Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 12 February 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                             12 February 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 12 February 2013 at 6:00.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (T Bowen), Andrews, Belleli, D’Souza (Deputy Chairperson), Garcia, Matson, Moore, Nash, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos and Stevenson (Chairperson)

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 4 December 2012

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W1/13       Tree Removal - Outside 2A Lorne Avenue, Kensington

W2/13       Bus Shelter - 174 Carrington Road, Randwick

W3/13       Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee

W4/13       Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee     

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                             12 February 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W1/13

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 2A Lorne Avenue, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owners of 2A Lorne Avenue, Kensington, wrote to Council on 4 July 2012 advising of ongoing and increasing structural damage to both their property and adjacent public infrastructure being caused by the large roots of two mature Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping figs) street trees growing on the nature strip.

 

Issues

 

There are two large Hill’s Weeping figs growing on the nature strip outside the above property and their roots have been causing damage to surrounding public infrastructure for well over a decade. Up until this point in time that damage has largely been confined to the adjacent footpath and driveway areas but roots have now begun to cause increasing and potentially serious damage to the adjacent residential property. The owners of this property have advised Council that fig tree roots are causing damage to their driveway and entranceway as well as the front brick fence. Large branches overhang the property and have to be pruned back severely on a regular basis. Fig tree roots have regularly entered the sewer pipes within the property for over a decade and are no longer able to be cleared without using a jet blaster. This work is undertaken on a regular basis by plumbers engaged by the property owner, who advises that this situation has become both expensive and unacceptable in the long term.

 

The property owners are now concerned that fig tree roots will extend beneath the residence itself and cause structural damage to the actual building. Considering the size and spread of roots associated with this species of tree, this concern is probably justified. The property owners have contacted their insurance company in relation to this matter but have been advised that their insurance will not cover the costs of any damage caused by the roots of a Council owned street tree asset. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:       Develop and implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the two Hill’s Weeping figs outside 2A Lorne Avenue, Kensington, and their replacement with two super-advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) would cost in the vicinity of $6,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 


Conclusion

 

The two Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street trees growing outside 2A Lorne Avenue, Kensington, have significant visual and historic significance. They are estimated to be approximately sixty years old. Up until now, Council has been committed to retaining them both, despite the fact that historically tree root damage caused by this species is increasing in both frequency and severity throughout the LGA.

 

The trees have been assessed as providing important habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the range and scope of damage being caused by their roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Because of the size and spread of root material associated with these two trees and the proximity of the trunks to the adjacent property alignment, the installation of a root barrier is not in any way a viable option. When used to control the spread of fig tree roots, root barriers are often effective for a limited time only, depending on the site conditions, before new roots either grow over the top or underneath any such barrier.

 

On 22 August 2012 Council’s Tree Gang arborists trenched along the front of the property to assess the amount of fig tree root material present and to evaluate whether tree root pruning was a viable option in order to retain both trees. This trenching revealed that significant roots had intruded into the front of the property and had cracked the front brick fence. Fig tree roots had also wrapped around the entire sewer pipe network and large roots appeared to be present at a depth that would require shoring up any trench dug to access those roots. Council’s arborists advise that the removal of large roots emanating from these trees would probably compromise the front brick fence and cause it to fail.

 

The Tree Gang subsequently severed all the roots they could on both trees and they have advised that at present this will allow the southern tree to be retained in the short to medium term. However, they have also advised that the northern-most Ficus ‘Hillii’ would need to be removed because the amount of root material required to be removed to deal with the damage they are causing would render the tree unstable.

 

Council has resolved that where Ficus ‘Hillii’ constitute the predominant species in any street and where those trees have recognised historic and heritage significance, no more than five (5) percent of vegetative canopy cover is to be removed in any one calendar year. The recommended removal of the northern tree only would possibly contravene that resolution but it is only being recommended because there are no viable options available that would deal with the damage being caused by its roots in the short term.

 

The removal of this tree would have a detrimental impact in the medium term on the surrounding streetscape that would not be able to be mitigated in any meaningful way by the planting of advanced replacement trees. However, Weeping Lilly Pillys are a fast growing species that will attain a sizable dimension at maturity and they could replicate to some degree the dimensions and habitat value of the removed fig tree.

 

Although the removal of both trees has been requested by the adjacent property owner, Council has undertaken steps that will allow the southern tree to be retained.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the northern-most Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 2A Lorne Avenue, Kensington, be removed and replaced with one Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs highlighting the significance of the two Council owned Hill's Weeping figs in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused by their roots.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs highlighting the significance of the two Council owned Hill's Weeping figs in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused by their roots.

Attachment 1

 

 

Two mature Hill’s Weeping figs are healthy and prominent in the streetscape

 

Large amount of tree root material present under adjacent footpath and driveway

Large fig tree roots undermining front brick fence and vehicle access into property

 

Matted section of tree roots directly underneath driveway into the property

Roots have cracked the pebble Crete vehicle entrance into the property

 

Fig tree roots have caused cracking and displacement of the adjacent front brick fence

Tree roots have undermined the footings of the brick fence and caused dislodgement

 

Cracking has occurred inside the property adjacent to the front entranceway area


Works Committee                                                                                             12 February 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W2/13

 

 

Subject:                  Bus Shelter - 174 Carrington Road, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/00823

Author:                   Kerry Colquhoun, Coordinator, Open Space Assets     

 

Introduction

 

As part of the 2011-12 Bus Shelter installation program, there was opposition to the proposed shelter at 174 Carringto n Road.  The matter was reported to Council at its meeting held on 28 February 2012.  Subsequently, Council resolved as follows:

 

‘(Tracey/Woodsmith) that before any decision is made, bus users at this bus stop be surveyed for their opinion and consultation be undertaken with the relevant Precinct Committee.’

 

A survey of bus patrons has been undertaken.  The survey included responses from 162 participants. The results of the user survey carried out at 174 Carrington Road, Randwick showed that there is strong opposition to the installation of a bus shelter in this location, with 118 against the proposal, 41 for the proposal and three neutral responses. For further details on the survey results, refer to Attachment 2.

 

The Randwick Precinct has indicated support for the shelter.  However, in response to this user survey this report recommends that this new bus shelter not be installed in this location.

 

Alternate Request

Council has received numerous requests for a bus shelter in front of 3 Dampier Street, Chifley on compassionate grounds. The specific request is for the installation of the shelter to assist a disabled person that uses the shelter and this person is not able to use an umbrella to shelter from the prevailing weather conditions.

 

Further to this request, it should be noted that this area is poorly serviced by shelters and that a number of elderly persons also use this particular bus stop.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a:     Maintain a current understanding of our community’s needs.

Direction 2b:     Enrich our range of community services that meet our            community’s needs.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost of the bus shelter is $30,000.  Funding is included in the budget to allow the installation.

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

After extensive community consultation the bus shelter proposed to be located in front of 174 Carrington has received significant opposition and therefore it should not be installed.

 

It is recommended that the bus shelter be proposed at the bus stop located in front of 3 Dampier St, Chifley.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the proposed installation of a new bus shelter at 174 Carrington Road, Randwick not be installed.

 

b)    a proposed new bus shelter be allocated at the bus stop in front of

        3 Dampier St, Chifley. 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Proposed location for bus shelter 174 Carrington Road Randwick

 

2.View

Survey Results - Proposed bus shelter in front of 174 Carrington Road Randwick

 

3.View

Proposed bus shelter in front of 3 Dampier Street Chifley

 

4.View

Works Report - 14 February 2012

 

 

 

 


Proposed location for bus shelter 174 Carrington Road Randwick

Attachment 1

 

 

ATTACHMENT 1 – PROPOSED LOCATION FOR BUS SHELTER

174 Carrington Road Randwick

 


Survey Results - Proposed bus shelter in front of 174 Carrington Road Randwick

Attachment 2

 

 

Attachment 2 - SURVEY RESULTS

Proposed Bus shelter in front of 174 Carrington Road Randwick

 

 

Response to Bus Shelter Survey - 174 Carrington Road, Randwick

Yes/No/Not bothered

Primary Reason

Number

Yes

Shelter from rain

19

Yes

General weather

6

Yes

Stop people having to stand under private carport

6

Yes

Other

10

 

Sub-total

41

No

Aesthetics

3

No

Noisy

10

No

Waste of money

10

No

Put shelter elsewhere

6

No

Anti-social behaviour

16

No

Bus stop not used enough

8

No

Space doesn't allow for a shelter

22

No

Other - graffiti; safety; etc

13

No

No reason

30

 

Sub-total

118

Not comment

Sub-total

3

 

TOTAL

162

 


Proposed bus shelter in front of 3 Dampier Street Chifley

Attachment 3

 

 

Attachment 3 – PROPOSED LOCATION FOR BUS SHELTER:

3 DAMPIER ST, CHIFLEY

 


Works Report - 14 February 2012

Attachment 4

 

 

 

Works Report No. W1/12

 

 

Subject:                  Proposed New Bus Shelter Installation - Carrington Road corner Alison Road, Randwick (in front of 174 Carrington Road)

Folder No:                   F2004/00823

Author:                   Gigi Lombardi, Parks & Recreation Officer     

 

Introduction

 

As part of the adoption of the Capital Works Program 2011–12, two new non–advertising bus shelters are to be supplied and installed along Carrington Road Randwick.  The first one at the corner of Frenchmans Road and the second one at the corner Alison Road.  This report covers the issues concerned with the installation of a new bus shelter at the location of Carrington Road near Alison Road.

