Ordinary Council Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 25 February 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Council Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, 30 Frances Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 25 February 2014 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Prayer and Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

Prayer

Almighty God,

We humbly beseech you to bestow your blessings upon this Council and to direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of your glory and the true welfare of the people of Randwick and Australia.

Amen”

Acknowledgement of the local indigenous people

I would like to acknowledge that we are here today on the land of the Bidjigal people of the Dharwahal Nation.  The Bidjigal people are the traditional owners and custodians of this land and form part of the wider aboriginal nations of the Sydney area.  On behalf of Randwick City Council I would also like to acknowledge and pay my respects to the Elders both past and present.”

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Ordinary Council Meeting - 10 December 2013

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Council by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 66 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Mayoral Minutes

Mayoral Minutes, if any, will be distributed on the night of the meeting.

Urgent Business

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting required)

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act, the General Manager is required to keep a register of Councilor voting on planning matters. Planning matters are any decisions made in the exercise of a function of a council under the EP&A Act and include decisions relating to a development application, an environmental planning instrument, a development control plan or a development contribution plan under that Act. In addition, Randwick City Council has resolved (22 July 2008) that its register of voting include the voting on all tender matters.

CP1/14      158 Moverly Road, South Coogee (DA/584/2012/A).................................... 1

CP2/14      158 Moverly Road, South Coogee (DA/584/2012/B).................................. 13

CP3/14      2R Barker Street, Kingsford (DA/874/2013)............................................. 19

CP4/14      3 Severn Street, Maroubra (DA/552/2013).............................................. 25

CP5/14      3 Kyogle Street, Maroubra (DA/703/2013).............................................. 37

 

Director City Planning Reports (record of voting NOT required)

CP6/14      Report variation to Development Standard under State Environment Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6 between October to December, 2013.................... 47

CP7/14      Randwick Environment Park draft Plan of Management Site visit.................. 51

CP8/14      Randwick Community Centre (Draft) Final Plan of Management................... 55

CP9/14      Proposal to update Terms of Reference for the Youth Advisory Committee (Randwick Youth Council).................................................................................. 65

CP10/14    Proposed Youth Week activities for 2014................................................ 73

CP11/14    Celebrating Cultural Diversity in Randwick City - feasibility for an annual cultural event...................................................................................................... 75

CP12/14    Seeking a continuation of the Green Money Recycling Rewards scheme for Randwick Residents......................................................................................... 79

General Manager's Reports

GM1/14     Community Panels.............................................................................. 83

GM2/14     Review of the 2013-14 Annual Operational Plan - December Quarterly Report 95

GM3/14     Replacement of Community Vacancy on Wylies Baths Trust...................... 127

GM4/14     Local Government Reform.................................................................. 131

Director City Services Reports

Nil

Director Governance & Financial Services Reports

GF1/14      Review of Outdoor Dining Valuation Process.......................................... 133

GF2/14      Affixing of the Council Seal................................................................ 139

GF3/14      Affixing of the Council Seal - Randwick Open Care for Kids Inc.................. 141

GF4/14      Investment Report - December 2013.................................................... 143

GF5/14      Investment Report - January 2014...................................................... 151

GF6/14      Quarterly Budget Review - December 2013............................................ 159

GF7/14      Councillors' Expenses & Facilities Policy................................................ 161

GF8/14      2014 National General Assembly of Local Government.............................. 163

GF9/14      SEGRA National Conference 2014........................................................ 181  

Petitions

Motion Pursuant to Notice

NM1/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Re-Dedication Ceremony - Kokoda Memorial Park Kensington...................................................................................... 183

NM2/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - Dedicated Multicultural Event............... 185

NM3/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Request for Annual Multicultural Festival 187

NM4/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Child Safety Awareness....................... 189

NM5/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - Response to reports of black algae spread in Clovelly Bay............................................................................................... 191

NM6/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Use of grounds of Australian Turf Club for UNSW Student Parking............................................................................... 193

NM7/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Randwick Local Government Area - Housing Affordability.................................................................................... 195

NM8/14     Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Overnight camping issue in Wolseley Road 197

NM9/14     Notice of Motion by Cr Garcia - Proposed Installation of automated external defibrillators.................................................................................................... 199

NM10/14    Notice of Motion from Cr Garcia - Environmental Management - Coogee Beach 201

NM11/14    Notice of Motion from Crs Andrews & Stavrinos - Proposed Reduction in Minimum Allotment Size in Randwick City........................................................... 203

NM12/14    Notice of Motion from Cr Garcia - Commemoration Marking Centenary of First World War.................................................................................................... 205

NM13/14    Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Proposed Study into Seasonal long term and Overnight Recreational Living .......................................................................... 207

NM14/14    Notice of Motion from Cr Stevenson - Review of Council IT policy to stop unecessary transmission towers.......................................................................... 209

NM15/14    Notice of Motion from Cr Stevenson - Making South Coogee Childcare Centres Safer 211

NM16/14    Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Exploring options for a Ciclovia style event in the Randwick Council area....................................................................... 213  

Closed Session (record of voting NOT required)

CP13/14    The Spot Festival - Licence for Spot Festival Bar

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (d) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

Closed Session (record of voting required)

CS1/14      T09/14 Coral Sea Park Amenities Upgrade - Maroubra

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) (c) Of the Local Government Act, as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

Notice of Rescission Motions

NR1/14      Notice of Rescission Motion from Crs Andrews, Stavrinos and Roberts - Alcohol and Drug Related Violence - Liquor Licensing Law Reforms ................................... 215  

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP1/14

 

 

Subject:                  158 Moverly Road, South Coogee (DA/584/2012/A)

Folder No:                   DA/584/2012/A

Author:                   Chahrazad  Rahe, Assessment Planner     

 

Proposal:                     Section 96 modification to Land and Environment Court approval to extend hours of operation of outdoor play area to 8.30am to 5.00pm Monday to Friday, increase number of children permitted in outdoor play area from 30 to 46, amend conditions 80 and 82 relating to acoustic

Ward:                      East Ward

Applicant:                Design 23 Pty Ltd

Owner:                         Victor Berk

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

Ù

North

Locality Plan


Development Application Executive Summary Report

 

This application is referred to Council for determination as the original development application was refused at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 26 March 2013. An appeal was lodged with the NSW Land and Environment Court and upheld on 28 June 2013.

 

Proposal

 

The original proposal detailed alterations and additions to the existing dwelling and change of use to a child care centre with capacity of 46 children, operating between the hours of 8.30am to 5pm weekdays. Works include construction of a subfloor parking area for seven (7) vehicles, disabled access and associated works.

 

This application has been lodged pursuant to Section 96AA of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, and seeks to modify the development consent to extend the hours of operation of outdoor play area from 8.30am to 5.00pm Monday to Friday and amend condition no.’s 72, 80, 82, 83 & 85 relating to the restriction of use for the outdoor play area & the number of children permitted in outdoor play area, acoustic report, noise levels and non-amplified music to be played outdoors.

 

It noted that another Section 96 application has been lodged (DA/584/2012/B) and is currently under assessment seeking to modify the approved development consent in the following manner:

 

a)    Relocate the main office and toilet to the western side of the building.

b)    Relocate a portion of play room number 1 to the eastern side of the building.

c)    Installation of mechanically ventilated sky tubes on the western side of the roof.

d)    Construction of a new window measuring 400m by 400mm on the southern elevation of the building.

 

Site context

 

The subject site is described as Lot 4781 in DP 752015, known as 158 Moverly Road, South Coogee. The site is zoned Residential 2A under Randwick Local Environmental Plan 1998 (Consolidation). The site is zoned R2 Low Density Residential under Local Environmental Plan 2012.

 

The site is located on the northern side of Moverly Road, opposite the intersection of Moverly Road and Coldstream Street. The parcel is of regular shape and is oriented roughly north-west to south-east. The site incurs a fall in topography of roughly three (3) metres across the site, in an easterly direction. This fall occurs as a result of a sandstone outcrop that roughly dissects the parcel longways.

 

The dimensions and land area of the site are summarised as follows:

 

Boundary

Length

Land area

North-west, rear boundary

15.24m

663.9m2

South-west, side boundary

42.265m

North-east, side boundary

38.075m

South-east, Moverly Road boundary

18.288m

 

The site is presently occupied by a single dwelling of part one (1), part two (2) storey scale. The building was constructed circa 1954 and is built over the above discussed sandstone outcrop, of which initiates a two (2) storey building scale to the north-eastern elevation.

The vicinity of the site comprises low density residential development, the Randwick General Cemetery (a listed heritage item), multi-unit development owned by the NSW Department of Housing, South Coogee Public School and a Council reserve occupying the unformed road of Roper Ave.

 

The site has only one (1) immediate nieghbour, a two (2) storey residential dwelling on its south-west boundary, at 156 Moverly Road. Similar residential development exists further to the south-west and across Moverly Road to the south-east.

 

The subject site is not recognised as having any heritage significance within the provisions of RLEP 1998.

 

Submissions

 

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. The following submissions were received as a result of the notification process:

 

152 Moverly Road, South Coogee

163 Moverly Road, South Coogee

165 Moverly Road, South Coogee

5 Coldstream Street, South Coogee

 

Issue

Comment

 

Questions suitability of site

 

The site is not suitable for a child care centre.

 

 

The proposed changes to the approved use is permissible under the current zoning and future zoning, satisfies the provisions of relevant Environmental planning Instruments and will continue to generally meets the requirements of Council’s Child Care Centre Policy. 

 

Potential impacts of noise, parking and traffic were assessed by Council’s technical officers in the original consent and the noise impacts associated with this modification has also been reviewed.

It is concluded that, the changes to the approved use and intensity can be reasonably accommodated within the residential area, subject to suitable conditions and updated recommendations made by acoustic consultant without resulting in unacceptable amenity impacts to neighbouring properties.

 

Unauthorised works

Concerned relating to alleged unauthorised works on the site breaching the conditions of consent.

 

The works related to the part demolition of the front masonry fence and re-tiling/cladding of the roof.

These matters were investigated by Council’s Regulatory and Compliance team.  The works did not form part of the development consent as they were exempt development under the State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying development Codes) 2008.

 

Safety concerns

The site is not safe for a child care centre and is an unsafe site for construction with heavy vehicle movement and trucks parking on Council verge.

 

Concerned about the road and pedestrian safety issues arising from the building activity.

 

Inadequate details of the demolition and no detail of the size, type of trucks involved.

 

There are no details on the road closures.

 

No details on measures to maintain public safety and convenience.

 

Asbestos concerns.

 

 

Suitable conditions have been included within the original consent to ensure that the development satisfies relevant standards of construction, demolition and to protect and maintain adequate levels of health, safety and amenity of the public, surrounding and adjoining properties.

 

 

Noise impacts

Increase in noise, for more hours of the day.

 

The predicted noise levels in the acoustic report are in consistent with the Association of Australian Acoustical Consultants – Guideline for Child Care Centre Acoustic Assessment September 2010.  The guideline also recommends that mechanical plant noise and noise from vehicles visiting the centre should be considered.  This has not been considered in the acoustic report.

 

Concerned about the amplified music.

 

The noise impacts emitted from the centre will create offensive noise and undesirable social and environmental impacts; and therefore will not be in the public interest.

 

The acoustic report prepared by Acoustic Logic, dated 15 July 2013 is incorrect and is based on assumptions.  It does not take into account cumulative impact of the mechanical services and noise from the underground car parking.

 

It is unclear in the application whether there are changes to the subfloor parking area.

 

Potential impacts of noise have been investigated by Council’s Environmental Health Unit. The noise expected to arise from the proposed modifications is capable of complying with the provisions of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1999 and Council’s Comprehensive DCP 2013.

 

The proposed use and intensity can be reasonably accommodated within the residential area, subject to suitable conditions and updated recommendations made by acoustic consultant without resulting in unacceptable amenity impacts to neighbouring properties. These noise concerns are discussed further in the Key Issues section below under Visual and Acoustic Privacy.

 

The proposed modifications do not include any changes to the mechanical service or underground parking area.  This was assessed as being acceptable in the original consent.

 

 

 

Key Issues

 

Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013

Part D11 – Child Care Centres

 

The proposed modifications have been assessed against Part D11 of the DCP and are considered to satisfy the objectives of all the relevant development and design controls that are applicable to the site. Where applicable to the proposed amendments specific comments in relation to the DCP are discussed below.

 

4

AMENITY

4.1

Acoustic Amenity and Privacy

 

The applicant is seeking to modify condition no.’s 72, 80, 82, 83 & 85 of the original consent relating to restriction and operational conditions of the outdoor play area, acoustic report, noise levels and restriction of no music to be played outdoors.

 

The conditions read as follows:

 

1)        Amendment to Condition No. 72;

The hours of operation for the outdoor play area are restricted to:

 

Monday to Friday:         1 hour and 30 minutes in the morning period

Monday to Friday:         1 hour and 30 minutes in the afternoon period

 

The applicant has requested to change these hours to;

 

Monday to Friday:         8.30am to 5.00pm

 

2)        Amendment to condition 80;

“The proposed use of the child care centre including the outside play area shall not give rise to an ‘offensive noise’ as defined in the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 and Regulations.

 

In this regard, the operation of the premises, plant and equipment shall not give rise to a sound pressure level at any affected premises that exceeds the background (LA90), 15 min noise level, measured in the absence of the noise source/s under consideration by more than 10dB(A) for a period of 1 hour 30 minutes in the morning and then again for 1 hour 30 minutes in the afternoon period and then by no more than 5dB(A) at all other times.  The source noise level shall be assessed as an LAeq, 15 min and adjusted in accordance with the NSW Environmental Protection Authority’s Industrial Noise Policy 2000 and Environmental Noise Control Manual (sleep disturbance)”.

 

The applicant has requested to change the second paragraph of this condition to read as;

“That exceeds the background (LA90), 15 min noise level, measured in the absence of the noise source/s under consideration by more than 5dB (A) at all times. The source noise level shall be assessed as an LAeq, 15 min and adjusted in accordance with the NSW Environmental Protection Authority’s Industrial Noise Policy 2000 and Environmental Noise Control Manual (sleep disturbance)”.

 

3)        Amendment to condition 82;

 

“The operation of the site and the project specific criteria for noise emissions shall be in accordance with the acoustic report referenced 20120735.1/0309/S/RO/TT dated 03 September 2012 prepared by Acoustic Logic PTY LTD unless otherwise stated by this development consent”.

 

The applicant has requested to amend this condition to comply with a new acoustic report submitted with this application.

 

4)        Amendment to condition 83;

 

“The outdoor play area must not exceed a maximum number of 30 children at any one time playing during the permitted operational hours for the outdoor play area specified in this consent.”

         

The applicant has requested to change this condition to read as;

 

“The outdoor play area must not exceed a maximum number of 46 children at any one time playing during the permitted operational hours for the outdoor play area specified in this consent”.

 

5)      Amendment to condition 85;

 

          “Music shall not be played in the outdoor area”

 

        The applicant has requested to change this condition to read as;

 

“Amplified music shall not be played in the outdoor area”.

 

The main environmental impact assessed related to this Section 96 modification is noise generated from the external play areas and the general operations of the centre. The operational hours of the Child Care Centre are from 8:30am to 5:00pm and the maximum number of children currently approved on the site is 46. 

 

There are two outdoor play areas located to the rear of the property.  The current approval restricted the number of children permitted to play outdoors. The applicant is seeking to remove this restriction to allow up to 16 children for passive activity to the upper level play area and 46 children for active play activity to the lower undercroft area. 

 

Randwick Councils Comprehensive DCP 2013 control adopts that noise levels generated from the child care centre, when measured over a 15 minute period (at any point on the boundary of the site) will not exceed 5dBA above the background level.

 

An acoustic report from Acoustic Logic was submitted with the amended development application stating that the predicted noise levels from the development will comply with the relevant requirements. The acoustic report was revised on a number of occasions due to Council’s Environmental Health officer requiring further additional acoustic information.  The most recent acoustic report for review being revised version 8 was submitted to Council on 27 November 2013. After detailed review of this report and consultation with the acoustic consultant it was confirmed that the predicted noise levels for the development will comply with relevant noise criteria of 5dBA; however, subject to the implementation of acoustic mitigation measures recommended within the report. These mitigation measures will ensure that noise impacts are appropriately managed on the site to protect the residential amenity of neighbouring properties. (Refer to detail comments made by Council’s Environmental Heath department).

 


These recommendations include:

·      The upper play area to be used by no more than 16 children at any one time and is to be used only for “passive “ non ambulatory play (acceptable activities to include reading/painting/craft or other closely supervised activities).

 

·      The lower outdoor play area is to be used by no more than 46 children.

 

·      A minimum 1.8m high bound fence/noise screen is required along the western boundary of the upper outdoor play area. Fence is to consist of Colorbond, lapped and capped timber or (clear) Perspex, or a combination of these items.

 

·      For the remaining fencing around the play areas, the 1.8m High Solid (Colorbond) Boundary fencing is to be retained. If replaced- any replacement fence should be at least 1.8m high and imperforate (no holes- e.g. lapped and capped timber or Colorbond).

 

·      There is to be a solid noise screen constructed to separate the upper and lower place areas. The screen is to be constructed along the top of the rock ledge at the edge of the upper play area. The height of the top of the screen is to be such that it provides line of sight between the lower (active play”) area and the top for windows of the residence to the west ( top of screen minimum RL 60.9). Screen to be constructed of lapped and capped timber or Perspex to architects detail.

 

·      All windows to be constructed using minimum 4mm thick glass with perimeter acoustic seals.

 

·      No amplified music is to be played in the premises, music is to be provided using a portable stereo.

 

·      Music is to be used as background music only (no more than 70dB (A) at 3m from the stereo). At this noise level, noise from the use of music will not add cumulatively to noise created by the children in the play area.

 

·      Noise from any new mechanical services (air-conditioners, kitchen exhaust fan or similar) should comply with the acoustic requirements of the EPA industrial Noise Policy (intrusiveness and Amenity Criteria) Detailed review of new plan items should be undertaken at Construction certificate stage, once plant items are selected and locations determined. Noise from plant will be designed to be compliant with a “Background +0) acoustic criteria (which is 5dB (A) stricter than EPA guidelines). In doing this, the cumulative noise contribution from mechanical plant will not significantly add to any noise created by children in the play grounds. Compliance with this design goal is achievable.

 

·      The car park will be naturally ventilated, and does not require ventilations fans.

 

·      Proposed air conditioner condenser is to be located within the new garage. The building shell will screen noise to the nearest residence (to the west) and will be more than 25m from the nearest residence with line of site of the condenser (to the south), across Moverly Road.

 

·      Bathroom Ventilation via Small Ceiling Mounted fans (55i/s discharging thought the roof. Use of 1m of flex ducting between fan and discharge point will ensure compliance with noise emission goals.

 

·      There is no external refrigeration equipment proposed.

 

In addition to the above recommended conditions, Council’s Environmental Health Officer has recommended that an acoustic assessment be undertaken after 3 months of commencement. This condition will allow Council to verify that the predicted noise levels and acoustic treatments are sufficient to ensure the operation of the business complies with the relevant noise criteria.

 

There are no overlooking impacts generated from the modifications, the impact lies mainly with noise. As indicated above, it is considered that this level of noise is reasonable and can be managed subject to the recommended conditions above relating to construction, acoustic treatment and management controls.  The amended acoustic report prepared by Acoustic Logic supports the changes and has indicated that the modifications will comply with the nominated noise criteria adopted by the Land and Environment Court, Council’s DCP and the Environmental Planning Act.

 

Given the above design measures, plan of management and recommended conditions, the modifications to the approved use and intensity can be reasonable accommodated with in the residential area without resulting in unacceptable impacts to neighbouring properties.  The modified development will satisfy the relevant objectives and control requirements of the DCP.

 

Note: The cumulative impacts of the proposed modifications under this section 96 application and the preceding section 96 application (DA/584/2012/B) have been assessed. The acoustic report (version 8) submitted to Council on 27th November 2013 includes both of the proposed modifications and demonstrates compliance with the requirements of NSW EPA-Industrial Noise Policy and other relevant noise requirements. To avoid duplication the acoustic recommendations have been included within this report with the exception of one additional condition which has been included in DA/584/2012/B relating to the ceiling mounted fans in the bathroom.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a:      Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed modifications have been assessed as being satisfactory with respect to the relevant provisions of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 and Comprehensive DCP 2013.

 

The proposed modification to the original consent satisfies Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, in that it will constitute substantially the same development. The issues raised by the neighbouring residents have been addressed within the body of this report.

 

Potential noise impacts and emissions resulting from the proposed modifications to the child care centre have been assessed and, subject to recommended conditions made by the acoustic engineer and Council’s Environmental Health department should not adversely impact on the acoustic privacy of neighbouring properties.

 

Accordingly, the application is recommended for approval, subject to conditions.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Section 96(AA) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. DA/584/2012 for modification of the approved development by extending the hours of operation of outdoor play area from 8.30am to 5.00pm Monday to Friday and amend condition no.’s 72, 80, 82, 83 & 85 relating to the restriction of use for the outdoor play area & the number of children permitted in outdoor play area, acoustic report, noise levels and non-amplified music to be played outdoors at No. 158 Moverly Road, South Coogee, subject to the following conditions:

 

Amend Condition 1 to read:

 

        Approved Plans & Supporting Documentation

1.     The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans and supporting documentation listed below:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Filed in the Land and Environment Court

D-CC01

Site Plan + Roof Plan + Landscape Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Design 23 Pty. Ltd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13.05.2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.05.2013

D-CC02

Lower Ground Floor Plan

+ Partial Site

D-CC03

Ground Floor Plan +

Partial Site

D-CC04

South-East + South –

West Elevations

D-CC05

North-West + North-East

Elevations

D-CC02.1

Lower Ground Floor

Level Carpark Layout +

Traffic Engineer Details

 

27.05.2013

 

27.05.2013

       

Except as amended by the Section 96 ‘A’ documentation only in so far as they relate to the modifications highlighted on the Section 96 ‘A’ documentation and detailed in the Section 96 application, except as may be amended by other conditions of this consent:

 

Amend Condition No. 72 to read:

72)   The hours of operation for the outdoor play areas is restricted to:

Monday to Friday:       8:30am to 5:00pm

 

Amend Condition No. No. 80 to read:

80)   The proposed use of the premises and the operation of all plant and equipment shall not give rise to an ‘offensive noise’ as defined in the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 and Regulations.

 

In this regard, the operation of the premises and plant and equipment shall not give rise to a sound pressure level at any affected premises that exceeds the background (LA90), 15 min noise level, measured in the absence of the noise source/s under consideration by more than 5dB(A).  The source noise level shall be assessed as an LAeq, 15 min and adjusted in accordance with the NSW Environmental Protection Authority’s Industrial Noise Policy 2000 and Environmental Noise Control Manual (sleep disturbance).

 

Amend to Condition No. 82 to read:

82)     The operation of the site and the project specific criteria for noise emissions shall be in accordance with the acoustic report referenced 20120735.1/0909A/R7/TT dated 27 November 2013 prepared by Acoustic Logic PTY LTD unless otherwise stated by this development consent”.

