Environment Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 8 July 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                             8 July 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Environment Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick on Tuesday, 8 July 2014 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:          The Mayor (S Nash), Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, D’Souza, Garcia, Matson (Deputy Chairperson), Moore, Neilson, Roberts, Seng & Shurey (Chairperson), Smith, Stavrinos & Stevenson

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the extraordinary meeting held on 22 May 2007, the Council resolved that the Environment Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Environment Committee Meeting - 10 June 2014

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 66 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Environment Reports

E5/14        Update on Council's approach to reduce contamination in household recycling bins      1

E6/14        Update on initiatives to reduce illegal dumping across Randwick City.............. 5

E7/14        Overview of Randwick's 2014 Who Cares About the Environment attitudes and actions survey of residents............................................................................ 41

E8/14        Update on the 3 Council Ecological Footprint project between Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils............................................................................. 47

E9/14        Randwick's 2014 Eco Living Fair............................................................ 51

 

 

 

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil  

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Environment Committee                                                                                             8 July 2014

 

 

Environment Report No. E5/14

 

 

Subject:                  Update on Council's approach to reduce contamination in household recycling bins

Folder No:                   F2004/07285

Author:                   Talebul Islam, Coordinator Strategic Waste      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Council’s Waste Management Strategy and Strategic Waste Action Plan was developed in 2010 to provide the strategic framework and approach for waste management including recycling across the City.

 

As outlined in recent reports to Council, the NSW Government’s Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy sets waste diversion targets for Local Councils as a means of maximizing the recovery of resources that would otherwise end up in landfills across the State.

 

The recovery of dry recyclables as picked up from households in the yellow-lidded recycling bins remains one of the key components of each Council’s approach to meeting the NSW Government’s waste diversion from landfill and resource recovery targets.

 

This report aims to provide an update to Council on Randwick’s dry recycling program and initiatives aimed at reducing contamination of recycling.

 

Issues

 

Every week, Council’s waste and recycling contractor (SITA) collects recycling from approximately 30,000 households. Each vehicle utilizes side arm pick-up technology and is equipped with a hopper camera for monitoring the recycling bin contents. Using these truck mounted cameras, drivers are able to provide advice on recycling contamination or related issues for follow up.

 

Over a 12 month period, Randwick households place 12,000-13,000 tonnes of co-mingled recyclables out for collection in their yellow-lid kerbside recycling bins. Co-mingling allows paper products, plastic drink containers, metal and aluminium products to be placed in the one bin for sorting at an approved material recovery facility. This collection system contributes significantly toward the achievement of Council’s landfill diversion targets and is one of the key environmental outcomes of the waste management services provided by Council for its community.

 

This 12,000 to 13,000 tonnes of dry recyclables is equivalent to:

·      around 50,000m3 of savings in landfill space;

·      greenhouse gas savings equivalent to 2,000 cars permanently removed from our roads;

·      around 350,000 litres of water saved; and

·      energy savings equivalent to the annual electricity supply of 14,000 households.

 

As well as the significant savings in landfill disposal costs and additional environmental outcomes as outlined above, Council also becomes eligible for a small but significant financial incentive for high quality recyclables picked up by our recycling contractor if there is an overall contamination of less than 5%. Contamination of the recycling stream is usually in the form of non-recyclable material that includes food, rubbish or plastic bags.

 

Conversely, high levels of contamination of co-mingled recycling can negatively impact Council’s landfill diversion rates as well as our intended environmental outcomes through the rejection of recycled materials delivered and if this occurs can also be subject to substantial cost penalties if contamination levels exceed 10% of material collected.

 

To improve our understanding and response to incidents of recycling contamination, regular audits are conducted of household waste streams. Improved waste and recycling messages or programs can then be developed and distributed to our community.

 

A recent waste audit carried out in December 2013 indicated a contamination level in Randwick’s household recycling stream of approximately 7.5%. The most common types of contamination found in the yellow-lid recycling bins included non-recyclable paper, food/organics, plastic bags/non-recyclable plastic/polystyrene foam and non-recyclable glass.