 

Issues

 

Background

The existing bus stop at this location is frequently used by a number of commuters.  It caters for two bus routes: 313 Bondi Junction - Coogee Beach and 374 Coogee Beach – Randwick.  There is currently a seat (in front of 172 Carrington Road) at this bus stop but no shelter.  Commuters often stand under the private carport at 168 Carrington Road for shelter from the weather.   The photos below were taken at different times on a week day showing average number of commuters catching the bus at this location. 

 

         

15 December 2011 - 8:05am                    16 December 2011 - 7:46am                    

 

Placement of proposed bus shelter

Liaison and consultation was carried out with JCDecaux and the State Transit Authority NSW to ensure that the proposed location is suitable and that it meets all required safety and Australian Standards.

 

The exact proposed location, in front of 174 Carrington Road was chosen as it does not interfere with existing street elements that can not be relocated such as the light pole, Telstra pit, and driveway from property No. 170 Carrington Road.  There are no changes to the existing location of the bus stop, J-pole or changes to the existing number of car parking spaces on the road.

 

Arrow showing proposed location of new shelter

 

The proposed bus shelter location allows a clearance of 1400mm at the back of the shelter for the existing footpath, and away from the property wall of 174 Carrington Road. It also allows a clearance of 600mm from the front of the shelter to the kerb. See diagram below.

 

Proposed new

bus shelter

 

 

Consultation

At the end of November 2011, letters were sent to a catchment area informing residents and property owners of Council’s proposal to install a new bus shelter.  Refer to Attachment 1 - boundary of catchment area for community consultation. 

 

Eight submissions were received and a petition letter signed by 41 people from 26 nearby properties, all objecting to the installation of the new bus shelter at this location.  Refer to Attachment 2 – Copies of Submissions and Petition Letter.

 

The following table is a summary of the letters received and the reasons for objecting to Council’s proposal, separate from the petition letter.

 

 

Reasons for objecting to proposal (summary)

 

Response

1.   Close proximity to existing dwellings (mostly bedroom windows facing Carrington Road).

 

2.   Constant loud noise and congregation of people leading to anti-social behaviour.  Residents are already experiencing this problem and feel that the provision of a shelter will aggravate the problem.

 

3.   It will have a negative impact on the value of these properties.

 

4.   Increase in litter including in their front yards.

 

5.   Addition to the existing clutter at this location (currently there is an existing post box, bin, electricity pole, seat. J-Pole and driveway).

 

6.   It will leave limited space for residents to put out their bins for collection.

 

7.   Commuter and driver safety concerns due to parked cars and large trees.

 

8.   Overall vandalism.

1.  Shelter on public footpath.

 

 

 

2.  Noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.  There is no evidence to substantiate this.

 

4.  Bin has been provided on site.

 

 

5.  Existing seat will be removed and replaced by shelter – no changes to existing other structures on site.

 

6.  There is enough space for bin collection.  Also, additional space as seat will be removed.

 

7.  No changes to existing conditions with proposal.

 

 

8.  Noted.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome   2:         A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a:        Maintain a current understanding of our community’s needs.

Direction 2b:        Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s

  needs.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The new bus shelter has being purchased from JCDecaux.  The total cost for supply and installation is $29,977.50 (Exc GST) and is included in the 2011-12 Budget.

 

Conclusion

 

There are a total of eight individual submissions and 41 local residents (26 households) signed a petition opposing the installation of a new bus shelter. Their reasons put forward to Council have been tabulated above.

 

Council has a list of locations for new bus shelters in order of priority.  These locations have been assessed by factors such as community requests and the hierarchy of the street/road buses frequency in relation to existing bus routes.

 

The purchased new bus shelter is a generic non-advertising shelter that can be installed anywhere in the Randwick City area.

 

On the basis of wide scale community objections, the bus shelter will be installed at 90-92 Marine Parade, Maroubra.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the bus shelter be installed Marine Parade, Maroubra near 90-92 Marine Parade, pending community consultation outcomes.

     

b)     all the residents/property owners in the consultation catchment be notified accordingly.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Boundary of catchment area for community consultation

 

2.

Copies of submissions and petition letter.

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                             12 February 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W3/13

 

 

Subject:                  Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee

Folder No:                   PROJ/10008/2005

Author:                   Terry  Kefalianos, Drainage Engineer     

 

Introduction

 

The prime responsibility for planning and management of flood issues in NSW rests with local government.  Randwick City Council has committed to carrying out Flood Studies and preparing Floodplain Management Plans.  They are carried out in accordance with the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government) and will allow Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The first step in the floodplain management process is to complete a calibrated flood model of the catchment and flood study.  The Draft Flood Study for the Kensington Centennial Park catchment was presented at a meeting of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee on 5 December 2012.  A copy of the minutes from this meeting is attached to this report.