 

Additional condition is added to read as follows;

(82.a) In accordance with the acoustic report 20120735.1/0909A/R7/TT prepared by Acoustic Logic PTY LTD dated 27 November 2013 the following measures are to be implemented:

 

·          A minimum 1.8m high bound fence/noise screen is required along the western boundary of the upper outdoor play area. Fence is to consist of Colorbond, lapped and capped timber or (clear) Perspex, or a combination of these items.

 

·          For the remaining fencing around the play areas, the 1.8m High Solid (Colorbond) Boundary fencing is to be retained. If replaced- any replacement fence should be at least 1.8m high and imperforate (no holes- e.g. lapped and capped timber or colorbond).

 

·          There is to be a solid noise screen constructed to separate the upper and lower place areas. The screen is to be constructed along the top of the rock ledge at the edge of the upper play area. The height of the top of the screen is to be such that it provides line of sight between the lower (active play”) area and the top for windows of the residence to the west ( top of screen minimum RL 60.9). Screen to be constructed of lapped and capped timber or Perspex to architects detail.

 

·          All windows to be constructed using minimum 4mm thick glass with perimeter acoustic seals.

 

·          Noise from any new mechanical services (air-conditioners, kitchen exhaust fan or similar) should comply with the acoustic requirements of the EPA industrial Noise Policy (intrusiveness and Amenity Criteria) Detailed review of new plan items should be undertaken at Construction certificate stage, once plant items are selected and locations determined. Noise from plant will be designed to be compliant with a “Background +0) acoustic criteria (which is 5dB (A) stricter than EPA guidelines). In doing this, the cumulative noise contribution from mechanical plant will not significantly add to any noise created by children in the play grounds. Compliance with this design goal is achievable.

 

·          The proposed air conditioner condenser is to be located within the new garage. The building shell should screen noise to the nearest residence (to the west) and should be more than 25m from the nearest residence with line of site of the condenser (to the south, across Moverly Road).

·          The bathroom ventilation is to be provided via Small Ceiling Mounted fans (55i/s discharging thought the roof. Use of 1m of flex ducting between the fan and discharge point should ensure compliance with noise emission criteria.

 

Amend Condition No. 83 to read:

(83.)  The  lower outdoor play area must not exceed a maximum number of 46 children at any one time playing during the permitted operational hours for the outdoor play area specified in this consent”.

 

Additional condition is added to read as follows:

 

(83.a) The upper outdoor play area is to be used by no more than 16 children at any one time. This area is only to be used for “passive “non ambulatory play” (acceptable activities to include reading/painting/craft or other closely supervised activities)

 

Amend Condition No. 85 to read:

(85.)   No amplified music is to be played in the premises, music is to be provided using a portable stereo.

 

Additional condition is added to read as follows;

 

(85.a) Music is to be used as background music only (no more than 70dB (A) at 3m from the stereo).

 

(85.b)    No music is to be played in the upper outdoor play area.

 

Add Condition No. 95 to read:

(95.)  A validation report must be obtained from a suitably qualified and experienced consultant in acoustics three (3) month after the business commences trading. The report should demonstrates and certifies that noise and vibration from the development (including all plant and equipment internally and externally) satisfies the relevant provisions of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997, NSW Office of Environment & Heritage/Environment Protection Authority Noise Control Manual & Industrial Noise Policy and conditions of Council’s development consent.

 

The report is to be forwarded to and approved by Council. This report must address (but not limited to) the accumulation effect of mechanical plant and equipment and noise generated from all children playing in the upper and lower outdoor play areas simultaneously and the noise generated from 46 children playing in the lower outdoor play area. Any recommendations outlined in the acoustic report are to be implemented accordingly.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA Compliance Report - 158 Moverly Road, South Coogee (DA/584/2012/A)

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP2/14

 

 

Subject:                  158 Moverly Road, South Coogee (DA/584/2012/B)

Folder No:                   DA/584/2012/B

Author:                   Tahlia Alexander, Student Assessment Officer     

 

Proposal:                     Section 96AA modification

Ward:                      East Ward

Applicant:                Design 23 Pty Ltd

Owner:                         V & S Berk Family Pty Ltd and Anibal 21 Pty Ltd

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

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North

Locality Plan


Development Application Executive Summary Report

 

This application is referred to Council for determination as the original development application was refused at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 26 March 2013. An appeal was lodged with the NSW Land and Environment Court and upheld on 28 June 2013.

 

Proposal

 

The original proposal detailed alterations and additions to the existing dwelling and a change of use to a child care centre with capacity of 46 children, operating between the hours of 8.30am to 5pm weekdays. Works include construction of a subfloor parking area for six (6) vehicles, disabled access and associated works.

 

This application has been lodged pursuant to Section 96AA of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, and seeks to modify the development consent in the following manner:

 

a)     Relocate the main office, staff room and toilet to the south-western side of the building;

b)     Relocate a portion of play room number 1 to the north-eastern side of the building;

c)     Installation of mechanically ventilated sky tubes on the south-western side of the roof; and

d)     Construction of a new window measuring 400m by 400mm on the south-eastern elevation of the building.

 

It is noted that another Section 96 application has been lodged (DA/584/2012/A) and is currently under assessment seeking to modify the approved development consent in the following manner:

 

a)     Extend hours of operation of outdoor play area to 8.30am to 5.00pm Monday to Friday;

b)     Increase number of children permitted in outdoor play area from 30 to 46; and

c)     Amend conditions 80 and 82 relating to acoustic report and noise levels and amend condition 85 to allow non-amplified music to be played outdoors.

 

Site

 

The subject site is located on the northern side of Moverly Road, opposite the intersection of Moverly Road and Coldstream Street. The parcel is of regular shape and is oriented roughly north-west to south-east. The site is presently occupied by a single dwelling of part one (1), part two (2) storey scale.

 

The vicinity of the site comprises low density residential development, the Randwick General Cemetery, multi-unit development owned by the NSW Department of Housing, South Coogee Public School and a Council reserve occupying the unformed road of Roper Ave. The site has one (1) immediate neighbour, a two (2) storey residential dwelling on it’s south-west boundary, at 156 Moverly Road. Similar residential development exists further to the south-west and across Moverly Road to the south-east.

 


Submissions

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. The following submissions were received as a result of the notification process:

 

Issue

Comment

152 Moverly Road, South Coogee

There are concerns that the proposed alterations to the building will impact their amenity and privacy and the amenity and privacy of other neighbouring properties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The development application was only approved through an appeal with the Land and Environment Court and the applicant is treating the approval process with contempt through repeated variations to the original approved plans.

 

 

The site only has one immediate neighbour to the south-west. The proposed window is located on the south-east elevation which faces the street and as such will not impact on the adjoining neighbour’s privacy. It is not considered that the proposed modifications will impact on the amenity or privacy of adjoining and nearby residents. A detailed discussion regarding potential acoustic impacts is outlined in the key issues section of this report.

 

It is permissible to modify the development consent pursuant to Clause 96AA of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

165 Moverly Road, South Coogee

The internal redesign will intensify the acoustic effect of the play room towards their property particularly when windows are open. The proposed amendments under the other modification application will increase the cumulative impact of the noise. The application is using the modification process to avoid a substantive analysis of the noise impacts.

 

The applicant should be forced to adhere to the approved plans and there is no planning reason why the rooms should be relocated.

 

 

 

Potential impacts of noise have been investigated by Council’s Environmental Health Unit. The noise expected to arise from the child care centre as is proposed to be modified is capable of complying with the provisions of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 and Council’s Comprehensive DCP 2013. A detailed discussion regarding potential acoustic impacts is outlined in the key issues section of this report.

 

 

As noted above, it is permissible to modify the development consent pursuant to Clause 96AA of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

Key Issues

 

Acoustic Impact

The application was referred to Council’s Environmental Health Unit in relation to the acoustic impacts associated with the proposed internal reconfiguration of the play room and the installation of the mechanically ventilated sky tubes. The following comments have been received:

The Environmental Health team raised concerns regarding the vented louvers to be serviced by mechanical motors. An acoustic report has been received for the development which confirms that that the bathroom ventilation will be provided  via small ceiling mounted fans (55l/s) discharging through the roof.

 

The acoustic report recommends the use of 1m of flex ducting between fan and discharge point to ensure compliance with noise emission goals.

 

The acoustic report also confirms that the noise from mechanical equipment will comply with the requirements of the NSW EPA Industrial Noise Policy and other relevant noise requirement.

 

The original development consent for this property DA/584/2012 has included a requirement for an acoustic assessment to be undertaken prior to the issue of an occupation certificate and an acoustic validation certificate within 3 months of operation. It is considered that these additional acoustic validation reports will confirm compliance with relevant noise criteria as outlined in the supporting acoustic assessment.

 

The cumulative impacts of the proposed modifications under this section 96 application and the preceding section 96 application (DA/584/2012/A) have been assessed. The acoustic report (version 8) submitted to Council on 27th November 2013 includes both of the proposed modifications and demonstrates compliance with the requirements of NSW EPA-Industrial Noise Policy and other relevant noise requirements subject to recommendations. The recommendation that relates to this section 96 application states:

 

Bathroom ventilation via small ceiling mounted fans (55l/s) discharging through the roof are to be fitted with 1m of flex ducting between the fan and discharge point to ensure compliance with the requirements of the NSW EPA Industrial Noise Policy and relevant noise requirements.

 

Council’s Environmental Health Unit has advised that this recommendation is required to be included as a condition of consent. Other recommendations contained within the acoustic report (version 8) are recommended as conditions of consent in DA/584/2012/A and have not been included in this section 96 application to avoid duplication.

 

Overall, it is considered that the proposed modifications will comply with relevant noise requirements and will not unreasonably impact on the acoustic privacy and amenity of the adjoining properties. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:      Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Having regard to the provisions of Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, as amended, the proposed modifications are considered to result in a development that remains substantially the same as the development for which the consent was originally granted.

 

The proposed modifications have been assessed as being satisfactory with respect to the relevant provisions of the Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012 and Comprehensive DCP 2013.

 

Approval of the modification will not result in any significant environmental, social or economic impacts on the locality. The amended proposal will not result in any unreasonable environmental, social or economic impacts on the locality, and hence is recommended for approval.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Section 96(AA) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. DA/584/2012 for modification of the approved development by relocating the main office and toilet to the western side of the building including new windows on the south eastern elevation  and installation  of skytubes to the roof at No. 158 Moverly Road, South Coogee, subject to the following conditions:

 

A.      Amend Condition No. 1 to read:

 

        Approved Plans & Supporting Documentation

1.     The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans and supporting documentation listed below except where amended by other conditions of this consent:

       

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Filed in the Land and Environment Court

D-CC01

Site Plan + Roof Plan + Landscape Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Design 23 Pty. Ltd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13.05.2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.05.2013

D-CC02

Lower Ground Floor Plan

+ Partial Site

D-CC03

Ground Floor Plan +

Partial Site

D-CC04

South-East + South –

West Elevations

D-CC05

North-West + North-East

Elevations

D-CC02.1

Lower Ground Floor

Level Carpark Layout +

Traffic Engineer Details

 

27.05.2013

 

27.05.2013

 

Except as amended by the Section 96 plans only in so far as they relate to the modifications highlighted on the Section 96 plans listed below and detailed in the Section 96 application:

       

 

 

 

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Received by Council

DA01

Site Plan + Roof Plan + Landscape Plan

 

 

 

Design 23 Pty. Ltd

 

 

 

08.08.2013

 

 

 

13.08.2013

DA03

Ground Floor Plan +

Partial Site

DA04

South-East + South –

West Elevations

 

B.      Add Condition 96 to read:

96.   Bathroom ventilation via small ceiling mounted fans (55l/s) discharging through the roof are to be fitted with 1m of flex ducting between the fan and discharge point to ensure compliance with the requirements of the NSW EPA Industrial Noise Policy and relevant noise requirements.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA Compliance Report - 158 Moverly Road, South Coogee (DA/584/2012/B)

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP3/14

 

 

Subject:                  2R Barker Street, Kingsford (DA/874/2013)

Folder No:                   DA/874/2013

Author:                   Willana Associates, Pty Ltd     

 

Proposal:                     Alterations and additions to an existing building (potting Shed) at the Randwick Community Nursery

Ward:                      West Ward

Applicant:                Randwick City Council

Owner:                         NSW Dept of Lands

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

Ù

North

Locality Plan


Development Application Executive summary report

 

The development application has been assessed by an external consultant and referred to Council as the subject site is under the care, control and management of Randwick City Council.

 

Proposal

 

The application seeks approval for the alterations and additions to an existing building at the Randwick Community Nursery, located on the corner of Barker Street and Day Lane at Kingsford.  The proposed scope of works to be carried out to the existing potting shed includes:

 

§  Replacement of the roof to improve light and ventilation within the building.  The existing roof-mounted solar panels will be re-instated on the new roof structure.

§  Construction of a new storeroom, with a gross floor area of 18m2, at the eastern end of the building.

§  Installation of new high level windows on the northern and southern elevations to increase light and ventilation to the existing workspaces and office.

§  Creation of a new window opening on the western façade to match the existing.

§  Installation of a roller shutter door on the southern facade to facilitate access.

§  Installation of new internal joinery and storage areas.

 

In addition to the works outlined above to the potting shed, a lightweight roof structure is also proposed to be constructed over the tractor parking area, located to the south of the potting shed.

Site

 

The subject site is legally described as Lots 1283 and 1284 of DP 752011 and Lot 1752 of DP 48478.  The Nursery site has an area of approximately 3,203m².

 

The property is owned by NSW Trade and Investment, Crown Lands Division.  Owners consent has been provided by Randwick City Council in its capacity as the Trustee and is included as part of the DA documentation.

 

The land is relatively flat.  Existing development on the site comprises:

§  A single storey, brick building with tiled roof located at the main entry on the Barker Street frontage which is used as the Nursery Administration office.

§  The potting shed, which is the subject of this application, comprises a single storey, brick building with tiled roof located near the vehicular access to/from Barker Lane.

§  Open plant storage/propagation areas.

§  Shaded plant propagation areas.

§  Material hoppers (mulch etc).

§  Tractor parking area.

The land is zoned RE1 Public Recreation under the provisions of Randwick Local Environmental Plan 2012.

 


Submissions

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. One (1) submission was received as a result of the notification process (see below).

 

Issue raised by the owner of 51 Houston Road, Kensington

§  Council must satisfy the neighbour that there is an adequate drainage system to collect or dispose of the rainwater that may enter the narrow space between the proposed shed extension and the neighbours shed.

 

Comment:

The neighbouring shed to the east has been built to the common boundary with the subject site.  It is proposed to construct the new storeroom at the eastern end of the potting shed also to the boundary, i.e. there will be a zero setback between the neighbouring shed to the east and the proposed potting shed storeroom.  There will not be a narrow space between the buildings for water to accumulate.

 

The existing rainwater tank located at the south eastern corner of the potting shed will be retained and connected to the proposed new roof. 

 

Image 1: Proposed location of the 18m2 storeroom between the existing neighbours shed (on the left side of the photograph) and the existing brick potting shed.  The proposed storeroom will have a zero setback to the neighbouring shed structure.

Key Issues

 

Visual Impact

The immediate vicinity of the site is primarily residential. The nearest residential dwellings are located immediately to the east of the site. The proposed storeroom will be single storey in height and will be built to the eastern boundary.

 

The proposal will not result in any adverse amenity impacts to the adjoining residential development. There is a shed built to the boundary on the adjoining property directly to the east, which will screen the storeroom as viewed from the dwelling house associated with 51 Houston Road, Kensington.

 

The proposed new roof to the potting shed is below the height of the existing roof line and will provide more light and amenity for staff working in the potting shed.

 

A new window opening to the potting shed is proposed to the western façade.  A roller shutter opening is proposed to the southern side of the building.  These openings are orientated away from adjoining residential properties to east and south east and will have no visual impact on the adjoining residential properties.

 

The roof structure for the tractor parking area is positioned on an existing brick wall that is situated close to the boundary with the residential property at 2A Barker Lane.  There will be no adverse impact to adjoining development as the structure is light weight and is a consistent roof form with the proposed roof form at the potting shed.  No view corridors are impacted as a result of the proposed roof structure.  The proposed tractor shed roof will not create any unaccepctable overshadowing impacts, given its orientation. 

 

The proposal is acceptable in regard to visual impact.

 

Amenity Impact

The proposal does not include any changes to the existing number of staff at the site or the hours of operation.  As there is no intensification in the use of the site as a result of the proposed works, the proposal is therefore acceptable in regard to amenity impact.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:      Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The subject consent of DA No. 874/2013 to include alterations and additions to the existing potting shed at the Randwick Community Nursery, located at the corner of Barker Street and Day Lane Kingsford is recommended for approval, subject to conditions.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the Consent Authority, grants Development Consent under Sections 80 and 80A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. 874/2013 for alterations and additions to the existing Potting Shed at the Randwick Community Nursery, located at the corner of Barker Street and Day Lane Kingsford, subject to the standard conditions contained in the development application compliance report attached to this report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA Compliance Report - 2R Barker Street , Kingsford (DA/874/2013)

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP4/14

 

 

Subject:                  3 Severn Street, Maroubra (DA/552/2013)

Folder No:                   DA/552/2013

Author:                   Roger Quinton, Coordinator Development Assessment     

 

Proposal:                     Demolition of existing dwelling, removal of Norfolk Island Pine tree, construction of part 3/part 4 storey residential flat building in two building forms containing 10 units, basement parking for 14 vehicles, strata subdivision and associated works

Ward:                      Central Ward

Applicant:                Alec Pappas Architects Pty Ltd

Owner:                         Dr N N Tanudisastro

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

Ù

North

Locality Plan


Development Application Executive Summary Report

 

The application is referred to Council as the estimated cost of the development is over $2 million.

 

Proposal

 

It is proposed to demolish the existing dwelling, remove an existing Norfolk Island Pine tree and construct a part 3/part 4 storey residential flat building in two building forms containing 10 units, basement car parking over 2 levels for 14 vehicles, landscaping and associated works.

 

Amended plans were received on 27 November 2013 which addressed the following:

 

·      Reduced floor area to comply with the development standard of 0.9:1.

·      Increased areas of landscaping and deep spoil planting.

·      Increased height of front building by 260mm to meet Design Review Panel suggestions.

·      Redesigned driveway to meet Council requirements.

·      Reduced height of retaining wall adjacent to south-east boundary.

·      Added sunshades and external louvers.

·      Reduced size of pop-up skillion roof features.

·      Added skylights to bathrooms for units 6 and 10.

 

Site

The site is located on the south-western side of Severn Street, is rectangular in shape and has an area of 828.4 sqm. The site slopes towards the rear, away from the street with the difference in level from the front to the rear being 7.58m. A large Norfolk Island Pine tree is located within the rear yard. A single storey (with rear basement level) dwelling is currently located on the site.

 

Surrounding development is residential with a mixture of single dwellings and two to four storey residential flat buildings. Immediately adjacent development includes a two storey residential flat building to the south-east at No. 5 Severn Street, a single storey dwelling to the north-west at No. 1 Severn Street and a three storey residential flat building to the rear, which has frontage to McKeon Street.

 

Figure 1: The subject site.

Figure 2: No. 1 Severn Street

 

Figure 3: Residential flat building (no. 5 Severn Street) located to left of dwelling on subject property at No. 3 Severn Street

 

Figure 4: View of northern side of Severn Street

 

Submissions

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. Amended plans were also notified to neighbouring properties and to those persons who had made submissions during the original notification process. The following submissions were received as a result of the original public exhibition:

 

1 Severn Street

16/5 Severn Street

17/5 Severn Street

6 Severn Street

8 Severn Street

4/10 Severn Street

2/11 Hereward Street

7/11 Hereward Street

 

As a result of the re-exhibition of amended plans, submissions were received from the following properties:

 

7/11 Hereward Street

1 Severn Street

 

One letter of non objection was received to both exhibitions with no address supplied.

 

Issues

Comments

Loss of views, including inappropriate landscaping in the front yard which will potentially result in view loss from adjacent properties. 

The proposal will meet the relevant objectives of RDCP 2013 and is acceptable in terms of view impacts. A proposed condition of consent requires the replacement of the Banksia tree which is proposed for the front yard with a smaller native tree which would only attain a maximum height of 2m when mature.  Refer to the key issues section below for further details.

Over development, over population and excess FSR

The proposed development was amended to comply with the FSR development standard in RLEP 2012 and the proposal meets the parking requirements in RDCP 2013. Also, as detailed below in the key issues section, the impacts of the proposed development are considered to be acceptable. The proposal is therefore not considered to result in an over development or to have the potential to result in an “over population” of the neighbourhood.  

The proposed development is excessively bulky

The perceived visual bulk of the development is considered to be acceptable because of the following:

·      The development complies with FSR and maximum height development standards in RLEP 2012.

·      The façade of the development is highly articulated.

·      The development proposes two distinct building forms.

·      The design scheme utilises a variety of building materials. 

The proposal will exacerbate existing traffic and parking problems in the street

The proposal meets the parking requirements in RDCP 2013 and Council’s Development Engineers have assessed the development as being acceptable.    The proposal includes 14 basement level car park spaces and meets the DCP requirement for 14.3 spaces (fractional spaces below 0.5 are rounded to the figure below).  Proposed conditions of consent require that each unit is allocated one space and two spaces are to be allocated for visitor parking.  The application is therefore considered to be acceptable in this regard.

Loss of sunlight to adjacent properties.

The proposed development is considered to be acceptable in this regard, see key issues section below. 

Construction impacts including damage to adjacent properties, noise and potential asbestos impacts.

Standard conditions are included in the recommendation limiting hours work, requiring a dilapidation report be undertaken prior to the commencement of construction, controlling impacts from excavation and controlling potential asbestos removal. 

Stormwater and flooding impacts on adjacent properties.

Council’s Development Engineer has recommended standard requirements for flooding and stormwater management. 

Privacy impacts on adjacent properties.

As discussed in the following key issues section, privacy impacts are considered to be acceptable subject to proposed conditions of consent.

 

Loss of cooling breezes to adjacent properties.

It is considered that as the proposed design complies with FSR and height standards, adequate setbacks are provided and the design scheme provides an open central area with two distinct building forms, impacts on air circulation to adjacent properties will be acceptable.

 

Removal of Norfolk Island Pine Tree

Council’s landscape technician has stated that the tree may be removed as it is susceptible to wind-throw because it is growing in an unsuitable medium and the location of the tree precludes reasonable development of the site, subject to suitable replacement landscaping being undertaken. This is addressed in proposed conditions of consent.

 

Key Issues

 

Side setbacks

The Objectives in the DCP for this control include ensuring adequate separation between buildings for visual and acoustic privacy, solar access, air circulation and views. For a site of this width the DCP requires side setbacks of 2.5m.

 

The proposal generally complies with the 2.5m setback to the north-western common boundary with No. 1 Severn Street, apart from awnings over the entries to the front and rear buildings which will be setback 1.4m from the side boundary and the basement access stair structure which will be set back 0.9m from the side boundary. The awnings are considered to be acceptable as they are light-weight structures which will not result in additional shadow impacts to the adjacent property, restrict air circulation or views and will not result in additional privacy impacts. The basement entry structure will not result in privacy, view loss or shadow impacts as it is only 2.7m in height and is to be located beyond the rear alignment of the adjacent dwelling at No. 1 Severn Street and will be behind a 1.8m high side boundary fence.

