Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 14 April 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                       14 April 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick on Tuesday, 14 April 2015 at 6:00pm

 

 

Committee Members:         The Mayor T Seng, Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, D’Souza (Deputy Chairperson), Garcia, Matson, Moore, Nash, Neilson, Roberts (Chairperson), Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos & Stevenson

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:   At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 10 March 2015

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 69 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W9/15      Tree Removal - Outside 11 Maitland Avenue, Kingsford........... 1

W10/15    Tram Lane, Randwick - Acquisition by Council of the privately owned section of the laneway................................................ 7

W11/15    Sydney Water Proposed Improvement to Quality of Stormwater Discharges to Beaches........................................................ 13

W12/15    Sports Committee Meeting Minutes...................................... 23    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                       14 April 2015

 

 

Works Report No. W9/15

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 11 Maitland Avenue, Kingsford

Folder No:               F2004/07359

Author:                    Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer      

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 11 Maitland Avenue, Kingsford, has been writing to Council since 5 May 2013 requesting the removal of the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside the front of his property because of a range of damage to private property and adjacent public infrastructure being caused by the roots of the tree.

 

Issues

 

The previous owner of the property experienced tree root related problems for many years and requested the removal of this tree on more than one occasion from 2009 until he sold the property in 2011.

 

Council records indicate that the roots of this tree have been causing sewer blockages since 2007 and that footpath damage and subsequent rectification works have been taking place since that same time. As a result of continued requests and a claim for property damage being lodged with Council its Tree Gang excavated along the entire property frontage on 29 August 2014 and a site inspection undertaken at that time confirmed a number of ongoing tree root issues.

 

The subject tree is in good health and is one of several growing along both sides of Maitland Avenue, Kingsford. It is approximately sixteen metres in height and around twenty metres across the canopy. It is an important provider of habitat and food source and provides significant visual amenity. However, it is growing directly underneath overhead powerlines and a number of domestic service wires and adjacent to a street light and the ongoing pruning required to maintain statutory clearances has meant that the tree’s visual amenity has been seriously compromised.

 

The subject tree has been root pruned on a number of occasions over several years to the extent that no further root shaving or cutting is a viable option. The adjacent damaged footpath section was replaced less than twelve months ago in bitumen because it could not be re-instated in concrete because of the presence of large fig tree roots. Council’s Tree Gang arborist advised as far back as 2012 that the amount of root pruning required to deal with the range of damage being caused by the roots would render the tree unstable and would dramatically impact upon its health. Because of the visual prominence of the tree and the fact that several trees of the same species have been removed in the past decade, the removal of this tree would have a negative impact on the aesthetics of the Maitland Avenue streetscape. However, this would be mitigated to a large degree by the fact that a large number of Blueberry Ash have been planted along both sides of the street in the past ten years and these have become well established and are all in a healthy condition. Despite the fact that several trees of this species have been removed within a relatively short timeframe, property owners within the street have not objected to their removal and replacement.

 


Relationship to City plan

 

The relationship to the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:   Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:       Develop and implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

The cost to remove and stump grind this tree and to replace it with two advanced Elaeocarpus reticulatus (Blueberry Ash) would be in the vicinity of $6,000 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The front fence of this property was removed and replaced approximately twelve months ago because of serious structural damage being caused by the roots of the adjacent Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree. The roots of this street tree have been causing ongoing damage to the adjacent property and public infrastructure which dates back to at least 2007. The tree has been root pruned on a number of occasions to ensure retention but this is no longer a practical management option. Branches have to be regularly pruned out of the overhead powerlines and the canopy creates significant shadowing of the adjacent residence at night and during the winter months.

