Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 3 December 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                             3 December 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, 30 Frances Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 3 December 2013 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (S Nash), Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, D’Souza (Deputy Chairperson), Garcia, Matson, Moore, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos (Chairperson) & Stevenson

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 12 November 2013

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 66 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W55/13     Tree Removal - Adjacent 22 Oswald Street, Randwick................................ 1

W56/13     Proposed Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ) for Future Music Festival..................... 15    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                             3 December 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W55/13

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Adjacent 22 Oswald Street, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introductionn

 

On 18 July 2013 the owner of 22 Oswald Street, Randwick, emailed Council detailing a number of issues relating to three large Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping figs) street trees growing on the nature strip adjacent to her property (in St Marks Road) and requesting that these trees be removed and replaced with Weeping Lilly Pillys, as has been done outside 77 St Marks Road, Randwick.

 

Issues

 

In the email to Council referred to above, the owner of this property advises that fig tree roots have made considerable inroads into the property, to the extent that they have undermined the foundations of the residence itself and have caused sizable cracking in a number of internal walls. They also advise that tree roots have been found under the bathroom shower stall and have also emerged through a crack in the bathroom slab. Fig tree roots have also cracked the brick fence between two of the trees and the residence in several places and are protruding above the ground in a number of areas within the property. A long section of the footpath adjacent to the property, in St Marks Road, has had to be replaced in bitumen because of the size and diameter of a large number of tree roots and the fact that these cannot be severed or pruned because any such action would render the trees unstable and would have a severely detrimental impact on their health. In addition, for well over a decade tree roots have entered and blocked the stormwater and sewer pipes within the property and these have to be cleared by Council’s plumbers on a regular basis.

 

The canopies of all three trees have to be regularly pruned well back from the roof of the residence and rear garage and the amount of property overhang means that the gutters and rear yard have to be cleared of leaf litter and debris all year round. A large section of roadway in St Marks Road adjacent to these trees has had to be replaced only recently because of tree root damage and significant roots protrude above the nature strip and overhang the kerb and gutter.

 

The southern-most tree is located within two metres of a large stormwater pit and leaf litter and fruit drop from all three trees causes an ongoing maintenance issue involving the cleaning of affected sections of footpath and roadway and the pit cover at the bottom of the street.  

 

The three subject trees average between eighteen-twenty metres in height with canopy spreads of around twenty metres. They are all in good health and contribute significantly to the visual amenity of the streetscape.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of these three large Hill’s Weeping figs and their replacement with three-four super-advanced Weeping Lilly Pillys would cost in the vicinity of $15,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The three large Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing adjacent to 22 Oswald Street, Randwick, are all in good health and form part of a predominantly single species avenue planting along the eastern side of St Marks Road, Randwick. They are estimated to be approximately sixty years old and up until now every effort has been made to retain them, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity.

 

The trees have been assessed as having important scenic and amenity value and with providing habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the range and increasing severity of damage being caused by their roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Due to the size and amount of root material required to be removed from the trees to effectively deal with the damage being caused by their roots, root pruning of any kind is not a viable option. This is supported by the findings and recommendations of Council’s Tree Gang arborists when excavations were recently undertaken adjacent to where the trees are located.

 

The only feasible long-term management option would be to remove the three trees entirely and to replace them with a more appropriate tree species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan. This is reinforced by the fact that roots from the two figs immediately adjacent to the residence are causing structural damage to the building that is not only clearly visible but which could be potentially catastrophic. Because two trees of the same species have been removed from this section of St Marks Road, Randwick, within the past twelve months the removal of any of these figs would contravene Council’s resolution that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year. However, the range and seriousness of tree root damage being caused by the roots of the two southern-most fig trees in particular is such that action to mitigate this damage needs to be taken at the earliest opportunity. Because the structural damage being caused by the roots of the northern-most Ficus ‘Hillii’ essentially involves only public infrastructure at this stage, it would be possible for this tree to be retained in the short-medium term to minimise the impact that removal of the other two trees would have on the streetscape.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the two (2) southern-most Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping figs) growing adjacent to the property at 22 Oswald Street, Randwick, be removed and that they be replaced with two-three advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

b)     the northern-most Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree adjacent to the garage at the rear of 22 Oswald Street, Randwick, be retained and that root damage caused by this tree be monitored over the next five years until any replacement Weeping Lilly Pillys to the south become well established.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the size of the subject Council owned street trees and the range of damage being caused by their roots.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the size of the subject Council owned street trees and the range of damage being caused by their roots.

Attachment 1

 

 

The three subject fig trees form an imposing green wall along St Marks Road

 

Cracking in wall adjacent to where one of the subject Council Ficus ‘Hillii’ is located

 

Large cracks in the cornice extend around the room and down the length of the wall

 

Crack in the wall likely to be caused by upward pressure underneath foundations

 

More cracking around cornice area consistent with other damage to residence

 

Relatively small crack in brick fence caused by fig tree roots from adjacent tree

 

Larger crack immediately adjacent to where southern-most fig tree is located.

 

Photograph shows extent of upward pressure caused by fig roots to brick fence. (South tree)

 

Fig tree roots have forced their way through mortar between the bricks in the fence. (Middle Tree

 

Another section of brick fence dislodged by fig tree roots adjacent to rear garage. (North tree)

 

One of a number of protruding fig tree roots within the lawn area inside the property

 

All three figs are significant in the streetscape and provide important visual amenity

 

Because of their size there is significant property overhang over roof and residence

 

Section of roadway recently replaced because fig tree root damage. (South tree)

 

Branches have to be regularly pruned away from service wires and Optus cable

 

 

 

Large buttress roots overhanging and dislodging kerb and cracking roadway (South Tree)

 

Several large tree roots snaking out from middle fig tree into the adjacent residence (Middle Tree)

 

Southern-most fig tree is located within close proximity to a large stormwater pit (South Tree)

 

Mass of large roots undermining brick fence and entering adjacent property (South Tree)

 

Similar sized roots entering the rear of the adjacent property further to the south.

 

 

 

Large roots averaging 250mm in diameter undermining footpath and entering property (South Tree)

 

Section of fig tree root typical of numerous roots entering and undermining residence (Middle Tree)


Works Committee                                                                                             3 December 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W56/13

 

 

Subject:                  Proposed Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ) for Future Music Festival

Folder No:                   F2005/00873

Author:                   Marianne Nicholls, Parks & Recreation Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Following the last Future Music Festival event held in March 2013 at the Royal Randwick Racecourse, Local Police made an application to Council for the streets surrounding the event to be declared a temporary Alcohol Free Zone (AFZ) for the day of the event only.

 

In response to the request Randwick City Council is proposing to establish a temporary AFZ in the streets surrounding the Randwick Racecourse, during the Future Music Festival held annually in March.

 

Attachment 1 is a map showing the area proposed to be covered by the AFZ.

 

Issues

 

Background

 

The temporary AFZ would apply for the duration of the event only and will apply for four years.  The next Future Music Festival is on Saturday 8 March 2014.  It is anticipated that a temporary AFZ during the Future Music Festival will discourage alcohol-related anti-social behaviour and crime from occurring in the local area.

 

AFZs prohibit the drinking of alcohol in specific public roads or car parks under the care and control of Council.  AFZs do not include parks and reserves, which are separately regulated.  An AFZ is established and operates under the NSW Local Government Act 1993.  The Zone excludes areas licensed by Council as outdoor eating areas.  In an alcohol free zone, you cannot drink alcohol in the specified streets and/or car parks.

 

Community Consultation

In October/November 2013, Council undertook community consultation to fulfill legislative requirements for the establishment of an AFZ.  Council sought community comments on the proposal.

 

Council received 30 submissions, all in support of the proposed temporary AFZ for the Future Music Festival.

 

The submissions received are summarised in Attachment 2.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2c:      Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

New signs will be required to cover the proposed temporary AFZ.  Funds are available in the 2013-14 Capital Works Budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The submissions received are in full support of the proposal to establish a temporary AFZ for the day of the Future Music Festival.

 

As the NSW Police (Eastern Beaches Local Area Command) initiated the proposed AFZ, Council has their full support for the proposal.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council establishes a temporary AFZ for the day of the Future Music Festival and that the temporary AFZ be valid for four years from March 2014.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Map showing the proposed temporary AFZ for the Future Music Festival

 

2.

Summary of Submissions available for Councillors upon request

 

 

 

 


Map showing the proposed temporary AFZ for the Future Music Festival

Attachment 1