 

The side setback to the south-eastern common boundary with No. 5 Severn Street ranges from 1.9m to 4.1m. A portion of the rear building with a length of 4.6m is to be located 1.9m from the south-eastern side boundary. This considered to be acceptable as the non-compliance is located at the rear of the site and is therefore not adjacent to the residential flat building on No. 5 Severn Street, proposed conditions of consent require screening on kitchen windows located in the area of non-compliance and there will be no other significant impacts as a result, such as view-loss impacts.

 

A portion of the front building is to be 2m from the side boundary with no. 5 Severn Street for a length of 5m. This is considered to be acceptable as the remainder of this building exceeds the required 2.5m required setback, the area between the building and the boundary is to be landscaped and proposed conditions of consent require kitchen windows located in this non-complying portion of the building to be screened. There would be no view-loss or additional shadow impacts resulting from this non-compliance.

 


Rear setbacks

The objective of the control includes the retention of contiguous open space areas and deep soil planting. A rear setback of 8.229m is required, being 15% of the depth of the site, however the DCP allows a relaxation of the control where a central courtyard is provided. A setback of 6m to the rear boundary is provided and the proposed development includes a central courtyard between the two building forms. The proposal is therefore considered to be acceptable in this regard. 

 

Wall height

Objectives for this control include ensuring the provision of interesting roof forms which are compatible with the street and the minimization of bulk in order to limit overshadowing, privacy and amenity impacts. The proposed development has wall heights ranging from 8m to 11.91m. The non-compliances occur in the rear building and generally result from the slope of the site towards the rear boundary. The infringement of the control is considered to be acceptable for the following reasons:

 

·      The design scheme incorporates interesting butterfly roof forms.

·      The buildings are well articulated and incorporate varied setbacks and materials to reduce the perception of bulk.

·      The development complies with the maximum height development standard.

·      Shadow and privacy impacts are, subject to proposed conditions of approval, considered to be acceptable, as discussed below.   

 

Shadow Impacts

Objectives for this control in the DCP include to ensure that new development retains reasonable levels of solar access to the neighbouring properties and the public domain.

 

Shadow diagrams, including shadow elevations, indicating impacts between 8am and 4pm on 21 June have been provided with the application. These show the following:

 

·        At 8am and 9am on 21 June shadows fall to the rear of the site on to the rear of No.s 38 and 40 McKeon Street and the rear of residential flat buildings located on those sites. A portion of the rear yard of No. 1 Severn Street is also shaded, however this site is clear of shading by 9am.

 

·        By 10am a portion of the rear of the site at No. 5 Severn Street is shaded and two windows on the western side of the ground floor to the rear of the residential flat building on this site are also shaded.

 

·        At 11am shading has increased so that four ground floor windows in the residential flat building at No. 5 Severn Street are completely shaded and five first floor windows are partially shaded.

 

·        By 1pm all windows on the western face of No. 5 Severn Street are shaded, apart from a small portion of a first floor window. By 1pm shading has moved off the rear face of the flat building at No. 40 McKeon Street and half of the rear yard of that site is clear of shadow. Shading further reduces on 40 Mckeon Street so that by 3 pm it is clear of shadow.

 

·        From 1pm to 4 pm the two building form of the proposed development ensures a portion of the rear yard of 5 Severn Street retains solar access. It is also noted that the rear yard of 5 Severn Street retains some solar access in part for the whole day.  

 

·        From 1pm some shading of the rear of 7-9 Severn Street occurs and there would also be shading of the roof of the residential flat building located on this site.   

 

Shadow impacts are considered to be acceptable for the following reasons:

·      The proposed development complies with RLEP floor space ratio and maximum height development standards. Proposed landscaping exceeds RDCP requirements. 

 

·      Over half the units in No. 5 Severn Street would receive sunlight to a portion of their west-facing windows for 3 hours on 21 June and all of these windows would receive at least 2 hours direct sunlight on 21 June. 

 

·      The form of the design scheme has been modified from the pre-development application stage to include two distinct building forms which ensures the rear yard of 5 Severn Street retains direct sunlight over a portion of it’s area for the whole of the period 8am to 4pm on 21 June.   

 

Privacy Impacts

DCP controls state that balconies should be oriented to the front and the rear of a site where possible. Balconies within the development face towards No. 5 Severn Street (as well as the front and the rear of the site). A proposed condition of consent requires screening to a height of 1.5m above floor level to be constructed on the south-eastern face of the balconies facing No. 5 Severn Street in order to limit privacy impacts.

 

Similarly, a proposed condition of consent requires metal louvre screening for dining room windows for units 8, 9, 10 and for the kitchen windows of units 4 and 6 in order to limit any privacy impacts from these windows on No. 5 Severn Street.  

 

Privacy impacts on the property to the north-west, No. 1 Severn Street, are generally acceptable given the balconies are oriented to the east and windows are either high-light, opaque glazing or are bedroom windows which would look onto the roof of No. 1 Severn Street in the case of units 3 and 5.  

 

The distance of development to the rear of the site, located fronting McKeon Street, is such that any privacy impacts from the development to the south are considered to be acceptable. 

 

View Sharing

The potential impact of the proposed development on views obtained from adjacent sites has been considered. The assessment has included site inspections and desk top analysis.

 

The following is a four-step analysis of view loss impacts established in the NSW Land and Environment Court case Tenacity v Warringah (2004).

 

Step 1: The first step is the assessment of views to be affected. Water views are valued more highly than land views. Iconic views (e.g of the Opera House, the Harbour Bridge or North Head) are valued more highly than views without icons. Whole views are valued more highly than partial views, e.g a water view in which the interface between land and water is visible is more valuable than one in which it is obscured.

 

The development will partially obscure ocean views from Unit 7, 11 Hereward Street.  The view below is taken from the lounge room window of this property and indicates that a view is obtained of the ocean at the end of Severn Street across Marine Parade.

 

Anticipated view loss from Unit 7, 11 Hereward Street would be approximately half of the water view from the lounge room.      

 

Figure 5:  View from Unit 7, 11 Hereward Street

 

Figure 6:  The photo above indicates views from the front ground level terrace of 1 Severn Street.

 

Step 2: The second step is to consider from what part of the property the views are obtained. For example the protection of views across side boundaries is more difficult than the protection of views from front and rear boundaries. In addition, whether the view is enjoyed from a standing or sitting position may also be relevant. Sitting views are more difficult to protect than standing views. The expectation to retain side views and sitting views is often unrealistic.

 

The views that would be impacted would be obtained across the side boundaries of No.s 1 and 3 Severn Street.

 

The view that would be lost from Unit 7, 11 Hereward Street is obtained from a sitting and standing position.

 

The view that would be lost from No. 1 Severn Street would be from both sitting and standing positions.

 

Step 3: The third step is to assess the extent of the impact. This should be done for the whole of the property, not just for the view that is affected. The impact on views from living areas is more significant than from bedrooms or service areas (though views from kitchens are highly valued because people spend so much time in them). The impact may be assessed quantitatively, but in many cases this can be meaningless. For example, it is unhelpful to say that the view loss is 20% if it includes one of the sails of the Opera House. It is usually more useful to assess the view loss qualitatively as negligible, minor, moderate, severe or devastating.

 

View loss from the lounge room of Unit 7, 11 Hereward Street is assessed as being moderate. As detailed, approximately half of the view would be retained.

 

View loss from 1 Severn Street is assessed as being severe.

 

Step 4: The fourth step is to assess the reasonableness of the proposal that is causing the impact. A development that complies with all the planning controls would be considered more reasonable than one that breaches them. Where an impact on views arises as a result of non-compliance with one or more planning controls, even a moderate impact may be considered unreasonable. With a complying proposal, the question should be asked whether a more skilful design could provide the applicant with the same development potential and amenity and reduce the impact on the views of neighbours. If the answer to that question is no, then the view impact of a complying development would probably be considered acceptable and the view sharing reasonable. 

 

In assessing whether the potential view loss is reasonable, the following has been taken into consideration:

 

·      As indicated by this assessment, relevant objectives in RDCP 2013 have been satisfied, including ensuring the design scheme  sensitively and skillfully allows for the retention of views where possible and acknowledging the significance of views to neighbours. 

·      As required by controls in RDCP 2013, a proposed condition of consent requires the deletion of the Banksia intergrifolia tree from the planting in the front yard in order to maintain views from properties to the north-west of the site. The proposed condition requires the planting of a native tree which will not grow higher than 2m. 

·      The proposed development is a largely compliant scheme: maximum height and FSR development standards in RLEP are met and landscaped areas are in excess of RDCP requirements. The front setback meets the RDCP control. Areas of non-compliance, for example wall height and side setbacks, do not contribute to view loss impacts.

·       Views are obtained over side boundaries.

·       A partial view from the lounge room of Unit 7, 11 Hereward Street will be retained

 

The potential view loss caused by the proposed development is considered to be acceptable for the reasons detailed above. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:      Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed development complies with FSR and maximum height controls in RLEP.  Relevant controls and objectives within RDCP 2013 are satisfied and environmental impacts have been assessed as being acceptable, subject to proposed conditions of consent.

 

The scale and design of the proposal is considered to be suitable for the location and compatible with the existing streetscape of Severn Street and surrounding streets.

 

The proposed development satisfies the matters for consideration under Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended and the relevant legislation, State policies and local planning controls. The application is accordingly recommended for approval subject to proposed conditions of consent.

 

Recommendation

 

A.       That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Sections 80 and 80A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. DA/552/2013 for demolition of existing dwelling, removal of Norfolk Island Pine tree, construction of part 3/part 4 storey residential flat building in two building forms containing 10 units, basement parking for 14 vehicles, strata subdivision and associated works  at No. 3 Severn Street, Maroubra , subject to the following non standard conditions and the standard conditions contained in the development application compliance report attached to this report:

 

Non standard conditions

 

        Amended Plans and Documentation

 

2          The approved plans must be amended in accordance with the following requirements

 

a.     A privacy screen having a height of 1.6m above floor level must be provided to south-western face of balconies for units 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10.  The privacy screen must be constructed of metal or timber and the total area of any openings within the privacy screen must not exceed 25% of the area of the screen.  Alternatively, the privacy screen may be constructed with translucent, obscured, frosted or sandblasted glazing in a suitable frame.

 

b.     The following windows must have a minimum sill height of 1.6m  above floor level, or alternatively, the window/s are to be fixed and be provided with translucent, obscured, frosted or sandblasted glazing below this specified height or exterior privacy screens can be added with openings not to exceed 25% of the area of the screen:

 

·         Kitchen windows of units 4 and 6

·         Dining room windows for units 8, 9 and 10

 

c.     The Banksia intergrifolia located in the front yard is to be deleted from the landscape plan L01/1-      K18306 and replaced with a native species capable of attaining no more than 2m in height when mature.

 

d.     The front fence is not to exceed 1200mm in height.

 

Details to be submitted to Council’s Manager Development Assessment for approval prior to issuing of the construction certificate.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA Compliance Report -  3 Severn Street, MAROUBRA

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP5/14

 

 

Subject:                  3 Kyogle Street, Maroubra (DA/703/2013)

Folder No:                   DA/703/2013

Author:                   Louis Coorey, Environmental Planning Officer     

 

Proposal:                     Ground and first floor alterations and additions to the existing dwelling

Ward:                      Central Ward

Applicant:                Chris Elliott Architects P/L

Owner:                         Mr M S S Keil and Mrs N M Henderson

Summary

Recommendation:     Approval

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submissions received

Ù

North

Locality Plan


Development Application Executive summary report

 

The development application has been referred to Council at the request of Councillors Andrews, Stavrinos, Matson, Shurey and Stevenson.

 

Proposal

Ground and first floor alterations and additions to the existing dwelling.

 

Amended application:

A final set of amended plans received by Council on 29 January 2014 are the subject of assessment and include the following changes from that originally proposed:

 

·      Increase the first floor rear setback from between 900mm and 4.5m to between 2.4m and 5.095m so that the first floor addition is in line with the existing rear gutter of the subject dwelling.

·      Introduce a splay at the north-eastern corner to maintain the same 2.4m rear setback as the existing ground floor level at this corner;

·      Delete the first floor east facing bay window, reduce window size and include external louvers up to 1600mm above floor level

·      Add fixed external privacy louvers to the first floor bedroom and sitting room windows (Please note: conditions require the screens to be fixed at an angle to avoid overlooking into rear yards and habitable living areas of neighbouring properties. Further, screen details are required to be submitted to Council prior to a Construction Certificate being issued for the development and to be installed prior to the issue of an Occupation Certificate).

·      Increase sill height of the first floor rear ventilation window to 1600mm above floor level.

·      Delete a first floor sitting room window.

 

Site

The subject site is located on the eastern side of Kyogle Street. The site has an area of 272sqm and irregularly shaped with a 14.22m frontage, side boundary depths of over 16m and 21m and a skewed rear boundary. The site adjoins the rear boundaries of No 95 and 97 Mons Avenue and shares a common side boundary with No. 5 Kyogle Street. The aerial view below shows the subject site and surrounding area.

 

Aerial View of subject site and neighbouring properties making submissions (shown marked with green circle)

The identification survey shown below is taken as showing the correct rear setbacks of between 2.4m and 5.545m from the rear boundary. The submitted architectural plan shows incorrect rear setbacks and in order to rectify this issue, a condition of consent requires the architectural plans to be amended to show the depth of the first floor level to be limited to the rear gutter line (450mm beyond the existing rear ground level elevation) and for the north-eastern corner splay to be no closer than 2.4m from the rear boundary.

 

 

Submissions

The owners of adjoining and likely affected neighbouring properties were notified of the proposed development in accordance with the Randwick Comprehensive DCP 2013. The following submissions were received as a result of the notification process:

 

97 Mons Avenue, Maroubra. Submission received in response to the originally submitted plans and a site visit conducted on 16 January 2014 following receipt of amended plans received by Council on 17 December 2013.

 

Issue: Non-compliance with rear boundary setbacks causing adverse impacts

 

Comment: Section 3.3.3 states that for irregular shaped allotments, the rear setback will be assessed on merit having regard to: compatibility with existing development pattern; complying private open space dimensions and potential impact on neighbouring dwellings and these are addressed as follows:

 

1.     In terms of compatibility, the neighbouring property at 97 Mons Avenue has a rear setback from the north western rear boundary that is similar to the subject dwelling’s rear setback. Notwithstanding, the 450mm projection beyond the existing and adjoining semi detached dwellings rear ground level elevation is considered minor and will not result in any significant adverse impacts on the objector’s premises having regard to solar access, overshadowing, privacy or view sharing as discussed in the key issues section of this report.

 

2.     In terms of provision of adequate private open space, the subject site provides the required area and complies with the RDCP 2013 controls.

 

3.     In terms of potential impact on the objector’s property it is considered that the proposal:

 

·      Maintains solar access to the objector’s property in compliance with the RDCP 2013 controls

·      Provides adequate privacy to the objector’s rear yard area and habitable living areas by the installation and conditioning of external privacy louvers to the proposed windows at first floor level and

·      Does not create significant loss of any high quality views from the objector’s property.

 

Issue: The proposed rear setback creates visual bulk:

 

Comment: The proposal will obviously have a greater presence at first floor level, however given the irregular shape of the site, the minor difference between the existing and proposed rear setback, and the absence of any major overshadowing, privacy or view loss impact, it is considered the proposed development will maintain the amenity of neighbouring allotments on these irregular shaped sites.

 

Issue: Window dimensions and location creates loss of privacy

 

The proposed window dimensions are acceptable and with the installation of external louvers ensure sufficient privacy protection of the objector’s property.

 

5 Kyogle Street, Maroubra NSW 2035. Site visit conducted on 17 January 2014

 

Issue: Visually overbearing impact onto kitchen, backdoor and backyard

 

Comment: The amended application is in line with the existing rear gutter line ensuring no immediate view from the objectors kitchen, and backdoor. The view from the rear yard is limited to only the portion of the development that is sited to the rear gutter line and it is not considered that this view would be overbearing or represent significant adverse impacts in terms of visual bulk or overshadowing.

 

Issue: Significant and substantial loss of sunlight in my backyard particularly before midday.

 

Comment: The amended application improves solar access to the rear yard of the objector’s property. The additional overshadowing occurs just before midday, and does not result in the objector’s rear yard having less than three hours of solar access. Overall, the amended application retains solar access to large portions of the objector’s rear yard up until around 2pm and the proposed development complies with the RDCP 2013 controls.

 

Issue: Reduction of privacy

 

Comment: Privacy to the objector’s rear yard is acceptable having regard to the RDCP 2013 objectives. It is noted that it is not out of the ordinary for some cross viewing between neighbouring sites to occur. Notwithstanding, the provision of external louvers and deletion of the bay window will ensure adequate privacy is maintained to the neighbour’s rear yard area.

 

Issue: Potential for structural damage to my property:

 

Comment: Appropriate standard conditions are included requiring dilapidation reports to be submitted and proper practices to be followed having regard to building and structural support of neighbouring properties.

 

Issue: The antenna is secured and shared by the subject dwelling and wish that this not change.

 

Comment: This is not a relevant planning matter; the objector has been advised to discuss this with their neighbours.

 

97 Mons Avenue, Maroubra NSW 2035. Submission received from Milestone Development Management and Town Planning in response to plans received by Council on 17 December 2013. Site visit conducted on 16 January 2014

 

Issue: The new sitting room contributes to unacceptable visual bulk and should be deleted or revised to match the existing building line below

 

Comment: A splay incorporated at this corner means the sitting room is no closer than the existing ground level rear setback at this corner and is conditioned as such. The remaining parts of the first floor level are sited 450mm closer to the rear and it will not result in any significant adverse impacts on the objector’s amenity.

 

Issue: The proposed living room window will give rise to adverse acoustic privacy impacts and its size should be reduced and sill increased.

 

Comment: The sitting room and rear yard are higher use areas. Nonetheless, noise associated with the responsible use of residential dwelling house would not give rise to significant noise impacts.

 

Issue: The first floor level should not extend further than the existing ground level

 

Comment: The proposed location of the first floor level is considered acceptable having regard to the relevant assessment criteria and it is considered that the amendments made in the course of assessment are reasonable and suitable for the site.

 

Issue: Privacy: The window treatment requires dimensions and additional details to ensure any Construction Certificate is consistent with DA plans.

 

Comment: In relation to visual privacy, amendments including the provision of external louvers, conditions requiring specific details and window reductions ensure compliance with the objectives under the RDCP 2013.

 

Issue: The proposal is not consistent with the aim of the RLEP 2013 for ecological sustainable development

 

Comment: The proposed development complies with the RDCP 2013 controls for ecological sustainable development having particular regard to solar access to neighbouring lots, and a BASIX certificate being issued for the proposed development.

 

Issue: The proposal represents an overdevelopment and sets an undesirable precedent:

Comment: It is not considered that the proposed development represents an overdevelopment in so far as it complies with the objectives of the RDCP 2013. Where there are additional impacts, it is considered that these are reasonable in the context of the site and the neighbouring properties.

 

Key Issues

 

Randwick Development Control Plan 2013

Section 3.1 Floor space ratio

 

The RDCP identifies floor space ratios as a measure that assists in controlling the mass and bulk of a development. The FSR operates in conjunction with building height, wall height and setback controls to define the 3D space within which a development may occur. The Randwick Local Environmental Plan (RLEP) 2012 does not provide maximum numerical provisions for sites that are less than 300sqm requiring a merit assessment of a proposals floor space ratio.

 

The floor space ratio of the subject development application measures 0.57:1, which is generally well below the FSR of those developed dwellings along this side of Kyogle Street. It is important to note that a portion of the proposal is contained within the roof and not visible from neighbouring sites and the public domain. In this respect, the visible aspects of the developments FSR represent a ratio of only 0.49:1.

 

In relation to streetscape amenity, the proposal is sited behind the main ridge line of the roof with the only visible aspects being skylights and in compliance with the additional design provisions for Semi detached dwellings under the RDCP 2013.

 

In relation to neighbouring properties, the originally proposed first floor addition cantilevered 1200mm to the rear as well as a bedroom bay window that cantilevered further towards the rear boundary by 510mm. This rear extent was considered excessive and was an obtrusive element when viewed from the rear of the neighbour at No. 97 Mons Avenue and at No. 5 Kyogle Street.

 

The proposal was amended reducing the rear cantilever so that it extends only a maximum of 450mm to the rear (in line with the existing rear gutter), deleting the rear bay window, incorporating a splay at the north eastern corner and including external louvers to the rear windows. These amendments have reduced the bulk to the rear and side boundaries and the level of overshadowing and privacy impacts as viewed from the rear yards of No. 97 Mons Avenue and the adjoining semi at No. 5 Kyogle Street

 

On balance, the proposal has effectively responded to the constraints of a semi detached dwelling situated on an irregularly shaped allotment, whilst minimising the impacts on neighbouring properties.

 

Section 3.3        Setbacks:

 

Side and rear setbacks are devised to ensure an adequate level of building separation, and to provide for access, landscaping, privacy and natural lighting and ventilation. The relevant objectives for side and rear setbacks are:

 

·      To ensure adequate separation between neighbouring buildings for visual and acoustic privacy and solar access.

·      To reserve adequate areas for the retention or creation of private open space and deep soil planting.

·      To enable a reasonable level of view sharing between a development and the neighbouring dwellings and the public domain.

 

Section 3.3.3 Rear setback

The site is irregularly shaped, with side boundary depths of between 16.155m at the northern side and 21.9m at the southern side boundary. The existing dwelling is setback between 2.4m and 5.545m from the rear boundary. The original development was sought to be setback between 900mm and 4.5m from the boundary. The amended rear setbacks are between 2.4m and 5.095m. The RDCP 2013 minimum rear setback controls for irregular shaped allotments require a merit assessment based on the following criteria:

 

·      Compatibility with the existing development pattern in the subject and adjoining urban blocks.

·      Provision of adequate private open space with dimensions compliant with the requirements of this DCP.

·      Potential impacts on the neighbouring dwellings in terms of solar access, privacy and view sharing.

 

A merit assessment in accordance with the above criteria is provided below:

 

·      The existing neighbouring property at 97 Mons Avenue has a rear setback from the north western rear boundary that is similar to the subject dwelling’s rear setback. Notwithstanding, the 450mm projection beyond the existing and adjoining semi detached dwellings rear ground level elevation is considered minor and will not result in any significant adverse impacts on the adjoining properties having regard to solar access, privacy or view sharing.

 

·      The subject site provides the required area and complies with the RDCP 2013 controls.

 

·      In terms of the potential impact on the objectors properties it is considered that the proposal maintains solar access to the neighbouring properties in compliance with the RDCP 2013 controls; provides reasonable privacy to the objector’s rear yard area and habitable living areas by the installation and conditioning of external privacy louvers to the proposed first floor level windows and it does not create any significant loss of any high quality views from the objectors properties.

 

Overall, the proposed development as amended and conditioned has been suitably designed and will satisfy the relevant assessment criteria for rear boundary setbacks on irregularly shaped allotments.