 

Based on the current tonnages, Council could be receiving approximately $65,000 for co-mingled recycling if we were to achieve a less than 5% contamination rate while the level of penalty could be up to $195,000 should contamination rates exceed 10%.

 

As with each of the various waste streams, regular campaigns, messages and other initiatives have been identified, implemented and refined over time to minimise the level of contamination occurring in our recycling stream. Council’s Strategic and Operational Waste Officers work closely with Council’s waste and recycling contractor, via a Recycling Contamination Management Plan developed collaboratively. The actions undertaken via this Plan include:

 

Action

Response

Driver monitoring and reporting of contaminated recycling bins

 

approx 400 contamination reports are provided per week to Council staff

Driver notifications (bin sticker) to householder

 

100-400 sticker notifications to residents per week from contamination reports received

Waste Education Officer letters to households reminding them of correct recycling practices

 

Up to 400 letters mailed to residents per week

Door knocks to residents and bin inspections by Waste Education Officer

 

As needed, to address repeat contamination incidents

School waste and recycling education visits

 

Average of 1 school visit per month, reaching 110 students per visit

School recycling service (on request)

 

Free co-mingled recycling bins and collection now provided to 23 local schools

Waste and Material Recovery Facility tours and excursions for residents to increase understanding of recycling processing and sorting carried out

 

2 excursions organized each year

 


Public Place Recycling

The success of kerbside recycling has facilitated the expansion of Council’s public place recycling program with 18 new public place recycling bins installed across the city. A total of 40 public place recycling bins are now located at Council’s beaches, parks and town centres.

 

Public Place recycling volumes (up to Dec 2013):

 

July, 2013

(tonnes)

Aug, 2013

(tonnes)

Sept, 2013

(tonnes)

Oct, 2013

(tonnes)

Nov, 2013

(tonnes)

Dec, 2013

(tonnes)

 

 

3.7

 

3.18

 

3.08

 

4.68

 

5.42

 

7.16

 

 

Council’s recent audit for the public place recycling stream showed contamination rates in the order of 18.7%. On this basis, public place recycling only contributes approximately 5% of public place waste collected. New signage is being trialed to increase community understanding of the public place recycling facilities provided.

 

Other Recycling related issues

As well as issues related around the yellow-lid household recycling bins, regular audits of the household red lid rubbish bins have established that more than 15% of red-lid bin contents are made up items which can be recycled (e.g. glass, plastics, paper). If these recyclables were removed from red-lid bins and placed into yellow lid recycling bins, around $900,000 could be saved in current disposal costs. Audits have also indicated the success of Council’s community education over the past years. Nevertheless, as with all of our resource recovery information, there is an ongoing need to refresh and remind our community of the items which can be recycled from the contents of the red-lid bin and those items which should be placed into the yellow-lid bin.

 

Council’s Perry Street Recycling Centre at Matraville also plays an important role, enabling additional resource recovery via drop-off facilities covering a wide range of products, including those regularly recycled from households e.g. paper, cardboard and containers. Additional materials which can be dropped off at the Perry Street facility for recycling and recovery include electronic waste in the form of televisions and computer peripherals, polystyrene packaging, and thin plastics which include shopping bags, food wrapping etc.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment

Direction 10(d):  Waste is managed sustainably to ensure the highest level of resource recovery.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact, however recycling contamination of less than 5% enables Council to receive up to $65,000 in payments for recycled material. Contamination in excess of 10% could attract a penalty payment up to $195,000.

 

Conclusion

 

Each of the various household waste streams for Randwick residents (recycling, rubbish, garden organics) reflect a wide range of issues which Council’s strategic and operational waste staff are responding to, proactively and creatively, within the context of our Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan. The issues are challenging and often-changing however the benefits are wide ranging across economic, social and environmental issues which is why ongoing auditing and evaluation of these streams and existing responses are conducted on a regular basis. A review of Randwick’s 2010 Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan is due to commence shortly.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council notes and endorses the current status of initiatives and progress underway in responding to the contamination of recycling material placed in yellow-lid household recycling bins.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                             8 July 2014

 

 

Environment Report No. E6/14

 

 

Subject:                  Update on initiatives to reduce illegal dumping across Randwick City

Folder No:                   F2007/00419

Author:                   Talebul Islam, Coordinator Strategic Waste      

 

Introduction

 

At its 25 March 2014 meeting, it was resolved (Stavrinos/Roberts) that Council:

 

a)  bring back a report to identify ways in which Council can address the illegal dumping of rubbish; and

 

b)  as part of this report, investigate ways to address the issue of illegal dumping such as educating our residents on how to dispose of their rubbish and the option of rewarding residents who successfully report dumpers which leads to a prosecution   (NM 28/14 refers).

 

In 2011, Council staff developed an Integrated Illegal Dumping and Litter Management and Action Plan (attached) in keeping with funding requirements at the time from the NSW Government and Council’s own strategic waste objectives.

 

The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the Action Plan as it relates to illegal dumping within Randwick and to seek support for the continuing implementation of the measures identified in the Plan.

 

Issues

 

The most recent results of Randwick’s 2014 ‘Who Cares About the Environment’ residents survey continues to highlight litter and the dumping of rubbish as the environmental issue of greatest concern among residents. This mirrors the same concerns of residents over the previous 3 surveys conducted in 2011, 2008 and 2005.

 

The view amongst residents that illegal dumping is on the rise may be reflected by incidents of household material awaiting either a booked collection or being dumped illegally on the kerbside. In either circumstance, Council has invested substantial time and effort over the years in communicating and responding to illegal dumping issues across Randwick.

 

As a result, Council’s programs to encourage scheduled and booked household collection and avoid illegally dumped household rubbish appears to be showing some positive trends (see Table I below). There are downward trends showing in each of the annual collection data over the past four years with part of the improvement also occurring as a result of separate mattress recycling (approx. 5,000 mattresses recycled this financial year equivalent to around 75 tonnes) and the high volumes of electronic waste (televisions and computers) being dropped off by residents at our Perry Street Recycling Centre (on average >20 tonnes per month, equivalent to 173 tonnes this financial year, from July 2013 to March 2014).

 

 

 

 

 

Table I: Illegal dumping data – Randwick City Council – 2010 / 2013

 

Year

Tonnage of material collected from Scheduled Household Clean-ups

Tonnage of material collected from

Booked / On-call Household Clean-ups

Tonnage of material collected from Illegally dumped Household clean-ups

Total tonnage

 

2013

 

1,641*

 

 

1,163*

 

988

 

3,792*

 

2012

 

1,919

 

1,306

 

1,229

 

 

4,454

 

2011

 

1,901

 

 

1,300

 

1,612

 

4,813

 

2010

 

 

2,049

 

1,257

 

1,676

 

4,982

* excludes mattress data due to separate collection processes instigated for mattresses

 

Over the past 4 years, there has been a positive downward trend in kerbside rubbish removal from both household clean-ups and illegally dumped household material. This translates to a reduction of approximately 1,000 tonnes over this period. Disposal costs for illegally dumped material are still in the order of $260,000 per year. Council’s communications, strategic and operational waste teams are continuing to examine and implement the recommended actions from our Illegal Dumping and Litter Management and Action Plan.

 

An important factor in the development and implementation of Council’s community information and education efforts over the years is the fairly high mobility of residents in and out of Randwick City. With up to 40 per cent of residents on average moving in and out of Randwick every 5 years, there is a constant requirement to both update and refresh the messages around illegal dumping so new residents coming into the City and existing residents find out and are reminded of the waste services provided by Council. Without such reminders there are patterns of behaviour continuously repeated amongst residents, that dumped household material will disappear regardless of how it is placed or whether Council is contacted to make additional household pick-ups.

 

To encourage wider take up of Council’s various waste pick-up and drop off services, various initiatives have been conducted with different areas of our community including:

·      UNSW students

·      Housing NSW residents

·      temporary travellers staying in Randwick and

·      residents of multi-unit dwellings.

 

A recent initiative where Council worked with the State Government to facilitate greater participation from Housing NSW residents was recognised in Environmental Excellence awards for NSW.

 

It should be noted, the issues related to illegally dumped household material in Randwick are repeated across the metropolitan areas of each State and Territory. Local Councils and their respective State Government agencies have a long record of tackling these issues.

 

Over many years, Randwick Council has been proactive in responding to illegal dumping issues across the municipality, in part because of the high mobility of the population. Council’s 2011 Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan identifies the various approaches applied over the years and a list of new initiatives intended to contribute to reductions in illegally dumped household wastes.

 

A number of recurring initiatives and programs already implemented by Council to reduce illegally dumped household waste includes:

·      Information and reminders about Council’s waste services sent to body corporates, strata managers, managing agents and businesses carrying out  cleaning functions of common areas;

·      Working with UNSW student housing to both inform and discourage illegal dumping practices particularly at the beginning and conclusion of terms;

·      Working with Housing NSW to develop and distribute information and organise educational events to inform Housing NSW residents about illegal dumping and clean up procedures;

·      Signage and campaigns, often in multilingual formats, to increase the level of community understanding and access to waste services available and the potential penalties relating to illegal dumping and littering.

 

Randwick’s Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan establishes Council’s approach to tackle litter and illegal dumping via four key activity or response areas identified in the NSW Government’s strategic framework on illegal dumping and litter management. These four activity areas are:  Prevention, Infrastructure, Enforcement and Education.

 

New and existing activities identified and being considered or progressively implemented for Randwick are shown below:

 

Prevention

Current activities

New activities

Continuing distribution of information,  organising campaigns and events for residents with a focus on:

·      Managing and strata agents and body corporates

·      Housing NSW residents

·      UNSW students

 

Distributing stickers for booked clean-ups

 

Placement of signage discouraging illegal dumping.

·      Improving data collection on services accessed across the various demographics to enable appropriate targeting of information needs and new information campaigns;

·      Considering changes in development control plans to enable appropriate storage for hard waste items prior to collection;

·      Increasing the level of signage at illegal dumping ‘hot’ spot locations;

·      Considering an ongoing strategic community education campaign to target and reduce illegal dumping;

·      Investigating models available to reward or incentivise correct behaviour by residents i.e. utilising booked and scheduled clean-up services.

 

Infrastructure

Current activities

New activities

Provision of two free scheduled clean-up services each year per household;

 

Provision of two additional on-call, free scheduled clean-ups each year per household;

 

Providing rapid response removal of illegally dumped material before further material is added;

 

Supporting two household chemical collections for residents each year targeting unwanted paints and chemicals;

 

Organising previous electronic (e)- waste collections annually, primarily for computer and television recycling.

·      Improving booking processes including mobile technology for residents to book and report clean-ups (mostly completed);

·      Enabling ongoing drop-off for electronic waste items (completed);

·      Improving lighting at known ‘hot’ spot areas for illegal dumping;

·      Improving signage at known ‘hot’ spot areas for illegal dumping;

·      Investigating and installing CCTV cameras at known ‘hot’ spot areas for illegal dumping

·      Investigating and installing physical barriers to deter vehicle access at known ‘hot’ spot areas for illegal dumping;

·      Consider permanent drop-off facility for waste items dumped illegally e.g. batteries, gas bottles, household paints etc.

 

 

Enforcement

Current activities

New activities

Development and application of a reliable system for the reporting of illegal dumping for residents and staff alike;

 

Following up systems to investigate and communicate in regard to illegal dumping particularly between Call Centre, Public Place officers, Waste Compliance Officer and Waste Education Officer.

·      Improving patrolling by staff of ‘hot’ spot areas for illegal dumping;

·      Increasing coordination of actions and responses between Public Place officers, patrol staff, Waste Compliance and Waste Education officers;

·      Consideration of regional Illegal Dumping (RID) squad with SSROC member Councils to enhance enforcement outcomes

 

 

Education

Current activities

New activities

Distributing a comprehensive range of printed and electronic educational material including the use of Council’s various social media outlets;

 

Participating and supporting national events including Clean Up Australia and National Garage Sale Trail;

 

Targeting other events such as, UNSW, Housing NSW, Eco Living, Spot Festival etc

·      Developing and distributing new residents kits on waste management services for real estate agents, strata managers, body corporates including mulit-lingual formats;

·      Examining initiatives to re-use or recover bulky waste items such as household furniture;

 

 

With the completion of Randwick’s Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan, Council’s focus has been on the implementation of the 17 new activities identified under the above Prevention, Infrastructure, Enforcement and Education activity areas. A number of these are currently progressing via funding from Council’s existing resources or external grants provided through the Waste and Sustainability Improvement Program (WaSIP) or the new Waste Less / Recycle More programs.

 

For various reasons, many local Councils find it difficult to take legal action against individuals or organisations involved in the illegal dumping of household material. The legal proofs of evidence to overcome any reasonable doubt are difficult to establish when dumping occurs outside a multi-unit complex or even outside a single dwelling. In addition, the illegally dumped material is often required to remain in place while investigations into how it was dumped are followed up. Over the longer time period that the material remains in the public domain, further material is often added, further complicating potential legal action. One response related to Randwick from other local Councils is the placement of closed circuit television (CCTV) and related signage in ‘hot spot’ areas known for illegal dumping. In general, the use of CCTV technology has been found to reduce the volume of illegally dumped material by as much as 70 per cent. 

 

CCTV camera placement is one of the more immediate actions proposed as a result of Randwick’s Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan. The proposal is to purchase and trial up to six mobile and fixed CCTV cameras for at a number of known local ‘hot spot’ areas for illegal dumping. While the primary focus of these mobile and fixed cameras will be to deter illegal dumping, where legally admissible, follow up court action may be considered. SSROC member Councils are also examining the feasibility of establishing a dedicated regional illegal dumping squad, used successfully in other Local Government Areas, to deter or take enforcement action against illegal dumping.

 

It is proposed to provide a six monthly update to Council on the progress of the various projects listed above and the implementation of our Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable city.

Direction 6(b):   Our centres, beaches, streets and other public places are safe, inviting, clean and support a recognizable image of our City.

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10(d):  Waste is managed sustainably to ensure the highest level of resource recovery.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There are no direct financial implications in relation to this matter. However a budget of up to $54,788 is allocated to the purchase and installation of fixed and mobile CCTV cameras and related signage for placement at a number of known ‘hot spot’ areas for illegal dumping. 

 

Conclusion

 

It does not take too many incidents of household material awaiting a booked collection or being illegally dumped for a general perception to arise amongst residents that the incidents of dumping are on the increase across our City. This is not necessarily reflected in the range of processes in place across Council aimed at responding to and reducing illegal dumping particularly in the form of increasing householder access to scheduled and booked clean-up services.

 

Council’s Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan aims to ensure a strategic approach to responding to the range of issues associated with illegal dumping and littering and is consistent with a similar strategic approach being developed by the NSW Government on these issues. Further funding is available from the NSW Government to assist local Councils deliver practical outcomes on illegal dumping over the next 3 years.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)  Council endorses the current implementation of Randwick’s Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan particularly in the 17 new activities planned or underway;

 

b)  notes this implementation includes purchase and installation of around 6 fixed and mobile CCTV cameras for an amount up to $55,000 for trialing at ‘hot spot’ areas known for illegal dumping. These are funded from previously provided WaSIP grants to Council from the NSW Government;

 

c)  that six monthly updates will be reported to Council on the progress of implementing initiatives aimed at reducing illegal dumping across Randwick City.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan - 2011

 

 

 

 


Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan - 2011

Attachment 1

 

 































Environment Committee                                                                                             8 July 2014

 

 

Environment Report No. E7/14

 

 

Subject:                  Overview of Randwick's 2014 Who Cares About the Environment attitudes and actions survey of residents

Folder No:                   F2006/00181

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability      

 

Introduction

 

To assist in improved understanding, planning and response to community attitudes on the environment, Council’s environmental levy program has carried out 3-yearly surveys via an external research group entitled, “Who Cares About the Environment in Randwick City”. These surveys have been completed in 2005, 2008, 2011 and now in 2014. The results are intended to be comparable and consistent with those of the wider NSW population through the NSW Government’s ‘Who Cares About the Environment’ survey which has been conducted since around 1993. Randwick’s results are intended to inform and guide the continuation of Council’s environmental levy program commencing from July 1, 2014.

 

This paper aims to summarise the findings of the 2014 survey results.

 

Issues

 

Since early 2014, Taverner Research has been conducting an in-depth telephone survey of Randwick residents intending to establish among other issues:

·      key environmental concerns among Randwick residents;

·      key actions taken by residents on these concerns;

·      residents’ perceptions on Council’s response to environmental issues; and

·      residents’ perspectives on their own sense of well-being and community.

 

Survey participants were sought across the LGA to maximise the validity of findings on a statistical basis. More than 8,000 households were contacted to obtain the statistically valid responses from 621 specific telephone interviews. This response across a number of key socio-economic attributes has a 95% statistical confidence level with an error variation of plus or minus 3.9%. A slight weighting was approved in terms of obtaining survey responses from individuals in the 24-35 age groups due to their increasing use of mobile technology and difficulties in engaging them in landline telephone surveys.

 

Randwick’s ‘Who Cares About the Environment’ attitudes survey found 82% of our residents were greatly or fairly concerned about the environment (up from 76% in the 2011 survey). Just under a third of Randwick residents (31%) were still unable to identify an environmental issue of concern or answered ‘none’ to the question about their level of concern in the survey. 

 

A summary of results follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On asking residents what the most important issues are across Randwick (with the environment rating third in importance for residents):

 

Most important issue across Randwick

2014

% of respondents

2011

% of respondents

2008

% of respondents

2005

% of respondents

NSW 2012
%

Roads and traffic

 

31

38

29

27

15

Public transport

 

19

16

8

6

22

Environment

 

19

12

14

15

8

City infrastructure/ urban development

14

4

7

n/a

n/a

Repairing footpaths

 

12

5

6

5

n/a

Parking

 

11

13

6

7

n/a

Rubbish collection

 

10

5

6

4

n/a

Crime and safety

 

6

5

6

19

4

 

Then, on asking residents what the most important environmental issue(s) are across Randwick:

 

Most important Environmental issue across Randwick

2014

% of respondents

2011

% of respondents

2008

% of respondents

2005

% of respondents

Litter and dumping of rubbish

 

15

12

12

12

Beach / ocean pollution

 

11

9

8

9

Recycling /  household rubbish

 

8

9

7

6

Urban development / loss of natural veg

 

8

5

2

5

Traffic congestion

 

5

5

2

n/a

Parks / opens space

5

4

3

4

The most prevalent actions taken by individuals to respond to environmental issues include:

 

Participation in activities to respond to issues

2014

% of respondents doing regularly

2011

% of respondents doing regularly

2008

% of respondents doing regularly

2005

% of respondents doing regularly

Reducing water consumption

 

59

57

67

76

Reducing energy consumption

 

53

75

77

77

Reduce fuel consumption / car use

 

53

55

40

42

Reducing amount of food thrown out

 

60

57

n/a

n/a

Avoiding plastic bags

 

48

48

n/a

48

Growing your own food

 

27

22

14

n/a

 

In responses to how surveyed residents saw Council responding on environmental issues:

·      69% said Council’s performance on the environment was very good or good (almost the same at 67% in the 2011 survey); and

·      7% of residents surveyed said Council’s performance was poor or very poor (6% previously)

 

·      63% rated Council’s provision of environmental information as excellent or good (up from 57% in the 2011 survey); and

·      8% of respondents stated they were not provided any information (down from 14% in the 2008 survey).

 

On community well-being questions:

·      95% strongly agreed or agreed the Randwick area is a good place to live;

·      90% strongly agreed or agreed they generally shop locally;

·      86% stated they play sport, swim or do some type of physical activity once a week;

·      77% strongly agreed or agreed they feel part of the local community; and

·      63% stated they have attended at least one event or festival in Randwick over the past 12 months.

 

·      89% rated their overall quality of life as excellent or good (only 1% rated it as poor).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most important Environmental issue for Council focus over next 12 months

2014

% of respondents

2011

% of respondents

2008

% of respondents

2005

% of respondents

Planting more trees / greening the City

 

21

26

17

n/a

Litter /  dumping of rubbish

 

21

20

11

n/a

Pollution of beaches and  / or the ocean

 

20

17

10

n/a

Reducing over development

 

17

11

6

n/a

Recycling issues / household rubbish

 

15

19

21

n/a

Better public t’port/ cycling/ less use of cars

 

9

13

9

n/a

Upkeep of roads / footpaths / kerbs

7

12

11

n/a

Water saving

 

4

10

17

n/a

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1(a):   Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The funding of $28,000 for the Who Cares About the Environment residential attitudes survey was paid from the environmental levy budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The survey continues to provide useful data on resident’s views and responses on environmental issues. To ensure continuity and improve Council’s understanding of community views and priorities regarding the environment, the 2017 Who Cares survey will be built into the next levy program. This will provide an update approximately mid-way into the 2014 – 2019 environmental levy program.

 

Randwick’s Who Cares About the Environment survey results will be placed on to Council’s website for community information.

 

 


 

Recommendation

 

That Council notes the summary of results of the 2014 “Who Cares About the Environment” attitudes survey.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Summary of 2014 Who Cares About the Environment survey results INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                             8 July 2014

 

 

Environment Report No. E8/14

 

 

Subject:                  Update on the 3 Council Ecological Footprint project between Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils

Folder No:                   F2008/00383

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

The 3 Council Ecological Footprint project is a collaboration between Randwick, Woollahra and Waverley Councils aimed at reducing water and energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions and waste generated across the three Local Government Areas (LGAs). The original basis for the collaboration was around the previous measurement of the ecological footprint, or level of resource consumption of householders across Sydney’s Eastern suburbs, which commenced in 2007 and was funded for a period of 3 years by the NSW Government Environmental Trust.

 

This successful collaboration continues through a Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Councils in December 2013 with a small allocation of funding from each Council to enable a continuation of projects and oversight by a Coordinator now located at Waverley Council (previously located at Randwick).

 

This paper discusses the current direction and priorities of the Program since the commencement of the new project coordinator.

 

Issues

 

The updated approach to this collaboration is about achieving regional conservation of our natural resources primarily through the continuation of a number of successful projects aimed at encouraging community engagement and behavioural change around conserving energy and water and reducing waste (refer table below).

 

Projects to date and collaborative results include:

 

Compost Revolution

Residents complete an online tutorial and quiz to receive a free compost bin or worm farm (see www.compostrevolution.com.au).

 

Since 2010, the Compost Revolution has delivered more than 5,500 worm farms and compost bins, diverting more than 1808 tonnes of food waste from landfill and reducing greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 5,280 tonnes in total.

 

Sustainable Business Project

Businesses sign up to a free water use assessment, and receive a detailed report with recommendations plus free water efficient products and installation.

Since commencement, the project has achieved saving of over 420,000 litres of water each day which is the equivalent of 150 million litres per year. This has produced cost savings for participating businesses of $478,633 per year.

 

Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration Project

Barrett House has been transformed into a sustainable demonstration house including permaculture and verge food garde.n

Barrett House is opened for community visits on a regular basis and used for Council staff meetings, courses and workshops as well as by over 10 community groups on a regular basis.

‘Reduce your Footprint’ website

An interactive website for the community to find out about environmental projects and events (see www.reduceyourfootprint.com.au)

The website includes a community driven Q+A forum plus a e-newsletter to more than 2,300 residents each month.

 

Events and Campaigns

Joint campaigns have been organised across the LGAs for Earth Hour, The Best Gift in the World, National Garage Sale Trail, National Permaculture Day, and Sustainable House Day.

 

 

A new Coordinator has been recruited to manage what is now being promoted as the combined Regional Environment Program of the 3 Councils. A key task of the new Coordinator has been to review previous projects and priorities to ensure the program’s ongoing success over the next 3 years.

 

As part of this review, the 3 Councils are:

·      currently undertaking a combined assessment of engagement actions to identify the most cost effective way to work with the community to achieve energy and water savings across the 3 LGAs;

·      revising and developing an updated communications and environmental action plan;

·      considering targets for energy and water savings.

 

This communications and environmental action plan will be reported to each of the Councils for review and adoption by the end of 2014.

 

Since the beginning of the year, the 3 Council Regional Environment Program has also been successful in receiving external funding to supplement existing project areas. These grants include:

·      providing a waste advisory service for cafes and restaurants and cafes ($80,000)

·      household energy reduction program from the NSW Environmental Trust ($40,000)

·      funding to extend the Compost Revolution across SSROC member Councils.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a): Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The 3-Council Regional Environment Program is currently funded by yearly contributions of $117,070 from each Council with Randwick’s contribution made up of equal amounts from the environmental levy and waste less/recycle more funding from the NSW Government.

 

Conclusion

 

The 3 Council collaboration is aiming to review and update the priorities under an updated Regional Environment Program for the 3 LGAs. The results of this review including any additional projects, targets and an Environmental Action and Communications Plan will be reported to Council for consideration in October 2014.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)            endorses the new focus for the 3 Council Regional Environment Program and the development of a regional Environmental Action and Communications Plan; and

 

b)            approves the ongoing annual allocation of $117,070 payable from Council’s environmental levy and waste less/recycle more funding from the NSW Government.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                             8 July 2014

 

 

Environment Report No. E9/14

 

 

Subject:                  Randwick's 2014 Eco Living Fair

Folder No:                   F2006/00246

Author:                   Helen Morrison, Sustainability Project Officer      

 

Introduction

 

Council’s annual Eco Living Fair now in its tenth year, is a major fixture in Randwick’s calendar of environmental events. It continues to be one of the largest and amongst the most successful environmental festivals held across the Sydney metropolitan area attracting up to 6,000 residents and visitors each year.

 

The Eco Living Fair is held at Randwick’s sustainability education ‘hub’ at the Randwick Community Centre in Munda Street from 10.30am to 3.30pm on Sunday, 14 September 2014.

 

Issues

 

This year’s Eco Living Fair will be celebrating its tenth year, and will continue to provide a range of new and popular activities for local residents and their families. As well as outdoor stalls promoting and showcasing environmental friendly products from across the Eastern suburbs and wider Sydney region, there will be a range of family and children’s entertainment, native wildlife on show for youngsters to learn about the importance of biodiversity, and sessions on how to save on householders’ energy and water bills.

 

The Eco Living Fair will also include the Junk Juke Box promoting recycling and anti-litter messages, craft sessions for all age groups and composting workshops encouraging residents to sign up to Council initiatives including the Compost Revolution.

 

Other popular events on the day include Council’s Garden Awards, cycling activities and free bicycle maintenance workshops, tours of the Randwick Environment Park and “ask the experts” sessions on keeping bees and chickens and sustainable composting and sustainable food production.

 

The sustainable food focus during our Eco Living Fair reflects the growing importance of this issue for residents and the wider community. Council has responded to this increasing level of concern particularly through our community garden and school food garden policies and specific funding support for these initiatives. This financial support is delivered as part of Randwick’s community engagement budget of the environmental levy program. Food preparation and using leftovers demonstrations and workshops as well as buying and storing foodstuffs and fresh produce have also featured regularly at the Eco Living Fair and other Council events to maximize our community’s understanding and response to sustainable food practices.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2(b):  Enrich our range of community services that meets our community needs.

Outcome 3:       An informed and engaged community.

Direction 3(c):   A community involved in shaping and enhancing our City.

Outcome 10:     A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a):  Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

 

Financial impact statement

 

An amount of $60,000 has been allocated for the annual Eco Living Fair, funded through the community education budget of the environmental levy program.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick’s Eco Living Fair, now in its tenth year, is a firm fixture on the environmental calendar for residents across Randwick and the Eastern suburbs. The event continues to showcase opportunities for local residents and their families to find out about and take action on how to protect and improve their local environment as well as achieving financial savings from using less water and energy and reducing waste around the home, school and workplace. Randwick’s Eco Living Fair continues to aim for a maximum level of enjoyment and learning for the whole family.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorses the broad program and approach for Randwick Council’s tenth Eco Living Fair at Randwick Community Centre on Sunday, 14 September 2014.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil