Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 11 June 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 11 June 2013 at 6:00 p.m.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (T Bowen), Andrews, Belleli, D’Souza (Deputy Chairperson), Garcia, Matson, Moore, Nash, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos and Stevenson (Chairperson)

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 14 May 2013

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Privacy warning;

In respect to Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act, members of the public are advised that the proceedings of this meeting will be recorded for the purposes of clause 66 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W17/13     Tree Removal - Outside 3 Quail Street, Coogee......................................... 1

W18/13     Tree Removal - Outside 10 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington......................... 5

W19/13     Tree Removal - Adjacent 289 Maroubra Road, Maroubra............................ 11

W20/13     Dunningham Reserve Irrigation Works..................................................... 19

W21/13     1408 Anzac Parade, Little Bay - Street and Park Names............................ 23

W22/13     Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee....................................... 31

W23/13     Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee................... 37

W24/13     Future installation of Outdoor Gym Equipment......................................... 45    

 

 

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W17/13

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 3 Quail Street, Coogee

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

On 21 March 2013 the owner of 3 Quail Street, Coogee, wrote to Council detailing a number of issues relating to the large Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree growing on the nature strip outside that property and requesting that the tree be removed and replaced with a more appropriate species.

 

Issues

 

The owner of this property has been experiencing a range of problems directly associated with the Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing on the nature strip for well over a decade and these problems have become worse over the past four-five years. They range from tree roots damaging the driveway and the footpath adjacent to the property to sewer blockages occurring on a regular basis at this property and the adjoining block of units at 5 Quail Street, Coogee. In fact, for well over a decade tree roots have entered and blocked the stormwater and sewer pipes within the property and they have had to be cleared by Council’s plumbers on a regular basis. The property owner also cites continual and severe leaf drop blocking his gutters and Grey headed Flying foxes roosting in the tree as major issues for himself and his family. The adjacent footpath and other damaged infrastructure have been repaired on a number of occasions and fig tree roots have been severed or shaved as much as possible to facilitate those repairs.

 

The tree is approximately 16-18 metres in height with a canopy spread of around twelve metres. It is in good health and contributes significantly to the visual amenity of the streetscape. It is one of only two trees of this species remaining on the southern side of Quail Street and it provides habitat and food source for a variety of birdlife and native fauna. The canopy has had to be regularly pruned around overhead low voltage powerlines and domestic service wires to maintain statutory clearances as well as being pruned back from the residence at the property owner’s request. This ongoing and severe pruning has adversely impacted on the visual aesthetics of the tree and has compromised its natural growth habit and form.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the tree outside 3 Quail Street, Coogee, and its replacement with a super-advanced alternative species would cost in the vicinity of $5,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 


Conclusion

 

The Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing outside 3 Quail Street is in reasonable health and is one of only two growing along the south side of the street. The subject tree is estimated to be approximately sixty years old and up until this point every effort has been made to retain it, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity. The tree has been assessed as having important scenic and amenity value and with providing habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the damage being caused by its roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Because of the size and amount of root material required to be removed from the tree to effectively deal with the damage being caused by its roots, root pruning is not considered a viable option. This is supported by the findings and recommendations of Council’s Tree Gang arborists when excavations were recently undertaken adjacent to where the tree is located.

 

The property owner has provided a quotation to Council to repair the sewer damage being caused by the roots of the subject tree and to reline his sewer pipes and this has been stated as being in the vicinity of $12,000. The only feasible long-term management option would be to remove the tree entirely and to replace it with a more appropriate tree species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Council resolved on 4 December 2012 that the Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 11 Quail Street, Coogee, be removed and replaced with an advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly). This means that removal of the fig outside 3 Quail Street, Coogee, would contravene Council’s resolution that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 3 Quail Street, Coogee, be removed post-December 2013 and that it be replaced with an advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the size of the subject tree and the range of damage being caused by its roots.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the size of the subject tree and the range of damage being caused by its roots.                                                                                                                     Attachment 1

                                                                    

Tree canopy has to be regularly pruned off the property and away from powerlines

 

Tree drops copious amounts of leaf litter and is located above Sydney Water mains

Fig tree roots regularly damage and undermine adjacent footpath and driveway

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W18/13

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 10 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

On 29 March 2013 the owner of 10 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, wrote to Council requesting the removal of a very large and significant Council owned Eucalyptus grandis (Flooded gum) and a smaller Agonis flexuosa (Willow Myrtle) growing on the nature strip outside her property.

 

Issues

 

This tree was inspected on a regular basis since 2003, however due to the tree’s good health and prominence in the streetscape and the fact that until now the problems associated with the tree were relatively minor, removal has always been refused. However, because the property owner has now nominated a range of tree root damage inside her property which she attributes to roots from one or both of these Council street trees, the footpath and driveway outside both 8 and 10 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, were recently removed to allow a proper assessment of those issues.

 

Council records indicate that this tree was canopy pruned in March, 2006, but this is the only type of maintenance pruning that has been required within the past decade and this pruning has only ever been minor and predominately involved the removal of deadwood. A request by the adjacent property owner to remove this tree was initially assessed and a report sent to Works Committee on 22 October, 2003. It was resolved at that meeting that the tree was significant and that it be retained. The tree was again inspected on Wednesday, 11 July, 2007, and found it to be in excellent health and contributing significantly to the surrounding streetscape.

 

The subject tree is a landmark within the street and is arguably the healthiest tree within the immediate vicinity. It is approximately twenty metres tall with a canopy spread of around 16-18 metres. The species is native to the NSW north coast region and is an important provider of habitat and food source for a variety of native birds and other fauna. At the time of the 2007 inspection there was no evidence of any branches having failed within the canopy and there was very little leaf litter and other debris littering the nature strip and footpath. There were two-three smallish dead branches within the canopy and these were removed in the interests of public safety. There was some minor borer damage on the lower trunk of the tree but this had calloused over and indicated that the tree was healthy and responding well to injury.

 

Due to the size and significance of the tree an independent arborist was engaged by Council in January 2008 to inspect the tree and provide a report on its long-term health and viability. That report concluded that he tree had high retention value and should be retained.  

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the Flooded gum and Willow Myrtle growing on the nature strip outside 10 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, and their replacement with an advanced alternative species would cost in the vicinity of $6,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council owned Eucalyptus grandis (Flooded gum) growing outside 10 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, has significant amenity and horticultural value. The adjacent Willow Myrtle is much less so but both trees are important providers of habitat and food source. As a result of the correspondence sent to Council by the property owner on 29 March 2013 and two supplementary letters sent on 18 April 2013 and 22 April 2013 Council’s Road Services section was instructed to remove the footpath outside that property and the driveway outside 8 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, so that tree root damage/intrusion could be assessed by Council’s tree gang arborists. The property owner advises Council that roots are intruding into the front of her property and that they have lifted the walkway between the property boundary and the front steps.

 

Council’s Tree Gang has advised that because of the spread and amount of root material required to be removed from both trees to effectively deal with the range of damage being caused by their roots, root pruning is not a viable option. Not only would any such root pruning destabilise the trees but it would impact severely on their long-term health and viability – particularly the Flooded gum which is on a slight lean in the opposite direction to where any root pruning would be required.

 

The only feasible long-term management option would be to remove the two trees entirely and to replace them with a more appropriate tree species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan. As the large Flooded gum is not a Ficus ‘Hillii’ its removal and replacement will not contravene Council’s resolution that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council-owned Eucalyptus grandis (Flooded gum) and the Agonis flexuosa (Willow Myrtle) growing outside 10 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, be removed and replaced with an advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the size and importance of the two subject trees in the streetscape and the damage being caused by their roots.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the size and importance of the two subject trees in the streetscape and the damage being caused by their roots.

Attachment 1

 

 

Flooded gum is extremely significant in Inglethorpe Avenue streetscape

 

Willow Myrtle is much smaller but is an important provider of habitat/food source

 

Large numbers of roots from the gum and Willow Myrtle are entering adjacent property

 

Significant amount of tree root material runs along the entire property frontage

 

 

 

Large matted roots from Flooded gum running into property at 8 Inglethorpe Avenue

 

Flooded gum is on a lean that precludes any sort of required root pruning

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W19/13

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Adjacent 289 Maroubra Road, Maroubra

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

On 22 March 2013 Council’s Tree Gang was called to inspect a section of footpath excavated adjacent to 289 Maroubra Road, Maroubra, where a number of fig tree roots from a Council street tree had cracked a Sydney Water mains to the extent that associated damage could not be repaired without major root pruning being undertaken.

