Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 8 July 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 July 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick on Tuesday, 8 July 2014 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:          The Mayor (S Nash), Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, D’Souza (Deputy Chairperson), Garcia, Matson, Moore, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos (Chairperson) & Stevenson

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 10 June 2014

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 66 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W16/14     Tree Removal – Outside 6 and 10 Helena Street, Randwick......................... 1

W17/14     Safety Vests for School Children............................................................ 9

W18/14     Significant Trees – National Trust of Australia (New South Wales) Register .. 13

W19/14     Maroubra Beach Volleyball Licence - Amended Conditions.......................... 27

W20/14     Sports Committee Meeting Minutes....................................................... 31

W22/14     Oxford Street proposed cycleway and footpath - Centennial Park............... 45    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 July 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W16/14

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal – Outside 6 and 10 Helena Street, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer      

 

Introduction

 

On 14 October 2013 the owner of 10 Helena Street, Randwick, wrote to Council requesting the removal of the Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree from the front of his property and detailing a number of reasons for this request.

 

Issues

 

There are a number of mature Ficus ‘Hillii’ street trees growing along both sides of Helena Street, Randwick, and the problems and damages issues they are causing are common for the species. Several have been removed within the past decade because of the extent and seriousness of damage to both private property and public infrastructure caused by their root systems. Specifically, an established Hill’s Weeping fig was removed from the nature strip directly in front of 8 Helena Street, Randwick, in November 2008 because of tree root damage it was causing to that property and another tree of the same species was removed from the front of 12 Helena Street in February 2013 for much the same reason. Several other trees of this species on both sides of the street have been extensively root pruned to the extent that Council’s Tree Gang arborists have recommended that further root shaving or cutting is no longer a viable option because of the amount of tree root material requiring removal. This is particularly relevant because there is a shallow rock shelf running along the entire length of Helena Street directly underneath these established street trees and in most cases any further root pruning would render any of these trees unstable.

 

In December 2012 Council’s insurers made an offer of settlement to the owner of 8 Helena Street, Randwick, in relation to damage that had been caused to her property by the roots of the Council owned Hill’s Weeping fig that had been removed from the front of her property. She refused to sign a deed of release because she was convinced that additional damage was being caused to the retaining wall on the western side of her property by roots from a Hill’s fig growing on the nature strip outside 6 Helena Street, Randwick.

 

On 19 December 2012 Council’s Tree Gang trenched along the frontage of 8 Helena Street, Randwick, and discovered a number of very large fig tree roots entering the property at several points along the frontage. This was despite the fact that the fig tree directly outside this property was removed in late 2008 and it was quite evident that these active roots were emanating from the two Council owned Hill’s Weeping figs growing outside 6 and 10 Helena Street, Randwick. This trenching revealed a cluster of very large fig roots from the tree outside 6 Helena Street undermining the front brick fence of No 8 and several other roots from the same tree were entering and damaging the sewer pipes at that property. There were also a number of large tree roots entering the property on the eastern side that had travelled from the fig on the nature strip outside 10 Helena Street. The recommendation of Council’s Tree Gang was that both trees should be removed and replaced with more appropriate street trees because of the size of intruding tree roots and the damage they are causing. The existence of a shallow rock shelf underneath these two trees makes any further root pruning unviable and could possibly render both trees unstable.

 

Relationship to City plan

 

Outcome 10:       A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:      Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:         Develop and implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

The cost to remove and stump grind these two street trees and to replace them with several advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) would be in the vicinity of $8,000 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Despite the fact that the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree growing directly outside 8 Helena Street, Randwick, was removed in 2008 tree roots from the two figs outside 6 and 10 Helena Street are entering all three adjacent properties and are causing structural damage to all those properties.

 

Council records indicate that the owners of 6 Helena Street first made application to Council to have the fig tree outside their property removed on 18 February 1999. That same property has also been the subject of regular sewer blockages since at least March 2001. Fig tree roots have been causing damage to the property at 10 Helena Street since March 1998 and sewer blockages have been occurring since at least December 1998. The current owner of that property first wrote to Council on 8 November 2012 detailing a range of tree root damage being caused to his property and advising that fig tree roots extended fifty metres to the rear of his property. He stated that in his opinion this tree was completely inappropriate for the situation in which it was growing and he requested that it be removed and replaced with something more appropriate.