 

Section 5  Amenity            

Section 5.3:       Visual Privacy – Windows

 

The objective of this section is to ensure that development minimises overlooking or cross-viewing to the neighbouring dwellings to maintain reasonable levels of privacy. The RDCP 2013 stipulates that to minimise any direct viewing of habitable room windows and rear yards may be achieved by one or more of the following measures:

 

-   Windows are offset or staggered

-   Minimum 1600mm window sills

-   Install fixed and translucent glazing up 1600mm minimum effective sill.

-   Install fixed privacy screens to windows.

 

The applicant has amended their application by incorporating external privacy louvers to the rear east facing first floor level windows to ensure no direct overlooking into the rear yards of neighbouring properties. A condition is included requiring that the louvers are configured and fixed so that there is no direct overlooking into the neighbouring properties rear yard areas.

The proposed north facing sitting room windows do not have sufficient privacy measures as there is a direct outlook into the rear yard of the northern neighbour’s rear yard area. A condition is included in the recommendation section of this report requiring external louvers be configured and fixed to these windows to ensure no direct overlooking into the rear yard of the northern property.

 

Overall, it is considered that these conditions will ensure the objectives for privacy protection are met.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:      Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The salient points of the above assessment are that the proposal complies with the RDCP 2013 control that requires first floor additions to symmetrical semi detached dwellings to be located behind the roofs main ridge line, that the RDCP 2013 permits rear setback variations on such irregular shaped allotments, the proposal will not result in substandard levels of solar access to the rear yards of neighbouring sites, and neighbouring properties share similar site characteristics to the subject site in so far as their dwellings currently do not have rear setbacks that meet the RDCP 2013 control.

 

Overall, the proposal complies with the relevant assessment criteria and will not result in any significant adverse impacts upon either the amenity of the adjoining premises or the character of the locality.

 

The application is therefore recommended for approval subject to the attached conditions of consent.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council, as the consent authority, grants development consent under Sections 80 and 80A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, as amended, to Development Application No. No. DA/703/2013 to carry out ground and first floor alterations and additions to the existing dwelling at 3 Kyogle Street, Maroubra  subject to the schedule of conditions attached to this report

 

Non standard conditions

 

Approved Plans & Supporting Documentation

1.       The development must be implemented substantially in accordance with the plans and supporting documentation listed below and endorsed with Council’s approved stamp, except where amended by Council in red and/or by other conditions of this consent:

 

Plan

Drawn by

Dated

Received by Council

DA-01-C Rev C

Chris Elliot Architects

24-01-14

29 January 2013

 

BASIX Certificate No.

Dated

Received by Council

A168475_03

5 February 2014

5 February 2014

 

Amendment of Plans & Documentation

 

2.       The approved plans and documents must be amended in accordance with the following requirements:

 

a.   External privacy screens attached to the north facing sitting room windows (N5 & N6), north-easterly facing sitting room window (E9) and east facing bedroom window (E8) at first floor level shall have a height of 1600mm above the internal floor level. The external screens shall be fixed at an angle to avoid overlooking into the rear yard and habitable living areas of No. 95 and 97 Mons Avenue and No. 5 Kyogle Street. Details of compliance are to be submitted to and approved by Councils Manager Development Assessment prior to the issue of Construction certificate.

 

Note: The privacy screens must be installed prior to the issue of any occupation certificate.

 

b.   The Architectural plans referred in Condition No. 1 shall be amended with the correct dimensions that correspond with the first floor addition not extending beyond the existing rear ground level gutter of the subject dwelling and the north eastern splay not extending beyond the existing north eastern corner of the subject dwelling at ground level.

 

Details to be submitted to Council’s Manager Development Assessment for approval prior to issuing of a construction certificate.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

DA Compliance Report - 3 Kyogle Street, Maroubra (DA/703/2012)

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP6/14

 

 

Subject:                  Report variation to Development Standard under State Environment Planning Policy No. 1 (SEPP1) and Clause 4.6 between October to December, 2013.

Folder No:                   F2008/00122

Author:                   Kerry Kyriacou, Manager Development Assessment     

 

Introduction

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in November 2008 advising Councils to adopt additional procedures in relation to the administration of variations to development Standard. The additional measures are largely in response to the ICAC inquiry into Wollongong City Council. Those additional measures are:

 

1)     Establishment of a register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

2)     Requirement for all development applications where there has been a variation greater than 10% in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6 to be determined by full council (rather than the general manager or nominated staff member);

 

3)     Providing a report to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 and Clause 4.6;

 

4)     Making the register of development applications determined with variations in standards under SEPP 1 and Clause 4.6 available to the public on council’s website.

 

This report is in response to point 3) above. A table is attached to this report detailing all SEPP1s and Clause 4.6 exceptions approved in the period between 1 October to 31 December 2013 – two (2) were approved during this period by Planning Committee meeting.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The NSW Department of Planning (DOP) released a Planning Circular in 2008 advising of additional requirements Councils are required to adopt in relation to SEPP1 objections and Clause 4.6 exceptions. This report is in response to one of those requirements whereby a report is provided to Council on the development applications determined where there had been a variation in standards under SEPP1 /Clause 4.6. 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Variation Standard between 1 October to 31 December, 2013.

 

 

 

 


Variation Standard between 1 October to 31 December, 2013.

Attachment 1

 

 

 

SEPP 1 AND CLAUSE 4.6 REGISTER BETWEEN 1 OCTOBER TO 31 DECEMBER 2013

Council DA reference number

Lot number

DP number

Apartment/Unit number

Street number

Street name

Suburb/ Town

Post-code

Category of development

Environmental planning instrument

Zoning of land

Development standard to be varied

Justification of variation

Extent of variation

Concurring authority

Date DA determined

dd/mm/yyyy

Approved by

DA/303/2013

4 Sec 3

9452, Lot A DP 366853

 

9

Seaside Parade,

SOUTH COOGEE 

2034

 2: Residential - Single new dwelling

RLEP 2012

R2

Clause 4.4 (2A) (c)  - FSR =0.6:1

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

FSR increased to 0.65:1 or by 8.3%

NSW Dept of Planning

03-Dec-13

PCM

DA/628/2013

65

270427

 

33

Harvey Street,

LITTLE BAY

2036

 5: Residential - New multi unit 20+ dwellings

RLEP 2012

R1

Clause 4.3  Building height of 18m

Maintains compatible scale with neighbouring buildings and does not adversely impact in terms of overshadowing, privacy and views.

Lift overrun – front  Maximum 20.5m (14% deviation) & Other rooftop structures: Maximum 19m (6% deviation)

NSW Dept of Planning

03-Dec-13

PCM

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP7/14

 

 

Subject:                  Randwick Environment Park draft Plan of Management Site visit

Folder No:                   F2010/00407

Author:                   Bronwyn Englaro, Senior Sustainability Officer     

 

Introduction

 

On November 26 2013 Council Meeting, Council resolved (Matson/Shurey) to defer the Randwick Environment Park draft Plan of Management (PoM) Report to the February 2014 Ordinary Council meeting to facilitate a meeting onsite for Councillors to meet with the Moverly Precinct Committee and the general community to discuss future options for the Park.

 

In response to this resolution, Council held an onsite meeting at 6pm on Wednesday 5 February at the Randwick Environment Park. The site visit was attended by 26 residents, 4 staff, Councillors Roberts, Neilson and Shurey and was facilitated by Council’s specialist ESBS consultant Glenn Berrill from Thompson Berrill Landscape Design. The site visit started at the picnic area entrance on the corner of Dooligah and Burragulung Streets and visited ten locations within the REP concluding at the Randwick Community Centre at approximately 8.30pm.

 

Issues

 

At each of the ten locations proposed improvements were outlined in the draft PoM were outlined and discussed. The following issues were raised by residents:

 

Toilet facilities proposed for the Picnic Area

Residents raised a number of concerns in regard to these including, the need for a facilities, the close proximity to adjacent residents and the design and scale of the proposed facility.

 

Residents were advised that the inclusion of toilet facilities within the draft PoM was in response to a Council resolution endorsed by Councillors at the Ordinary Council meeting on 13 December 2011 (Bowen/Tracey). Residents were advised that the PoM, inline with Council’s resolution, has recommended the provision of the toilet facilities in the medium term subject to budgetary priorities.

 

It was also noted that the new public toilet facilities recently installed at the Randwick Community Centre is located over 400m from the picnic area so that any potential future facility would need to consider proximity to the picnic area especially being within sight lines for children accessing the facilities and in a location south of existing ESBS vegetation to prevent any possible over shadowing.

 

Condition of the Wetland

Concerns were raised as to the water quality in the wetland; the existence of dead trees within the wetland, and creek bank stability. While there are a range of possible reasons for the existing condition of the wetland; the dead trees in the wetland and existing creek bank instability in the southern section of the wetland (as canvassed at the site meeting), it was pointed out to the attendees that a wetland management strategy is proposed in the draft REP that will include specific actions to address these issues in a holistic and strategic manner.

Condition of the Open space turfed area south of the wetland

Residents raised concern that the grass in this area has been “scalped”, exposing bare sand such that there should be more plantings in this area to create habitat for birds and increased enjoyment for visitors. Residents were advised that the draft plan includes actions to investigate enhancing this area with a sculptural landscape feature consistent with the natural values of the site. It is recommended that the PoM be further amended to incorporate site relevant plantings (including bird habitat varieties) for the subject area. In line with residents’ request it is recommended that this action be increased from low to a high priority subject future works budget.

 

Southern wetland lookout

Concerns were raised that the design of the existing southern lookout is inadequate for seating and that the 1.3m high railing balustrade is too high to allow children to see the wetland. Residents were advised that the lookout could be enlarged to accommodate seating and upgraded to improve viewing options. The draft PoM recommends that Council “Investigate opportunities to upgrade wetland lookouts to allow for improved viewing opportunities and more sympathetic design” subject to future works budget. Details of any proposed upgrading works can be included in this action.

 

Path on western side of the wetland

Concerns were raised on potential environmental impact on the wetland of a new loop pathway along its western side. Residents requested that the pathway not be made of concrete and not be as wide as the other pathways within the park, which are currently 3m wide to allow for vehicle access. Residents were advised that completion of the new loop path has been identified as a high priority action in the draft plan. It is recommended that this specific action incorporate the use of a low-impact material with an approximate pathway width of 2m subject to detailed design.

 

Western wetland lookout

Concerns were raised that the lookout needs to be connected to the proposed western pathway and should be wheelchair accessible. Residents were advised that, with the exception of the northern ESBS lookout, the other wetland lookouts are built to be wheelchair accessible. Accordingly, subject to a future link to the proposed western pathway, the western lookout will meet wheel chair access requirements. As with the southern lookout, the western lookout will also be subject to a specific action in the draft REP to investigate opportunities to upgrade its functionality in line with residents’ requests.

 

Proposed WIRES relocation site

WIRES currently have aviary facilities within the REP on the eastern boundary of the adjoining community centre site which is proposed in the PoM to be relocated to a new location within the REP to the south of the community centre site. With respect to this proposed new location, concerns were raised that the proposed relocation of the existing WIRES facility within the REP would expose the relocated facility to interference and vandalism due to its location adjacent to the western walkway. Residents also raised concerns that the existing demonstration raised planter boxes for community garden within the REP (adjacent to the proposed WIRES location) would be environmentally detrimental to the REP.

 

In relation to the WIRES facility, residents were advised of the reasons for the new location of the proposed WIRES facility, namely that, this location would be further away from existing ESBS areas and closer to vehicle access for transporting wildlife. Residents were further advised that there is an existing action in the draft PoM for liaison with WIRES to be undertaken regarding the relocation of the existing WIRES facility. It is recommended that an additional action be included in the PoM for the provision of appropriate screening and security for the new facility.

 

With respect to the community gardens beds, residents were advised that this demonstration facility was no longer in use and would be disassembled and replaced with appropriate native screening vegetation as part of the WIRES facility works.

 

ESBS lookout structure (North)

Attendees commented that this lookout structure was not being used, does not have any views of the wetland and ESBS and currently segregates the important remnant ESBS vegetation areas. Residents were advised that there is an existing action in the draft plan to investigate opportunities to modify the lookout for improved viewing opportunities. It is recommended that this action be replaced with an action to “Consider removal of the underutilised ESBS lookout structure and reuse of materials on site to improve existing wetland lookouts”.

 

ESBS demonstration site

Residents commented that this piece of ESBS vegetation on the northern side of the community centre is the most valuable area of ESBS on the site and raised concern over the impact of a path proposed in this area. Residents were advised that a gravel pathway is proposed in the draft plan as it is necessary to enable schools groups visiting the community centre site to experience and learn about the nationally endangered ESBS vegetation. Furthermore, it was advised that the proposed pathway would only run along the edge of the existing vegetation and not through it. Residents were also advised that the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage had commended Council for the inclusion of the pathway in their feedback on the draft plan in August 2013.

 

Signage

Residents raised concern regarding lack of regulatory or interpretive signage within the Park. Residents were informed that an existing high priority action in the draft PoM is to “Develop a comprehensive signage strategy, including community input to the strategy”.

 

Conclusion

A number of changes have been recommended to the draft plan in recognition of the issues raised during the site visit held on 5 February. These include measures to improve and enhance existing facilities and introduce essentially new low impact facilities comprised of sustainable materials. These propose changes are included in the draft concept plan for the site (Attachment 4) and in track changes to the draft PoM document (Attachment 5).

 

In relation to the toilet facilities in the picnic area, residents have been advised that the inclusion of these facilities in the draft PoM arises from a Council resolution at the Ordinary Council meeting on 13 December 2011 where it was also resolved that the facilities be provided in the medium term subject to budgetary priorities.

 

The draft plan now recommends inclusion of the following High priority actions, which are supported by the residents:

 

•      Completion of a low impact walkway on the western side of the wetland;

•      Investigation of improvements to the wetland lookouts;

•      Landscape improvement to turfed space on the south side of the wetland; and;

•      Consideration to remove the existing ESBS lookout on the northern entrance of the park and reuse of these materials for improvements to the wetland lookouts.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship to the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10c:            Land use planning and management enhances and protects biodiversity and natural heritage.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The majority of the works proposed on the plan are to be funded through the existing maintenance budget. The proposed works items of high priority (1-2 years) are at an estimated cost of $360,000, moderate priority actions (3-5 years) approximately $600,000 including for toilet facilities and low priority actions of approximately $230,000 (6-10 years)which will be partially funded through Council’s future budgets.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     endorse the Randwick Environment Park Plan of Management; and

 

b)     agree that the Director City Planning may make minor modifications to rectify any numerical, typographical, interpretation and formatting errors as required in finalising the Plan of Management.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Copy of Report to Council on 26 November 2013

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

2.

REP PoM Submission summary

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

3.

Public Hearing Report by SJB Planning

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

4.

A3 Concept Plan with proposed changes

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

5.

Draft final Plan of Management with proposed changes

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

6.

Final Bushfire Management Plan

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

7.

Unchanged Draft PoM Appendices

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP8/14

 

 

Subject:                  Randwick Community Centre (Draft) Final Plan of Management

Folder No:                   F2004/06764

Author:                   Teresa Mok, Manager Community Planning & Development     

 

Introduction

 

On November 26 2013 Council Meeting, Council resolved to defer consideration of a report recommending the adoption of the Randwick Community Centre (Draft) Plan of Management (PoM), until after an on-site meeting is held for Councillors to meet with the general community, including the Moverly Precinct Committee, to discuss future options for the Park.

 

In response to this resolution, Council held an onsite meeting at 6pm on Wednesday 5 February at the Randwick Environment Park. The site visit was attended by 26 residents, 4 staff, Councillors Roberts, Neilson and Shurey and was facilitated by Council’s specialist ESBS consultant Glenn Berrill from Thompson Berrill Landscape Design.

 

Issues

 

No specific issues relating to the Randwick Community Centre draft PoM were raised. 

Accordingly, it is now in order for the Council to consider the Randwick Community Centre Draft PoM, as described in Attachment 1- Copy of report to Council 24 November 2013.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction2A:      New and updated community facilities that are multi-purpose and in accessible locations.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The PoM has been prepared in-house, in consultation with the Strategic Planning and Sustainability Departments.  A small budget of $2,000 was allocated to cover the costs of exhibition, finalisation, and printing of the Plan.

 

Conclusion

 

The PoM provides clear guidelines, requirements and strategies for the utilization and management of the Centre.  Implementation of the plan will ensure that this valuable asset continues to be maintained to a high standard and retains its importance as a multi-functional and active space. 

 

The PoM is now proposed to be finalized after consideration of the community’ comments received during the public consultation period in 2013, and following the on-site meeting held on 5 February 2014

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     endorse the Randwick Community Centre Plan of Management; and

 

b)     agree that the Director City Planning may make minor modifications to rectify any numerical, typographical, interpretation and formatting errors as required in finalising the Plan of Management.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Council Report of 24 November 2013.

 

2.View

Summary of Key Issues from Public Submissions and Council Response

 

3.

Public Hearing Report Prepared by Consultants SJB Planning

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Council Report of 24 November 2013.

Attachment 1

 

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP93/13

 

 

Subject:                  Randwick Community Centre Draft Final Plan of Management

Folder No:                   F2004/06764

Author:                   Teresa Mok, Manager Community Planning & Development     

 


Introduction

 

On 25 June 2013 Council resolved as follows:

 

‘(Moore/Smith) that Council:

 

a)     endorse the attached draft Randwick Community Centre Plan of Management for public exhibition and a public hearing, to be held in conjunction with the Draft Plan of Management for the Randwick Environment Park which adjoins the subject site;

 

b)     Agree that the Director City Planning may make minor modifications to rectify any numerical, typographical, interpretation and formatting errors as required in preparing the Plan of Management for public exhibition/presentation.’

 

The draft Plan was exhibited for approximately 6 weeks from 9 July 2013 to 26 August 2013.  As part of the public consultation process, council officers held two open days at the Centre to give residents and interested parties the opportunity to gather information about the draft Plan.  In accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act, 1993 (LG Act), the public hearing was held on 28th August 2013 at the Randwick Community Centre.

 

This report recommends Council adopt the Plan of Management for Randwick Community Centre, which has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the LG Act.

 

Background

 

The Centre is located at 21-29 Munda Street, Randwick. Currently, the vehicular entry point to the Centre is via a right of way extension of Munda Street. Although Munda Street is a gazetted road, the section leading to the Centre has yet to be constructed.  The community centre complex with its surrounding park has a site area of 1.424 hectares. The site is zoned RE1 Public Recreation under the Randwick Local Environmental Plan (RLEP 2012). The Centre was constructed and dedicated to the Council by the Department of Defence as part of a major residential development undertaken on an excised portion of Randwick Barracks declared as surplus land.  Officially opened to the public in June 2006, the Centre has been operating for 7 years, providing a wide range of community activities on site

 

The Centre is divided into three main buildings.  Building 1 and 2 are leased to three community organisations – South Eastern Area Health Services (Annabel House), Randwick South Sydney Family Care, and SOS Pre-school. Building 3 provides office accommodation for the Council’s Sustainability and Environmental Unit and offers a variety of venues (e.g. hall, a meeting room, shaded outdoor playground, permaculture demonstration garden area, and a large grassed open space area) to support a range of community and environmental sustainability uses.


The Draft Plan of Management

The draft Plan recognises the role of the Centre in facilitating our residents’ cultural and community needs. It will provide a practical framework for council staff to manage and maintain the Centre for the benefit of our residents. The draft Plan aims to achieve the following objectives:

 

§ to assist the community in understanding the role of the Centre, and describe the facilities and amenities provided for the use and enjoyment of the City’s residents;

§ to meet the Council’s obligations under Chapter 6 of the LG Act in respect to public land management;

§ to enable the Council to renegotiate or enter into contracts, leases, licences and hire agreements for the Centre in relation to the provision of services and utilities; and

§ to provide for an effective program of asset management, maintenance and improvements to the Centre.

 

As required under the LG Act, the draft Plan contains a detailed description of the land and building, authorises the current and future uses of the Centre, specifies the scale and intensity of any permitted use/development and categorises the land as “general community use”.

 

The draft Plan covers a variety of key operational issues, including access, asset management, environmental sustainability, operational management, safety/security and waste management. Management strategies and performance measures have been developed in terms of these issues to:

 

§ maintain the asset condition of the building to acceptable industry standards;

§ promote the Centre’s role as a demonstration building for retrofit environmental products;

§ manage, coordinate and promote events/activities, and enhance social interaction with the community;

§ provide an accessible environment with clear signage, improving convenience for people with disabilities and secure emergency access; and

§ provide a safe environment for staff, visitors and all users of the Centre.

 

Consultation

 

The draft PoM was on exhibition for public comment for approximately 6 weeks from 9 July 2013 to 26 August 2013. The public exhibition and consultation process for the draft plan included: 

 

§ notices in the local newspaper and on Council’s website

§ exhibition of the draft at Council’s Administration Building and Bowen, Randwick and Malabar Libraries

§ direct notification to:

1.  adjoining residents and land owners;

2.  interest groups, e.g. community groups;

3.  precinct committees; and

4.  Chamber of Commerce.

 

§ 2 x community open days in conjunction with the Plan of Management for the Randwick Environment Park.

Submissions

A total of 54 submissions were received during the joint exhibition period with the draft Plan for Randwick Environment Park. Of this total, 5 submissions related to the Randwick Community Centre, while 49 were relevant to the Randwick Environment Park.

 

Key issues raised, that are relevant to the draft Plan for Randwick Community Centre, were:

 

1.  The need to amend the statement in the draft plan to clarify that vehicular access to the Centre is not via a public road, but via a ‘right-of-way” on Defence land; and to correct a reference in the plan about the future use of the adjoining land west of the Centre for housing as the future use is still under consideration by Defence Department.

2.  Provision of additional bbqs and picnic facilities in the large open space area adjacent to the Community Centre.

3.  Perception of under utilisation of the Centre, in that more infrastructure and activities should be provided such as basketball court, gym, and a range of recreational/leisure/hobby related classes.

4.  Perception that the fee are too high, which could prevent greater use of the Centre.

5.  Provision of public toilets outside the Centre for park users.

6.  Improve linkage between the Park and the Community Centre.

 

The Council’s response to the key issues raised is detailed in Attachment 3 – Summary of Key Issues from Public Submissions.  In terms of points 3 and 4 above, it is worth noting that in the last financial year (2012/13), the Centre took a total of 539 bookings, of which only 14 bookings paid a commercial rate for the use of the premises. During the day, the Centre, also serves as a sustainability education hub, hosting site visits for groups of local school children. These visits are not counted as ‘bookings’.

 

In terms of the perception that the hall rental fees are too high, the charge for hiring the hall with a seating capacity of over 200 people is $64 per hour (Monday – Friday to 5pm) and $92 per hour after 5pm, during weekends and public holidays.  There is also the option for not for profit organisations to rent half the hall (147 square metres) for half the full fees.  In determining the amount of fees to be charged for goods and services provided by the Council, the following factors had to taken into account:

 

·              The cost of providing the service

·              The importance of the service to the community

·              Prices fixed by the relevant industry body or bodies

·              Any factors specified in the Local Government regulations

·              Equity factors

·              User-pays principle

·              Financial objectives

·              Customer objectives

·              Resource use objectives

·              Goods and Services Tax (GST)

·              Market prices

·              Cross-subsidisation objectives

 


Public hearing

A public hearing under section 40A of the Local Government Act Council was held on Thursday 29 August at the Randwick Community Centre to categorise the community land for the first time, as a “community facility” under section 36I of the Act.