 

Issues

 

These two fig trees average sixteen-eighteen metres in height with canopy spreads of around fourteen metres. They are both in good health and contribute significantly to the Mons Avenue streetscape. They are also important providers of habitat and food source for a variety of native birdlife and other fauna. Over the past decade the adjacent footpath has had to be repaired on a number of occasions because of tree root damage but roots continue to cause ongoing and increasing damage to public infrastructure. Council recently trenched along the front of both adjacent townhouses and this revealed a number of large fig tree roots entering those properties. Council’s Tree Gang advises that it would not be possible to remove the amount of damaging tree root material required to abate the damage being caused by the roots of these trees without seriously compromising their stability and long-term viability. Both trees have had to be regularly pruned back to the property alignment area and have to be regularly pruned well clear of an adjacent street light. The trees also create a major shading issue for adjacent property owners and leaf litter build up is significant and ongoing. Sydney Water has installed a temporary water mains diversion around the base of the two trees until a decision is made about their removal/replacement.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:       Develop and implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the two Hill’s Weeping figs adjacent to 289 Maroubra Road, Maroubra, and their replacement with two-three advanced Cupaniopsis anacardioides (Tuckeroos) would cost in the vicinity of $8,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The two Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street trees growing adjacent to 289 Maroubra Road, Maroubra, have significant visual amenity and historic significance. The trees are estimated to be approximately sixty years old and up until now Council has been committed to retaining them, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity. Both trees have been assessed as having significant scenic and amenity value and with providing important habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the damage being caused by their roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Using Australian Standard ASDR99307 both trees have been calculated as having an average amenity value of $14,400 each. Due to the size and amount of root material required to be removed from both trees to effectively deal with the damage being caused by their roots, root pruning is not in any way a viable option. This is supported by the findings and recommendations made by Council’s Tree Gang arborists when a trench was recently dug adjacent to where the trees are situated.

 

The Tree Gang found that because a substantial percentage of the root mass is located on the eastern side of the trees, severance of roots along the property boundary in such close proximity could result in the death of the trees or cause destabilization of the root plates due to the removal of supporting structural roots as well as vital feeder root mass. Effectively, therefore, the only practicable long-term management option is to remove the two subject trees and to replace them with a more appropriate tree species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan. The removal of these trees will certainly have a detrimental impact on the Mons Avenue streetscape that will in no way be able to be mitigated by the planting of advanced replacement trees. However, Tuckeroos are a fast growing species that will attain a reasonable size at maturity and they will eventually provide dense shade from the westerly sun without being responsible for any serious tree root damage to either public infrastructure or private property.

 

As these two fig trees are the only examples of this species in Mons Avenue, Maroubra, their removal and replacement will not contravene Council’s resolution that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year.

 

Recommendation

 

That the two Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping figs) street trees growing adjacent to 289 Maroubra Road, Maroubra, be removed and replaced with two-three Cupaniopsis anarcardioides (Tuckeroos) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the importance of the subject trees in the streetscape and the damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by their roots

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the importance of the subject trees in the streetscape and the damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by their roots

Attachment 1

 

 

The two subject fig trees are significant in the Mons Avenue streetscape

 

Branches have to be regularly pruned right back from the property and street light

 

 

Roots have encased and cracked the Sydney Water mains and caused flooding

 

Large mass of fig tree roots responsible for water mains collapse and leaking

 

 

Excavation revealed extensive amounts of tree root material in vicinity of water mains

 

Fig tree roots regularly uplift and damage adjacent footpath slabs despite root pruning

       

Large fig tree root has cracked and uplifted recently laid footpath slab

 

View along Mons Avenue showing footpath and driveway uplifted by fig tree roots

       

Slab immediately adjacent to townhouse 1 entranceway creating major trip hazard

 

Sydney Water had to install a temporary diversion because of fig tree root damage

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W20/13

 

 

Subject:                  Dunningham Reserve Irrigation Works

Folder No:                   F2008/00199

Author:                   George Bounassif, Manager Infrastructure Services     

 

Introduction

 

Following on from the successful completion of the irrigation system at Coogee Beach from Goldstein Reserve to Grant Reserve, it is proposed to install an irrigation system in Dunningham Reserve north Coogee. The system will irrigate a large portion of the turf surface and garden areas with harvested water extracted from the watercourse under Coogee Oval.

 

Issues

 

Council officers have put together an irrigation design to water the majority of turf surface at Dunningham Reserve.  The design incorporates numerous pipes that will be trenched into the ground and numerous irrigation pop-up sprinkler heads that will operate on a timer.

 

In addition, an underground 200KL tank will be required and will be installed within the grounds of Dunningham Reserve (Attachment 1).  The tank will be constructed onsite and will be totally underground.  The underground tank is 9.8m in diameter and 2.4 metres deep.  A UV system will also be installed as a last filtration measure prior to the water being released through the sprinkler heads. It is proposed to install the UV filter into a vandal proof box which will be attached to the side of the existing “Fishermans” building (attached).  The UV box is 2.4m long x 2m high x 800 deep.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10f:     A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, re-use and water quality improvements is adopted.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Council has received funding through the climate change fund, administered by the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) to the amount of $310,000.

 

Conclusion

 

Council has received funding from Office Environment and Heritage to continue the Coogee Stormwater Harvesting Project. The final stage of the project is Dunningham Reserve. The proposal will include the installation of an underground tank, installation of a UV filter and the installation of pipes and pop up sprinklers to water the turf and garden areas across the entire reserve.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council approve the installation of an underground tank, UV filter, pipes and pop up sprinklers to water the turf and garden areas across Dunningham Reserve.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Diagram of Proposed location of underground tank and UV filter unit

 

2.View

Diagram of Proposed UV Filter location

 

 

 

 


Diagram of Proposed location of underground tank and UV filter unit

Attachment 1

 

 

Proposed location of underground tank and UV filter unit

 

 


Diagram of Proposed UV Filter location

Attachment 2

 

 

Proposed Irrigation Layout

 

UV Filter attached to the building

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W21/13

 

 

Subject:                  1408 Anzac Parade, Little Bay - Street and Park Names

Folder No:                   DA/812/2011

Author:                   Stephen Audet, Coordinator Engineering Services     

 

Introduction

 

The Little Bay Cove development at 1408 Anzac Parade, Little Bay includes the dedication of streets and a park to Council.

 

The developer has submitted a proposal for the naming of the streets and park within the development.

 

Issues

 

The guidelines set by the Geographical Names Board of NSW for the naming of roads have been considered during the review of the proposal. These guidelines stipulate that street names should be unique.  Name duplication within a local government area or adjacent local government areas should be avoided.  Similarity in road names within these areas should also be discouraged. The preferred sources for road names outlined by these guidelines include Aboriginal names, local history, early explorers, pioneers, settlers and other eminent persons, war/casualty lists or thematic names such as flora, fauna or shops.

 

The Little Bay Cove development is situated between the northern section of the Coast Golf Course and Anzac Parade, and between the existing residential houses on Gubbuteh Road and Bilga Crescent.  Its location is shown in Attachment 1.  The Street layout with proposed names is in Attachment 2.

 

The proposed names are found in the table below.

 

PROPOSED NAME

THEME

DESCRIPTION

Cawood Avenue

Local History

Dorothy Cawood trained as a nurse at Coast Hospital and enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 14 November 1914 as a staff nurse serving in both Egypt and France. She was one of a group of four nurses who became the first members of the Australian Army Nursing Service to be awarded Military Medals.

Cordia Street

Local History

Maylean Cordia (OAM) was another Prince Henry nurse who became founding president of the hospital’s Trained Nurses Association. 

Bamburr Way

Indigenous History

Bamburr is a local aboriginal word for grass. 

Dickinson Way

Local History

Sir Harold Dickinson was the CEO of Prince Henry Hospital from 1960-63.  It is noted on the Coast Golf Course website that during his tenure the course was resurrected for staff use and to protect the Little Bay foreshores as open space.

Solarch Avenue

Local History

The eastern end of this road was the site of the Solarch Solar Research Centre, an initiative of the University of NSW, the former owners of the site. Solarch was the first building to generate grid connected solar power in NSW. As such it is a place of significance in the development of Green energy in this country. 

Galaup Street

 

Local History

The French Navy officer and explorer known as La Perouse was named Jean-François de Galaup. He added ‘La Parouse’ to his name which was the name of his family estate thus forming his full title: Jean François de Galaup, comte de Lapérouse.

Belbowrie Road

Local History

The TSS Belbowrie ,with a cargo of blue metal from Shellharbour struck rocks at the southern end of Maroubra Beach on 16 January 1939. The 10 man crew was rescued when ropes were secured from shore to ship, and with help from the police and locals. 

Lapwing Street

Local Fauna

Masked Lapwings (Vanellus miles) are large, ground-dwelling birds that are closely related to the waders. This bird has been recorded onsite during fauna studies, and the remediated wetlands will provide an ideal habitat for this species.

Fairway Terrace

 

Local Environment

This street runs south from Cawood Ave, and then curves around to the east near the southern boundary adjacent to the golf course. 

Dune Street

 

Local History and Environment

The original landscape of the estate consisted of stable sand dunes with Banksia scrub and coastal heath. These dunes were removed by sandmining on the site in the 1960s. The name refers to the original historical land form.  

Marang Lane

 

Indigenous History

Marang is a local Indigenous word meaning “sand”.

Christo Street

 

Local History

In 1969 the iconic artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrapped the cliffs at Little Bay. Called Wrapped Coast – One Million Square Feet, Little Bay, Sydney, Australia, 1969 . Wrapped Coast was the largest single artwork that had ever been made at the time.  

Little Bay Park

Local Context

This name ties the estate and the future community to Little Bay and the coast and helps differentiate the community from Prince Henry.  

Burriburri Park

Indigenous History

Burriburri is a local Indigenous word meaning “whale”. Whales are frequently seen off Little Bay during their annual migration.

 

The La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council was consulted in relation to the indigenous names proposed in accordance with the guidelines set by the Geographical Names Board of NSW.  Detailed descriptions supporting the selection of the names are found in Attachment 3.

 

 


Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4b:      New and existing development is managed by a robust framework.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed street and park names are well researched, locally relevant and comply with the guidelines set by the Geographical Names Board of NSW. 

 

As a result of this review, the proposed street and park names have been put forward for approval and endorsement by Council prior to public advertisement of the names and statutory notification to public bodies.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)   Council endorse street and park names as proposed and that the proposed for the Little Bay Cove development.

 

b)   the developer be advised to advertise the proposed street and park names and notify the public bodies in accordance with Division 2 of Road Regulations 2008.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Aerial View Location Map

 

2.View

Map with Street Layout and Proposed Names

 

3.View

Street and Park Name Descriptions

 

 

 

 


Aerial View Location Map

Attachment 1

 

 


Map with Street Layout and Proposed Names

Attachment 2

 

 


Street and Park Name Descriptions

Attachment 3

 

 




Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W22/13

 

 

Subject:                  Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee

Folder No:                   PROJ/10515/2009

Author:                   Terry  Kefalianos, Drainage Engineer     

 

Introduction

 

The prime responsibility for planning and management of flood issues in NSW rests with local government.  Randwick City Council has committed to carrying out Flood Studies and preparing Floodplain Management Plans.  They are carried out in accordance with the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government) and will allow Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The first step in the floodplain management process is to complete a calibrated flood model of the catchment and flood study.  The Coogee Bay Flood Study, Final Report incorporating amendments to the draft that resulted from the public exhibition was presented at a meeting of the Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee on 17 April 2013.  A copy of the minutes from this meeting is attached to this report.

 

The outcome of this meeting is as follows:

 

·           The Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee recommend that Council adopt the Coogee Bay Flood Study, Final Report incorporating amendments to the draft that resulted from the public exhibition;

·           That work proceeds on preparation of the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

Issues

 

The NSW Government provides assistance on state-wide policy issues and technical support.  Financial assistance is also provided through grant funding to undertake flood studies and floodplain management studies and for the implementation of works identified in these studies.