 

The aesthetics of the tree have been severely compromised as a result of the severe pruning required and the canopy now basically consists of several branches with excessive end weight extending over the adjacent property on one side and the roadway on the other.   The removal and replacement of this problematic street tree would certainly fall within the parameters originally set out in Council’s resolution relating to aggressive rooted street trees, although its removal would have a negative impact on the visual amenity of the Maitland Avenue streetscape. It should be noted that several trees of the same species have had to be removed from Maitland Avenue over the past decade because of the serious and increasing amount of damage caused by their roots to both private property and public infrastructure. However, this species of tree is not the predominant species in Maitland Avenue, Kingsford, and the removal of this particular tree would therefore not contravene Council’s resolution that in such streets no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council owned Ficus microcarpa var. ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside 11 Maitland Avenue, Kingsford, be removed and replaced with an appropriate number of more appropriate tree species – as per Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs highlighting the prominence of the Hill’s Weeping fig outside 11 Maitland Avenue, Kingsford, and the range of tree root damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs highlighting the prominence of the Hill’s Weeping fig outside 11 Maitland Avenue, Kingsford, and the range of tree root damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property.

Attachment 1

 

 

DSCF0966

Hill’s Weeping fig located underneath powerlines, service wires and street light

 

DSCF0967

Pruning required has resulted in excessive end weight and reduced visual amenity

DSCF0984

Severe pruning was undertaken only recently to achieve required statutory clearances

 

DSCF0971

Large fig tree roots have consistently damaged footpath and undermined front fence

DSCF0972

Another group of fig tree roots underneath footpath and entering adjacent property

 

DSCF0973

Recently repaired front fence has large fig roots undermining and damaging footings


Works Committee                                                                                                       14 April 2015

 

 

Works Report No. W10/15

 

 

Subject:                  Tram Lane, Randwick - Acquisition by Council of the privately owned section of the laneway

Folder No:               F2004/06325

Author:                    Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services      

 

Introduction

 

Under the Local Government Act the Council “is the custodian and trustee of public assets………”

 

Tram Lane is located between Church Street and Prince Street behind the properties known as 116 to 138 Alison Road.

 

The condition of the lane has deteriorated and requires substantial maintenance.  Council has received numerous requests to undertake the necessary maintenance, however the western half of the lane is privately owned by the adjacent property owners with numerous Rights of Way to facilitate access.  The responsibility to undertake maintenance of the land lies with the owners.

 

A number of the body corporate that own portions of the lane have combined to request that Council acquire the private portion of Tram Lane so that it can be incorporated in the local road network under Council’s management.

 

Issues

 

An aerial image of Tram Lane is shown in Attachment 1 with the privately owned portion of Tram Lane depicted in pink.

 

There are a number of options that Council can consider in dealing with maintenance and upgrade of the privately owned portion of Tram Lane.  These are:

 

(i)    Do nothing.  The lane is private property and hence the responsibility of the owners.

(ii)    Seek the Costs from the Owners to bring the lane to a satisfactory standard and take on the future maintenance liability.

(iii)   Donate the cost of upgrading of the lane to the private owners.  Clearly this proposal set a precedent for future consideration of similar situations and not in the charter of Local Government.

(iv)   Seek to take ownership of the lane and fund the upgrade and ongoing maintenance of the section of lane.

 

Option (iv) is our preferred option as although privately owned, the section of Tram Lane looks like part of the road network and it is the only vehicular access to the properties that front Kynaston Avenue and Alison Road.  The lane is open to the public and from the community’s point of view, forms part of the public road network.

 

Whilst a number of owners have indicated support for Council taking over the lane, it was necessary to confirm all interests in the land.  Determining the ownership of Tram Lane has been complex, and Council officers sought legal advice to clarify the ownership of the private section of Tram Lane.  The ownership of the private portion of Tram Lane is depicted in Attachment 2.

 

The legal advice confirms that the privately owned section of Tram Lane is comprised of:

 

·       6 strata properties comprising 76 units (possibly some owners with multiple units). The addresses of the strata blocks are:

 

-    4-6 Kynaston Avenue (TLCC)

-    8 Kynaston Avenue (TLCC)

-    10 Kynaston Avenue

-    116 Alison Road (TLCC)

-    118 Alison Road (TLCC)

-    120 Alison Road (TLCC)

 

·       1 individual owner shown in yellow (10a Kynaston Avenue)

 

·       1 corporation, Broken Hill Investment, which owns the 300mm wide sliver shown in red. 