 

A report on the outcomes of the public hearing is provided as Attachment 2 of this report.  This report concluded that:

 

There have been no significant concerns raised with the draft PoM, but rather suggestions for additional activities and additional facilities.  Many of the activities suggested in submissions are already possible and are specifically nominated within the draft PoM.  Some of the works suggested also already exist, such as BBQ facilities.

 

It will be a matter for the Council to determine whether additional capital works, outlined above in Section 5.1.3 are included in the PoM. (Page 20)

 

These additional capital works refers to the provision of additional bbq and picnic facilities, a basketball court, toilets within the grounds of the Community Centre, and accessible outdoor tap for drinking water, improved linkage between the neighbouring Environment Park and the Community Centre premises.

 

Amendments

Following the public exhibition and consultation, a number of minor changes have been made to the PoM to address valid issues raised. These changes are summarised below:

 

1.  Rewording of a paragraph in 2.3 Site Context (Page 6) to emphasise the Community Centre and adjoining open space as focal point for leisure, recreation and education pursuits for residents in potential future neighbouring development.

2.  Including the accommodation of the sensory walking trails in the principles for the management of and use of the community centre. (Page 11).

3.  Expanding the vehicular access details to explain that: access to the centre is via Munda Street, a gazetted public road; Munda Street is yet to be extended past the community centre and, until it is constructed, vehicular access to the community centre is provided by a right of way extension to Munda Street (Page 11).

 

In relation to the additional capital works referred to in the public hearing report, the construction of outdoor toilets within the grounds of the Centre has commenced and will be completed before year end. The PoM has also indicated the provision of a walking and cycling trail connection between the Centre and the Environment Park.

 

In relation to the remaining capital works, it would be more practical for Council to consider, review, and (if appropriate) deliver these items, such as the provision of a basketball court, an outside tap for drinking water, and additional bbq and picnic facilities, via the Council’s 2014/15 annual capital works program.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a:     New and updated community facilities that are multi purpose and in accessible locations.

 

 


Financial impact statement

 

The PoM has been prepared in-house, in consultation with the Strategic Planning and Sustainability Teams.  A small budget of $2,000 was allocated to cover the costs for exhibition, and finalisation/printing of the Plan.

 

Conclusion

 

The PoM provides clear guidelines, requirements and strategies for utilising and managing the Centre. The implementation of the PoM will ensure that this valuable asset continues to be maintained to a high standard and retains its importance as a vibrant and active space, to meet the cultural and community needs of our residents across the City.

 

The PoM is now proposed to be finalised after consideration of the community feedback received during the consultation period. This report recommends that the Council adopt the attached Plan of Management for Randwick Community Centre, as amended.

 


 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

a)     endorses the Draft Randwick Community Centre Plan of Management with the minor amendments listed in this report.

 

b)     agree that the Director City Planning may make minor modifications to rectify any numerical, typographical, interpretation and formatting errors as required in finalising the Plan of Management

 


Attachment/s:

 

1.

Plan of Management Randwick Community Centre

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

2.

Report on Public Hearing, Draft Plans of Management: Randwick Community Centre & Randwick Environment Park

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

3.

Summary Key Issues from Public Submissions and Council Response

 

 

 


Summary of Key Issues from Public Submissions and Council Response

Attachment 2

 

 

ATTACHMENT 3

Summary of Key Issues from Public Submissions – Plan of Management - Randwick Community Centre

 

 

Key Issues

Council response

1

The need to amend the statement in the draft plan to clarify that vehicular access to the Centre is not via a public road, but via a ‘right-of-way” on Defence land; and to correct a reference in the plan about the future use of the adjoining land west of the Centre for housing as the future use is still under consideration by Defence Department.

The Draft PoM has been amended to explain that access to the centre is via Munda Street, a gazetted public road.  Also that Munda Street is yet to be extended past the community centre.  Until it is constructed, vehicular access to the community centre is provided by a right of way extension to Munda Street.

2

Provision of additional bbqs and picnic facilities in the open space area/playground

 

BBQ facilities already exist in the area near the permaculture garden.  However it is recommended that Council review the need for additional picnic facilities in the open space area of the centre, for possible inclusion in the Council’s 2014/15 capital works program

 

3

The need to address under utilisation of the Centre, in that more infrastructure and activities should be provided such as basketball court, gym, and a range of recreational/leisure/hobby related classes

 

The Centre is already well utilised.  In the 2012/13 financial year, the Centre took a total of 538 bookings, of which 14 were for commercial purposes. This figure does not take into account school children visiting the Centre’s sustainability education facility.  The Council has no plans to provide a second indoor gym, since it has recently built one at the Des Renford Centre. The Council makes available affordable facilities that can be rented out to the community for a variety of recreational pursuits, activities and classes.

4

Fees are too high, preventing greater use of the Centre

 

The charge for hiring the hall with a seating capacity of over 200 people is $64 per hour (Monday – Friday to 5pm) and $92 per hour after 5pm, during weekends and public holidays.  There is also the option for not for profit organisations to rent half the hall (147 sq metres) for half the full fees. The fees are set to ensure that the Council recoup the cost of maintaining the building and its surrounds.

5

Provision of public toilets outside the Centre for park users

 

The Council has commenced construction of public toilets on the grounds of the Community Centre.

6

Improve linkage between the Park and the Community Centre

 

The PoM has, as one of its principals for the management of and use of the community centre and open space to accommodate the sensory walking and cycling trails at its peripheries that are linked into the existing footpath and cycle way networks.

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP9/14

 

 

Subject:                  Proposal to update Terms of Reference for the Youth Advisory Committee (Randwick Youth Council)

Folder No:                   F2004/07647

Author:                   Tania Krasinski, Youth & Multicultural Community Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The current Youth Advisory Committee known as the Randwick Youth Council has been meeting in 2011 and 2012. By early 2013, participation had begun to decline. This report recommends changes to the current Terms of Reference to help re-ignite the Youth Advisory Committee.  It would also help ensure a sustainable membership base and an on-going forum to advise Council staff on youth related issues and projects.

 

Issues

 

In January, 2014, the Youth Community Project Officer contacted the current Randwick Youth Council members. Of the 10 members contacted, seven members advised that they have decided to resign. One member indicated her interest to continue with the committee, and two members to date had not responded.

 

In light of the current situation, and the important role the Youth Advisory Committee plays in providing guidance to the Council’s youth projects it is proposed that the Terms of Reference be amended as shown in Attachment 1 – Proposed Youth Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.  A summary of the proposed changes is provided below:

 

1. Name
Change name from Randwick Youth Council to Youth Advisory Committee to keep in line with Advisory Committee standard naming convention.

 

2. Aims
Delete ‘on line’ to expand the definition and scope of a forum.

 

5. Membership
Membership to include a minimum of 8 young people to ensure a greater ratio of young people and no more than 4 representatives who work in a local youth related organisation.

 

Update ‘Community Project Officer – Young People & Cultural Services’ to ‘Community Project Officer – Youth, or an appropriate officer’

 

7. Responsibilities of members
Adding that the Committee is ‘an advisory and’ working committee.

 

9. Eligibility for appointment
Committee members may include young people who live, ‘study and work’ in the Randwick City. Members over 25 years who work in youth related organisations will now be eligible for nomination to the committee to widen the knowledge and skills base of the Youth Advisory Committee.

 

10. Tenure of membership
Tenure for community members to be 36 months with a maximum of 2 consecutive terms to give different young people an opportunity to participate in the Advisory Committee.

 

11. Procedures and proceedings
Remove the election of Youth Mayor and Deputy Youth Mayor to enable ambassador opportunities to all young committee members.

 

Items 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 to 15 remain unchanged. A major change to the Terms of Reference is the widening of the membership to enable the local youth organizations to be represented on the committee. Attachment 1 contains the proposed changes and attachment 2 contains the current Terms of Reference.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  3.     An informed and engaged community.

Direction:                  Developing opportunities for community input into the Council’s
decision-making processes.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed changes to the Terms of Reference will sustain and improve the participation rate of the Youth Advisory Committee. It will also encourage a broader representation of young people and their interests on the Youth Advisory Committee. Local youth organisations, as advocates of young people from different backgrounds can offer a different level of expertise to the Council’s Youth Advisory Committee. 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorses the proposed changes to the Youth Advisory Committee’s Terms of Reference (as detailed in attachment 1.).

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Proposed New Terms of Reference - Youth Advisory Committee

 

2.View

Current Terms of Reference - Randwick Youth Council

 

 

 

 


Proposed New Terms of Reference - Youth Advisory Committee

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

YOUTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE

 

 

PROPOSED NEW TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

1.      NAME

 

The Advisory Committee shall be known as Youth Advisory Committee.

 

2.      AIMS

 

·     To provide forum to raise issues of concern affecting young people (12–25 years) in the Randwick LGA.

 

·     To promote improved access to Council facilities and services for young people and recommend how their needs may be satisfied.

 

·     To provide young people with a greater understanding of the role of Local Government and how they can participate in the decision making process.

 

3.      OBJECTIVES

 

·     To encourage student and young people’s participation in Council’s activities and community service initiatives.

 

·     To assist Council in effective policy development through the provision of advice.

 

·     To assist Council in the identification of current interests of young people (aged 12–25 years) in the Randwick LGA.

 

·   To support and promote activities and special projects which relate to young people living in or visiting Randwick City.

 

·     To assist in planning for youth events such as Youth Week.

 

4.      DETERMINATIONS

 


The committee shall be an advisory body, operating on a consensus basis, which submits recommendations for consideration by Randwick City Council.

 

5.      MEMBERSHIP

 

Membership of the Committee shall consist of no less than 8 young people aged 15–25 years from the Randwick LGA. The committee may include youth related and local area organisation representatives over the age of 25. Organisation representatives must not exceed 4 persons.

Two Councillor Representatives are also requested to provide guidance and mentoring.  It is expected that members have an understanding and commitment to support the values of Randwick City Council.  Council will actively seek membership from all sectors of the community to ensure youth representation from the Indigenous and Culturally Linguistic diverse Communities.

 

Council officers will include one from the following:

 

·     Community Project Officer – Youth, or an appropriate Officer

·     Community Project Officer – Aboriginal (as required)

·     Representative from City Services (as required)

·     Representative from City Planning (as required)

 

6.    COUNCIL’S VALUES

 

Integrity is ensuring transparency and honestly in all our activities.

 

Customer Focus is delivering prompt, courteous and helpful service and being responsive to people’s changing needs.

 

Accountability is accepting our responsibility for the provision of quality services and information that meet agreed standards.

 

Respect is treating everyone with courtesy, dignity and fairness regardless of our own feelings about the person or the issue.

 

Excellence is being recognised for providing services, programs and information which consistently meet and exceed expectations, through the use of best known practices and innovation.

 

7.    RESPONSIBILITIES OF MEMBERS

 

Members will be asked to feedback issues and Committee strategies through their own networks, schools and circle of friends to gauge response and enhance decision-making.

 

The Committee is an advisory and working committee and therefore it is anticipated that some tasks will need to be undertaken by members outside of meetings.

 

8.    RESPONSIBILITIES OF COUNCIL

 

Council will provide secretariat support, including minute taking and professional officer support as appropriate. 

 

9.    ELIGIBILITY FOR APPOINTMENT

 

Randwick City Council seeks young members of the community aged 15–25 years who live, study or work in the Randwick LGA and can best represent the diverse needs and expectations of our youth. Members aged over 25 years may include people who work for organisations representing young people residing within the Randwick Local Government Area.

 

10.  TENURE OF MEMBERSHIP

 

In the case of a Councillor, as determined by Council each year in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act.

 

Tenure of community members will be 36 months with the opportunity to serve a maximum of 2 consecutive terms.

 

11. PROCEDURES AND PROCEEDINGS

 

Youth member representatives may be invited to attend Council events as youth ambassadors.

 

During face to face meetings, there will be no quorum required.

 

In relation to any procedural matter, the ruling of the Chairperson shall be final.

 

The committee shall undertake an annual review and forward planning process to determine future directions and establishment of priorities.

 

12. NOTICE OF ORDINARY MEETINGS

 

Members of the Committee shall receive at least ten working days written notice of meetings and such notice shall include an agenda for that meeting.  Meetings may be in person or via the internet.

 

13. MINUTES OF MEETINGS

 

Minutes of meetings shall be made available to any interested residents for inspection and shall be published on Council’s Internet web site.

 

14.  NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETINGS

 

Should the need arise for a special meeting to consider an urgent matter, a special meeting to consider only that particularly urgent matter, may be called by the Youth Project Officer.

 

15. ATTENDANCE AT MEETINGS

 

Members may, in consultation with the Committee, request that an invitation be extended to a particular individual to attend a future meeting as a visitor, when it is considered that the visitor may be in a position to contribute to the proceedings.

 

16.  AMENDMENTS TO TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

These Terms of Reference shall only be amended by a resolution by Randwick City Council.


Current Terms of Reference - Randwick Youth Council

Attachment 2

 

 




Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP10/14

 

 

Subject:                  Proposed Youth Week activities for 2014

Folder No:                   F2004/07647

Author:                   Tania Krasinski, Youth & Multicultural Community Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

National Youth Week will take place from Friday 4 April to Sunday 13 April 2014 highlighting the theme ‘Our Voice, Our Impact’. To take advantage of such an empowering theme, it is proposed that youth week activities be expanded to reflect the diversity of our young people, and provide more opportunities for them to communicate their thoughts and visions for now and the future.

 

Council officers will work with the Mayor and Councillors, Library Services, Sustainability Department, and in partnership with local youth services, UNSW, police and schools to facilitate and contribute to National Youth Week.  This report outlines a proposal to hold a series of inclusive, fun and educational events that will appeal to a range of young people throughout National Youth Week.

 

Issues

 

Focusing on media and the arts, the Randwick LGA has enjoyed the Filthy Arts Festival since 2011 and Urban Shorts since 2007. In 2014, taking advantage of an empowering theme ‘Our Voice, Our Impact’, it is proposed that National Youth Week activities take on a political and empowering edge and implement a program of activities designed to attract our young peoples’ diverse interests and capacity to engage with their community.

 

Providing a range of safe, inclusive and age-appropriate environments for young people to make their impact, the following is a summary of activities proposed for Youth Week 2014:

 

1.   Questions without notice to the Mayor of Randwick

A forum where the Mayor will outline the purpose and processes of Council and how young people can get involved leading to a Q&A. This event is an opportunity for young people to learn about local government, the roles and responsibilities of the Mayor and Councillors and to ask questions about issues that are important to them.

 

To be held on Friday 4 April, 6pm to 7:30pm at the Council Chambers

 

2.   After School, What’s Next?

A non-uni careers information session, After School, What’s Next will be in its third year of showcasing stories and experiences from professionals in health, music, community, defence, police, retail, trades and those who have followed non-traditional pathways.

 

To be held on Tuesday 8 April, 7pm to 8:30pm at the Bowen Library

 

3.  Sustaining our future expo

An expo at the Randwick Community Centre where school groups will be booked into groups of up to 20 to visit each stand/activity at 30 minute intervals. Activities involve recycling games, environmental park tour, WIRES visit and food co-op demonstrations.

 

To be held Wednesday 9 April, 11am to 2pm at the Randwick Community Centre

 

4.  Youth Music Festival/Showcase

This event will close Youth Week and launch the Local Youth Music Showcase. The event will include a concert and youth-friendly stalls.

 

To be held Sunday 13 April from 2pm at Maroubra Beach

 

The Youth Advisory Committee will be involved in the coordination of the events with the support and guidance of the Community Project Officer (Youth). Opportunities to survey and engage local young people to support and promote the week will be encouraged along with participation by the Mayor and Councillors.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  2.     A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction:                  promoting and supporting partnerships to keep service provision relevant to the community, providing a range of safe and suitable activities/programs for young people.

 

Financial impact statement

 

National Youth Week 2014 activities will cost an estimated $12,000. This is funded through the Community Development annual budget as well as an annual $3,075 financial grant provided by NSW Department of Family and Community Services.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed youth week calendar of events will offer young people in Randwick City inspiration, motivation and confidence to express and communicate their thoughts and opinions for a better future. This series of events are designed to attract and include young people from all over the City regardless of age, education, health and socio-economic status. In 2014, National Youth Week will demonstrate the effective partnerships within and around Randwick City Council and is an excellent opportunity to establish on-going relationships with young people and encourage their involvement with Council.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorse the proposed activities planned for National Youth Week 2014 in Randwick City.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP11/14

 

 

Subject:                  Celebrating Cultural Diversity in Randwick City - feasibility for an annual cultural event

Folder No:                   F2004/06281

Author:                   Tania Krasinski, Youth & Multicultural Community Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

On 26 November 2013, it was resolved (Stavrinos/Roberts) resolved as follows:

 

That Council:

a)       recognise the importance and the contribution that cultural diversity has played in shaping the Randwick LGA;

b)       hold a civic reception in the Lodge Room to commemorate Greek Independence Day on 25 March, 2014; and

c)       bring back a report to Council, from our Multicultural Advisory Committee, investigating the feasibility of holding one annual cultural event to commemorate a significant event that is celebrated by the various ethnic groups that live within the Randwick LGA, ie. Chinese New Year Celebrations.

 

This report has been prepared in response to resolution (c) above and includes the recommendations by the Multicultural Advisory Committee.

 

Issues

 

Response from the Multicultural Advisory Committee (MAC)

The MAC welcomed the opportunity to have an input into the feasibility study for an annual cultural event. Randwick City LGA enjoys great diversity with residents representing well over 60 countries from around the world.

 

According to the 2011 Census statistics, the top 7 languages (30.1%) spoken at home (other than English) are:

 

§ Mandarin (6,126 | 4.7%),

§ Greek (4,948 | 3.8%),

§ Cantonese (4,420 | 3.4%),

§ Indonesian (2,488 | 1.9%)

§ Spanish (1,975 | 1.5%)

§ Russian (1,792 | 1.4%)

§ Italian (1,661 | 1.3%)

 

Greek (7,035), Italian (4,796) and German (3,599) ancestries make up the top 8 with another 55 countries representing the rest of the population within the LGA. Since the Council’s resolution, the MAC has also received two other proposals for its consideration, involving an Indian Festival and Waitangi Day Celebration. Around the same time, Council officers have also received several phone calls from several groups enquiring about the merits of celebrating significant occasions from different cultures, including St Patrick’s Day, and Wesak Day (a holy day for Buddhists)

It is the view of the MAC that a cultural event celebrating only one culture, for example Chinese New Year, instead of including multiple cultures, could potentially be interpreted as promoting one culture above others. The MAC recommends that an inclusive annual event celebrating all cultures collectively should be held instead, to showcase Randwick City’s racial diversity. 

 

The MAC’s Proposal

Randwick City Council is part of a strong network of multicultural community groups and services that cater to the Randwick LGA and surrounds. To celebrate the many cultures of Randwick City, the MAC proposes to hold two separate events celebrating the Council’s racial diversity.

1)  A Multicultural Festival comprising of food stalls and activities with live music and performances.

     The MAC discussed two possible venues, a festival held in partnership with the the Kingsford Hawkers Market, an event adopted by the Council at its meeting of 23 April 2013, or a stand alone event held at the Randwick Town Hall. The MAC recommends that the event be held in the second half of the year, to fall on or around an international day of significance such as World Food Day (Oct 16).

 

2)  A photographic competition and street banners promoting ‘The Many Faces of Randwick City’.


During informal discussions, the MAC suggested a photographic competition with the theme of ‘The Faces of Randwick City’. The winning photographs could be printed onto the Council’s 151 street banners, to mark Harmony Day in March 2015. It is envisaged that the printed street banners could be installed for two to three weeks leading up to and including Harmony Day in March. The winners get to keep their own banners.

 

It should be noted however that for the past 2 years, the Council have been celebrating Harmony Day (21 March) in-conjunction with The Spot Festival. .  Plans for the Harmony Day celebrations at the 2014 Spot Festival have been finalised.  Once again, a variety of music and dancing from different countries will be performing on a dedicated Harmony Day stage located in Perouse Road.  The staging costs of the Harmony Day celebrations is modest, in the vicinity of $5,000, as this amount represents a portion of The Spot Festival event set-up and infrastructure costs, such as staging, tents, and sound systems. Having a stand-alone event will require additional funds to cover essential infrastructure costs.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  2:     A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction:  2d:   Our cultural diversity is appreciated and respected.

Deliver and/or sponsor a range of cultural programs to promote a

sense of community.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of running the photographic competition, including promotion, advertising, printing and installation of street banners is estimated at $15,000.  A report on the estimated cost of a Multicultural Festival at the Town Hall or in partnership with the Kingsford Hawkers Market will be brought to Council for its consideration as soon as an agreement is reached with the event’s key stakeholders. Additional funds will need to be identified as part of the new financial year’s budget 2014-15.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick City Council LGA is a diverse city whose residents come from over 60 countries. The Multicultural Advisory Committee recommends that a celebration of all cultures on an international day of significance, together with the Harmony Day project as detailed in this report, would demonstrate the Council’s commitment to multicultural objectives.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

a)  Endorse and support an annual Multicultural Festival event that celebrates the diversity of cultures within the Randwick City. A further report to be brought back to Council with relevant details about the event, including the cost of holding the event.

b)  Support and fund a photographic competition and street banners to showcase ‘The many Faces of Randwick City’ as a project leading up to Harmony Day in March 2015, to a cost not exceeding $15,000.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director City Planning Report No. CP12/14

 

 

Subject:                  Seeking a continuation of the Green Money Recycling Rewards scheme for Randwick Residents

Folder No:                   F2011/00380

Author:                   Sima Truuvert, Director City Planning     

 

 

Introduction

Council has been partnering with Green Money Recycling Rewards since March 2012 to demonstrate and trial a program aimed at increasing recycling rates from amongst Randwick residents. In summary, the recycling volume for each participating household is converted into ‘green money’ points and redeemed as discounts or vouchers at local businesses.

 

This paper seeks Council approval to fund the continuation of our participation with Green Money Recycling Rewards until September 30, 2014.

 

Issues

 

Council would be aware of our innovative partnership with Green Money Recycling Rewards aimed at encouraging and rewarding increased recycling participation by Randwick residents. The agreement struck with Green Money was for a 12 month trial with Council providing approximately $10,000 of in-kind support to assist Green Money deploy and refine their systems. This commenced around March 2012 and was extended under mutual agreement for two additional periods of 6 months from around March 2013 to the present.

 

Results to date are positive and indicate a strong take-up and understanding of the incentives developed and implemented over this timeframe. The summary of overall results is attached but in general:

 

·           5,065 residents are participating in Green Money Recycling Rewards and figures to date are showing an average 10.4% increase in recycling rates amongst these participating households (an additional 1.4kgs of recycling per fortnight);

·           64 local businesses are participating to support the Green Money Recycling Rewards providing annualized returns to these businesses of approx. $475,000 of additional business;

·           12,000 reward vouchers have been redeemed while Green Money have supported 5,300 calls and questions on Council’s recycling and Green Money programs;

·           Green Money have used their electronic communications platform to market other sustainability programs and in the case of the Compost Revolution initiative led to a trebling of participation by residents in this separate program.

 

A temporary offer has been agreed by Green Money to temporarily continue the partnership with Randwick for the amount of $20,000 up until September 30, 2014. Green Money has recently signed contracts with two Councils and has developed a pricing policy based on those contractual arrangements for Randwick to consider if their platform and product was taken up in the future. As much of the platform architecture and systems for enabling participation by residents is in place, Green Money has indicated their willingness for Randwick to continue on this interim basis while further assessments of the value and other potential providers for this type of service are investigated.

 

Green Money and Council are also working for an external evaluation of the results of the partnership so far to inform any potential future agreement or continuing partnership with the Green Money platform. Green Money has been made well aware of Council’s tendering and purchasing requirements for major projects such as this.

 

This temporary funding relationship with Green Money ensures Randwick residents can continue to receive the high level of support and incentive to work toward increasing recycling volumes while continuing arrangements are investigated.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a):  Council’s programs and partnerships foster sustainable behavioural changes and outcomes.

Direction 10(d)   Waste is managed sustainably to ensure the highest level of resource recovery.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The $20,000 for this continuation is available from the existing funding provided to Council under the Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payment (WaSIP) program.

 

Conclusion

 

Green Money Recycling Rewards is the first of its kind in Australia and the partnership with Randwick has generated significant experience and learning for both organizations on the concept of incentivizing for increased levels of recycling for our residents. Feedback and participation has been very positive from participating residents. This partnership has also attracted widespread interest from Councils across Australia and been recognized in a number of national and NSW based awards programs.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council agrees to fund the continuation of Green Money Recycling Rewards for an amount of $20,000 up to September 30, 2014;

 

b)     An external evaluation of this program be conducted and results brought back for Council consideration of further involvement in this incentive program for Randwick residents.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Program summary - March 2012 - February 2014

 

 

 

 


Program summary - March 2012 - February 2014

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM1/14

 

 

Subject:                  Community Panels

Folder No:                   F2013/00114

Author:                   Joshua Hay, Communications Manager     

 

Introduction

 

Community panels are a community consultation technique being increasingly used by private and government industries as part of their broader community engagement strategies. This report outlines how a community panel could be set up for Randwick City Council as part of Council’s community consultation framework.

 

Issues

 

Community panels have historically been run by large corporations and businesses as a way of tapping into the sentiments and ideas of their customers. They provide a means to sample a smaller, representative group, market or audience and test new ideas, ask questions or get feedback.

 

This group is typically asked questions, given surveys to complete, shown samples or ideas either in an online forum or a face-to-face environment. Their feedback is weighted to reflect the demographic of the wider audience. The feedback provided by the panel is typically communicated back to the panel and used by the organisation to inform their decisions.

 

The information obtained through this process is generally statistically representative the broader market and therefore provides good information to help make decisions that are in the best interest of the majority.

 

Businesses use panels to build brand loyalty, reward passionate customers and to test new ideas before launch.

 

For local government, community panels can be an efficient and effective means to engage with local residents and a way for residents to have further input on important local issues.

 

For Councillors, community panels offer a consultation mechanism to find out the views of a typical resident in a geographic area or by interest group. Information obtained through community panels could provide further insights into resident views to inform decision-making.

 

A number of NSW councils are already using community panels with mixed results. Typically those councils that resource the panel with dedicated staff members and budget have an active and effective panel, whereas the councils who don’t resource the panel struggle to attract a broad range of people on the panel.

 

Current consultation framework

 

Randwick City Council currently uses a variety of techniques to engage our community:

§ online engagement using www.yoursayrandwick.com.au and Council’s website

§ community-run, Council supported Precincts

§ public exhibitions

§ targeted community engagement strategies employing a range of online, face-to-face and communication strategies

§ social media including Facebook and Twitter

§ regular print and electronic newsletters

 

This approach has been recognised with awards for community consultation. Council is a member of the peak engagement body IAP2 (International Association for Public Participation) and uses their principles as part of Council’s adopted Community Consultation Principles and Consultation Planning Guide.

 

The following is an excerpt from Council’s Community Consultation Principles Policy:

 

What are Council’s principles for consultation?

 

The principles of community consultation practice are based on the values of integrity, customer focus, accountability, respect and excellence.

 

These values are demonstrated when consultation practice:

 

1.  develops out of a strong customer focus and a respect for the community that Council serves

2.  makes community the focus

3.  acknowledges the community’s right to be advocates for what they want or need

4.  includes an awareness and understanding by staff of how Council actions impact on the community

5.  involves honest and straightforward dealing with the community

6.  provides accurate and timely information to the community

7.  includes a clear explanation of the decisions and actions of Council at all stages of the consultation process

8.  incorporates actively listening and acknowledgment of other points of view respects individual and cultural differences at all times.

 

When will Randwick City Council consult the community?

 

Community consultation will take place:

 

·      where community input can improve a project or enhance decision making

·      to help identify community needs in response to expressions of community interest

·      when Council resolves to consult the community

·      when required by law or by agreement with a government agency or statutory body

 

How will the community consultation principles be implemented?

 

Randwick City Council’s Community Consultation Principles will be implemented through the Consultation Planning Guide, using consultation plans and strategies.

 

What are Randwick City Council’s objectives for consultation practice?

 

In consulting the community, Council acts to:

 

·      make sustainable and improved decisions

·      build positive relationships between Council and all sections of the community

·      provide the community with the information needed to participate in a meaningful way, ensuring that all communications meet corporate communications standards

·      explain clearly why community consultation is taking place and the decisions to be made

·      inform the community of any limits to influence they will have on the decision, including information on any matters that are non-negotiable and why

·      build on any previous relevant community consultations

·      create community consultation processes so that the community can participate easily make best use of community expertise and diversity seek out and facilitate the involvement of those potentially affected by a decision

·      create consultation processes that take into account any barriers to participation experienced by particular groups, with special attention given to the needs of children, young people, women, older people, people with a disability, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people from a culturally and linguistically diverse background, or other identified special needs groups

·      help facilitate mutual understanding between groups and individuals with differing perspectives and interests

·      develop processes to collect information on the broad spectrum of community views on an issue

·      give feedback on how the community consultation informed Council’s decisions, and

·      explain the processes and outcomes of community consultations to Council’s elected representatives.

Council’s current community engagement strategy has been developed over many years and uses a variety of tools to enable the community to have their say. As new technology has become available like social media and apps, we have embraced these tools giving our residents more options for communicating with Council.

 

The following figure provides an overview of Council’s consultation framework and how it integrates with our communications strategy to deliver on our City Plan commitments.

Figure 1: Randwick Council community consultation framework.

 

Challenges

While Council’s existing community consultation strategies are sound, Council is always looking for new ways to enhance our engagement to make it easy and convenient for people to be part of the council decision-making process.

 

People are increasingly time-poor and there are multiple, competing priorities in busy family lives which makes engaging with Council often a lesser priority. Council needs to respond to this challenge by providing new and easier ways for people to be involved and by using new systems such as community panels to be able to ascertain, as close as possible, the views of the broader community as a distinct voice to interest groups or lobby groups who can sometimes dominate public discussion.

 

The key challenges facing Randwick City Council which community panels may help to address are:

 

·      Engaging the ‘hard to engage’ sector. This sector traditionally includes the younger age group, older age group, time-poor busy professionals and busy families groups. These sectors make up a significant percentage of the Randwick City population.

 

·      Engaging the ‘silent majority’ – how do we reach those time poor residents who make up the majority of our residents? 

·      Balancing the ‘squeaky wheel’ - the views of interest groups are important but they are not always representative of the views of their area. How can we make sure everybody’s voice is heard?  

·      Increasing satisfaction – Council research shows that people’s perception of their opportunity to be involved in consultation and consequently council decision-making is strongly linked to their overall satisfaction with council.

 

The link between engagement and satisfaction

Council’s 2012 Community Satisfaction Survey was completed using a random telephone survey of 1,000 Randwick City residents. The results found an overall increase in people’s satisfaction with Council’s provision of information about council activities and services, but no change in people’s perception of community consultation.

 

Figure 2: Community Satisfaction Survey 2012, Trends for community

engagement / communication. Source Micromex Research.

 

The Community Satisfaction Survey also showed that of the factors that make up resident satisfaction with Council performance, resident involvement and community consultation accounted for more than 20 per cent of resident satisfaction (see figure 2 on next page).

 

This provides an indication of the level of importance that consultation and engagement opportunities have in resident perception of involvement in the council and their resulting satisfaction.

 

In short, giving our residents more opportunities to have their say will likely improve how satisfied they are with Council’s overall performance.     

Figure 3: Community Satisfaction Survey 2012, top 10 indicators of resident satisfaction. Source Micromex Research.

 

The Randwick Community Panel proposal

The following section provides an overview of how a Randwick Community Panel could be set up and operate in Randwick City. It draws upon best practice in the private industry as well as lessons learnt from local government organizations who have trialled community panels.

 

Goals

The goals of the Randwick Community Panel are to:

 

·      create a system to enable residents to be more involved in Council decision-making

·      develop a system to help Councillors and decision-makers tap into community sentiments and opinions

·      promote Council’s commitment to community engagement to a broad audience

·      give voice to the time-poor ‘silent majority’ voices of Randwick City

 

Purpose of the Community Panel

The Panel’s purpose is to restore the balance in public debate and ensure the views of local residents are accurately represented. The Panel will give decision-makers the chance to tap into the ‘pulse’ of local residents on local issues and help inform decisions.

 


Review of other local government community panels

An informal review was undertaken of other local government authorities who run community panels. The following table provides some general comments and information about each of the panels.

 

Column1

Est.

Size

Comments

North Sydney Council

2013

100+

Established Voicebox mid 2013. Participants voluntarily sign-up, surveys done using free online software

City of Newcastle

2009

2700

Award-winning program called Newcastle Voice. Run by two fulltime staff members using sophisticated custom software and regular engagement of panel members.

City of Ryde

2012

600 approx

Launched myPlace Ryde in 2012, but closed in 2013. Soon to launch new platform Let's Engage which will be "more user friendly and also provide greater transparency around Council projects".

Port Macquarie-Hastings Council

2009

272

Community Reference Group (CRG) managed through Google group and paper copies.

Albury Council

 

530

Community Engagement Group. Surveys and emails developed using Campaign Monitor. Approximately 10 consultations per year.

Canada Bay Council

2009

various

Two panels: A Citizen's Panel for large, complex projects (eg a 36-participant, 3-month review of council service levels in 2013) and a FuturesPlan20 panel for ongoing consultation on various matters.

Coffs Harbour City Council

2013

460

Recently launched Online Survey Panel. Initial enlistment undertaken through random sampling of local residents via telephone survey.

Parramatta City Council

2005

1500 aprox

One of the first council community panels. Panel members sent on average eight surveys a year. Panel includes residents, visitors and workers.

Figure 4: Snapshot of local government community panels

 

How would the Panel operate?

The Randwick Community Panel would:

 

·      be an online community with capacity to undertake online engagement as well as telephone and face-to-face focus groups and workshops

·      be supplementary to Council’s current consultation channels

·      comprise a large enough pool of people to ensure results can be demographically weighted to be representative of all suburbs and ages in the Randwick Local Government Area

·      include volunteer members and randomly chosen participants.

·      be refreshed every 12 months to reduce panel fatigue

·      be open to any resident, ratepayer or worker aged 15 years and older

·      include regular prize draws to offer incentives for participants.

·      involve ongoing communication with panel members on the results of consultation to keep members engaged

·      be advertised and marketed to recruit panel members and to promote awareness of the panel to the broader Randwick City community

·      be managed by a dedicated project officer

·      be voluntary and members would be able to opt out at any stage.

·      produce a minimum of 10 consultations per year and a minimum of 2 (two) face-to-face engagement sessions.

 

Types of consultation

The Randwick Community Panel could be used by resolution of Council or by Council staff to conduct consultation on key issues affecting Randwick City.

 

The Panel could be used as part of a broader consultation strategy or it could be used independently for specific issues.

 

Figure 5: Types of consultation

 

Topics for consultation would vary depending on Council’s requirements, but they can generally be classified as follows:

 

·      concept/policy testing – seeking views of the community prior to development of plans for building upgrades, park upgrades, town centre improvements etc

·      budget and visioning consultation – obtaining feedback to help Council prioritise longer term planning

·      ad testing – this refers to testing specific products or services whether it be which creative concepts for events, types of finishes for public areas, materials in upgrades and town centre designs or playground types.

 

Matters for consultation using Council’s existing engagement strategies could also be consulted using the panel. This would provide a range of feedback from different sources and consultation mechanisms that would enable Councillors and Council decision-makers to gain valuable insights

 

Size of Randwick Community Panel

We require 383 respondents for a statistically valid survey of the entire Randwick City area. Fewer respondents are required for smaller survey areas as indicated by the table below.

 

The figure of 383 respondents is based on:

 

·      A survey sample of 109,493 Randwick City residents (aged 15-years and older)

·      95% confidence level (ie. If repeated, the survey would return the same results 19 times out of 20.)

·      +/- 5 confidence interval (ie. If the entire population was asked the survey questions, the same results would be returned with an error margin of +/- 5)

 

It is estimated the panel would optimally have about 2,000 members to ensure an appropriate demographic spread. This size would enable an LGA-wide statistically valid survey sample size of 383 respondents factoring in a 20% response rate to each survey. Recruitment work would need to be undertaken to enlist participants in traditionally ‘hard to engage’ demographics such as younger people and older, retired people.

 

Proposed Randwick Community Panel

membership targets by age

 

 

 

 

 

 

Age group

Group

Number

% of

totalpop

% of panel

Min no. req to meet  n=383

sample survey size

Panel size

req if only

1 in 5 do

each survey

15-24

students and young workforce

20,122

15.6

18.4

70

352

25-34

Young workforce

24,334

18.9

22.2

85

426

35-49

Parents and homebuilders

28,441

22

26.0

99

497

50-64

Older workers

19,663

15

18.0

69

344

65+

retirees

16,933

13

15.5

59

296

Total

 

109,493

84.9

100.0

383

1915

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing 2011. 

Figure 6: Optimum Randwick City Council Community Panel composition.

 

It should also be noted that this membership target is an optimum target only. Should the panel not comprise this ratio of ages, the results of the surveys can be weighted to reflect the demographics.

 

Panel composition by suburb

Ideally, the Randwick Community Panel would also include a broad spectrum of residents from each of our local suburbs. This would enable a large enough pool of people to draw a genuine cross-sample representation across the entire LGA. It would also enable Council to conduct statistically valid surveys of issues that relate to specific suburbs.

 

The following table shows the optimum panel composition per suburb. The column “sample size req” is an indicative figure of the number of respondents required to have a statistically valid survey of that suburb based on its population.

 

For surveys based on suburbs the following table provides a survey sample guide.

 

Proposed Randwick Community Panel

Membership targets by suburb

2011 Census

 

 

 

 

 

Pop

 % of LGA

Confidence Level

Confidence Interval

Sample size req

Randwick

27,750

22

95%

5

379

Kensington

12,833

10

95%

8

148

Kingsford

14,037

11

95%

8

148

Clovelly

4,585

4

95%

10

94

Coogee

14,011

11

95%

8

148

South Coogee

5,079

4

95%

5

94

Maroubra

29,591

23

95%

5

379

Matraville

9,038

7

95%

8

148

Malabar

4,937

4

95%

10

94

Little Bay

2,942

2

95%

10

93

Chifley

3,144

2

95%

10

93

La Pa / Phillip Bay

1,055

1

95%

10

88

Randwick LGA

129,002

100

95%

5

383

* Note the above includes all residents, including children aged 15 who had been removed from previous age calculations. Statistically, removing this group would not vary the above figures significantly.


Figure 7: Optimum panel size by suburb

 

The combined sample size for all suburbs is 1,906 which supports the panel membership of target of 2,000 people.

 

Indicative timeframe

It is anticipated that development of a Randwick Community Panel would take approximately six months to establish. During this time a project manager would be recruited, software packages researched and procured and the necessary framework developed.

 

Figure 8: Indicative timeframes

 

It is anticipated that using the above timeframes there could be a soft launch for the Community Panels concept in late 2014 if budget allocation is made in the 2014-15 budget.

 

Key performance indicators

To track the progress of the panel, key performance indicators (KPIs) would be developed to report against. These KPIs could include:

 

·      A target panel size

·      Annual growth rate targets for the panel size

·      Number of consultations conducted

·      Response rate to consultations

·      Annual Community Panel satisfaction surveys

·      Regular newsletter updates to panel members on the results of consultations

·      Regular updates to Councillors on the outcome of Community Panel consultations

·      How the information obtained from the Community Panel has been used to better inform and direct Council activities

Next steps

To launch a Randwick Community Panel, Council would need to undertake the following functions:

 

·      Recruit a dedicated project officer

·      Undertake a Request for Quotation for panel software

·      Develop a Community Panel Charter that the panel would operate under

·      Develop a marketing and recruitment strategy outlining how Council will promote the panel and enlist panel members

·      Develop branding and a name for the panel

·      Develop a retention and engagement strategy detailing how Council will communicate with residents while they are Panel members

·      Undertake internal planning with Council Departments to identify potential topics for consultation during the next 12 and 24 months.

·      Conduct annual reports on the effectiveness of the panel.

 

Risks

While a Randwick Community Panel presents many opportunities to provide additional community consultation opportunities with local residents, the following risk need to be considered.

 

·      Cost

·      Perception. Council needs to ensure that the general public is aware that Community Panels are just one way of obtaining information and that essential consultation activities are not undertaken exclusively with only panel members to the exclusion of other non-panel residents.

·      Recruitment. From the experience of other councils, obtaining a large enough pool of people to join the panel is a challenging and time-consuming process. It is envisaged that to reach an optimal panel size, Council will need to conduct extensive recruitment of local residents. While some of this can be achieved using mass marketing, there will also need to be some direct marketing targeting local residents and face to face engagement. It is likely that the panel will grow in size over a number of years.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2c:      Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and government agencies.

Outcome 3:       An informed and engaged community.

Direction 3c:      Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide services.  

 

Financial impact statement

 

 

Estimated annual cost

Software

$60,000

Dedicated project officer

$80,000

Recruitment and communication

$60,000

TOTAL

$200,000

 


Conclusion

 

A Randwick Community Panel provides Council with an exciting opportunity to continue to expand our community consultation and engagement framework. An effectively run panel could provide Councillors and Council decision-makers with powerful, statistically valid insights into the views and ‘pulse’ of Randwick City residents.  It however does carry some risk and needs to be considered in the context of Council’s overall Community Consultation Strategy.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:

 

a)     Agree to support the development of a community panel;

b)     Develop a Community Panel Framework and Community Panel Charter inline with Council’s Community Consultation Strategy; and

c)     Bring a report back to Council for further consideration.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM2/14

 

 

Subject:                  Review of the 2013-14 Annual Operational Plan - December Quarterly Report

Folder No:                   F2012/00177

Author:                   Karen Hawkett, Coordinator Integrated Planning & Reporting     

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors and the community on the implementation of the 2013-14 Operational Plan.

 

Issues

 

This is the December 2013 Quarterly Review of the 2013-14 Annual Operational Plan. Comments are provided against each of the 2013-14 Operational Plan actions. Highlights are also provided where appropriate.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The purpose of the December Quarterly Report is to inform and update Council and the community on the progress of all actions at set out in the adopted 2013-14 Annual Operational Plan.  In addition, given that the Operational Plan is based on the 20 year Randwick City Plan and that Council’s reporting format is based on outcomes rather than organisational structure, the December quarterly report also provides a level of accountability against our long term vision for the City of Randwick. 

 

Recommendation

 

That the information contained in the December 2013 Quarterly Review of the   2013-14 Annual Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

RCC December 2014 Quarterly Report

 

 

 

 


RCC December 2014 Quarterly Report

Attachment 1

 

 
































Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM3/14

 

 

Subject:                  Replacement of Community Vacancy on Wylies Baths Trust

Folder No:                   F2012/00407

Author:                   David Kelly, Manager Administrative Services     

 

Introduction

 

A vacancy currently exists for a community representative on the Wylie’s Baths Trust. A process is currently being followed to find a suitable community representative to serve on the Trust moving forward. The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the recommendation being made by the Trust for a suitable replacement and for Council to determine the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.

 

Issues

 

According to the Rules of the Trust the maximum number of members shall be eight persons being:

 

·      One member appointed by the Coogee Randwick RSL swimming club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·      One member appointed by the Coogee Amateur swimming club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·      One member appointed by the South Maroubra winter swimming club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·      One member appointed by the Coogee Surf Life Saving Club who shall be a resident within the boundaries of Randwick City Council;

·      The Mayor of Randwick City Council or another councilor nominated by the Mayor;

·      Three members appointed by Randwick City Council who shall be residents within the boundaries of Randwick City Council who are regular users of the baths.

 

The vacancy was first discussed at the meeting of the Trust held 27 February 2013 where it was agreed that the new community member would need to have the following skills

·       a desire to effectively work as part of the Wylie’s Baths Trust to ensure the ongoing management of the baths;

·       a strong financial background – it is expected that the successful applicant would take on the role of Treasurer within six months of appointment;

·       a commitment to allocate time, energy and expertise to working with the Trust and the Wylie’s Baths Manager to maintain the standards required to successfully operate this community facility; and

·       a Passion for Wylie’s Baths and what it has to offer the local community.

 

The trust nominated Janice Morris to co-ordinate the recruitment process. A suitable advertising process was undertaken with Janice Morris and Tony Cousins carrying out the first interviews and the second interviews including the Mayor. The number of candidates was shortlisted at two for the second interviews. It was agreed that all three members of the interview committee would all vote after the interviews on their preferred choice and advise the General Manager of their choices in writing.

 

The interview committee members each advised the General Manager of their preferred candidate and the result was a 2 – 1 decision in favour of Mr James France over Chris Bastic. It should be noted here that the Mayor supported Mr Bastic. Former Mayor and Councillor Chris Bastic was a long standing member and Chair of the Wylies Baths Trust.

 

A reference check was undertaken and on this basis the Trust recommended to Council that James France be appointed as the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.

 

At 10am on Monday 12 August 2013 the General Manager received a phone call from Mr France advising that he had officially withdrawn his application for personal reasons. As there was only one candidate (Mr Chris Bastic) remaining, our intention was to progress with the report to Council seeking the views of the Trust and for the Council’s consideration on the appointment of the remaining candidate.

 

On Friday 16 August, 2013 the General Manager received an email from Janice Morris advising that the Trust will now re-advertise the role and seek new interested applications. Ms Morris further advised that all trust members have been contacted and agree that this is the next step that needs to be taken. They will be looking again for someone with a passion for Wylies and the preferred replacement would ideally have a business/financial background. This would enable that person to move into the treasurer’s role over the next six months.

 

Interviews were again held and the interview committee advised the General Manager by email dated 8 January 2014 that their preferred candidate is Ms Thea Askew for appointment as the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.

 

Ms Askew comes highly recommended by the interview committee with her qualifications for the role summarised as follows:

 

§ Bachelor of Business in Accounting from Charles Sturt University;

§ Certificate in Professional Accounting post graduate study at University of New England;

§ Is a Certified Practicing Accountant (CPA);

§ Over 15 years experience in progressive roles encompassing a strong technical accounting focus and management functions

§ Experience working at management level and liaising with key 3rd parties including auditors, bankers and major stakeholders;

§ Management and leadership in hiring, training and supervising new and existing accounting and administration personnel;

§ Very keen to be participate and contribute  to a community group;

§ Local Randwick resident for over 35 years;

§ Very keen to preserve the heritage around Randwick and at Wylie’s Baths in particular.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A Vibrant & Diverse Community.

Direction 2c:      Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

Conclusion

 

The Wylies Baths Trust originally recommended the appointment of Mr James France as the new Trust Member on the Wylies Baths Trust. It should be noted that the Mayor, Cr Bowen had supported former Mayor and Councillor Chris Bastic as his preferred candidate for Council’s determination. The subsequent withdrawal of Mr France has resulted in the Trust re- advertising the role and seeking to now appoint Ms Thea Askew as the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council determines the new Community Trust member for the Wylie’s Baths Trust.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

General Manager's Report No. GM4/14

 

 

Subject:                  Local Government Reform

Folder No:                   F2012/00406

Author:                   Anne Warner, Manager Corporate Performance     

 

Introduction

 

The Revitalising Local Government Final Report of the NSW Independent Local Government Review Panel (ILGRP), October 2013 culminates the work of the Panel and coincides with the Report to the Minister for Local Government from the Local Government Acts Taskforce.

 

Provided under separate cover is Randwick City Council’s response to these reports, which is proposed to be submitted to the Minister for Local Government.

 

Issues

 

The work of Panel was conducted in four key stages:

 

 

Randwick City Council has been very pro-active in terms of Local Government Reform, including: responses to each of the ILGRP’s reports have been prepared and submitted; key research and community engagement has been undertaken; and extensive participation in Local Government Reform working groups in the industry.

 

The Panel’s final report addresses the areas of: fiscal responsibility; strengthening the revenue base; meeting infrastructure needs; improvement, productivity and accountability; political leadership and good governance; advanced structural reform; regional arrangements; Metropolitan Sydney; and State-local relations.

 

In 2012, the Minister for Local Government, the Hon Don Page MP appointed the Local Government Acts Taskforce to rewrite the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) and review the City of Sydney Act 1988 (CoSA).

 

In undertaking the review, the Taskforce consulted widely holding workshops at locations across NSW and meeting with individual stakeholders and special interest groups. The Taskforce released two discussion papers and invited written submissions commenting on the ideas and proposals contained in these papers.

 

The purpose of the review was to rewrite the Local Government Act and review the City of Sydney Act with the intention of developing principles-based, enabling legislation that is streamlined, easily understood, in a logical framework, eliminates unnecessary red tape and will provide a legislative and statutory framework to meet the current and future needs of the community and the local government sector. 

 

The attached Submission provides an overview of the ILGRP’s final report as well as that of the Local Government Acts Taskforce. Randwick Council’s due diligence around Local Government Reform is tabled, as is a detailed response to all of the relevant recommendations.

 

NOTE: the Submission will be available for review from 21 February, 2014.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  1. Leadership in sustainability.

Direction:  1b. Council is a leader in the delivery of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Local Government Reform provides an opportunity to improve the financial sustainability of the sector, as detailed in the attached Submission.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick City Council is a positive advocate of Local Government Reform and has a strong history of industry participation and development. Comments in response to the Panel’s Final Report and the paper presented by the Local Government Acts Taskforce, are outlined in the attached Submission.

 

Recommendation

 

That the attached Randwick City Council Local Government Reform Submission be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government via the Division of Local Government - Department of Premier and Cabinet.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Randwick City Council Local Government Reform Submission – INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

   

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF1/14

 

 

Subject:                  Review of Outdoor Dining Valuation Process

Folder No:                   F2011/07593

Author:                   Sharon Plunkett, Property Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting on 25th June 2013, Council resolved (Andrews/Moore) that:

 

a)     the Recommended Operational Plan 2013-14 be adopted as per the attached, and that the General Manager be authorised to make any minor changes as requested by the Council or the NSW Division of Local Government;

 

The General Manager’s report included the following submission received from the Coogee Chamber of Commerce and Council’s response.

 

Issue

Response

Variation in outdoor dining fees.

Council will review the outdoor dining valuation process with regard to market commercial rents. A report will be prepared for Council on the refunding of bonds, trial free periods and associated administration and application fees.

 

 

Also, at the Ordinary Council meeting on 26th November 2013, Council resolved (Roberts/Stavrinos) that:

 

Council review the outdoor dining administrative and fee structures and bring a report back to council in time for a new system to be implemented in the coming Financial Year. Options should include but not be limited to the following:

 

a)     the status quo;

b)     updated outdoor dining fees that more accurately reflect foot traffic in any particular area;

c)     a graded fee structure where small outdoor dining areas are free but larger ones are paid for;

d)     seasonal variation in the amount of fees charged; and

e)     options to streamline the scheme's administration.

 

Issues

 

The benefit of outdoor dining to any retail business is that it enables operators within a small retail shop to expand their business without the need to relocate to a larger premise.  In some instances the outdoor dining enables businesses to increase the number of customers by over 50%, resulting in much greater profit to businesses operating from a small premise.  The use of footpaths for dining purposes also promotes the business and encourages new customers who would not have otherwise seen the cafe/restaurant.

 

A detailed investigation into the background of the outdoor dining process and associated dining fees has been undertaken by Council’s Property Services section. A history of the planning approval process for outdoor dining is available upon request.  In summary, the history shows that Council’s intention for the outdoor dining fees has always been that they were to be set in accordance with the market value of the site and comparable to other Council’s fees.

 

However after the abovementioned issues were raised by local business owners and councilor, it became apparent that maintaining the status quo with respect to our outdoor dining licence structure is no longer an option.

 

Current Outdoor Dining Process & Administration

 

PART 1 – DEVELOPMENT CONSENT

Currently, before the placement of any items on the footpath, a Development Approval must be obtained for the use of the road reserve for outdoor dining/footpath dining, trading purposes and the display of goods. This assists Council and other Roads Authorities in responding to potential noise, health and safety issues, manage the public access, manage incidents and approved items and undertake community consultation for proposed seating.  Upon approval of the development consent, an outdoor dining application must be completed by the applicant to enter into an Outdoor Dining / Display of Goods Licence Agreement.

 

PART 2 – LICENCE AGREEMENT

The licence agreement is required as a condition of Development consent, to identify terms and condition of use of the footpath including compliance with the approved area, the designated number of tables & chairs, hours of operation, Council policies including Smoking in the Public Place, payment of fees and the requirement for current Public Liability insurances for the approved area.  Preparation and execution of a licence agreement for outdoor dining takes on average 3 days from receipt of the outdoor dining licence application form.

 

PART 3 – LICENCE FEES

 

The current fees are determined by precinct, with the fees set during the term of this Council summarised below:

 

FEE/CHARGE DESCRIPTION

2013/2014

PER M2

per annum

2012/2013

PER M2

per annum

Coogee Beach Precinct

$600.00

$572.73

Randwick Shopping Centre Commercial Precinct

$545.45

$518.18

The Spot Precinct, Randwick

$509.09

$486.36

Maroubra Precinct District

$390.91

$372.73

Clovelly Precinct

$381.82

$363.64

Kingsford/Kensington Precinct

$381.82

$363.64

La Perouse Precinct

$318.18

$304.55

Other Commercial Precincts

$295.45

$281.82

 

A full history of the fees for each precinct is also available upon request.

 

In determining the fees to be charged, Council obtains valuations from registered Valuers.  Once set, the fees are reviewed annually having regard to CPI and then a new valuation is obtained every couple of years.

 

The charging for GST on outdoor dining commencing 2013/2014 was removed due to the Australian Taxation Office ruling that all components of charges for restaurants to use the footpaths be GST exempt.

 

PART 4 – VALUATIONS

 

Currently, in determining a valuation for outdoor dining, the Valuers’ considerations include retail rentals, seasonal usage, inclement weather conditions, the size and position of the licensed area, the views achievable, precinct location, environmental planning, zoning, market commentary and direct comparison with other Councils. Comparative outdoor dining fees have been obtained from 23 Councils.

 

Changes to Outdoor Dining Process & Administration

 

The NSW Department of Planning & Infrastructure has recently prepared amendments to the State Environmental Protection Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008 to commence on 22 February 2014. These amendments identify development types that can be classed as exempt and complying development in NSW, including footpaths and outdoor dining. This in effect means that approval may be granted for footpath dining under Section 125 of the Roads Act 1993 and the approval conditions such as hours of operation of the premises must be complied with and approval issued under section 68 of the Local Government Act 1993 (LGA)

 

PART 1 – ROADS ACT CONSENT

As of 22 February 2014, the applicant will apply for use of the footpath for outdoor dining display of goods under a Roads Act application, which will reduce the time for granting consent.  This process streamlines the scheme’s administration considerably and addresses clause (e) of the abovementioned motion.

 

PART 2 – LICENCE AGREEMENT

The licence agreement will still be required as a condition of the consent and take up to 3 days to prepare following consent being granted.

 

PART 3 – LICENCE FEES

A detailed revaluation of all outdoor dining areas has been conducted by Council’s independent valuers and a new fee structure identified for primary areas and secondary areas. This revaluation considered the fact that outdoor dining trading is seasonal. It also provided a clearer reflection of foot traffic in secondary areas and addresses the concerns raised by local business owners as well as clauses (b) and (d) of the abovementioned motion.

 

The proposed fees are determined by precincts/category per metre squared per annum:

 

PRECINCT/CATEGORY

2014/2015

PER M2

PER ANNUM

Coogee (Primary)

$650.00

Clovelly (Primary)

$400.00

La Perouse (Primary)

$400.00

Kingsford-Kensington (Primary)

$400.00

Maroubra (Primary)

$300.00

Matraville (Primary)

$250.00

Randwick (Primary)

$550.00

The Spot (Primary)

$600.00

Other/Isolated/Secondary (Part Coogee, Part Kensington, Part Kingsford, Part Randwick, Part The Spot)

$400.00

Other/Isolated/Secondary (Part La Perouse, Part Matraville, Malabar, Part Maroubra Central, Part Maroubra Beach, Moverly)

$200.00

 

Some comparable outdoor dining fees for other Councils include City of Sydney $670 per square metre per annum, Waverley Council $827 per square metre per annum, Willoughby Council $988 per square metre per annum, North Sydney Council $589 per square metre per annum, Mosman Council $917 per square metre per annum and Manly Council $1,364 per square metre per annum.

 

A full list of comparable Councils outdoor dining fees is available upon request.

 

PART 4 – VALUATIONS

A market rental valuation will be conducted every 3 years and CPI increases implemented for all other years. A copy of the valuation is also available upon request.

 

It should be noted here that a graded fee structure where small outdoor dining areas are free but larger ones are paid for was examined but was considered to be inequitable and open to staff interpretation and challenge by business owners.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable city.

Direction 6a:      Our public infrastructure and assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The financial impact is a reduction in the next financial year’s outdoor dining income of $3,276.00 however, with reduced rates for outdoor dining in secondary areas it is anticipated that a greater uptake of outdoor dining should result in an increased outdoor dining/display of goods income to Council in future.

 

Conclusion

 

The administration process will be streamlined upon adoption of the proposed changes to the State Environmental Protection Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008 as at 22 February 2014. The revaluation of outdoor dining fees for 2014/15 better reflects foot traffic in primary and secondary areas throughout the city, addresses the concerns raised by local business owners and is considered to be a more equitable treatment of outdoor dining licences.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council:-

 

a)     adopts the proposed outdoor dining fees as at 1st July 2014 and the Council Pricing Policy and Fees & Charges be amended to reflect the new fee structure and valuations; and

 

b)     notifies the outdoor dining licensees of the new fee structure as at 1 July 2014 and implements the fees for new and existing license agreements entered into from 1st July 2014.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF2/14

 

 

Subject:                  Affixing of the Council Seal

Folder No:                   F2011/07367

Author:                   Sharon Plunkett, Property Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

Clause 400 (Part 13) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Seal of the Council must not be affixed to a document unless the document relates to business of the Council and the Council has resolved (by resolution referring to the document) that the Seal be so affixed.

 

Three commercial leases have recently been renewed by Council for:

 

a.     the airspace leased by Coogee Legion Club Coogee, and

b.     the commercial premises at 28 Silver Street Randwick leased by PJ Ying.

 

Issues

 

Coogee Legion Ex-Services Club Limited 10 year & 6 year leases expired on 21 October 2012.  PJ Ying purchased the business from Jennifer Chang whose 5 year lease expired on 1 August 2013.

 

The agreements were prepared by Council’s Solicitors, Marsdens Law Group and rental set at market value.  It is now necessary for the Council’s Seal to be affixed to the signing of agreements between Council and Coogee Bowling Club to formalise the documentation.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Upon signing the licence agreement the annual rental payable to Council will be:

 

1.     For the lease of airspace contained within Lot 2, DP 1129675 by Coogee Legion Club the rental will be $3,524.60 + GST indexed annually,

2.     For the lease of airspace contained within Lot 1, DP 1129675 by Coogee Legion Club the rental will be $17,640.34 + GST indexed annually,

3.     For the lease of retail shop, 28 Silver Street, Randwick by PJ Ying the rental will be $15,500 + GST indexed annually.

 

Conclusion

 

As Clause 400 (part 13) of the Local Government (General) Regulation requires that the Council pass a resolution authorising the Affixing of the Seal, it is necessary for this action to take place to facilitate legal formalities.

Copies of the agreements will be available for Councillors (from Council’s Manager Administrative Services) at the Council meeting.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council grants consent to entering into agreements with:

 

a)     Coogee Legion Ex-Services Club for the airspace at 210 Arden Street, Coogee for a period of ten (10) years, and

 

b)     PJ Ying for the retail premises at 28 Silver Street, Randwick for a period of five (5) years; and

 

c)     Council’s Common Seal to be affixed to the agreements.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF3/14

 

 

Subject:                  Affixing of the Council Seal - Randwick Open Care for Kids Inc

Folder No:                   F2011/07367

Author:                   Sally Fernandez, Property Officer      

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Open Care for Kids Inc has occupied the Council owned site at 30-32 Waratah Avenue, Randwick for the operation and management of a child care centre in excess of 20 years.

 

The Clause 400 (Part 13) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Seal of the Council must not be affixed to a document unless the document relates to business of the Council and the Council has resolved (by resolution referring to the document) that the Seal be so affixed.

 

Issues

 

The licence agreement between Council and Randwick Open Care for Kids Inc. expired on 31 December 2014.

 

A renewed five year licence agreement with Randwick Open Care for Kids Inc. is required to formalise occupation and commenced on 1 January 2014.  The licence requires the execution of Council under seal. The licence agreement has been prepared in accordance with Councils adopted Community Facilities Management Policy.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Upon signing the licence the annual rental payable to council will be $21,900.91 + GST per annum indexed annually.

 

Conclusion

 

As Clause 400 (part 13) of the Local Government (General) Regulation requires that the Council pass a resolution authorising the Affixing of the Seal, it is necessary for this action to take place to facilitate legal formalities.

 

A copy of the licence will be available for Councillors (from Council’s Manager Administrative Services) at the Council meeting.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council’s Seal be affixed to the signing of agreements between Randwick City Council and Randwick Open Care for Kids Inc in relation to the licence commencing 1 January 2014 for a period of 5 years.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF4/14

 

 

Subject:                  Investment Report - December 2013

Folder No:                   F2014/06527

Author:                   Greg Byrne, Manager Financial Operations     

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s investments.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – December 2013” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of December 2013. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council's Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipt of the Financial Assistance Grant.

 

Expenditure during the period was incurred for capital works, payroll and miscellaneous expenses. Main income sources were rates income, grants and miscellaneous fees and charges.

 

The investment portfolio decreased by $472 thousand during December 2013. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month as expenditure exceeded income.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The above graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from December 2012 to December 2013. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

The above graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio for the period December 2007 to December 2013.

 

The investment portfolio is diversified across a number of investment types and is spread across a number of financial institutions. The various investment types may include term deposits, rolling rate investments, floating rate notes and on‑call accounts.

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of December 2013.

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of Council's portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the UBS Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period December 2007 to December 2013.

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the UBS Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the previous twelve months.

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark UBS Australian Bank Bill Index with an average return after fees of 4.52% compared with the benchmark index of 2.59%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate at the end of December was 2.50%.

 

Credit Quality of Portfolio

 

The credit quality of the portfolio is of very high quality with approximately 94% of assets rated “A” or better. The 6% allocation to “BBB” reflects the short-dated term deposits with regional banks. The recent update to Council’s Investment Policy restricts allowable investments to only Prime, High Grade and Upper Medium Grade investments. This will result in all new investments having a minimum Standard & Poors long term credit rating of A-. Council will no longer invest in any products with a credit rating of BBB+ or less. Current investments held with a rating of BBB+ or less will be held to maturity.

The credit quality maximums as per Council policy and the actual portfolio holdings are shown in the table below.

Credit Quality

Maximum

Credit Quality (Holding)

Capacity

 

 

 

 

AAA

100%

4%

96%

AA

100%

31%

69%

A

75%

59%

16%

BBB+

0%

6%

0%

 

 

 

 

The graph below shows the actual percentage of funds held by Individual Institutions V the maximum limits allowable under Council policy as at 31 December 2013.

 

 

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. This Ministerial Investment Order included transitional arrangements that allow councils to continue to hold investments that were made in compliance with the previous Ministerial Order dated 15 July 2005. Council’s investment portfolio contains a number of investments that fall into this category including both Managed Funds and Structured Products.

 

A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011, which replaces the Order dated 31 July 2008 and includes changes that:

 

Ÿ      remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

Ÿ      remove the ability to make a deposit with the Local Government Financial Services Pty      Ltd;

Ÿ       and includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority by a council to invest in funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Floating Rate Notes

 

The investment portfolio includes $15.488 million in floating rate notes (FRN).

 

The National Australia Bank FRN was purchased at a capital price of $3,006,360.00, the premium of $6,360.00 will be amortised on payments of the quarterly coupons. The amortised amount to date is $5,218.44 bringing the book value to $3,001,141.56.

 

The ING Bank FRN was purchased on 21 June 2012 at a capital price of $1,979,713.01. The discount of $20,286.99 will be amortised on payment of the quarterly coupons. The amortised amount to date is $6,935.04 bringing the book value to $1,986,648.05.

 

The balance of the FRN’s is held by the Macquarie Bank for $2,000,000.00, Bendigo Adelaide Bank for $4,500,000.00, CBA for $2,000,000.00 and AMP Bank for $2,000,000.00.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in 2013-14 and outperforming the UBS Australian Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period.  The current budget provision for investment income from this source is $2,221,084.00. Investment income to 31 December 2013 amounted to $1,428,966.48.

 

A budget variation of $250,000 has been included in the December 2013 Quarterly Budget Review. This additional revenue has been transferred into the Infrastructure Reserve to repay the funds utilised by the Fallen Lifesavers Memorial being constructed at Coogee Beach. 


Following is the detailed Investment Report – December 2013:


Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 December 2013 have been made in accordance with Council Investment Policy. All investments meet the requirements of s625 of the Local Government Act and the Local Government (General) Regulation.

 

Changes to the economic climate and financial markets are being closely monitored. Appropriate adjustments to the investment strategy will continue to be made as required.

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for December 2013 be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF5/14

 

 

Subject:                  Investment Report - January 2014

Folder No:                   F2014/06527

Author:                   Greg Byrne, Manager Financial Operations     

 

Introduction

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation requires a written report to be provided to the ordinary meeting of the Council giving details of all monies invested and a certificate as to whether or not the investments have been made in accordance with the Act, the regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Issues

 

Council is authorised by s625 of the Local Government Act to invest its surplus funds. Funds may only be invested in the form of investment notified by Order of the Minister dated 12 January 2011. The Local Government (General) Regulation prescribes the records that must be maintained in relation to Council’s investments.

 

The table in this report titled “Investment Register – January 2014” outlines the investment portfolio held by Council as at the end of January 2014. All investments have been made in accordance with the Act, Regulations and Council's Investment Policy.

 

Investment Commentary

 

The size of the investment portfolio may vary significantly from month to month as a result of cash flows for the period. Cash outflows (expenditure) are typically relatively stable from one month to another. Cash inflows (income) are cyclical and are largely dependent on the rates instalment due dates and the timing of grant payments including receipt of the Financial Assistance Grant.

 

Expenditure during the period was incurred for capital works, payroll and miscellaneous expenses. Main income sources were rates income, grants and miscellaneous fees and charges.

 

The investment portfolio decreased by $5.115 million during January 2014. The decrease is representative of a negative cash flow for the month as expenditure exceeded income.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The above graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio from January 2013 to January 2014. Peaks are representative of the rates instalment periods.

 

 

The above graph illustrates the movement in the investment portfolio for the period January 2008 to January 2014.

 

The investment portfolio is diversified across a number of investment types and is spread across a number of financial institutions. The various investment types may include term deposits, rolling rate investments, floating rate notes and on‑call accounts.

 

The following graph indicates the allocation of investment types held at the end of January 2014.

 

The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed in order to maximise investment performance and minimise risk. Comparisons are made between existing investments with available products that are not part of Council's portfolio. Independent advice is sought on new investment opportunities.

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the UBS Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the period January 2008 to January 2014.

 

The following graph shows the investment returns achieved against the UBS Bank Bill Index and the official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate for the previous twelve months.

 

 

Investment performance for the financial year to date is above the industry benchmark UBS Australian Bank Bill Index with an average return after fees of 4.16% compared with the benchmark index of 2.62%.

 

The official Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) cash interest rate at the end of January remained at 2.50%.

 

Credit Quality of Portfolio

 

The credit quality of the portfolio is of very high quality with approximately 94% of assets rated “A” or better. The 6% allocation to “BBB” reflects the short-dated term deposits with regional banks. The recent update to Council’s Investment Policy restricts allowable investments to only Prime, High Grade and Upper Medium Grade investments. This will result in all new investments having a minimum Standard & Poors long term credit rating of A-. Council will no longer invest in any products with a credit rating of BBB+ or less. Current investments held with a rating of BBB+ or less will be held to maturity.

The credit quality maximums as per Council policy and the actual portfolio holdings are shown in the table below.

Credit Quality

Maximum

Credit Quality (Holding)

Capacity

 

 

 

 

AAA

100%

5%

95%

AA

100%

32%

68%

A

75%

57%

18%

BBB+

0%

6%

0%

 

 

 

 

The graph below shows the actual percentage of funds held by Individual Institutions V the maximum limits allowable under Council policy as at 31 January 2014.

 

 

Ministerial Investment Order

 

In late 2007, the NSW Government commissioned a review of NSW local government investments. The review, known as the Cole Report included eight recommendations that were all adopted by the NSW Government and incorporated into the Ministerial Investment Order dated 31 July 2008. This Ministerial Investment Order included transitional arrangements that allow councils to continue to hold investments that were made in compliance with the previous Ministerial Order dated 15 July 2005. Council’s investment portfolio contains a number of investments that fall into this category including both Managed Funds and Structured Products.

 

A revised Investment Order was issued on the 12 January 2011, which replaces the Order dated 31 July 2008 and includes changes that:

 

Ÿ      remove the ability to invest in the mortgage of land;

Ÿ      remove the ability to make a deposit with the Local Government Financial Services Pty      Ltd;

Ÿ       and includes the addition of “Key Considerations” with a comment that a council’s General Manager, or any other staff, with delegated authority by a council to invest in funds on behalf of the council must do so in accordance with the council’s adopted investment policy.

 

Floating Rate Notes

 

The investment portfolio includes $15.489 million in floating rate notes (FRN).

 

The National Australia Bank FRN was purchased at a capital price of $3,006,360.00, the premium of $6,360.00 will be amortised on payments of the quarterly coupons. The amortised amount to date is $5,218.44 bringing the book value to $3,001,141.56.

 

The ING Bank FRN was purchased on 21 June 2012 at a capital price of $1,979,713.01. The discount of $20,286.99 will be amortised on payment of the quarterly coupons. The amortised amount to date is $8,165.14 bringing the book value to $1,987,878.15.

 

The balance of the FRN’s is held by the Macquarie Bank for $2,000,000.00, Bendigo Adelaide Bank for $4,500,000.00, CBA for $2,000,000.00 and AMP Bank for $2,000,000.00.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Long term financial viability is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funds are invested with the aim of achieving budgeted income in 2013-14 and outperforming the UBS Australian Bank Bill Index over a 12 month period.  The current budget provision for investment income from this source is $2,221,084.00. Investment income to 31 January 2014 amounted to $1,636,759.31.

 

A budget variation of $250,000 has been included in the December 2013 Quarterly Budget Review. This additional revenue has been transferred into the Infrastructure Reserve to repay the funds utilised by the Fallen Lifesavers Memorial being constructed at Coogee Beach. 


Following is the detailed Investment Report –January 2014:
Conclusion

 

All investments as at 31 January 2014 have been made in accordance with Council Investment Policy. All investments meet the requirements of s625 of the Local Government Act and the Local Government (General) Regulation.

 

Changes to the economic climate and financial markets are being closely monitored. Appropriate adjustments to the investment strategy will continue to be made as required.

 

Recommendation

 

That the investment report for January 2014 be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF6/14

 

 

Subject:                  Quarterly Budget Review - December 2013

Folder No:                   F2012/00511

Author:                   Mitchel Woods, Manager Corporate and Financial Planning     

 

Introduction

 

As part of the integrated planning and reporting framework for NSW Local Governments, the Division of Local Government has a set of minimum reporting requirements for Councils, in order for them to facilitate progress reporting against the original and revised annual budgets at the end of each quarter.

 

Collectively, these documents are known as the quarterly budget review statement (QBRS) and are reported to council in accordance with the relevant legislation at the end of each quarter.

 

Section 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that at the end of each quarter, a Budget Review Statement be prepared and submitted to Council that indicates the latest estimates of income and expenditure for the 2013-14 year.

 

The regulation (Section 203 (2)) also requires that the budget review statement must include, or be accompanied by:

 

I.      A report as to whether or not the responsible accounting officer believes that the Statement indicates that the financial position of the Council is satisfactory, having regard to the original estimate of income and expenditure; and

II.     If that position is unsatisfactory, recommendations for remedial action.

 

Issues

 

This report is a review of the Council’s 2013-14 current budget and recommends adoption of a revised budget for the 2013-14 financial year.

 

It proposes variations to Council’s adopted budget, which will result in a projected surplus at year end of $13,588. Major variations to the budget are highlighted below:

 

FINANCIAL POSITION

$

 

 

Current projected deficit/(surplus)

(9,490)

 

 

Variations Proposed This Review

 

Increases in Income

(144,689)

Increase in Expenditure

140,591

Total Variations This Review

(4,098)

 

 

Projected deficit/(surplus) as at 30 June 2014

(13,588)

 

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in Sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long term vision based on sustainability.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The proposed variations in this report and listed in the attachment will result in a projected surplus at year end of $13,588.

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Director Governance and Financial Services, as the responsible accounting officer, advises that the projected financial position is satisfactory.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the report in relation to the December 2013 budget review be received and noted; and

 

b)     the proposed December 2013 budget variations shown in the attachment to this report be adopted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Quarterly Budget Review Statements (QBRS) - December 2013

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF7/14

 

 

Subject:                  Councillors' Expenses & Facilities Policy

Folder No:                   F2004/06576

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

Section 252 of the Local Government Act requires Councils to adopt a policy for the payment of expenses incurred by and the provision of facilities to Mayors, Deputy Mayors and other Councillors.  Mayors, Deputy Mayors and Councillors can only be reimbursed for expenses and provided with facilities in discharging the functions of civic office in accordance with this policy.  The Councillors’ Expenses and Facilities Policy must comply with the provisions of the Act, the regulations and the Department of Local Government ‘Guidelines for the payment of expenses and the provision of facilities for Mayors and Councillors for Local Councils in NSW.’

 

Issues

 

Council is reminded that:

 

·           Under section 252(5) of the Local Government Act 1993, Council’s Expenses and Facilities Policy must comply with the DLG Guidelines

·           Provisions made by the policy in regard to the payment of expenses and the provision of facilities to Councillors, must be acceptable to and meet the expectations of the local community

·           Limits to expenses and the level of provision of equipment and facilities must be set by individual Councils to suit their need and capacity to afford them

·           There are no circumstances in which legal expenses should be met by a Council for proceedings initiated by a Councillor.  Nor should legal expenses be met for a Councillor defending any action in a matter not arising directly as a result of his or her civic duty.

 

The current clauses in relation to the provision of an office for the Mayor and Rooms in the Town Hall for the Councillors are disjointed and out of date. It is suggested that the following clauses be amended to provide for more flexibility in the appropriate fitting out of the Mayor’s office and Councillors’ Rooms:

 

Part 3 (Clause (xii):

 

Currently reads

Access to shared Councillors’ Rooms in the Town Hall.

Change to

Access to shared Councillors’ Rooms in the Town Hall with appropriate furniture, fittings, business equipment and meeting supplies as determined by the General Manager in consultation with the Mayor.

Part 3 (Clause xiv)

 

Currently reads

From within the Councillors’ Rooms in the Town Hall, access to external email and internet facilities and internal email with staff appearing on the ‘Councillor/Staff Liaison List.

Change to

Delete clause – no longer required.

Part 4 (Clause iii)

 

Currently reads

Office accommodation at the Town Hall and standard business equipment. The provision of a refreshment cabinet in the Mayor’s Office maintained and stocked by the Council within budgetary limits.

Change to

Office accommodation in the Council Administration Building with appropriate furniture, fittings, business equipment and meeting supplies as determined by the General Manager in consultation with the Mayor and the provision of a refreshment cabinet in the Mayor’s Office maintained and stocked by the Council within budgetary limits.

 

Section 253(3) of the Local Government Act states that:

 

“a council need not give public notice of a proposed amendment to its policy for the payment of expenses or provision of facilities if the council is of the opinion that the proposed amendment is not substantial.”

 

The proposed amendments are not considered substantial. The policy will, however, be reviewed again in June 2014 as part of the required annual review process and any amendments made at that time will require re-advertising as part of the process.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1c:      Continuous improvement in service delivery based on accountability, transparency and good governance.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter. Any expenses and facilities provided to the Mayor and Councillors as part of this policy have been allowed for in the 2013-14 Budget.

 

Conclusion

 

That the minor amendments proposed to be made to the Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy be endorsed and included in the policy for immediate implementation.

 

Recommendation

 

That the amended Councillors’ Expenses & Facilities Policy be adopted for immediate implementation.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Amended Councillors' Expenses & Facilities Policy

INCLUDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF8/14

 

 

Subject:                  2014 National General Assembly of Local Government

Folder No:                   F2004/07432

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

The 2014 National General Assembly (NGA) of Local Government will be held at the National Convention Centre in Canberra from 15-18 June.  The NGA is the principal conference of the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) and the theme of this year’s conference is ‘Getting down to Business’. 

 

This year’s theme reflects current issues being debated nationally and priority issues facing Local Government.

 

Issues

 

The President of the ALGA has written to Councils indicating that “the NGA is your opportunity to contribute to the development of national local government policy and receive updates on the major policy issues facing local government nationally.”

 

The ALGA is calling for motions for the 2014 NGA. To be eligible for inclusion in the NGA Business Papers, motions must follow the following principles:

 

1.     fall under the NGA theme

2.     be relevant to the work of local government nationally; and

3.     Complement or build on the policies of state and territory local government associations.

 

A Discussion Paper has been prepared to assist councils to identify motions that address the theme of the NGA – see attached. Motions are required to be submitted no later than 17 April 2014. All motions, however, are required to be endorsed by Council prior to submission. This means that proposed motions for Randwick City Council will need to be submitted to the March Council Meeting, in order to make the 17 April deadline.

 

The deadline for the submission of Notices of Motions for the March Council Meeting is Monday 17 March 2014 (at midday).

 

Relationship to city plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long-term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:      Council is a leader in the deliver of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Councillors’ attendance at conferences has been allowed for in the 2013-14 budget.

Conclusion

 

This is an important conference for Local Government throughout Australia as it is the only conference where the States come together to discuss Local Government specific issues.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     any Councillors interested in attending 2014 National General Assembly of Local Government advise the General Manager as soon as possible for registration purposes.

 

b)     any proposed motions for the conference be submitted to the March Council Meeting (via a Notice of Motion) for Council endorsement.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

2014 National General Assembly of Local Government - Call for Motions & Discussion Paper

 

 

 

 


2014 National General Assembly of Local Government - Call for Motions & Discussion Paper

Attachment 1

 

 

















Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Director Governance & Financial Services Report No. GF9/14

 

 

Subject:                  SEGRA National Conference 2014

Folder No:                   F2005/00646

Author:                   Julie Hartshorn, Senior Administrative Coordinator     

 

Introduction

 

The 18th annual “Sustainable Economic Growth for Regional Australia (SEGRA) conference is being held in Alice Springs, from 8 to 10 October 2014.

 

Issues

 

This conference will address important issues facing local government, including:

 

·      Identifying and engaging local talent, passion and finances to grow your region

·      Policy development and implementation for regional Australia

·      Using practice-based research to promote regional development

·      How regional Australia can effectively respond to the changing place of Asia in the national economy

·      Stewardship of natural resources

·      The importance of a dedicated communications strategy for remote and rural Australia.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1:       Leadership in sustainability.

Direction 1a:      Council has a long-term vision based on sustainability.

Direction 1b:      Council is a leader in the deliver of social, financial and operational activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Councillors’ attendance at conferences has been allowed for in the 2013-14 budget.

 

Conclusion

 

It is important that Council is open to new ideas, is flexible enough to adapt to changing circumstances and experienced enough to know what to maintain and what to change. This conference tackles these challenges and, as economic development is a high priority for our community, Councillors interested in attending this conference should advise the General Manager’s office.

 

Recommendation

 

That Councillors interested in attending the 18th annual “Sustainable Economic Growth for Regional Australia” (SEGRA) conference from 8 through to 10 October 2014 advise the General Manager’s office.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM1/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Re-Dedication Ceremony - Kokoda Memorial Park Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/06877

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     acknowledge the email received from the Kensington & West Kingsford Precinct         on 24 January 2014 requesting a re-dedication ceremony for Kokoda Park to be     held on 2 November 2014;

 

b)     bring back a report into holding such a ceremony; and

 

c)     bring back a report and consult with all relevant stakeholders to investigate the feasibility of re-instating the obelisk that was removed from the park, which was dedicated to the soldiers who made the supreme sacrifice by protecting Australia from foreign invasion.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM2/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - Dedicated Multicultural Event

Folder No:                   F2004/07648

Submitted by:          Councillor  Shurey, North Ward     

 

 

That Council incorporate a dedicated multicultural event into the annual calendar of Council events, to celebrate and show our pride in the diverse cultures that make up Randwick City.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM3/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Request for Annual Multicultural Festival

Folder No:                   F2004/07648

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward      

 

 

That Council hold an annual multicultural festival to celebrate the diversity of Randwick City.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM4/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Child Safety Awareness

Folder No:                   F2004/06184

Submitted by:          Councillor Bowen, East Ward     

 

 

That:

 

a)    Council notes the number of tragic accidents involving children and motor vehicles either exiting, entering or negotiating driveways or other areas of private property.

 

b)    Council investigate and bring back a report on a safety awareness campaign for drivers, focusing on child safety awareness for driver’s on private property, in particular exiting and entering private properties through driveways, with such campaign to be run in conjunction with Council’s existing information campaigns highlighting traffic safety for school and infant children; and

 

c)    if appropriate, Council’s existing driver awareness information for traffic safety awareness for school and infant children be updated to include commencement of the journey to school/care from private residences and the return journey as well.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM5/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Shurey - Response to reports of black algae spread in Clovelly Bay

Folder No:                   F2004/07490

Submitted by:          Councillor Shurey, North Ward     

 

 

That Council note reports of black algae spread in Clovelly Bay and:

 

a)     call for wider feedback from the diving and snorkeling fraternity on the degree of spread of algae and the observed impact on Blue Groper and other species and bring a report back to Council on the received responses;

b)     responds to these public responses by considering commissioning an environmental study of potential dangers to aquatic species in Clovelly Bay;

c)       as an interim measure, consider erecting signage to warn snorkelers of the possible negative environmental consequences of the practice of crushing sea urchins to feed Blue Groper and other species.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM6/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Use of grounds of Australian Turf Club for UNSW Student Parking

Folder No:                   F2006/00681

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council, as per the resolution passed on 27 November 2012, re-affirm its position to arrange a meeting with representatives of the ATC and UNSW (and Council's General Manager and the CEO of the ATC be invited to attend) to discuss the possibility of using the grounds of the ATC for student parking during semester times.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM7/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stavrinos - Randwick Local Government Area - Housing Affordability

Folder No:                   F2011/00536

Submitted by:          Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     note the article in the Sydney Morning Herald published on 24 January 2014      titled "welcome to Sydney's new million-dollar suburbs".

 

b)     note that in 2 decades, the number of suburbs with a median house price of $1        million or more, has "soared" and now includes most notably many suburbs in   the Randwick local government area( indeed the great bulk of the Randwick     local government area)

 

c)     note the adverse negative social impacts caused by housing un-affordability,    including the inability for lower paid workers such as nurses, school teachers,       child-care workers, social workers and emergency services workers, to live in   our local area and therefore close to where they work.

 

d)     note that the Randwick local government area is home to the Prince of Wales   Hospital, the University of NSW and many public schools, where many of these   lower paid workers are employed.

 

e)     note the negative environmental impacts caused by the need for these workers        to commute by private motor vehicles, which burn fossil fuels, create carbon emissions and result in highly-competitive demand for parking in our town    centres and local streets.

 

f)     note the adverse negative infrastructure impacts caused by the need for these        workers to commute to their work, such as the impact on public transport        provision.

 

g)     note that Randwick City Council has a number of housing affordability initiatives        and policies such as the Joint Venture with NSW Housing in Minneapolis     Crescent, Maroubra and the collection of developer funds and land   dedication (via S.94) and voluntary planning agreements.

 

h)     note that these initiatives although worthwhile and extremely important, are     not sufficient to address the crisis we are facing in the Randwick Local        Government area.

 

i)      bring back a report on additional ways in which Council can help address the     housing affordability crisis in the Randwick local government area.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM8/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Overnight camping issue in Wolseley Road

Folder No:                   F2011/00455

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

That Council respond to resident complaints over low budget travelers camping in Wolseley Street and adjacent reserve land by bringing forward a report on:

 

a)    the degree of community support for an appropriately signed resident preferred parking scheme in Wolseley Road;

 

b)    discussions with the local area command seeking joint Police and Council actions to move overnight campers on and the targeting of budget rental van companies found to be supplying vehicles used by overnight campers in the area of interest;

 

c)    a review of the efficiency of current signage prohibiting camping in the adjacent park land; and

 

d)    other strategies considered potentially effective by Council officers.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM9/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion by Cr Garcia - Proposed Installation of automated external defibrillators

Folder No:                   F2013/00420

Submitted by:          Councillor Garcia, South Ward     

 

 

That Council investigate the possibility of installing automated external defibrillators in Council operated publicly accessible buildings in the City of Randwick.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM10/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Garcia - Environmental Management - Coogee Beach

Folder No:                   F2004/06464

Submitted by:          Councillor Garcia, South Ward     

 

 

That, in light of recent reported polluting of Coogee beach via the storm water drain at the northern end of the beach, Council:

a)     examine ways to increase public awareness among residents about:

(i) the route of the stormwater pipe which drains at the northern end of

Coogee beach;

(ii) the impact of the dumping of pollutants into our stormwater drains; and

(iii)  who residents can contact to report incidents of pollution, and

b)     investigate the possible standstone repair of the sandstone wall along the storm       water drain at the northern end of Coogee beach; and

c)    investigate long term alternatives for the amelioration of water pollution from the Coogee beach storm water drain at the northern end of the beach.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM11/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Crs Andrews & Stavrinos - Proposed Reduction in Minimum Allotment Size in Randwick City

Folder No:                   F2011/06159

Submitted by:          Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

1)     Acknowledge that many Sydney metropolitan council’s have minimum allotment sizes aimed at addressing the social, financial and economic impacts caused by      housing un-affordability.  These include:

 

        Bankstown Council – 250 sqm, 15 metre frontage (attached dwelling)

        Canterbury Council – 300 sqm, 15 metre frontage

        Rockdale Council – 350 sqm, 15 metre frontage

        Strathfield Council – 280 sqm

        Sutherland Shire Council – 300 sqm, 18 metre frontage

        Botany Council – varies according to location in LGA

 

2)     Reviews its current minimum allotment size of 400sqm with the aim of reducing the minimum allotment size to address the social, economic and financial   impacts caused by housing un-affordability.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM12/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Garcia - Commemoration Marking Centenary of First World War

Folder No:                   F2008/00317

Submitted by:          Councillor Garcia, South Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

a)     Note that on 4 August 2014, worldwide commemorations marking the       centenary of the First World War, will commence and continue until 2018;

 

b)     Note that bells will be rung at dusk across NSW and Australia to mark the centenary;

 

c)     Note that more than 4,000 residents of Randwick fought in the First World War;

d)     Note that the residents of Randwick have always sought to remember and        honour the sacrifices of those residents who served in the First World War;

 

e)     Note that a number of monuments remembering those residents who fought in   World War I have been built, and continue to be built, throughout the city and   Randwick Road, a major arterial road that connects Randwick to the city was    renamed ANZAC Parade in 1917;

       

e)     Investigate, in consultation with local stakeholders including the Coogee   Randwick Clovelly RSL Sub-Branch, an appropriate way for the community       to mark the centenary of WWI on 4 August 2014 and remember the sacrifices      of those residents who fought in that war. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM13/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Bowen - Proposed Study into Seasonal long term and Overnight Recreational Living

Folder No:                   F2011/00455

Submitted by:          Councillor Bowen, East Ward     

 

 

That Council:

 

1)     In response to recent complaints about seasonal longterm and overnight recreational living in motor vehicles, camper vans and caravans in Council’s     beachside parks, reserves and streets that  Council undertake a study to determine the effectiveness of strategies taken to date and whether further         measures in response might be required;

 

2)     Invite residents to participate in the study; and


3)     A report be brought back to council on the results of the study.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM14/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stevenson - Review of Council IT policy to stop unecessary transmission towers

Folder No:                   F2012/00087

Submitted by:          Councillor Stevenson, Central Ward     

 

 

That Council review it's long term Information Technology plan and bring back to an ordinary Council meeting recommendations that make provisions for the following changes to the plan:   

 

1.          Eliminate the need for the implementation of microwave link technology to connect council sites and facilities in residential areas.

 

2.          Engage in discussions with NBNCO regarding the long term facilities that will be available to Council for streaming high volume data between Council sites.

 

3.          Identify where there are alternative and more cost effective methods for streaming high volume data between Council sites and methods to reduce the need for high speed high volume data traffic between Council sites.

 

4.          Identify the most cost effective methods for delivering to residents localised free accessible wifi at typical public wifi data speeds at the three identified Council test sites prior to developing any plan for delivering broader free resident or visitor wifi services.    

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM15/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Stevenson - Making South Coogee Childcare Centres Safer

Folder No:                   F2004/06276

Submitted by:          Councillor Stevenson, Central Ward     

 

 

That:

 

i)      Council initiate a traffic study and prepare a traffic management plan that maximises safety outcomes for children parents and pedestrians in the vicinity of the two childcare centres located on Moverly Rd South Coogee between Elphinstone Road and Malabar Road; and

 

ii)     the above study take into consideration the following enhancements to the      streetscape and intersection and provide a report to Council on the cost to      Council of implementing these enhancements.

        a)     Ensure there is a continuous footpath on both sides of the road for 300                   meters either side of both child care centre.

        b)     Earthworks required to widen the road to ensure there is a stopping zone         with a curb side footpath on the Northern side of Moverly Rd between                    Elphinstone Road and Malabar Road.

        c)     Traffic calming measures and/or redirection of traffic into and out of the                  intersection of Coldstream Street and Moverly Road.

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice No. NM16/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Motion from Cr Matson - Exploring options for a Ciclovia style event in the Randwick Council area

Folder No:                   F2013/00506

Submitted by:          Councillor Matson, East Ward     

 

 

That Council notes the extremely popular Better Block event that was recently held in Clovelly and will remain open to exploring further opportunities for involving local communities in alternative uses for their local streets by seeking feedback from Leichhardt Council on how its proposal for a Ciclovia style event is progressing.

 

 

 

 

  


Ordinary Council                                                                                               25 February 2014

 

 

Notice of Rescission Motion No. NR1/14

 

 

Subject:                  Notice of Rescission Motion from Crs Andrews, Stavrinos and Roberts - Alcohol and Drug Related Violence - Liquor Licensing Law Reforms

Folder No:                   F2004/07767

Submitted by:          Councillor Andrews, Central Ward; Councillor Stavrinos, West Ward; Councillor Roberts, East Ward     

 

That the resolution passed at the Planning Committee meeting held on Tuesday 11 February 2014 in relation to Mayoral Minute MM1/14 – Alcohol and Drug Related Violence – Liquor Licensing Law Reforms reading as follows:

 

RESOLUTION: (Neilson/Shurey) that:

 

a)    this Mayoral Minute be received and noted and that Council continue to liaise with the Eastern Beaches Local Area Commander in relation to the issues raised in this Mayoral Minute.

 

b)    the consumption and distribution of alcoholic beverages be banned in the beachside reserves adjacent to Coogee and Clovelly Beaches and Gordon’s Bay for a trial period of two (2) years, in order to determine whether it would be appropriate to extend the ban throughout the City, and that appropriate signage be installed in these locations.

 

BE AND IS HEREBY RESCINDED.

 

If the Rescission Motion is carried, it is intended to move the following motion:

 

That Council adopt recommendation in MM1/14 with the effect that Council not proceed with a total prohibition of the consumption of alcohol on beachside parks of Clovelly and Coogee.