 

The floodplain management process is outlined in the NSW Floodplain Development Manual and is summarised by the following figure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Floodplain Management Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Collection

è

Flood Study

è

Floodplain Management Study

è

Floodplain Management Plan

è

Plan Implementation

 

 

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time frame for completion

6-9 months

9-12 months

12 months

ongoing

The key steps in the process are the Flood Study, the Floodplain Management Study and the Floodplain Management Plan.

 

Public Exhibition

The Coogee Bay Flood Study was commissioned by Council and covers the portion of Randwick Council draining to Coogee Bay.  On 12 February 2013, Randwick Council’s Works Committee resolved that:

 

a) the Draft Coogee Bay Flood Study be placed on public exhibition for 28 days.

b) Council officers report back to Council detailing the outcomes of the public exhibition.

 

The Draft Coogee Bay Flood Study was paced on public exhibition from Tuesday 19 February 2013 to Tuesday 26 March 2013.  The community was notified of the flood study via newspaper advertisements in the Southern Courier.  In addition, 7317 letters were mailed to property owners in the catchment advising of the public exhibition.  The Draft Coogee Bay Flood Study was available for review by the community at the following locations:

 

·           Bowen Library, 669-673 Anzac Parade, Maroubra,

·           Randwick Library, Level 1 Royal Randwick Shopping Centre, Randwick,

·           Council’s administration centre, 30 Frances Street, Randwick

·           Council’s website at www.randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

In addition, a community information session was held at Bowen Library on Monday 11 March between 6pm and 8pm.

 

A total of five written submissions were received during the public exhibition period.  The submissions have been considered and found to be either general comments or observations that are consistent with the Flood Study.

 

Study Finalisation

The public exhibition comments received and the resulting consideration including a summary of the comments have been incorporated into the Coogee Bay Flood Study.  The Coogee Bay Flood Study will be completed when adopted by Council and will then assist with the next phase, the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  A Liveable City.

Direction:  Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                            community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding is available in this year’s budget to complete the Coogee Bay Flood study and to commence the Coogee Bay Floodplain Risk Management Study.  Two thirds of the funding is available through grant funding from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, with the remainder coming from Council funds in line with the conditions of the grant.

 

Conclusion

 

The Coogee Bay Flood Study has been placed on public exhibition and has now been finalised to the satisfaction of the Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee. 

 

The Flood Study is considered complete and will form the basis for commencement of the Floodplain Risk Management Study.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council adopts the Coogee Bay Flood Study.

 

b)     Work proceeds on preparation of the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Minutes - Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting - 17 April 2013

 

2.View

Summary of responses from the Coogee Bay Flood Study Public Exhibition

 

 

 

 


Minutes - Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting - 17 April 2013

Attachment 1

 

 



Summary of responses from the Coogee Bay Flood Study Public Exhibition

Attachment 2

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W23/13

 

 

Subject:                  Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee

Folder No:                   PROJ/10008/2005

Author:                   Terry  Kefalianos, Drainage Engineer     

 

Introduction

 

The prime responsibility for planning and management of flood issues in NSW rests with local government.  Randwick City Council has committed to carrying out Flood Studies and preparing Floodplain Management Plans.  They are carried out in accordance with the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government) and will allow Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The first step in the floodplain management process is to complete a calibrated flood model of the catchment and flood study.  The Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study, Final Report incorporating amendments to the draft that resulted from the public exhibition was presented at a meeting of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee on 17 April 2013.  A copy of the minutes from this meeting is attached to this report.

 

The outcome of this meeting is as follows:

 

·           The Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee recommend that Council adopt the Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study, Final Report incorporating amendments to the draft that resulted from the public exhibition;

·           That work proceeds on preparation of the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

Issues

 

The NSW Government provides assistance on state-wide policy issues and technical support.  Financial assistance is also provided through grant funding to undertake flood studies and floodplain management studies and for the implementation of works identified in these studies.

 

The floodplain management process is outlined in the NSW Floodplain Development Manual and is summarised by the following figure.

 

 

 

 

 

Floodplain Management Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Collection

è

Flood Study

è

Floodplain Management Study

è

Floodplain Management Plan

è

Plan Implementation

 

 

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time frame for completion

6-9 months

9-12 months

12 months

ongoing

 

The key steps in the process are the Flood Study, the Floodplain Management Study and the Floodplain Management Plan.

 

Public Exhibition

The Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study was commissioned by Council and covers the portion of Randwick Council draining through Centennial Park and south towards Eastlakes.  On 12 February 2013, Randwick Council’s Works Committee resolved that:

 

a)     the Draft Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study be placed on public exhibition for 28 days.

b)     Council officers report back to Council detailing the outcomes of the public exhibition.

 

The Draft Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study was paced on public exhibition from Tuesday 19 February 2013 to Tuesday 26 March 2013.  The community was notified of the flood study via newspaper advertisements in the Southern Courier.  In addition, 6236 letters were mailed to property owners in the catchment advising of the public exhibition.  The Draft Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study was available for review by the community at the following locations:

 

·           Bowen Library, 669-673 Anzac Parade, Maroubra,

·           Randwick Library, Level 1 Royal Randwick Shopping Centre, Randwick,

·           Council’s administration centre, 30 Frances Street, Randwick

·           Council’s website at www.randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

In addition a community information session was held at Council’s administration centre on Wednesday 13 March between 6pm and 8pm.

 

A total of four written submissions were received during the public exhibition period.  The submissions have been considered and found to be either general comments or observations that are consistent with the Flood Study.

 

Study Finalisation

The public exhibition comments received and the resulting consideration including a summary of the comments have been incorporated into the Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study.  The Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study will be completed when adopted by Council and will then assist with the next phase, the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  A Liveable City.

Direction:  Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                            community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding is available in this year’s budget to complete the Kensington Centennial Park Flood study and to commence the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Study.  Two thirds of the funding is available through grant funding from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, with the remainder coming from Council funds in line with the conditions of the grant.

 


Conclusion

 

The Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study has been placed on public exhibition and has now been finalised to the satisfaction of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee.  The Flood Study is considered complete and will form the basis for commencement of the Floodplain Risk Management Study.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council adopts the Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study.

 

b)     Work proceeds on preparation of the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Minutes - Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting - 17 April 2013

 

2.View

Summary of responses from the Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study Public Exhibition

 

 

 

 


Minutes - Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee Meeting - 17 April 2013

Attachment 1

 

 




Summary of responses from the Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study Public Exhibition

Attachment 2

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   11 June 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W24/13

 

 

Subject:                  Future installation of Outdoor Gym Equipment

Folder No:                   F2005/00834

Author:                   Jorde Frangoples, Director City Services     

 

Introduction

 

Council resolved at its Ordinary Council Meeting held 23 April 2013 (Belleli/Moore) that:

 

“Council bring back a report on a program on installing an outdoor gym of the type currently installed at Maroubra Beach in each ward.”

 

Issues

 

The 2013-14 Draft Capital Budget includes funds for senior outdoor exercise equipment at Burrows Park.  In considering other sites, Council Officers have considered geographical dispersion and the suitability of the sites, rather than the Wards.

 

As part of the Chifley Reserve remediation/upgrade, it is proposed to install outdoor exercise equipment around the shared cycle pedestrian path. Noting that the approved Masterplan for Chifley Reserve has exercise equipment set at regular intervals around the shared pathway rather than in a consolidated gym layout.

 

Other longer term options include Bicentennial Park at La Perouse perhaps adjacent to a basketball court (subject to further report). As future funding becomes available, other sites proposed include Latham Park and Kensington Oval.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in Recreation and Lifestyle Opportunities.

Direction 5b:      A range of sporting and leisure activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The equipment for Burrows Park and Chifley Reserve are funded in the 2013-14 Draft Capital Budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Outdoor gyms will be installed in Burrows Park and Chifley Reserve and have been funded in 2013-2014 Draft Capital Budget.  The installation of outdoor gym equipment at Latham Park and Kensington Oval will be considered in future capital budgets.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council note:

 

a)   the installation of outdoor exercise equipment for Burrows Park and Chifley Reserve are funded in the 2013-14 Draft Capital Budget.

 

b)   the installation of outdoor exercise equipment for Latham Park and Kensington Oval will be considered for funding in future capital budgets.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil