress and Reporting’.   Council will commence preparation of a RAP in draft form then initiate consultations with key Stakeholders.

Waverley Council’s RAP had been formally endorsed by the La Perouse Aboriginal Community Alliance.

Text Box: Action: This will be a standing agenda item until the RAP is completed. Sharron Smith to prepare a list of stakeholders for further discussion.

 

 

3.

 

          2.3     Fit for the Future (Update) 

Council is continuing consultations around Council amalgamations and has contracted Straight Talk to undertake focus groups. A ‘Fit for the Future’ focus group forum has been organised for the Aboriginal Community at La Perouse on 18 Feb 1:00 – 3:00pm, light refreshments provided. Members of the Committee requested to see the final report from the consultation process with Straight Talk.

 

Joshua Hay, Communications Manager with RCC will present Fit for the Future to the La Perouse Aboriginal Community Alliance Meeting on 18 February.

 

Action: Sharron Smith to follow up final report from Straight Talk forum.  This item is a standing agenda item.

 

 

2.4     Reconciliation Week Event

Council discussed possible activities for National Reconciliation Week (NRW) and suggestions include: a Guided Walk / Tour of Coogee; Bondi to Coogee boardwalk with mini concert at the end; Corroboree on Coogee Beach followed with a talk / presentation from Reverend Lindsay McDowell and Dean Kelly, pop up Black Markets and mini concert.

 

Action: This will remain a standing agenda item until Reconciliation Week event is completed.  Sharron Smith will cost the event and prepare a report to Council.

 

 

2.5     National Act of Recognition

Dean Kelly provided a progress update that the National Act of Recognition is wrapping up Stage 2 which involves getting Aboriginal Communities from all around the country to meet at Botany Bay to discuss moving to stage 3.  Stage 3 is a meeting with Prime Minister Tony Abbott and his Advisors to discuss moving forward with a National Act of Recognition Event.  Rev Lindsay has approached Peter Cooley to engage wider community on Black Market days. No Government Funding has been provided for this project. 

 

Cr Matson informed the group that he will draft a Notice of Motion with the guidance and assistance of the Committee to put to Council.

 

Action: Cr Matson to draft Notice of Motion to Council.

 

 

2.6         Stolen Generations Memorial

On 5 February an initial meeting was held with Aunty Barbara Simms-Keeley, Carrine Liddell, Yvonne Simms, Melinda Leves and Sharron Smith to discuss the Stolen Generation Memorial Project. The preferred site chosen is located at the bottom of Murrong Place near the breakwall on the north side of the path above the beach (near the seating). An Expression of Interest process will be developed to seek an artist to design a sculpture/artwork that is appropriate for the Stolen Generations and the area it represents. Assistance will be sought from a historian to assist with the wording of the plaque at the memorial. Aunty Barbara and Yvonne have drafted a list of people to attend a morning tea in approx 1 month to present site photos / art / wording. The timeline for this project to be delivered was 26 May (Sorry Day) however it is recognised that this may need to be extended to ensure proper consultation.

 

 

Action:  Sharron to prepare Expression of Interest process and arrange morning tea. 

 

 

  3.  General Business

 

3.1   Change of Time for Aboriginal Advisory Meetings in 2015

Melodie Gibson raised the issue of potentially changing the time of future Committee meetings to either earlier or later in the day to assist several of the Committee members to meet their work commitments. It was agreed that future meetings would commence at 9.30am 

 

Text Box: Action: Sharron Smith to change meeting times in scheduling Calender.

     

 

      3.2   Black Markets

Peter Cooley informed the group that he has funding to employ 3 local young people to work at the Black Markets. Peter has requested assistance to promote the advertisement via email networks.

 

Peter also raised the issue of parking at the loop on Black Market days reporting that people are parking all day and other visitors are unable to park to attend the Market on Bare Island. He suggested that Council give consideration to establishing 1 hour parking restrictions on these days.

 

3.3     La Perouse Museum

Peter McKenzie enquired about the La Perouse Museum (cable station) handover from National Parks and Wildlife Services to Randwick City Council. Cr Matson has informed the Committee that this is still undergoing discussions around changes to contracts.

 

3.4     LGAN Conference

The 2015 Local Government Aboriginal Network Conference is being held on the 5-7 August at the Glasshouse, Port Macquarie. The theme is ‘Bringing us Together Strong’ on Birpai Country. Council has offered to sponsor 2 delegates from the Aboriginal Advisory Committee to attend this Conference. Members requested to email Sharron Smith of their interest in attending.

 

 

3.5 Traffic and Parking at the Mission

Carrine Liddell and Michael Ingrey reported that traffic and parking issues have escalated at the La Perouse Aboriginal mission over the past few months along with dumping of rubbish and using residents water hoses on the way back from the beach.  There is also an issue with visitors exceeding the speed limit in a built up area where there are a large number of children playing outdoors and at times on the road. 

 

A couple of suggestions were made.

a. Implementation of the Resident Reserved Parking Scheme which could be an option. It was suggested that residents get together and start a petition for Council to conduct a survey.

 

b. As this is Land Council owned property, the Local Aboriginal Land Council (LALC) erect a sign similar to the one at Wreck Bay (south coast of NSW) advising visitors that they are entering Private Property owned by the La Perouse LALC.

 

 

3.6         RCC Coordinator Position

Gary Ella has been appointed at Randwick City Council as Coordinator of Community Development. He will commence on 18 February.

 

3.7 Robyn Murphy

Robyn Murphy formally thanked Randwick City Council for assistance in providing bins and support for the Duffy’s Koori Kids Christmas Party.  Robyn has also informed the Committee that she is on secondment from 16 Feb to Legal Aid for 12 months.

 

3.8 Lateral Violence Training

Carrine Liddell and Sharron Smith will attend Lateral Violence Training on 2 March with Spirit Dreaming.

 

 

 

Next Meeting:  10 April 2015 – Randwick City Council

              


The Youth Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - May 2015.

Attachment 2

 

 

Minutes

Randwick City Council Youth Advisory Committee

Meeting held on 18 May, 2015 at 6:00pm

 

Present

Ashley Brekenridge (Chair)        Community Representative

Adry Awan                                Community Representative

Anne Wang                               Community Representative

Alia Huberman                          Community Representative

Andrea Gomes                          Youth Off the Streets

Eric Brown                                Youth Off the Streets

Tania Krasinski                          Randwick City Council

 

Apologies

Cr Kiel Smith                            Randwick City Council

Cr Pat Garcia                             Randwick City Council

Georgia Heighway                     Community Representative

Luke Colombo                           Community Representative

Sam Sbisa                                Randwick City Council

 

 

Previous Minutes

 

Minutes confirmed: Adry Awan

Seconded: Ashley Brekenridge

 

 

Events / Projects Update

 

CultureFEST Debrief

Committee members said the event went well and recommended that if the event were to run again: 1) more promotion was needed for the beach volleyball event including signage; 2) local businesses be approached to provide drink stalls at future events; 3) ensure better targeting of activities to attract youth groups;4) more diversity of performers are needed in future events; and 5) activities such as the social media treasure hunt which included tweeted locations and photos on Instagram, was successful in attracting mostly the youth target groups, should be built upon for the next event.

 

The Randwick Youth Advisory Committee is now active and will commence planning for Youth Week 2016 activities /events at its October meeting.

 

Tania Krasinski thanked all members of the Youth Advisory Committee for their contribution in making CultureFEST a success. Tania commented that she is pleased to be working with such a creative and proactive committee.

 

Action: ‘Youth Week 2016’ planning be included on the October YAC Agenda

 

 

Youth Advisory Committee Social Media

 

It was recommended that timed posts be regularly scheduled for peak periods to maintain engagement and the committee create a social media engagement strategy.

 

YAC discussed the benefit of using social media to promote YAC to the broader community as a voice for local young people and a useful long-term platform for youth engagement regarding issues relating to services, events and opportunities available to young people in the Randwick City Council area. Committee to consider posting summaries of the YAC meetings, Council and media communication and youth issues on social media.

 

Committee requested that a social media expert present at the next meeting to assist the committee in optimal use of social media. It was also recommended that YAC Social Media be a regular agenda item during which time, messages/posts for the following month would be scheduled.

 

Action: Tania Krasinski to arrange social media presentation for June meeting.

 

Action: ‘YAC Social Media updates’ to be added as a regular agenda item.

 

Adry Awan suggested that YAC needs a logo/identifier to be developed via a competition for local young people to design a logo. The competition could be used to promote YAC social media. The committee agreed that this is a beneficial promotional campaign and were keen to support it.

 

Action: Adry Awan to draft a project plan/proposal outline for Council’s consideration.

 

 

Advisory / Advocacy Opportunities

 

Anne Wang presented an article from the Mosman Daily, 23 April 2015 titled, ‘Youth thrown in the mix’. This article describes a North Sydney Council mentoring program designed to increase the diversity of future Councillors. The aim of the program is to encourage interest in Council involvement amongst local young people. Anne recommended that a similar program be adopted by Randwick City Council. The committee agreed that this would be an interesting and beneficial program proposal. The committee recommended that Council research and consider implementing a similar mentoring program if viable.

 

Action: Tania Krasinski to research into the viability of a Councillor Youth Mentoring program and report back at the June meeting.

 

Action: Anne Wang to contact North Sydney Council for more information in regard to their current program and report back at the June meeting.

 

Randwick City Council ‘Refugee Welcome Zone’ / Refugee Week in June

 

Refugee Week will take place from Sunday 14 June to Saturday 20 June. Since 2006, Randwick City Council has been a Refugee Welcome Zone. It was suggested that the committee might be interested in a project researching into young people’s views on current refugee issues and media attention with a view to host an event or campaign.

 

Action: Ashley Brekenridge to research into the viability for a project involving a campaign and/or event to promote Council’s Refugee Welcome Zone and/or Refugee Week and report at the June meeting.

 

Before I die, I want to . . .

 

Tania Krasinski reported on a community arts project in New Orleans, USA. An artist installed a chalkboard onto an abandoned house with the title, ‘Before I die, I want to . . .’ http://www.ted.com/talks/candy_chang_before_i_die_i_want_to and the campaign encouraged residents to write their secrets, wishes and hopes and share discussions throughout the community.

 

It was suggested that a similar project could be utilised at events to gain insights and opinions of local young people, building on Georgia’s idea of a suggestion box. Adry Awan extended the idea to the electronic platform on social media.

 

Youth Issues

 

Alia Huberman asked if the committee received information on the proposed amalgamations. Anne Wang, Adry Awan and Georgia Heighway attended a focus group specifically for young residents. An email containing the outcomes of the focus group was recently received and will be posted on the YAC Facebook page.

 

Anne informed the committee that the Council Budget and Operational Plan is currently open for submissions until May 31st, and suggested that the committee could contribute. She would create a draft and call for contributions by the committee.

 

Action:  Anne Wang to draft a submission to the Council Budget and Operational Plan, post it on the closed Facebook page and request the committee to contribute prior to the closing date, 31 May.

 

General Business

 

Eric Brown reported that the YOTS Young Men’s group has been running Monday nights. Another program that is being piloted, Identify, is targeted to Aboriginal males 12 years of age and over. The program is about bringing young men ‘back to country’. Eric has also started a martial arts program, partnering with a local Jiu Jitsu group.

 

Andrea Gomes is a new addition to the YOTS team and is building capacity for local girls both within existing programs as well as ‘girls only’ programs.

 

Correspondence

 

YAC applicants who had not yet attended a meeting were contacted and asked if they wished to continue on the committee.

 

·             Resignation of Julia from the Shack. The new youth worker will fill her place as a committee member.

·             Resignation of Ryan due to university and other commitments.

·             Resignation of Michaela due to university and other commitments.

·             No response from Veronica and Vanessa.

 

The abovementioned will be removed from the committee correspondence, however, if circumstances change, they are welcome to notify their interest to return.

 

 

Meeting closed at 7:40pm

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Director City Planning Report No. CP36/15

 

Subject:                  Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad - Randwick Council's particpation

Folder No:               F2014/00427

Author:                    Talebul Islam, Coordinator Strategic Waste     

 

Introduction

 

Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squads are identified as a priority regional solution in EPA’s Illegal Dumping Strategy 2014-2016 to combat illegal dumping. The EPA 50% funds the Western Sydney Councils RID squad, operational since 1999, and SSROC negotiated on similar terms with EPA NSW the formation of a new Inner West RID squad hosted at Bankstown last year. EPA NSW has agreed to provide 50% funding to extend the Inner-West RID Squad to the Eastern-Sydney councils including Randwick Council and forming a new RID “Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad”.

 

All eight proposed new members of the Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (Botany, Hurstville, Kogarah, Marrickville, Randwick, Rockdale, Sutherland and Waverley Councils) will require to sign an agreement with NSW EPA and a Co-opertaion Agreement (MoU) between participating councils and the host Council (Bankstown Council).

 

The purpose of this memo is to seek Council’s approval Randwick Council to participate in the new Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad.

 

 

Issues

 

RID Squad Concept

A RID squad has been active in Western Sydney for 15 years and seen significant success with investigation and enforcement actions on illegal dumping. The concept relies on a partnership approach with equal funding and representation at the management committee from all member councils. The RID squad work program applied in the Inner-West has been tailored to the councils’ enforcement needs and the scope of dumping. The co-ordinated approach, regular information sharing and a consistent educational message all have benefits and can be strengthened by the focus a RID squad provides.

 

SSROC Initiative

Following on from a report on RID Squad for the Eastern Sydney Council endorsed by the General Managers, SSROC prepared a business case and conducted a workshop with relevant councils. A presentation was made to the General Managers’ meeting on the following Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (Sydney RID Squad) concept:

 

1.     Inner-West Sydney RID Squad to be expanded to include the Eastern-Sydney councils;

2.     Bankstown City Council to remain the host Council;

3.     Multiple operational posts (Randwick a potential post);

4.     All participating councils to contribute to the cost (approximately $62,500 per Council per year);

5.     EPA to cover 50% of the cost; and

6.     Two-year pilot (2015-16 and 2016-17) with a potential for longer term.

EPA NSW has agreed to fund 50% of the total project cost of the new Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad. The expected cost to individual participating Council is approximately $62,500 per year. Currently Council expends more than $1.5 M per year on collection of illegal dumping.

 

Potential benefit to Randwick Council

 

Should participate in the 50% NSW EPA funded Sydney RID Squad, Randwick Council can expect the following benefits:

 

·          Effective intelligence sharing across the region;

·          Dedicated resource available for targeted investigation/education work;

·          Added capability for enforcement action;

·          Consistent reduction in illegal dumping;

·          Saving in collection cost

 

Funding Agreement

NSW EPA is currently funding an Inner-Sydney RID Squad hosted by Bankstow City Council and participated by Ashfield, Auburn, Canada Bay, Canterbury and Strathfield Councils. The funding agreement with the EPA is for three years ending in 2017. NSW EPA has now agreed to fund an extension of the Inner Sydney RID Squad to include Botany, Hurstville, Kogarah, Marrickville, Randwick, Rockdale, Southerland and Waverley Councils. For the extension NSW EPA will fund $500,000 per year for two years until 2017 and the participating councils will need to contribute $62,500 each par year to match the EPA funding.   

All the participating Councils will require to collectively sign a funding agreement with the NSW EPA.                                         

 

Co-operation Agreement and Delegation of Power

A ‘Co-operation Agreement’ between each of the participating councils and the host council (Bankstown Council) is needed to be signed.

The host Council (Bankstown City Council) will employ RID officers using the EPA funding and individual council contributions. Each of the participating councils are required to sign a ‘Delegation of Power’ to allow RID Officers to operate in their Council areas.

 

Operational Post for RID officers

For productive operation of the RID Officers they will be operating from three ‘Operational Post’s in the region. Being strategically located Randwick Council has been proposed to host one ‘Operational Post’ that will service Randwick, Waverley, Botany and Marrickville councils.

 

RID Squad Management

A management committee with representatives from each participating Council will be formed that will oversee the operation and performance of the RID squad. Should Council agree to participate in the Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping squad, Talebul Islam, Coordinator Strategic Waste Management, will represent Randwick Council in the management committee.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:         A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a): Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

Direction 10(b):        Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 


Financial impact statement

 

Each of the new eight participating Councils will require to match NSW EPA funding of $500,000 per year for two years through equal contribution that equates to $62,500 per council per year. Randwick Council’s contribution of $62,500 per year will be funded through Council’s Domestic Waste Budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squads being identified as a priority regional solution in EPA’s Illegal Dumping Strategy 2014-2016, NSW EPA has agreed to provide 50% funding to extend the Inner-West RID Squad to the Eastern-Sydney councils forming “Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad.”

 

Participation in the Sydney RID Squad could bring the following benefits to Randwick council: Effective intelligence sharing across the region;

 

·          Dedicated resource available for targeted investigation/education work;

·          Added capability for enforcement action;

·          Consistent reduction in illegal dumping;

·          Saving in collection cost

 

To participate in Sydney RID Squad Council will require to sign a ‘Funding Agreement’ with the NSW EPA and a ‘Co-operation Agreement’ between with the host council (Bankstown Council). Also, Council’s General Manager will require to provide a ‘Delegation of Power’ for the RID Officers to operate in the Randwick Council area.

 

Council will require to contribute $62,500 per year matching NSW EPA funding.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse:

 

a)     participation in the ‘Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad’;

 

b)     a contribution of $62,500 per year matching NSW EPA funding for two years;

 

c)     Randwick hosting of one ‘Operational Post’.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Inner - West RID Coordinator's Report July 2015

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

General Manager's Report No. GM13/15

 

Subject:                  Review of the 2014-15 Annual Operational Plan - June Quarterly Report

Folder No:               F2015/00098

Author:                    Karen Hawkett, Coordinator Integrated Planning & Reporting      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the annual Operational Plan. The 2014-15 Operational Plan was adopted by Council on 24 June 2014. In this report, achievement and status comments are provided for each action in the 2014-15 Operational Plan. Highlights are also provided where appropriate.

 

Issues

 

This is the June 2014 Quarterly Report and fourth and final review of the 2014-15 annual Operational Plan. This report demonstrates our commitment to meeting the actions in the 2014-15 annual Operational Plan.

 

During the June report period, several key projects were completed, including: the adoption of the 2015-16 Operational Plan and Budget; the 2014-15 Roads Rehabilitation and Kerb Ramp programs, the 2014-15 Building Maintenance program; the stormwater harvesting system at Chifley Sports Reserve; implementation of the 2014-15 ICARE about Learning program; and the upgrade of three core corporate technology applications.

 

From the activity undertaken by Council during the quarter there were many highlights. The following table lists our significant highlights:

 

City theme

City Plan Outcomes

Action code

Highlight

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

1a. Vision for Randwick City Council

 

P001

Council adopted its 2015‑16 Operational Plan and Budget which include: refurbishment of the Fred Hollows Reserve Boardwalk in Randwick; further expansion to part of the Coastal Walkway around Malabar; constructing new toilets and showers at Mahon Pool, Maroubra; upgrading the Maroubra Junction streetscape; and new barbeques at Maroubra Beach.

 

                                     

2015‑16 Operational Plan and Budget

 

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1b. Leadership

 

 

S002

 

P006

 

 

Randwick and Waverley Councils lodged a joint merger proposal with the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal, in response to the NSW Government's Fit for the Future program.

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1b. Leadership

 

 

P007

 

 

The 2014‑15 ICARE about Learning program has been implemented throughout the year with participating staff rating the courses with an overall high satisfaction rate of 97 per cent.

 

 

1.Leadership in Sustainability

 

 

1c. Continuous Improvement

 

 

P010

 

 

The Corruption Risk Management Planning process has been completed.

 

 

2.A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2a. Understanding Community Needs

 

S028

 

 

The recently completed outdoor classroom at the Randwick Community Centre has started being used for Sustainability education classes.

 

 

2.A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2a. Understanding Community Needs

 

S032

 

 

Throughout the 2014‑15 year, Council removed around 20,000 square metres of graffiti.

 

 

 

Graffiti management

 

 

2.A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2a. Understanding Community Needs

 

S035

 

 

Applications for the 2015‑16 Community Partnership Grants funding round were assessed in June.

 

2.A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2a. Understanding Community Needs

 

P017

 

 

The Koojay Corroboree, held at Coogee Beach, was a tremendous success, attracting many positive responses from community members.

 

 

 

Koojay Corroboree

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2b. Strong Partnerships

 

S036

 

A Precinct Combined Committee Meeting was held with the General Manager in April, with nine precincts represented.

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

2b. Strong Partnerships

 

P020

 

A Service Providers Expo for Mental Health Workers, held in partnership with the Prince of Wales Hospital, took place in May at the Randwick Town Hall.

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

 

2c. Community facilities

 

 

P021

 

 

The first meeting of the Collection Management Sub‑Committee was held in June at which Council's consultant conservator reported on the progress of the Preservation Needs Assessment of the La Perouse Museum collection.

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

 

2d. Cultural diversity

 

S038

 

 

During the June quarter, five events were held as part of 2015 Twilight Concerts program including a Gershwin and Me performance by pianist Simon Tedeschi. The annual Rock Around Randwick Vintage Fair hosted over twenty dealers in retro fashion, jewellery and home‑wares.

 

 

2. A Vibrant and Diverse Community

 

 

2d. Cultural diversity

 

S039

 

 

The ANZAC Day Dawn Service that was supported by Council was attended by over 20,000 people.

 

 

 

 

Anzac Dawn Service at Coogee

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3a. Communicating Effectively

 

S041

 

 

During the June quarter, Council developed and implemented nine communications plans to inform and engage the community on Council activities including the ANZAC Day centenary, I am local, Beach Breaks, Buildings for our Community, Eco‑living fair, Randwick Town Hall upgrade, Fit for the Future and the Community Race Day.

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3a. Communicating Effectively

 

S042

 

 

 

The winter edition of Council's community magazine 'Randwick Scene' was increased from 12 to 16 pages to include a special feature on the 2014-15 Operational Plan and Budget.

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3a. Communicating Effectively

 

S044

 

Council produced a vibrant popular social campaign called 'I am Local' whereby 151 banners, featuring the face of an everyday Randwick City resident, worker or student, were flown across the City.

 

 

I am local campaign

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3a. Communicating Effectively

 

S044

 

 

 

S046

 

P023

 

New web sub-sites for the Des Renford Leisure Centre and Randwick City Library were created allowing for increased community interaction and engagement.

 

As part of the new Library Management System, a new Library App (myRandwickLib) was launched.

 

 

 

Des Renford Leisure Centre and Randwick City Library sub websites

Library App (myRandwickLib)

 

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3c. Community Involvement

 

S050

 

During the June quarter, more than 24,000 people visited Council's community consultation websites, downloading more than 8,000 documents. The consultation websites included Randwick City Council’s 2015-16 Operational Plan and Budget.

 

 

3. An Informed and Engaged Community

 

 

3c. Community Involvement

 

S051

 

Council communication about the April storms and Council's cleanup operations through social media received significant interest with a single post on Facebook receiving 1,500 likes, almost 500 comments and almost 400 shares. The post reached more than 63,000 people on Facebook ‑ a record for Council Facebook posts.

 

 

April storm cleanup operations

 

 

4. Excellence in Urban Design and Development

 

 

4b. Robust Development Framework

 

P027

 

 

Results to the independent survey of customers' satisfaction with Council's DA processing service indicate a consistently high level of service provided.

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

5b. Range of Activities

 

P032

 

The construction phase for Heffron Park Stage A is near completion. The remaining works include the installation of floodlight poles, final trim of sub‑base, importing and spreading topsoil, turfing, minor concrete works and landscaping.

 

 

 

Heffron Park development

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

5c. New Open Space Creation

 

P035

 

Commonwealth Government Finance and NSW National Parks are currently working through the proposed land transfer for the eastern lot of the Malabar headland site to NSW Government as National Park.

 

 

5. Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities

 

5d. Innovative Library Programs

 

S056

 

In the June quarter, Randwick City Library ran 479 individual events, attended by 15,115 people.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

 

 

6a. Public Asset Management

 

 

 

S058

 

 

 

In the April to June period Council successfully prepared all sports fields for the commencement of the winter sports season. The tasks included marking of the fields, installation of the goal posts, cleaning of amenities and the erection of the portable grand stand at Coogee Oval.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

 

 

6a. Public Asset Management

 

 

 

P041

 

P042

 

 

Council has completed the 2014‑15 Footpath Construction program and Local Road Rehabilitation program.

 

2014‑15 Footpath Construction program (Alison Road, Randwick)

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

 

 

6a. Public Asset Management

 

 

 

P046

 

During the June quarter development applications for the Coogee Beach lower promenade amenities and the Kensington Community Centre were approved.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6c. Community Safety

 

P047

 

 

Council's Youth Week Event at Maroubra Beach gave Randwick Community Drug Action Team members opportunity to engage young people from the South Coogee, Maroubra, South Maroubra and Matraville areas.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6d. Strategic land Use Framework

 

P051

 

 

In the June quarter, all internal testing of Council’s ICON plan enquiry system was completed.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6d. Strategic land Use Framework

 

P053

 

 

Final editing, printing and advertising of the adopted S.94A Development Contributions Plan 2015 and accompanying DCP were completed during the June quarter.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6e. Housing Diversity

 

S071

 

In the 2014‑15 financial year Council increased its stock of affordable rental housing units to 17 dwellings.

 

 

6. A Liveable City

 

6f. Distinctive neighbourhoods

 

 

P055

 

 

Work has continued on the Belmore Road, Randwick urban design analysis. Concept designs have been prepared for Sandgate Cottage to create a public space and the intersection of Belmore Road/High Street/Avoca Street to incorporate Council's preferred light rail terminus.

 

 

7. Heritage that is Protected and Celebrated

 

7a. Heritage

 

S072

 

 

Randwick City Library partnered with the Royal Randwick Racecourse to host a unique exhibition about the history of the Royal Turf Club "And They're Racing..." which featured artwork, photographs and artefacts documenting the history of the Royal Turf Club.

 

 

And They're Racing..." exhibition

 

 

7. Heritage that is Protected and Celebrated

 

7a. Heritage

 

S073

 

 

During the April ‑ June quarter, heritage comments were provided for a total of 41 development applications and major project applications.

 

 

8. A strong Local Economy

 

8c. Effective partnerships

 

 

P060

 

Free online marketing, and electronic business resources workshops focusing on developing and maintaining customer databases for local Randwick City businesses and residents, have been developed with the Business Enterprise Centre.

 

 

9. Integrated and Accessible Transport

 

 

9a. Active Transport Network

 

 

P063

 

 

Council has completed the 2014‑15 Kerb Ramp program.

 

 

9. Integrated and Accessible Transport

 

 

9d. Road safety initiatives

 

 

S078

 

 

Council is likely to seek road safety funding for three locations that satisfy the RMS’s requirements following an assessment of 10 sites for possible future road safety funding submissions.

 

 

9. Integrated and Accessible Transport

 

 

9e. Parking Management

 

 

S080

 

 

Council is working with Transport for NSW regarding a parking strategy in association with the light rail project. A brief for angle parking in side streets off Anzac Parade, to offset parking loss for businesses and residents, is being issued for expressions of interest.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10a. Leader in Environmental Sustainability

 

S083

 

 

Council's Discover Your Coast Holiday Program, held during April, offered a range of activities to the 80 participants such as snorkelling, Rockpool Ramble and Backyard Bugs.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10a. Leader in Environmental Sustainability

 

P067

 

 

Through the Compost Revolution program, Randwick residents have composted and diverted nearly 500 tonnes of organic material from landfill since July 2014.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10a. Leader in Environmental Sustainability

 

P069

 

 

Council's Sustainability Water Management for Chifley Playing Fields and Food Waste trial projects were listed as finalists under the 'Best Local Government Initiative Category' for the World Environment Day Awards.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10b. Management of Environmental Risks

 

P072

 

 

Work plans for the Kensington ‑ Centennial Park, Coogee Bay and Maroubra Bay catchments were submitted to the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage in June.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10c Biodiversity and Natural Heritage

 

S087

 

 

Randwick City Council has been successful in obtaining Commonwealth funding of $8,000 through the Sydney Coastal Council's "Salty Communities Grant Program". The Grant involves 14 coastal councils participating in a fox monitoring program involving tagging, tracking, scat analysis and community education.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10d. Sustainable Waste Technologies

 

S088

 

 

 

 

Council resource recovery initiatives contributed to a 64 per cent rate of domestic waste diversion from landfill this quarter. In the June quarter the Alternative Waste Treatment Plant had greater capacity to take a larger amount of waste from Council for processing which contributed to this result.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10d. Sustainable Waste Technologies

 

S090

 

 

 

 

Randwick Council is now a member of the Regional Illegal Dumping squad which targets illegal dumping.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10d. Sustainable Waste Technologies

 

S091

 

 

 

 

More than 1,000 residents dropped‑off 36,760 kg household chemicals for recycling at the Clovelly Beach car park.

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10e. Water conservation

 

P077

 

S092

 

 

In the June quarter the Chifley Sports Reserve stormwater harvesting system project was completed.

 

Through use of recycled and bore water, Council reduced its mains water consumption by an estimated 34,176 kL in the June quarter.

 

 

Chifley Sports Reserve stormwater harvesting system project

 

 

 

10. A Healthy Environment

 

10f. Energy conservation

 

 

S094

 

30,654 kWh of electricity was generated between April and June 2015 from solar panels currently installed on 9 Council sites.

 

Council solar panels

 

In acknowledgement of our efforts, Randwick City Council won the best marketing and public relations campaign for promoting the Coogee Beach Library in the Government Communications Australia 2015 Awards for Excellence.

 

In addition Council was amongst the finalists for the following awards:

 

·             United Nations Association of Australia: World Environment Day (national) Awards - Excellence in Sustainable Water Management - the Chifley Playing Fields Stormwater Harvesting and Re-Use project.

·             World Environment Day (national) Awards  - Best Specific Local Government initiative - Randwick City Council Food Waste trial.

·             Government Communications Australia 2015 Awards for Excellence – Best social marketing campaign - #turfwar.

·             Government Communications Australia 2015 Awards for Excellence – Best digital media - Randwick Council website.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:     Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the June Quarterly Report is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions as set out in the adopted 2014-15 Annual Operational Plan. In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20-year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the June quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick.

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the June 2015 Review of the 2014-15 annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

2014-15 Randwick City Council Annual Operational Plan - June Quarterly Report – INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

   


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF29/15

 

 

Subject:                  Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures Act

Folder No:               F2005/00303

Author:                    Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

Council reviews its Internal Reporting System and Policy in relation to the Public Interest Disclosures Act (formerly known as the Protected Disclosures Act) every two years.

 

The policy was last reviewed in August 2013 to bring it in line with the NSW Ombudsman’s ‘Model Internal Reporting Policy – Local Government – July 2013’.

 

Issues

 

As detailed in the policy, Randwick City Council does not tolerate corrupt conduct, maladministration, serious and substantial waste of public money or government information contravention.  The Council is committed to the aims and objectives of the Public Interest Disclosures Act.  It recognises the value and importance of contributions of staff and Council to enhance administrative and management practices and strongly supports disclosures being made by staff and Councillors without any detrimental action or reprisal for making the disclosures.

 

Council’s network of nominated disclosure officers is as follows:

 

Disclosure Coordinators:          Manager Administrative Services

                                                       Internal Auditor

 

Disclosure Officers:                 Manager Administrative Services

Internal Auditor

Manager Organisational Staff Services

                                                       Manager Library and Community Services

                                                       Manager Waste Services

                                                       Manager Aquatic Services

                                                       Manager Sustainability

Senior Administrative Coordinator

Plus three (3) members of staff determined by election from time to time

Internal Audit Committee

 

All Council’s Disclosure Officers and the Disclosure Coordinators have undertaken appropriate training.

 

Information on protected disclosures has recently been provided to all staff via a payslips attachment and information continues to be available via Simeon.  The ‘Internal Reporting Policy – Public Interest Disclosures Act’ also forms part of the staff induction process.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:     Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Whilst no disclosures have been made under the Council’s Internal Reporting Policy (copy attached) during the past two (2) years, the Policy remains up to date and simply requires ratification.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council’s Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures Act (August 2015) be endorsed.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures Act

 

 

 

 


Internal Reporting Policy - Public Interest Disclosures Act

Attachment 1

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBDirector Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF30/15

 

 

Subject:                  Annual Review of Councillors' Expenses & Facilities Policy

Folder No:               F2004/06576

Author:                    Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

Section 252 of the Local Government Act requires Councils to adopt a policy for the payment of expenses incurred by and the provision of facilities to Mayors, Deputy Mayors and other Councillors.  Mayors, Deputy Mayors and Councillors can only be reimbursed for expenses and provided with facilities in discharging the functions of civic office in accordance with this policy.  The Councillors’ Expenses and Facilities Policy must comply with the provisions of the Act, the regulations and the Department of Local Government ‘Guidelines for the payment of expenses and the provision of facilities for Mayors and Councillors for Local Councils in NSW.’

 

The policy must be adopted annually and, within five (5) months after the end of each financial year, must be forwarded to the Office of Local Government – Department of Premier and Cabinet) (OLG). 

 

Issues

Council is reminded that:

 

·          Under section 252(5) of the Local Government Act 1993, Council’s Expenses and Facilities Policy must comply with the DLG Guidelines

·          Provisions made by the policy in regard to the payment of expenses and the provision of facilities to Councillors, must be acceptable to and meet the expectations of the local community

·          Limits to expenses and the level of provision of equipment and facilities must be set by individual Councils to suit their need and capacity to afford them

·          There are no circumstances in which legal expenses should be met by a Council for proceedings initiated by a Councillor.  Nor should legal expenses be met for a Councillor defending any action in a matter not arising directly as a result of his or her civic duty.

 

There is only one (1) minor amendment proposed to be made to the Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy as a result of the current review. The proposed amendment is as follows:

 

Part 3 - Provision of facilities & specific expenses for Councillors

(i)    Equipment and other items not required to be returned;

 

The following sub-clause is proposed to be added:

 

(xix) Attendance at Council, or Council sponsored events, free of charge when such events are held at Council owned, or Council managed venues. This expense is subject to a limit of $300 per Councillor per annum.

 

This will allow Councillors to attend Council sponsored community events and is in line with the role of a Councillor, as an elected person, to facilitate communication between the community and the council (Section 232(2) of the Local Government Act 1993)

 

The policy will require re-advertising as part of the annual review process.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:     Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter. Any expenses and facilities provided to the Mayor and Councillors as part of this policy have been allowed for in the 2015-16 Budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy (copy attached) is required to be publicly exhibited for a period of 28 days in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993. After the public exhibition period, this matter will be reported back to Council (at the October 2015 Council Meeting) to be formally adopted. The amended policy is required to be forwarded to the OLG (in accordance with legislative requirements) by 30 November 2015.

 

Recommendation

 

That the annual review of the Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy be publicly exhibited for a period of 28 days.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Councillors' Expenses & Facilities Policy - 2015-16

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBDirector Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF31/15

 

 

Subject:                  Contingency Fund - Status as at 31 July 2015

Folder No:               F2007/00634

Author:                    Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator      

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to detail the progressive amount of donations, allocations, waiving of fees and other similar contributions for the 2015-16 financial year.

 

Issues

 

In the 2015-16 financial year there have been 12 allocations totalling $51,370.00 as listed in the table below.

 

Meeting

Details

Approved allocation

Annual contributions (ongoing)

Ord Council – 22 Feb 2011

Annual contribution (5 years from 2011-12 to 2015-16) - Randwick Girls High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

Planning Committee – 13 Mar 2012

Annual contribution – Australia Day Botany Bay Regatta

$750.00

Ord Council – 25 June 2013

Annual contribution Sponsorship of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Lifesaver Service – 3 year agreement 2013-14 to 2015-16

 

$15,000.00

Ord Council

17 Sept 2013

Annual Contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) Waiving of Fees – Rainbow Club Australia Inc – Murray Rose’s Malabar Magic Ocean Swim

 

$14,500.00

Ord Council  23 Sept 2014

Annual contribution (5 years from 2015-16 to 2019-20) - Randwick Boys High School - 'Mayor's Award'

$1,000.00

2015-16 Contingency Fund allocations

Ord Council – 23 Sept 2014

POW Hospital's request for financial support to use Prince Henry Centre – to celebrate 50th year since the first kidney transplant in NSW

$3,600.00

Ord Council – 28 Apr 2015

Waiving of fees - South Maroubra Surf Club use of DRLC for the Annual Nippers Proficiency Test

$1,210.00

Ord Council – 23 June 2015

Waiving of fees - Saint George Coptic Orthodox Church Annual Community Fete

$1,545.00

Ord Council – 23 June 2015

Waiving of fees - Des Renford Leisure Centre for Maroubra Swim Club Carnivals

$4,100.00

Ord Council – 23 June 2015

Sponsorship - Eastern Beaches Masquerade Ball (supporting the Eastern Beaches LAC)

$6,500.00

Ord Council – 23 June 2015

Waiving of Fees - Indonesian Presbyterian Church Community BBQ

$165.00

Ord Council – 28 July 2015

New Mayor's Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Randwick Business Community

$2,000.00

Total - 2015-16 Contingency Fund allocations

$51,370.00

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:        A vibrant and diverse community.

Our community will be proud to be part of our City and celebrate its range of cultures and people.

Direction 2b:      Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Key Actions:       Support the provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of our Target Groups and celebrate the range of cultures and people within Randwick City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has allocated $75,000.00 in the 2015-16 Budget for contingencies. Any expenditure that exceeds the budget allocation will be funded through savings at the September quarterly budget review.

 

Recommendation

 

That the status of the contingency fund allocations for 2015-16 be noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGBDirector Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF32/15

 

 

Subject:                  Proposed Shopfront Improvement Grants Program

Folder No:               F2007/00634

Author:                    Suzanne Williamson, Economic Development Officer      

 

Introduction

 

At its Ordinary Meeting of 5th August, 2014 Council resolved as follows:

 

“(Stavrinos/Andrews) that Council bring back a report on the feasibility of adopting a shop front improvement grants program, based on shared contributions, aimed at improving the appearance of shop fronts and enhancing the visual landscape of town centres.

 

a)     the grant program cover costs including;

 

·       removal of roller shutters

·       laminating or double glazing

·       removal of unused signs

·       security lighting

·       shopfront painting & application of anti-graffiti treatments

·       fixed display shelves within window frames

·       under awning repairs

·       replacement of approved security devices or alarm systems

 

b)     the program excludes;

 

·       Purchase of buildings

·       Extensions or additions to properties

·       Routine maintenance

·       Relocation of business

·       Internal shop fittings

·       Staffing and operational costs

·     Properties owned by council staff or other government agencies.”

 

This report has been prepared in response to the above resolution. It outlines for Council’s consideration shop front improvement grant programs and funding models currently in place in other local government areas as well as the estimated costs of adopting a similar program.

 

Issues

 

Shop front improvement grant programs are aimed to improve shop fronts and building facades in town centres in order to support the growth of local businesses, improve the local environment and raise the image of the town centre amongst locals and visitors. Many local government areas and cities across Sydney and Australia have adopted shopfront improvement schemes to encourage improvements to shopfronts which, without financial assistance, may not occur.

Liverpool Council has been running a shop front improvement grants program since 2002. The initial offer was up to $4000.00 per business, dependent on a matched cash contribution. There were five applications over the ten year period to 2012. In 2012 the program was reviewed and the offer is currently up to a maximum of $16,000.00 per businesses with a 25% contribution. The uptake is now averaging ten businesses per year with the 2015/16 funding pool for the grants at $80,000.00. The program is funded from the CBD town improvement levy.

Wollongong Council has a current Façade Rejuvenation Program that offers private property owners grants of up to $20,000.00, dependent on a 50% cash contribution towards the costs of eligible projects. The current 2015/16 funding pool is $300,000.00, funded from the City Centre Special Rate and the Wollongong Mall Special rate.

The City of Sydney has adopted a current shop front improvement 50% matched grant program up to $10,000.00 for priority precincts. The funding pool is not capped with fifteen grants totalling $82,000.00 approved in the 2013/14 financial year. The City of Sydney has an area based differential business rate structure.

Common attributes of the current programs are:

·      Shop front improvement grants programs are not offered city wide and are extended to businesses in specified retail/commercial areas designated as in need of revitalisation;

·      all applications must have property owners approval and require a level of matched cash contribution by the applicant;

·      shop front improvement grants schemes are predominantly funded through business levies incorporated into differential business rates structures.

Business levy programs incorporated into differential business rates structures raise additional revenue over and above the standard business rates. The levies are property value based and are applicable to all businesses located in designated town centres or main streets within the local government area. The funds are dedicated to the promotion, beautification and development of those respective business areas.

As an example Marrickville Council has budgeted in 2015/16 to raise $179,898.00 from 757 businesses contained within the four urban centres of Newtown, Marrickville, Petersham and Dulwich Hill. This averages out at $238.00 per business and will fund business improvement initiatives in those four urban centres.

Randwick Council has not adopted a differential business rate structure, although differential rate structures and business levy programs have been widely adopted across Australian local government areas to support main street and town centre business support initiatives. Greater Sydney Councils incorporating differential rates structures include Parramatta, Liverpool, Newcastle, Wollongong, Ryde, Marrickville, Sutherland and Woollahra.

 

The traditional role of town centres is under threat from structural changes in shopping behaviour and commercial property use, compounded by the impact of technology on working and retail patterns. The decline of traditional town centres and the need for revitalisation projects to ensure that they remain sustainable and relevant to the resident population’s changing needs has prompted multiple town centre research studies across Australia and the globe. One of the main findings of these studies is that any interventions such as shop front improvement programs need to be planned as part of an overall well researched, data driven and locally relevant long term strategy.

Randwick Council adopts a planned and strategic approach to City management and is currently undertaking significant works and projects across many of the City’s town and village centres:

·      a strategic planning review of the Randwick Junction Town Centre is under development. The review is aimed at generating a long term planning strategy to provide the framework for the physical, economic, social and cultural future of Randwick Junction;

·      a strategic planning review is also scheduled for the Kingsford/Kensington town centres;

·      the Belmore Road Public Domain study focussing on opportunities for public domain improvements linked to Councils capital works program is under development;

·      the Coogee Bay Road Urban Improvement Project is currently in the detailed design development stage;

·      a comprehensive business support strategy for implementation along the light rail alignment during the CSELR construction period is currently in planning;

·      a comprehensive business audit has been completed across the Randwick, Kingsford and Kensington town centres with the audit of remaining Randwick City town, village and local centres scheduled to be completed in the 2015/16 financial year.

In light of this scheduled long term strategy development, capital works, business centre related projects and data collection activities it is suggested that the adoption of a Randwick City shopfront improvement grants program be deferred. The feasibility and relevance of such a program to Randwick City can be revisited and better assessed after the completion of the currently scheduled works, projects and planned activities.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:     A liveable city.

Direction 6f:    Foster distinct neighbourhoods with commercial centres that meet the needs of our community as places to work, shop, live and socialise.

Outcome 8:     A strong local economy.

Direction 8a:   Vibrant business, commercial and industrial sectors that provide ongoing and diverse employment opportunities and serve the community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Randwick City Council decide to implement a Shop Front Improvement Grants Program, similar to those mentioned in this report, it would cost anywhere from $80,000.00 to $300,000.00 per annum, depending on the scale of the program.

The funding of a Shop Front Improvement Grants Program currently does not exist in the budget and would need to be sourced from existing budget allocations. The option of funding these programs through Special Business Rate Levies would be problematic as Randwick City Council does not have an existing differential business rates structure.

 

Conclusion

 

One of the main findings of multiple town centre research studies carried out across Australia and internationally is that any interventions such as shop front improvement programs need to be planned as part of an overall well researched, data driven and locally relevant long term strategy. In addition, other Councils have funded their programs through Special Business Rate Levies, which would currently be problematic as Randwick City Council does not have an existing differential business rates structure.

 

Accordingly, the feasibility and relevance of such a program to Randwick City can be revisited and better assessed after the completion of the currently scheduled works, projects and planned activities in our town centres, as well as a review of our rating structure to take into account the possibility of funding these programs through Special Business Rate Levies.

.

Recommendation

 

That the investigation into the feasibility of adopting a Randwick City shop front improvement grants program be deferred and revisited after the completion of the currently scheduled long term town centre strategy development, capital works projects, business centre related initiatives and data collection activities.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF33/15

 

 

Subject:                  Investment Report - July 2015

Folder No:               F2015/06527

Author:                    Greg Byrne, Manager Financial Operations     

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – July 2015” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of July 2015. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

As at 31 July 2015, Council held investments with a market value of $ 63.568 million. The portfolio value decreased during July by ~$777 thousand. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month reflecting the net effect of revenue receipts (rates, grants & miscellaneous) offset by capital works expenditure and other operational payments.

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipts of the Financial Assistance Grants.

 

 

The following graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from July 2012 to July 2015. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

Council’s Portfolio

 

The portfolio has high levels of liquidity with 7% of investments available at call and a further 14% of assets maturing within 3 months. Council also currently has a number of senior FRNs as additional cover for liquidity requirements (access to funds within 3 business days)

 

The investment portfolio is diversified across a number of investment types and is spread across the higher rated ADIs. The various investment types may include term deposits, floating rate notes, on-call accounts and covered notes.

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of July 2015. The portfolio is dominated by term deposits (58% of the portfolio) with the higher rated ADI’s. Credit assets (FRNs) are around 35% of the portfolio.

 

 

The entire investment portfolio is diversified across the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher).

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of the Council’s portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

Credit Quality

 

The portfolio is of very high quality from a ratings perspective. Credit quality is entirely directed amongst the higher rated ADI’s (A- or higher), in compliance with Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Council’s Investment Policy restricts allowable investments to only Prime, High Grade and Upper Medium Grade Investments. This will result in all new investments having a minimum Standard and Poors long term credit rating of A-. Council no longer invests in any products with a credit rating of BBB+ or less.

 

 

^ Under the Financial Claims Scheme (FCS), the first $250,000 is guaranteed by the Federal Government (rated AAA by S&P), per investor, per ADI

 

All of these are within Policy limits.

 

Counterparty

 

The table below shows the individual counterparty exposures against Council’s current investment policy. Individual counterparty exposures comply with the Policy.

 

 

 

Performance

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the AusBond Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period July 2012 to July 2015.

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index with an average return after fees of 3.24% compared with the benchmark index of 2.23%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate remained unchanged at 2.00% at the 4 August meeting.

 

Term Deposits

 

At month end, deposits accounted for 58% of the total investment portfolio.

Four deposits matured and were withdrawn. No new deposits were undertaken during the month.

 

As at the end of July, the weighted average deposit yield stood at 3.41% or around +120bp over bank bills.

    

Floating Rate Notes (FRNs)

 

The portfolio includes $22.2 million in floating rate notes.

 

On 28 July, Council purchased $3M of the new issue Westpac FRN at +90bpts trading margin.

 

These investments are classified as “held for trading” requiring that they are reported at the latest indicative market valuations at month end.

 

The indicative market value of the FRNs increased by ~$28k as at the end of July.

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011 and includes changes that:

 

·          Remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

·          Remove the ability to make a deposit with Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd;

·          And includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority to invest funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Investment Register

 

The investment register is maintained with details of each individual investment including; financial institution; amount invested; date invested; maturity date and the applicable interest rate.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction:  Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in the 2015-16 financial year and outperforming the AusBond Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period. The current budget provision for investment income from this source is $1,958,370.00. Investment income to 31 July 2015 amounted to $172,234.36.

 

Certification – Responsible Accounting Officer

 

I hereby certify that all investments as at 31 July 2015 have been made in accordance with Council’s Investment Policy. All investments meet the requirements of s625 of the Local Government Act and the Local Government (General) Regulation.

 

Mitchel Woods

Responsible Accounting Officer

 

Conclusion

 

All investments as at July 2015 have been made in accordance with the Local Government Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for July 2015 be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

RCC LOGO_Stacked_COLOUR_RGB

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF34/15

 

Subject:                  Ongoing Engagement of Event Performers and Sustainability Educators

Folder No:               F2013/00200

Author:                    David Kelly, Manager Administrative Services     

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Council is now an industry leader in both Sustainability and in the conduct of Community Events. The increased level of participation in these areas has led to a unique situation in the procurement of Event Performers and Sustainability Educators which requires Council approval to resolve.

 

Issues

 

In the area of Event Performers, Council engaged fifty seven suppliers in 2013/14 at an average cost of $1,659.00 whilst in 2014/15 a total of eighty five suppliers were engaged at an average cost of $1,594.00. Similarly, in the area of Sustainability Educators, Council engaged thirty two suppliers in 2013/14 at an average cost of $2,429.00 whilst in 2014/15 a total of thirty four suppliers were engaged at an average cost of $3,444.00.

 

This means that whilst the aggregate spends in these areas would normally require the conduct of a tender process for each, the reality is that it is not in the interest of the relevant suppliers to invest the time and effort in the preparation of a detailed tender submission for the annual amounts referred to above. There would also be no guarantee of work for the suppliers chosen which would lead to dissatisfaction in our local business community.

 

Council’s Manager Administrative Services, in consultation with the Purchasing Section and relevant Managers, has suggested a purchasing arrangement whereby Council would approve the engagement of suppliers in these two specialised areas for a two year period. This would occur on the proviso that Council staff engaging these suppliers will ensure that certificates of insurance are current, where applicable, and that the suppliers are engaged strictly only for Event Performances or Sustainability Education.

 

On occasions where the expected cost of the service will exceed $5,000.00, a standard thee quotes will be need to be obtained or General Manager approval sought, before a supplier is engaged. Council’s Purchasing Section will also produce spend reports on a monthly basis for analysis and Internal Audit will conduct random audits to ensure adherence to these requirements.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1b:     Demonstrate best practice leadership in local government.

 

 

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact in the approval of these suppliers. How much is spent with each supplier will depend on their level of engagement.

 

Conclusion

 

Every effort has been made to come up with a solution that is not too onerous for Council staff and for our suppliers to abide by the relevant Tendering Regulations and Purchasing Policy and Procedures in these niche areas. It is considered that for now, until a better option is discovered, that Council approval with strict internal controls, is the most workable solution.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

(a)    Council approve the engagement of Event Performers and Sustainability Educators for a two year period under the arrangements outlined in this report;

 

(b)   these suppliers are only to be utilised strictly for Event Performances and Sustainability Education;

 

(c)    on occasions where the expected cost of the service will exceed $5,000.00, a standard thee quotes will be need to be obtained or General Manager approval sought, before a supplier is engaged; and

 

(d)   relevant Managers are responsible for ensuring the standard requirements for the engagement of such suppliers, including relevant and current insurance coverage, are always undertaken.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM36/15

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Proposed additional lighting usage at Pioneer Park

Folder No:               F2008/00161

Submitted by:         Councillor D'Souza, South Ward      

 

 

That Council prepare and lodge a sect 96 application for Council’s consideration to allow the sports field lights on the upper level Pioneers Park Malabar to be used on Fridays and Saturdays.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM37/15

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Smith - Proposed Removal of Weeping Fig - 75-77 Arden Street, Coogee

Folder No:               F2015/07359

Submitted by:         Councillor Smith, North Ward      

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     permit the removal of the weeping fig at 75-77 Arden Street, Coogee

b)     recognise the continued damage to private and public property caused by the roots of the weeping fig


c)     note that damage has been occurring since at least 2007 and since then the         strata has attempted to manage the tree in accordance with the Director of         Governance & Finances 2007 advice, albeit without success


d)     whilst regretting the loss of any weeping figs and significant trees recognise         that it is unfortunately a necessary occurrence at time, including 3 similar         weeping figs having been removed in neighbouring Quail Street


e)     direct the strata to replace the removed weeping fig with a mature planting.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM38/15

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Litter Education Campaign

Folder No:               F2014/00413

Submitted by:         Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That:

 

a)     Council bring back a report investigating the possibility of running an education campaign in the Randwick LGA on general litter (in particular cigarette butts) advising residents on how to dispose of their rubbish correctly; and

 

b)     as part of this report, look at grants offered by various government agencies aimed at funding general litter education campaigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM39/15

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr D'Souza - Sydney Water Emergency Power Supply

Folder No:               F2004/08039

Submitted by:         Councillor D'Souza, South Ward     

 

 

That Council, as a matter of urgency, write to Sydney Water demanding that they immediately take whatever steps are necessary to ensure appropriate emergency power supplies are always available at all of their waste water treatment plants to ensure sewerage spills, such as the recent one into Botany Bay, can never happen again.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM40/15

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Council response to sewerage flow into Botany Bay

Folder No:               F2004/06144

Submitted by:         Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council’s Environment Committee review the impact of the sewage leak into Botany Bay from the Cronulla waste-water pumping station.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM41/15

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Council response to Marriage Equality debate

Folder No:               F2004/07085

Submitted by:         Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council recognises that the need for a referendum or plebiscite on marriage equality is unnecessary given the strong public support for it, notes the pending Warren Entsch private member’s Bill, and takes a proactive position on behalf of our residents by writing to the Prime Minister urging a conscience vote on the issue in Federal Parliament prior to the next Federal election.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM42/15

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Need to upgrade Bicentennial Park drainage from Laperouse Chinese Market Gardens

Folder No:               F2011/00422

Submitted by:         Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That Council brings back a report examining the merits of upgrading the drainage system under Bicentennial Park to enable it to more effectively drain the input water discharged through the two box culverts on Bunnerong Road into the Laperouse Chinese Market Gardens.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM43/15

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Proposed Chinese Market Garden Meeting

Folder No:               F2012/00210

Submitted by:         Councillor Matson, East Ward      

 

 

That, in order to determine and promote the most responsible program for rehabilitating the uncultivated third lot on the Laperouse Chinese Market Gardens site for safe agricultural use, Council initiate an on-site meeting of the following persons and bodies:

 

·      Randwick City Council staff and Councillors;

·      Chinese heritage representatives;

·      Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust (SMCT);

·      Leigh James LLS (Land Services Officer Horticulture at Greater Sydney Local Land Services);

·      State Government MP Michael Daley;

·      Laperouse Land Council and

·    Fred Haskins (NSW Farmers Association).

 

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR5/15

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Rescission Motion from Crs Belleli, Bowen, Moore & Stevenson - Update to Precinct Committee Boundaries, Rules & Procedures

Folder No:               F2012/00372

Submitted by:         Councillor Belleli, South Ward; Councillor Bowen, East Ward; Councillor Moore, West Ward; Councillor Stevenson, Central Ward     

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 28 July 2015 in relation to Item GF23/15, reading as follows:

 

“That:

 

a)     all Precinct Executives be advised that they are bound by Council’s Code of Conduct moving forward and that a briefing session on how the Code of Conduct applies to be provided in the near future to all Precinct Executives;

 

b)     the updated Precinct Rules & Procedures be adopted;

 

c)     a section be included on Council’s website for the provision of all Precinct agendas, minutes containing Precinct resolutions and Council responses;

 

d)     an independent minute taker be provided, at Council’s expense and upon request, at an upcoming meeting of each Precinct to improve the accuracy and consistency of minutes being taken by all the Precinct Committees;

 

e)     Council endorse the revised Precinct boundary maps and update such maps as required to reflect the absorption of the Moverly Precinct into adjoining Precincts upon their agreement; and

 

f)      all Precinct Executives and complainants be advised of Council’s above resolution.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That:

 

a)     the proposed Precinct rules and procedures be placed on public consultation for 28 days, including consultation with all Randwick City Council Precinct Committees.

 

b)        Council defer any decision on the Councillor Code of Conduct applying to voluntary executive members of Randwick City Council Precinct Committees until the results of the consultation (referred to in part (a)) come back to Council.”


Ordinary Council                                                                                                      25 August 2015

 

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Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR6/15

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Rescission Motion from Crs Andrews, Nash, Roberts & Stavrinos - Botany Cemetry expansion proposal

Folder No:               F2004/07905

Submitted by:         Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor Nash, West Ward; Councillor Roberts, East Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

That the resolution passed at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday 28 July 2015 in relation to Item CP28/15 reading as follows:

 

“That:

 

a)     Council commence discussions with all stakeholders including Crown Land, OEH, LALC, utility agencies, service providers and SMCT to identify all issues affecting the proposed Botany Cemetery expansion into Military Road and the unformed Crown Road and the feasibility of addressing these issues;

 

b)     Council commences consultations with Crown Lands Department on the future operation and ownership of the Chinese Market Gardens site and the proposed transfer of the unformed Crown road on the southern side of Botany Cemetery to form part of the Cemetery; and

 

c)     the findings on the discussions/consultations with the stakeholders and agencies be reported to Council for Council to consider its in-principle support for the Botany Cemetery expansion proposal as detailed in the SMCT Briefing Document.

 

d)     that Council initiate, as a matter of urgency, discussions with the relevant State authority with the intent of stabilizing the de-vegetated northern slope of Hill 60 to better protect the historical and agricultural value of the Chinese market gardens

 

e)     Mr Fred Haskins be invited to make a submission to Council on the feasibility and advantages of using mechanical de-weeding techniques on the Chinese Market Gardens site rather than herbicide based techniques; and

 

f)      Council arrange a forum between the Councillors and the Farmers’ Association on the issue of the Chinese Market gardens.”

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

“That:

 

a)     Council note that it has historically taken the position that before making any major decisions, it consults with all relevant stakeholders.

 

b)     Consistent with that position, Council resolves to adopt the recommendation in the business paper without amendment.”

 

[Note: the recommendation in relation to Item CP28/15 (Council meeting of 28 July 2015) was as follows:

 

“That:

 

a)     Council commence discussions with all stakeholders including Crown Land, OEH, LALC, utility agencies, service providers and SMCT to identify all issues affecting the proposed Botany Cemetery expansion into Lot 4858, Military Road and the unformed Crown Road and the feasibility of addressing these issues.

 

b)     Council commences consultations with Crown Lands Department on the future operation and ownership of the Chinese Market Gardens site and the proposed transfer of the unformed Crown road on the southern side of Botany Cemetery to form part of the Cemetery.

 

c)     the findings on the discussions/consultations with the stakeholders and agencies be reported to Council for Council to consider its in-principle support for the Botany Cemetery expansion proposal as detailed in the SMCT Briefing Document.”]