 

The initial approach for Council to take over the land was made by a group that calls themselves the “Tram Lane Campaign Committee” (TLCC).  The group consists of the properties listed above and designated (TLCC).

 

The reasons for the complex nature of ownership of Tram Lane is unknown however it has created a legacy whereby the owners of the private portion of the lane have a burden of maintaining a portion of the local road network that benefits the community. 

 

A commitment was made to the TLCC that the ownership of the lane would be clarified by Council and that a recommendation would be made to the Works Committee for the land to be transferred to Council without compensation.  It was also agreed that the recommendation would include that Council would undertake maintenance and program for the necessary upgrades in the capital works program following the acquisition of the lane.

 

It was also agreed that such commitments by Council would be on the condition that all parties with ownership of Tram Lane or a legal interest (for instance ROW) wrote to Council confirming their willingness to dedicate the lane to Council

 

A recent approach by TLCC to the sole owner of 10 Kynaston Avenue indicates support.  However, the owners of 10A Kynaston Avenue have recently had a DA approved for a residential flat building.  They have indicated in preliminary discussion with TLCC that they would be willing to consider “relinquishing ownership” following completion of the project and the sale of all units. In addition to this, initial discussions with Broken Hill Investment Corporation regarding the 300mm sliver depicted in red in Figure 2 have resulted in them requesting a refund of all rates paid on the land, or the purchase of the land at its valuation rate. To date they have not been open to any form of voluntary acquisition unless they are compensated. Since the general community is to take on the liability associated with the upgrade and maintenance of this section of lane, there is no proposal to pay compensation for any of the parcels of land.  However, the 300mm residual parcel of land that is owned by the Broken Hill Investment Corporation has attracted a waste levy and land rates since 2006-2007.  So it is considered appropriate that the waste levy that amounts to $3,685.05 be refunded to the corporation as they did not use the services.

 

Council’s legal advice extended to clarification of the preferred process for the transferring of land to Council on a no-cost voluntary basis. Section 30 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 allows a compulsory acquisition to be undertaken in accordance with a voluntary agreement between Council and the affected person(s). Therefore the acquisition is undertaken with the voluntary agreement of the relevant person(s); however it is still undertaken as a compulsory acquisition under the Act in order to ensure that the benefits to Council under the Act are obtained (which wouldn’t be the case if the land was transferred to Council).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:     Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The legal searches to date have amounted to approximately $8,000. There will be no cost to acquire the land.  The cost of legal negotiations, survey and adjustments to land titles is estimated at $40,000, which will be funded from the Roads Budget. The cost of works involved with renewing the section of Tram Lane mentioned in the report is estimated at approximately $200,000. This will be funded in future capital works programs.

 

Conclusion

 

The privately owned section of Tram Lane appears as part of the local road network and is utilised as such by the local community, including the Joseph Varga School.

 

The reliance on this road by the community confirms that it should be incorporated into the local road network.  The request by a committee of owners for Council to take over the lane provides an opportunity for the road to be acquired as a community asset.

 

Ultimately, until agreement is reached with the Broken Hill Investment Corporation and the 10A Kynaston Avenue is reached; there can be no further progress on this matter.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     contact all owners of the privately owned portions of Tram Lane with the objective of seeking agreement for acquiring the lane under Section 30 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 on a no cost voluntary basis.

 

b)     acquire the lane under Section 30 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 once all agreements are in place at no cost to Council (other than legal fees).

 

c)     makes budget provision to renew the section of Tram Lane that is currently privately owned upon completion of the acquisition process.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Aerial image - privately owned section of Tram Lane, Randwick

 

2.View

Diagram - multiple ownership of the privately owned portion of Tram Lane, Randwick

 

 

 

 


Aerial image - privately owned section of Tram Lane, Randwick

Attachment 1

 

 


Diagram - multiple ownership of the privately owned portion of Tram Lane, Randwick

Attachment 2

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                       14 April 2015

 

 

Works Report No. W11/15

 

 

Subject:                  Sydney Water Proposed Improvement to Quality of Stormwater Discharges to Beaches

Folder No:               F2004/08208

Author:                    Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services      

 

Introduction

 

In September 2013, a pipeline failure at Malabar Wastewater Treatment Plant resulted in discharge that did not comply with the plant’s Environmental Protection Licence.  Subsequently, the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) brought legal proceeding against Sydney Water for pollution of waters.

 

Sydney Water is seeking to propose a project to the NSW Land and Environment Court in in lieu of a financial penalty. The project seeks to improve the quality of dry weather stormwater discharge to Randwick LGA beaches.  Sydney Water considers the project to provide a more valuable and direct benefit to the Randwick community compared to a financial penalty.

 

Sydney Water is seeking Randwick Council’s support for the proposed project.

 

At the Council meeting held on 23 September 2014, in recognition of sewer infrastructure and the potential for environmental impacts on beaches and waterways, council resolved as follows:

 

“(Shurey/Andrews) that Council notes the inadequacies of the Coogee sewerage pit situation, the need for a broader local sewer infrastructure improvement, and the ecological importance of secondary treatment of ocean sewage discharges. That Council responds to these issues by adopting a policy position of urging the State Government to consider the following options:

 

a)     The commencement of a feasibility study into constructing an earlier diversion away from Coogee of the main sewage flows from other suburbs thus achieving a more direct path to their ultimate destination at the Malabar treatment plant;

 

b)     Sydney Water to investigate opportunities to work collaboratively with the Council to model and project changes to pressures placed on the sewage infrastructure system under various projected population growth scenarios;

 

c)     The implementation of secondary treatment techniques at the Malabar treatment plant; and

 

d)     A State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) imposing a sewage infrastructure improvement levy on all new developments causing residential increase in the LGA.”

 

This proposed collaboration will lead towards reduced pollution into waterways and better water quality at our beaches.

 


Issues

 

The Sydney Water draft project proposal is titled ‘Improving the quality of stormwater discharges to the Randwick LGA beaches’.  The proposal is included as Attachment 1.

 

The project seeks to test dry weather flows from selected stormwater outlets at beaches.  The stormwater outlets will be selected in consultation with Randwick Council. The testing will seek to determine if there is any bacteriological pollution and tracing of any pollutants to a source.  Appropriate measures and actions can then be taken for identified pollution sources within the catchment.

 

Identified Sewer leaks on Sydney Water Assets causing will be subsequently repaired by Sydney Water.  Unauthorised discharges of sewer to the stormwater system will be addressed by issuing notices to private property owners or businesses.

 

As part of this project, Sydney Water proposes to trial the use of caffeine as a diagnostic tool for identification of bacteriological pollution from humans as opposed to animal sources.

 

Sydney Water is also offering to train Randwick Council staff in the methodology for investigating and determining sewer leaks across a catchment.

 

The project involves Sydney Water:

·      Sampling coastal stormwater outlets for traditional bacteriological indicators (faecal coliform) as well as ammonia.

·      Sampling coastal stormwater outlets for caffeine (a good indicator of human wastewater pollution).

·      Conducting comprehensive catchment investigations using traditional indicators to trace wastewater pollution in the stormwater system to the source.

·      Undertaking analysis at Sydney Water NATA accredited laboratories of the samples obtained.

·      Evaluating the effectiveness of caffeine as a diagnostic tool for anthropogenic sources of faecal pollution.

·      Providing project management of the above work and the production of a final report of the findings of the stormwater sampling program by Sydney Water

·      Providing an option for Randwick City Council Environment Officers to receive training in the techniques and methodology of sewer leak surveillance and catchment investigation to maintain stormwater surveillance.

 

The project scope is intended to be of a scale to match the penalty costs imposed by the NSW Land and Environment Court. Sydney Water has developed the proposal on an assumption that the penalty cost would be at or about $50,000.

 

The project will deliver a report on the methodology for surveillance of the stormwater network, identification of problem locations and proposed rectification measures.

 

A review of the proposal indicates that the project can identify pollution sources entering stormwater network by undertaking methodical testing of key strategic locations within the catchments.  Addressing these pollution sources will improve the quality of the stormwater discharge to our beaches. 

 

 

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:             A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10e.2:                Contribute to projects and studies aimed at improving water quality of our marine and coastal areas.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of the project will be funded by Sydney Water.  The participation and training of Randwick Council’s Environmental Health Officers will be subject to their availability and will be covered by the existing operational budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Sydney Water is proposing a project to the NSW Land and Environment Court in lieu of a financial penalty for a discharge exceeding the Malabar Waste Water Treatment Plant’s Environmental Protection Licence.  Sydney Water considers the project to provide a more valuable and direct benefit to the Randwick community compared to a financial penalty.

 

The project entails testing of dry weather flows in our stormwater network. It will assist in identifying and pollution sources in the catchment that can be addressed to improve the quality of stormwater discharge to our beaches.

 

It is recommended that Randwick Council support the Sydney Water project proposal on an ‘in principle’ basis subject to the NSW Land and Environment Court determination.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     The Sydney Water proposal to “Improving the quality of stormwater discharges to Randwick LGA beaches” be noted.

 

b)     Randwick Council supports the project on an ‘in principle’ basis subject to the NSW Land and Environment Court determination.

 

c)     Randwick Council work with Sydney Water to determine the stormwater outlets to be tested for sources of pollution.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Improving the Quality of Stormwater Discharges to the Randwick LGA Beaches

 

 

 

 


Improving the Quality of Stormwater Discharges to the Randwick LGA Beaches

Attachment 1

 

 

 

ANNEXURE

Improving the quality of stormwater discharges to Randwick LGA beaches

Overview

 

Sydney Water would like to propose this project to the Land & Environment Court (Court) as a form of penalty (other than financial penalty) which the Court may order as reparation for Sydney Water’s discharge of treated effluent from the Malabar Cliff face outfall. This discharge occurred due to a pipeline leak from the Malabar Wastewater Treatment Plant.  Should the Court rule that the project is a suitable form of reparation, the project can be scaled to match the penalty costs determined by the Court. 

 

Sydney Water believes the project would provide a more valuable and direct benefit to the community as compared to a financial penalty.  The potential benefit of the project is proportional to the scale (catchment coverage for finding sewer leaks). 

 

The work will improve the local ecosystem and suitability for swimming across the Randwick LGA.  This will be achieved by improving the water quality of dry weather stormwater discharges to Randwick LGA beaches.

 

The project involves Sydney Water monitoring the water quality at stormwater drain outlets to beaches across the Randwick LGA (surveillance monitoring) during dry weather and if indicators of sewage pollution are observed, to do further water quality monitoring (investigation monitoring) across the catchment of the polluted drains to find the source of pollution.  The costs for the project as scaled in this proposal are estimated to be $50,000. The project will also trial the use of caffeine as a diagnostic tool for detecting sewage pollution.

 

The cost to fix leakage from either the private or public sewer is not included in project cost.  If Council would like to improve skills in sewer leak detection methods, its staff can attend the work.

Background

 

In September 2013, a Sydney Water pipeline failed at Malabar Wastewater Treatment Plant resulting in treated effluent being released from the cliff face outfall. This discharge was not compliant with the plant’s Environmental Protection Licence. The Environment Protection Authority investigated the incident and brought legal proceedings against Sydney Water for pollution of waters and for failure to maintain plant and equipment in a proper and efficient matter.

 

Project Objectives

 

The aim of this project is to improve the local ecosystem and suitability for swimming across the Randwick LGA.  This will be achieved by improving the water quality of dry weather stormwater discharges to Randwick LGA beaches.

 

The risk to beach users is highest where they can come into contact with undiluted discharges. This can occur where the flow crosses the beach in an open channel and in the near shore. The risk to the ecosystem is highest in the near shore and rock platforms.

 

This project includes trialling the use of caffeine as a diagnostic tool for the presence of pollution from human sewage.

 

If Randwick City Council Officers attend the work, the project will share the sewage leak detection skills. Council officers will then be able apply the learnings in the future to maintain the good water quality achieved by the project.

Project Design and Outcomes

 

It is proposed that Sydney Water identifies any likely sources of wastewater contamination in stormwater drains in the Randwick Council area, and provides an option to train Randwick Council officers in this process should they wish.

 

This work benefits the local community and visitors to the Randwick LGA through reducing the risk of exposure to sewage contaminated stormwater (especially where this discharges to swimming beaches) and improves environmental outcomes for local waterways. Through monitoring stormwater quality, the risks are far better understood. Training local officers in source detection methodology would provide the additional benefit of immediate catchment investigation after becoming aware of an issue. This would improve the likelihood of finding and fixing intermittent pollution sources.

 

Sydney Water is committed to fixing any sewer leaks found on Sydney Water assets. The project would involve a sampling program for about 15 stormwater drains within the Randwick City Council area with priority given to those stormwater drains that discharge to beaches as agreed with Randwick City Council. Sources of pollution can include Sydney Water assets or private sewer service lines.

 

In addition to traditional bacteriological indicators, caffeine will be trialled as an indicator of human wastewater pollution. The use of caffeine is innovative and is currently being used in a Sydney Water project that is showing promising results.

 

The proposal involves Sydney Water:

·    Sampling coastal stormwater outlets for traditional bacteriological indicators (faecal coliform) as well as ammonia.

·    Sampling coastal stormwater outlets for caffeine (a good indicator of human wastewater pollution).

·    Conducting comprehensive catchment investigations using traditional indicators to trace wastewater pollution in the stormwater system to the source.

·    Undertaking analysis at Sydney Water NATA accredited laboratories of the samples obtained.

·    Evaluating the effectiveness of caffeine as a diagnostic tool for anthropogenic sources of faecal pollution.

·    Providing project management of the above work and the production of a final report of the findings of the stormwater sampling program by Sydney Water

·    Providing an option for Randwick City Council Environment Officers to receive training in the techniques and methodology of sewer leak surveillance and catchment investigation to maintain stormwater surveillance.

 

The final report would document the methodology for surveillance of stormwater drains, project results and identification of problem locations and proposed rectification. The report will also include the feasibility of utilizing caffeine as a diagnostic tool for detection of human sewage pollution (traditional indicators detect sewage from warm blooded animals, including human).

 


Funding Schedule and Project Schedule

 

Item

Work detail

Outcomes

Timeframe

Cost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Field surveillance of stormwater drains outlets for traditional bacteriological indicators and caffeine

Field sampling:

Ammonia(colorimetric field kit) + flow estimate (L/sec)

(positive for sample collection)

Sample collection:

Faecal coliform   (laboratory x2)

Caffeine (laboratory x2)

Ammonia (laboratory)

Nutrients TN and TP (lab.x 2)

Conductivity (laboratory x2)

Field Observation:

Flow, Odour, Visual

Detection of potential sewage contamination

 

(may also detect other pollutants eg high ammonia

discharges)

April – June 2015 (TBC)

15 drains x 6 times

 

(about $30,000)*

Field source detection

 

(where potential sewage detection indicated)

Field sampling:

Ammonia(colorimetric field kit) + flow estimate (L/sec)

Sample collection:

Faecal coliform   (laboratory x2)

Field Observation:

Flow, Odour, Visual

Source detection tools:

CCTV sewers/stormwater, dye testing

Confirm and locate source of sewage contamination

June – December 2015

$10,000

Project Management

Liaise with Council, EPA, prepare storm water maps, manage project.

Objectives met on time, to cost and high quality

Project duration

$5,000

Report

Production of report including methodology, maps and photos, results and discussion and project outcomes.

Quality report produced by Sydney Water for Randwick City Council

December 2015

$5,000

Ongoing technical support to Randwick City Council

Sydney Water to provide optional training and ongoing technical support to Randwick City Council.

Ongoing collaboration between parties

Ongoing

Nil

 

 

 

 

Total $50,000

 *             While all agreed drains will be included, some drains may not have any water flowing in them during dry weather. For these drains, no sample can be taken for laboratory analysis (obviously there is no discharge if there is no flow). The cost assumed about $300 per duplicate sample where positive ammonia is detected in flowing water.


Roles and Responsibilities

 

Sydney Water will conduct and manage the project.

 

Sydney Water provides an option for Randwick City Council Environment Officers to receive training on the methodology of dry weather sewer leakage detection in stormwater and field staff from both Randwick City Council and Sydney Water to conduct one-off surveillance and source detection monitoring of stormwater drains.

 

In the event of ongoing monitoring by Randwick City Council, Sydney Water will provide technical support and source detection investigations where sewage pollution is indicated. 

 

Accountability

 

Sydney Water will retain accountability for the project and will fund the project to the value of $50,000. This includes Analytical services and items listed in the Project and Funding Schedule above.


FOR INFORMATION ONLY

Benefits of Local Government and Sewer Utility partnership

 

Local Government (Council) can play an important role in co-ordinating a dry weather sewer leak investigation and rectification program, in partnership with sewer utilities, to protect local recreational waterways. The benefits of such partnerships are that they utilise functions of both parties to improve the efficiency of finding waterway pollution and fixing problems. These functions are described below.

 

This requires a relatively minor financial investment from Local Government to conduct an initial screening level assessment and identify potential problems; and the tools and capacity of both parties to investigate, pinpoint, and rectify any dry weather sewer leaks detected, which may involve both of their respective stormwater and sewerage assets.

 

A key benefit of the partnership is that the program will detect sewer leaks arising not only from faults arising on the sewer utility’s assets, but also from private property, where these enter the Local Government’s stormwater network.

 

Potential contributions available from Local Government and Sewer Utilities to a Dry Weather Sewer Leak Investigation and Rectification Program

 

Local Government

Sewer Utility

·    Access to / ownership / management of stormwater assets

·    Local knowledge and manpower

·    CCTV of stormwater assets

·    Investigation using existing skills already practiced in stormwater pollution control (eg water quality testing, pollution source tracking and tracing)

·    Regulatory authority to issue pollution prevention notices to private property

·    Responsibility and resources to protect water quality in recreational waterways and environmental protection

·    Access to / ownership / management of sewer assets (and in some cases stormwater assets)

·    Detailed network maps and knowledge of sewer assets

·    CCTV of sewer assets

·    Existing skills in sewer leak tracking and tools (eg fluoroscein dye testing, smoke testing)

·    Conduct and fund water quality analysis for potential sewer leaks

·    Responsibility and resources to ensure efficient and safe management of public sewer

 


Works Committee                                                                                                       14 April 2015

 

 

Works Report No. W12/15

 

 

Subject:                  Sports Committee Meeting Minutes

Folder No:               F2005/00446

Author:                    George Bounassif, Manager Infrastructure Services      

 

Introduction

 

The Sports Committee Minutes for the meeting held on 18 February 2015 in the Matraville Room, Randwick City Council Depot, 192 Storey Street, Maroubra are presented at the Council Community Committee.

 

Issues

 

As scheduled, the Sports Committee has met and the minutes of the meeting, which reflects discussions and outcomes, are attached.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities.

Direction 5a:     Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active and passive open space uses.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that Council acknowledges and accepts the minutes of the attached Sports Committee.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the minutes of the Sports Committee Meeting held on 18 February 2015 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Randwick City Council Sports Committee Minutes – 18 February 2015

 

 

 

 


Randwick City Council Sports Committee Minutes – 18 February 2015

Attachment 1