 

Damage to public infrastructure by the roots of these two trees has been occurring for at least two decades and has had to be regularly repaired to negate trip hazards and minimise Council’s liability exposure. Both trees have had to be regularly and severely pruned away from overhead powerlines to maintain statutory clearances and this pruning has severely negated the visual amenity of the two trees. 

 

The removal and replacement of these fig trees would certainly fall within the parameters originally set out in Council’s resolution relating to aggressive rooted street trees, although their removal would have a negative impact on the surrounding streetscape. This would be mitigated to some degree by the fact that there are a number of established Bull Bay Magnolias and Weeping Lilly Pillys growing along both sides of the street and if removed they would be replaced with several advanced Weeping Lilly Pillys, which is a fast growing species once established. Because no Hill’s Weeping figs have been removed from Helena Street, Randwick, within the past twelve months the removal of these two trees would not contravene Council’s resolution that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year. The impact of their removal on the streetscape would also be negated by the fact that there are a number of healthy and established Magnolias and Lilly Pillys growing along both sides of the street.

 

 


 

Recommendation

 

That the two Council owned Ficus microcarpa var. ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping figs) growing on the nature strip outside 6 and 10 Helena Street, Randwick, be removed and replaced with an appropriate number of advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) – as per Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs highlighting the size and scale of the two fig trees outside 6 and 10 Helena Street, Randwick, compromised visual aesthetics and tree root damage and intrusion into the front of adjacent properties.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs highlighting the size and scale of the two fig trees outside 6 and 10 Helena Street, Randwick, compromised visual aesthetics and tree root damage and intrusion into the front of adjacent properties.

Attachment 1

 

 

Description: 10%20Helena%20St%203

Fig tree outside 6 Helena St has had majority of canopy removed for wire clearance

 

Description: 10%20Helena%20St

Tree outside 10 Helena St overhangs adjacent property and overhead powerlines
Description: 10 Helena St 6

Foliage on fig outside No 6 are growing into powerlines, service wires and street light

 

Description: 10%20Helena%20St%204

Nature strip outside No 8 will require extensive and costly remediation works

 

Description: 10%20Helena%20St%205

Large buttress roots protruding above nature strip outside property at 6 Helena St

 

Description: DSCF9095

Large mass of fig tree roots entering property at 8 Helena St from tree outside No 6

 

Description: DSCF9102

Tree roots from fig outside 6 Helena St which are entering front of adjacent property 

 

Description: DSCF9084

Damage to front brick fence caused by roots from fig outside 6 Helena Street

 

Description: DSCF0411

Large fig tree roots entering 10 Helena St and travelling diagonally into 8 Helena St

 

Description: 14 Helena St - 14 Feb 2014

Weeping Lilly Pillys planted outside 12-14 Helena St when fig was removed in late 2012

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 July 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W17/14

 

 

Subject:                  Safety Vests for School Children

Folder No:                   F2007/00187

Author:                   Jorde Frangoples, Director City Services      

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Ordinary meeting of 23 October 2013 resolved:

 

“(Seng/Andrews) that Randwick City Council:

 

a)     note that many school children are exposed to road related risks when they cross the roads, on school excursions, field trips and other outings from school grounds;

b)     note that an organisation called Safety Kids Australia has a proposal to address the above issue by providing safety vests to all primary schools;

d)     resolve that the General Manager be asked to provide a report on the matter with appropriate recommendations.

e)     Council undertake a campaign to encourage children to wear safety vests to and from school.”

 

Background

A private organisation that sells safety vests has set up a program called “Safety Kids Australia” has proposed that the Council facilitates an initiative to sell safety vests to Randwick’s primary schools, to address the safety of school children.  In order to assess this proposal the Council contacted each of the local primary schools and the NSW lead agency relating to the road safety of children.

 

Issues

 

The Council acknowledges that “Safety Kids Australia” is seeking to supply high visibility safety vests to all of the primary schools in the City of Randwick, and that it is seeking the Council’s support for this initiative, by Council marketing this program to its local schools.

 

Each of the twenty eight local primary schools was contacted to see if they were interested in this proposal.  Only three, out of the twenty eight (11%) primary schools which were approached, responded stating that they would be interested in the program.

 

In New South Wales road safety is the responsibility of Transport for NSW (TfNSW). Within TfNSW is the NSW Centre for Road Safety.  The Centre for Road Safety's key responsibilities includes:

 

·       Funding and developing targeted road safety programs and campaigns 

·       Collating and analysing crash statistics

·       Assessing speed camera effectiveness

·       Developing and reviewing speed zone policies to ensure safety

·       Allocating flashing lights outside schools in high crash-risk areas

·       Funding targeted police operations and programs

·       Developing best-practice road safety policies for design, building and maintenance of the road network

·       Testing new road safety technologies

·       Producing road safety education material for schools and local communities

·       Improving safety standards for new vehicles and promoting the uptake of safer vehicles

·       Developing awareness campaigns to improve road user behaviour

 

The Centre for Road Safety has engaged an organisation known as ‘Kids and Traffic’ to manage the NSW Early Childhood Road Safety Education Program.  It is based at Macquarie University.  Their Program is part of the statewide road safety education program, along with the Association of Independent School (AIS), Catholic Education Commission (CEC) and the Department of Education and Communities (DEC).

Recent contact with Kids and Traffic indicates that the proposed initiative may not be supported.  Also, there are some concerns about the use of so called high visibility vests by children.  It has been suggested that wearing the vest may result in less safe behaviour by some children – similar to the so-called Superman Syndrome.  Some children wearing these vests may think they can boldly walk across roads with them on, and that they will be safe, no matter what.  There should not be an over-reliance on personal protective equipment (the vests) instead of higher order behavioural projects.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9a:      A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreational opportunities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

At this time there is no proposal for the Council to provide the vests.  If Council were to provide the vests they would be sourced, in the usual manner, from amongst the Council’s approved suppliers.

 

Conclusion

 

Given the possible safety implications of the proposal it is considered that formal advice be sought from the expert NSW agency for children’s safety, Kids and Traffic’.

 

Council should continue to support schools by providing Road Safety initiatives which fall within the guidelines of the Local Government Road Safety Program (LGRSP) and include SchoolSafe, Pedestrian Safety and Speed campaigns.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the proposal by the safety vest supplier to provide high visibility safety vests to primary school children, be formally referred to the expert NSW agency for children’s safety, ‘Kids and Traffic’.

 

b)     Council continues to support schools by providing Road Safety initiatives which fall within the guidelines of the Local Government Road Safety Program (LGRSP).

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Correspondence from Safety Kids Australia

 

  


Correspondence from Safety Kids Australia

Attachment 1

 

 

From: Stephen Thomas [mailto:stephen@safetykids.com.au]
Sent: Thursday, 19 June 2014 1:54 PM
To: Jorde Frangoples
Subject: Follow up to our meeting

 

Hi Jorde,

 

Once again thanks for your time yesterday. I appreciate the candid nature of our discussions. I just wanted to highlight some points after yesterday’s meeting. It seemed to me that there are three main points you brought up that have the potential to kill this idea.

 

Point 1

You Already have a supplier of hi-vis safety equipment.

My response to this is that, as I mentioned yesterday, Randwick wouldn’t be purchasing the vests, a business/corporate sponsor would. Randwick would simply be supporting and facilitating the initiative.

 

Point 2

You said a government body had indicated there was a potential for children to feel ‘bulletproof’ with the safety vests and may in fact reduce safety. 

My response to this is that, this is one study. I can show you many studies (by government and not-for-profit) organisations supporting their use. Both Australian and International studies. Either way, expert theories are one thing, but facts are another and the fact is road accidents continue to be the leading cause of death and injury to children in Australia (well over half of all deaths and injures). I’m not saying safety vests will stop all of these, but it is step in the right direction in reducing them. If you have time, google news reports over the last month, I took 5 minutes and found 8 children had been hit by cars in Sydney in the last month.

 

Point 3

You said the vests have the potential to ‘water-down’ current safety programs (Such as the 40km/h speed zones, crosswalks etc…)

My response to this is that these vests are to be used whilst these initiatives are not in operation. I.e. during school hours, whilst on excursions, outings, etc… They are not intended to be used on the way to and from school.

 

In conclusion, we can both find experts/studies/reasons that will support our point of view, all valid. It is all a matter of whether you, and council for that matter support the idea. If not, that is fine, we have a lot of support for corporations and schools already and will continue to roll out the vests to schools through our current channels. If you do support the idea, then that is great news and it will only lead to an increase in the safety of children in the city of Randwick.

 

Kind Regards,

 

 

Stephen Thomas
Safety Kids Australia
E: stephen@safetykids.com.au
W: www.safetykids.com.au


 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 July 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W18/14

 

 

Subject:                  Significant Trees – National Trust of Australia (New South Wales) Register

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

On 16 April 2014 the Director, Advocacy of the National Trust of Australia (NSW) wrote to Randwick City Council advising that several trees listed on Council’s Register of Significant Trees had also been listed on the Trust Register because of their significance.

 

Issues

 

The following trees or groups of trees have now been listed on the Trust Register:

 

·      Remnant population of Woody Pear trees – Purcell Park, Matraville

·      White Walnut tree - 45 Wansey Road, Randwick

·      Maroubra Junction Silver Date palms - Haig Street, Maroubra

 

The Trust Register lists those buildings, sites, areas and items which, in the Trust’s opinion, fall within the following definition:

 

     “Those places which are components of the natural or the cultural environment of Australia, that have aesthetic, historical, architectural, archaeological, scientific or social significance or other special value for future generations, as well as the present community.”

 

Listing by the National Trust does not have any legal force but it is recognised as an authoritative statement of the historical, architectural importance or other value of a building, site, item or area and by listing such items in its Register, the Trust hopes to advise the public of the value of Australia’s national heritage.

 

The population of Woody Pears (Xylomelum pyriforme) located within Purcell Park, Australia Avenue, Matraville, is a rare example of this species, uncommon in the Sydney region in a conventional park setting. This population is a remnant of the Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub (ESBS), an endangered ecological community which once grew commonly throughout the eastern suburbs of Sydney. Although these multi-trunk specimens are not particularly large examples, they are believed to be of considerable age and original components of the former plant community and thus have considerable botanical significance. This remnant population has exceptional natural heritage significance in terms of its combined botanic, biodiversity, historic, cultural, aesthetic and visual qualities and is particularly distinguished by its rarity and representative values. This group of trees is located within land under the care and control of Randwick City Council.

 

The White Walnut tree (Cryptocarya obovata) located within 45 Wansey Road, Randwick, has historic significance as an early cultivated specimen. It has aesthetic significance as an outstanding and rarely cultivated subtropical rainforest specimen of dramatic scale, proportions and sculptural form. This White Walnut tree is a dominant landscape element in the Wansey Road streetscape and makes an important contribution to the visual and aesthetic character of the street and local environs. Moreover, the tree is considered to have regional significance in terms of its historic, botanic, social, cultural, aesthetic and visual qualities. In particular, the tree is highly significant in terms of its botanic rarity, historic associations and representative values and is one of the most significant trees in the Randwick Local Government Area. The only other known example of this taxon in cultivation, of similar structure, trunk diameter and overall scale, occurs in the Sydney Botanic Gardens. This tree is located within land owned and under the care and control of the University of New South Wales.

 

The formal row of six Silver Date palms (Phoenix sylvestris) located on the southern side of Haig Street, Maroubra (corner Anzac Parade) has significance in terms of its historic, commemorative, botanic, visual, aesthetic, social and cultural values. This row plantation also has important representative, landmark and rarity values. Unlike the Canary Island Date palm which it resembles, Silver Date palms are a rare specimen planting in the Randwick LGA. It is the only known commemorative plantation using this species in the Randwick LGA and has been rarely cultivated in the Sydney metropolitan area. This plantation is believed to date from the early years following the First World War when returning servicemen brought the seeds back to Australia, possibly from cultivated specimens in North Africa or the Middle East. These palms, therefore, have important commemorative values and a long association with the adjacent RSL club and the war memorial positioned opposite in Anzac Parade, Maroubra.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

Outcome 10:       A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10c:      Land use planning and management enhances and protects biodiversity and natural heritage.

Key Action:         The protection and enhancement of biodiversity is facilitated through partnerships with the community.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

The inclusion of these trees on the National Trust of Australia (New South Wales) Register has no financial impact on Council.

 

Conclusion

 

The National Trust of Australia (New South Wales) does not advocate rigid and unnecessarily restrictive development controls with regard to listed items or places. However, it recommends that their significance as part of the national, state or local heritage should be conserved through controls that allow, where necessary, for new and compatible development and associated works, all of which represent the character of the place or item through enhancement rather than conflict.

 

In order to improve the protection of these trees Council should amend its Register of Significant Trees to highlight their inclusion in the National Trust of Australia (New South Wales) Register as well as making appropriate amendments to the parcel condition details of its property register.  The owners of the properties where these trees are located should also be advised in writing of the extremely important cultural and heritage significance of these trees and the reasons for their inclusion on the National Trust Register. They should also be encouraged to ensure that the management and maintenance of these significant tree assets complies with best practice and that any such management regime improves as much as possible the long-term health and viability of these trees in order that future generations are able to appreciate the value of Australia’s National heritage.  

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council amends its Register of Significant Trees and the parcel condition details of its property register to reflect the fact that the remnant population of Woody Pears in Purcell Park, Matraville, the White Walnut tree at the rear of 45 Wansey Road, Randwick, and the Maroubra Junction row plantation of Silver Date palms have been listed on the National Trust of Australia (NSW) Register.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Copy of the National Trust Register listing report detailing all three inclusions on it Trust Register and the reasons for their listing.

 

 

 

 


Copy of the National Trust Register listing report detailing all three inclusions on it Trust Register and the reasons for their listing.

Attachment 1

 

 


 










Works Committee                                                                                                      8 July 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W19/14

 

 

Subject:                  Maroubra Beach Volleyball Licence - Amended Conditions

Folder No:                   F2014/00096

Author:                   Kerry Colquhoun, Coordinator, Open Space Assets      

 

Introduction

 

At the Works Committee on 11 March 2014 Council resolved:

 

(Moore/Smith) that Council enters into a formal Licence agreement with Beachvolleyball.com.au Pty Ltd to conduct volleyball classes, competitions and training games on Maroubra Beach for a term of five (5) years subject to the following:

 

·      The licence apply to an area located at the southern end of Maroubra Beach and the number of courts allowed will be limited to three (3) as shown in Attachment 1.

·      Operating hours will be:

-    Monday to Saturday - 7am to 7pm

-    Sunday - 12pm to 7pm

·        The annual fee be $5,200 and indexed annually in accordance with Council’s Fees and Charges (GST is not chargeable).

·        Any other conditions required by the NSW Trade & Investment (Crown Lands Division).

 

Issues

 

Mr Salvin, the operator of Beachvolleyball.com.au Pty Ltd was advised of the conditions of approval.  Mr Salvin has requested a reassessment of the approval as some restrictions will impact the business.

 

Mr Salvin has requested that the approval be reconsidered to include the following:

 

1.  The Sunday operating hours be 7:00am-7:00pm.  The Sunday morning period is currently in place and is well attended.  Loss of Sunday morning will significantly impact business.

2.  The Council approve an additional temporary court to increase flexibility and availability of game time for the community.

 

The requested issues by Mr Salvin were considered by Council staff including lifeguards and the Manager, Aquatic Services to determine whether these issues could be permitted without impact to beach operations. The change to the Sunday operating hours and the provision of a temporary court can be accommodated.  It is considered that these changes, the activity can be conducted with minimal impact on beach operations.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction 5b:      A range of cultural, sporting and leisure activities.

Financial impact statement

 

As per the previous report on this issue, the term of the licence would be for five (5) years and, therefore, an income of approximately $26,000 can be expected for the period of the Licence.

 

Conclusion

 

The activity of beach volleyball is a very popular sport in the local community of Randwick City.  Beachvolleyball.com.au Pty Ltd has safely and successfully operated this activity for a number of years and Council has agreed to continue the operation.

 

Council staff have assessed changes requested by the operator to the approval conditions.  The changes will allow the business to run successfully and the conditions are satisfactory from a beach operational perspective.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council enters into a formal licence agreement with Beachvolleyball.com.au Pty Ltd to conduct volleyball classes, competitions and training games on Maroubra Beach for a term of five (5) years subject to the following:

 

·      The licence apply to an area located at the southern end of Maroubra Beach and the number of courts allowed to be limited to three (3) permanent and one (1) temporary court as shown in attachment 1.  The temporary court is to be removed at the end of each session.

·      Operating hours will be 7:00am to 7:00pm Monday to Sunday.

·      The annual fee be $5,200 and indexed annually in accordance with Council’s Fees and Charges (GST is not chargeable).

·      Any other conditions required by the NSW Trade and Investment (Crown Lands Division).

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Map showing number of courts and extent of Licenced Area

 

 

 

 


Map showing number of courts and extent of Licenced Area

Attachment 1

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                      8 July 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W20/14

 

 

Subject:                  Sports Committee Meeting Minutes

Folder No:                   F2005/00446

Author:                   George Bounassif, Manager Infrastructure Services      

 

Introduction

 

The Sports Committee Minutes for the meeting held on 21 May 2014 in the Matraville Room, Randwick City Council Depot, 192 Storey Street, Maroubra are presented at the Council Community Committee.

 

Issues

 

As scheduled, the Sports Committee has met and the minutes of the meeting, which reflects discussions and outcomes, are attached.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities.

Direction 5a:      Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active and passive open space uses.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that Council acknowledges and accepts the minutes of the attached Sports Committee.

 

Recommendation

 

That the minutes of the Sports Committee Meeting held on 21 May 2014 be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Randwick City Council Sports Committee Minutes – 21 May 2014

 

 

 

 


Randwick City Council Sports Committee Minutes – 21 May 2014

Attachment 1

 

 













Works Committee                                                                                                      8 July 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W22/14

 

 

Subject:                  Oxford Street proposed cycleway and footpath - Centennial Park

Folder No:                   F2010/00077

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport      

 

Introduction

 

Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust (CPMPT) are undertaking works in order to establish a path link along the southern side of Oxford Street, from York Road to Lang Road.  They are seeking Randwick Council’s approval to extend the path into some Council owned land.  This report details the proposal and, in consideration of the positive benefits for cyclists and pedestrians, recommends endorsement of the Trust’s proposal.

 

Background

 

Randwick local government area’s northern boundary is basically the centre line of Oxford Street, between York Road and Lang Road, Centennial Park.  However, as Oxford Street is state road the Council has no authority on changes to the road itself.  Also, the property boundary of Centennial Park and Sydney Water is, for the most part, only some 60cm behind the southern kerb of Oxford Street.  There are a couple of locations where the boundary extends further from the kerb and to the east of the Woollahra Gates the whole footpath is in the ownership of Randwick City Council. 

 

In 2008-2009 following representations from local bicycle groups and others, Randwick Council convened a meeting between officers of RMS, Sydney Water, Centennial Parks, Waverley Council and City of Sydney Council, to examine the possibility of providing a footpath or shared cycle path along this southern side of Oxford Street. 

 

The conditions along the southern side of Oxford Street for pedestrians and cyclists were very poor.  To the west of the Woollahra Gates the path generally consisted of a dirt track with a number of level variations and exposed tree roots to be negotiated.  It met no standards for footpaths.

 

In parallel to Randwick Council’s processes for planning a path the CPMPT was preparing its Masterplan for Centennial Park and this included the provision of a shared path along its Oxford Street frontage. 

 

CPMPT successfully applied to RMS for funding to undertake this significant length of pathway and has recently commenced construction upon its land. 

 


Issues

 

Oxford St Cycleway - pre works

 

CPMPT have approached Randwick City Council seeking approval to convert the existing unformed pathways / tracks which are on Randwick City Council land into full-width surfaced pathway.  It has also sought permission to reconstruct the existing poor quality bitumen path alongside the “slip road” section of Oxford Street, from York Road toward Woollahra Gates. 

 

The creation of the proposed pathways will significantly improve conditions for pedestrians and cyclists travelling along the southern side of Oxford Street.  This proposal aligns well with Randwick Council’s practice of installing footpaths along each roadway.  It also meets mobility access requirements – allowing for the less mobile community members to utilize this aesthetically pleasing route as well.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:   Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9a:  A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycleways linking major land uses and recreational opportunities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

CPMPT is proposing to undertake all of the work involved with Randwick Council having to contribute no funds for footpath works.  However, the little utilized bus shelter in the “Oxford Street slip lane” will have to be relocated in order to provide sufficient width for the intended use.  Generally relocation of bus shelters costs $20,000.  Quotes for this work are being currently sought.

 

Conclusion

 

Given that the footpaths proposed by CPMPT will support increased walking and cycling, align with Randwick Council’s practices and City Plan objectives, and, can be achieved with minimal financial input from Randwick Council, is recommended that the proposal be supported.

 

Recommendation

 

That no objection be raised to the proposal by CPMPT to install pathways along the southern side of Oxford Street between York Road and Lang Road.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Plan - Oxford Street Cycleway, Centennial Park

 

 

 

 


Plan - Oxford Street Cycleway, Centennial Park

Attachment 1