 

The outcomes of this meeting are as follows:

·           The Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee adopted a Constitution to govern the functioning of the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee.

·           The Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee recommended that the Draft Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study be placed on public exhibition.

 

Issues

 

The NSW Government provides assistance on state-wide policy issues and technical support.  Financial assistance is also provided through grant funding to undertake flood studies and floodplain management studies and for the implementation of works identified in these studies.

 

The floodplain management process is outlined in the Floodplain Development Manual and is summarised by the following figure.

 

 

 

 

 

Floodplain Management Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Collection

è

Flood Study

è

Floodplain Management Study

è

Floodplain Management Plan

è

Plan Implementation

 

 

 

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time frame for completion

 

6-9 months

9-12 months

12 months

ongoing

The key steps in the process are the Flood Study, the Floodplain Management Study and the Floodplain Management Plan.

 

On 14 September 2010 Randwick Council’s Works Committee adopted Terms of Reference for the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee.  The role of the committee is to oversee the above floodplain management process.

 

A committee was reformed in November 2012.  The membership includes Councillor Shurey, Councillor Neilson, representatives from the community, Council, Sydney Water, Centennial Park, Moore Park Trust, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and the State Emergency Services.

 

Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study

The specialist consultant WMAWater was engaged by Council to undertake the Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study.  The process and outcomes of the study were presented to the Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee on 5 December 2012.  The Committee recommended that the Draft Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study be placed on public exhibition.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:          A Liveable City.

Direction:          Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding is available in this year’s budget to complete the Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study.  Two thirds of the funding is available through grant funding from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, subject to Council contributing one third.

 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study has been developed.  The Kensington Centennial Park Floodplain Management Committee consider the flood study to be accurate and ready to be placed on public exhibition.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)    the Draft Kensington Centennial Park Flood Study be placed on public exhibition for 28 days.

 

b)    Council officers report back to Council detailing the outcomes of the public exhibition.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Minutes - Kensington Centennial Park Floodplan Management Committee - 5 December 2012

 

 

 

 


Minutes - Kensington Centennial Park Floodplan Management Committee - 5 December 2012

Attachment 1

 

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



Works Committee                                                                                             12 February 2013

 

 

Works Report No. W4/13

 

 

Subject:                  Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee

Folder No:                   PROJ/10515/2009

Author:                   Terry  Kefalianos, Drainage Engineer     

 

Introduction

 

The prime responsibility for planning and management of flood issues in NSW rests with local government.  Randwick City Council has committed to carrying out Flood Studies and preparing Floodplain Management Plans.  They are carried out in accordance with the Floodplain Development Manual (NSW Government) and will allow Council and other stakeholders to be better informed and to better manage flooding in storm events.

 

The first step in the floodplain management process is to complete a calibrated flood model of the catchment and flood study.  The Draft Flood Study for the Coogee Bay catchment was presented at a meeting of the Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee on 5 December 2012.  A copy of the minutes from this meeting is attached to this report.

 

The outcomes of this meeting are as follows:

·         The Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee adopted a Constitution to govern the functioning of the Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee.

·         The Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee recommended that the Draft Coogee Bay Flood Study be placed on public exhibition.

 

Issues

 

The NSW Government provides assistance on state-wide policy issues and technical support.  Financial assistance is also provided through grant funding to undertake flood studies and floodplain management studies and for the implementation of works identified in these studies.

 

The floodplain management process is outlined in the Floodplain Development Manual and is summarised by the following figure.

 

 

 

 

 

Floodplain Management Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Collection

è

Flood Study

è

Floodplain Management Study

è

Floodplain Management Plan

è

Plan Implementation

 

 

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

ç

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time frame for completion

6-9 months

9-12 months

12 months

ongoing

 

The key steps in the process are the Flood Study, the Floodplain Management Study and the Floodplain Management Plan.

Coogee Bay Flood Study

The specialist consultant BMT WBM was engaged by Council to undertake the Coogee Bay Flood Study.  The process and outcomes of the study were presented to the Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee which recommended that the Draft Coogee Bay Flood Study be placed on public exhibition.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  A Liveable City.

Direction:  Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding is available in this year’s budget to complete the Coogee Bay Flood Study.  Two thirds of the funding is available through grant funding from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, subject to Council’s contribution.

 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Coogee Bay Flood Study has been developed.  The Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee consider the flood study to be accurate and ready to be placed on public exhibition.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the Draft Coogee Bay Flood Study be placed on public exhibition for 28 days.

 

b)     Council officers report back to Council detailing the outcomes of the public exhibition.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Minutes - Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting - 5 December 2012

 

 

 

 


Minutes - Coogee Bay Floodplain Management Committee Meeting - 5 December 2012

Attachment 1