Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 11 February 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                             11 February 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, 30 Frances Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 11 February 2014 at 6:00pm.

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (S Nash), Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, D’Souza (Deputy Chairperson), Garcia, Matson, Moore, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos (Chairperson) & Stevenson

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 3 December 2013

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 66 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W1/14       Boat Holding Yard................................................................................ 1

W2/14       Tree Removal - Outside 38 Balfour Road, Kensington.................................. 3    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                             11 February 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W1/14

 

 

Subject:                  Boat Holding Yard

Folder No:                   F2004/06847

Author:                   Robert Rosadi, Coordinator, Integrated Transport     

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Ordinary Council Meeting held on 23 July 2013 resolved:

 

“(Andrews/Stavrinos) that Council refer to the Parking Taskforce and investigate and report back as to the feasibility of having a boat and trailer holding yard for its residents within the City of Randwick.”

 

Issues

 

The Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) has available data on the number of trailers registered in Randwick.  The 2013 data shows that there are 3072 trailers registered within Randwick.

 

For the purposes of determining the potential size of a trailer holding yard, some conservative assumptions have been made as to the number of trailers stored on the road.  Noting that not all of the 3072 trailers are parked on the public road, and the actual number of trailers parked on the road can fluctuate, a figure of 3% has been used to determine a potential size for the holding yard.  Based on 3% a land parcel capable of holding 90-100 trailers would be required.

 

Currently, Council does not have available a land parcel (classified as operational land) that is sufficient is size such that it could be developed as a trailer holding yard for residents.

 

Under the current NSW road legislation trailers shorter than 7.5m, and or with a Gross Vehicle Mass (GVM) of less than 4.5 tonnes are permitted to park on the public road as per a normal motor vehicle.  Transport for NSW has issued a discussion paper on trailer parking in harbour side areas, to which Council has provided feedback and a possible solution to mitigate trailer parking in areas of high parking demand whilst still offering some flexibility in areas where parking availability is not problematic.

 

In the event that the suggestions put forward by Council for restricted trailer parking areas are implemented by Transport for NSW, residents with boats that cannot be parked within their residence do have the option of joining fishing associations, such as the South Sydney Amateur Fishing Association, many of which have secure facilities for storage of boats.  Many commercial storage facilities also have the capability of accommodating boats and trailers.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9d       Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

Conclusion

 

Council does not have available suitable land to develop a trailer holding yard with the capacity to store up a volume of trailers that would mitigate the impact that trailer parking creates in areas of high parking demand. 

 

In the event of changes to legislation that would restrict parking of trailers on the public road, residents who cannot accommodate a trailer within their residence may need to consider storing their trailers at facilities such as those offered by fishing associations or commercial storage operators.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                             11 February 2014

 

 

Works Report No. W2/14

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 38 Balfour Road, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 38 Balfour Road, Kensington, has emailed Council on several occasions requesting the removal of a very large and significant Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside his property.

 

Issues

 

In email correspondence sent to Council on 22 October 2013 the owner details a number of issues associated with the roots of the subject tree entering his property – with particular concern about a large root 200mm in diameter which is growing through a wall in the basement and spreading along the bedrock foundation area. Also contained within that correspondence is a residential building report which highlights the fact that tree roots are spreading through the front yard area and damaging the side retaining walls. Of note is the fact that the front left brick retaining wall is cracked and leaning due to pressure caused by large roots from the nearby Council fig tree growing in the nature strip. Large roots have also lifted and dislodged adjacent footpath and driveway pavers on more than one occasion and this has cost several thousand dollars for Council to repair and reinstate. These repairs have highlighted the fact that because of the size and spread of intruding tree roots, root pruning and/or the installation of a tree root barrier are not viable options for dealing with the problems associated with this public tree asset.

 

The property owner has also provided a termite inspection report which advises that although there are no termites present at this point in time that fig tree roots entering the property and travelling underneath the building would be a possible entry point at some time in the future. An attached photograph sent to Council also indicates that there has been separation between the garage floor and a horizontal wall which the owner attributes to movement caused by the roots of this tree.  

 

The subject street tree is approximately twenty-five metres in height with a canopy spread of around twenty metres. It is in excellent health and contributes significantly to the Balfour Road streetscape. It is one of several trees of the same species growing along the western side of Balfour Road, Kensington, and they all provide important habitat and food source for a variety of native birdlife and other fauna. They also provide important screening between properties on the eastern side of the street and the Raleigh Park complex to the west of where they are located.

 

Large roots have also cracked and dislodged a section of the adjacent bitumen roadway outside 38 Balfour Road as well as lifting the kerb and gutter. The subject tree has to be regularly pruned away from overhead power lines to maintain the statutory clearances around these wires as well as large branches having to be kept well clear of the roof of the residence. The tree drops copious amounts of leaf litter and debris into the front of the two adjacent properties on a year round basis and this has to be swept up and removed almost every day. The property owner considers these leaves to be a fire risk – particularly those which blow into the roof gutters and accumulate.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:       Develop and implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the Hill’s Weeping fig outside 38 Balfour Road, Kensington, and its replacement with a super-advanced Ulmus parvifolia (Chinese Elm) would cost in the vicinity of $6,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree growing outside 38 Balfour Road, Kensington, has significant visual and historic significance. It is estimated to be approximately sixty-seventy years old and up until this point Council has been committed to retaining it, despite the fact that historically tree root damage caused by this species is increasing in both frequency and severity throughout the LGA.

 

The tree is in excellent health and has been assessed as providing important habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the size and spread of root material associated with the damage being caused by the roots of this tree, root pruning and/or the installation of a root barrier are not in any way viable options and therefore the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. When used to control the spread of fig tree roots, root barriers are often effective for a limited time only, depending on the site conditions, before new roots either grow over the top or underneath any such barrier.

 

Council has resolved that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year. The proposed removal of this street tree asset would not contravene that resolution and it is only being recommended because there are no viable options available that would deal with the damage being caused by the roots of this tree in the longer term. The removal of this tree will certainly have a detrimental impact on the Balfour Road streetscape that will not be able to be mitigated simply by the planting of an advanced replacement tree. However, there are established Chinese Elms growing either side of where this fig is located and these are a fast growing species that will attain a sizable dimension at maturity and they should replicate to some degree the dimensions and habitat value of the removed fig tree.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 38 Balfour Road, Kensington, be removed and replaced with one advanced Ulmus palvifolia (Chinese Elm) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs highlighting the significance of the Council owned Hill’s Weeping fig in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused by its roots to both public infrastructure and private property.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs highlighting the significance of the Council owned Hill’s Weeping fig in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused by its roots to both public infrastructure and private property.

Attachment 1

 

 

Council fig tree is significant in the streetscape but located underneath powerlines

 

Tree roots have lifted and damaged kerb, gutter and roadway adjacent property

Accumulated leaf litter and debris is an ongoing issue for adjacent property owners

 

Large numbers of leaves pile up throughout the year and constitute a fire hazard

Large buttress roots protrude from the nature strip and regularly lift footpath pavers

 

There are established Chinese Elms growing either side of the subject fig tree

 

View of the tree looking north reinforces its prominence and visual amenity

 

This is one of several fig roots that have encroached into the property at several points

Large Ficus ‘Hillii’ tree root has encroached into underground basement area

Fig tree root has separated garage floor and wall and is allowing water to penetrate

 

Several fig roots have entered the front of the property and caused structural damage

 

 

 

 

Fig roots have dislodged the side brick fence and caused structural damage