Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 4 December 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                             4 December 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 4 December 2012 at 6pm.

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (T Bowen), Andrews, Belleli, D’Souza (Deputy Chairperson), Garcia, Matson, Moore, Nash, Neilson, Roberts, Seng, Shurey, Smith, Stavrinos and Stevenson (Chairperson)

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 13 November 2012

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W30/12     Tree Removal - Outside 11 Quail Street, Coogee

W31/12     Tree Removal - Outside 77 St Marks Road, Randwick

W32/12     Buildings for our Community - upcoming 2012-13 and 2013-14 projects    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                             4 December 2012

 

 

Works Report No. W30/12

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 11 Quail Street, Coogee

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

On 1 August 2012 one of four unit owners at 11 Quail Street, Coogee, lodged a service request with Council requesting that fig tree roots from the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree growing outside the front of the property be severed because they had grown into the unit block and surfaced in the front lawn area.

 

On 6 September 2012 another unit owner logged a separate service request advising that tree roots from the same Council fig tree had broken sewer pipes inside the property and that this was an ongoing issue.  

 

Issues

 

The four unit owners at 11 Quail Street, Coogee, have been experiencing a range of problems directly associated with the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing on the nature strip outside their property for well over a decade and these problems have become increasingly worse within the past four-five years. They range from tree roots damaging the neighbouring driveway and the footpath adjacent to the property to root damage being caused to the front brick fence and roots growing into the front lawn area of the units. For well over a decade tree roots have entered and blocked the stormwater and sewer pipes within the property and they have had to be cleared by Council’s plumbers on a regular basis. The adjacent footpath and other damaged public infrastructure have been repaired on a number of occasions and fig tree roots have been severed or shaved as much as possible to facilitate those repairs.

 

As a result of the service request lodged on 1 August 2012 Council’s road gang removed the footpath adjacent to the subject fig tree to assess what management options might be available that would allow the retention of this significant street tree asset.

 

The tree is approximately 16-18 metres in height with a canopy spread of around twelve metres. It is in good health and contributes significantly to the visual amenity of the streetscape. It is one of several trees of the same species growing along the southern side of Quail Street and it provides habitat and food source for a variety of birdlife and native fauna. The canopy has had to be regularly pruned away from overhead low voltage powerlines to maintain statutory clearances as well as being pruned back to the property alignment at the adjacent property owners’ request. This has adversely impacted on the visual aesthetics of the tree and has compromised its natural growth habit and form.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the tree outside 11 Quail Street, Coogee, and its replacement with a super-advanced alternative species would cost in the vicinity of $4,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing outside 11 Quail Street is in reasonable health and is one of several growing along the south side of the street. The subject tree is estimated to be approximately sixty years old and up until this point every effort has been made to retain it, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity.

 

The tree has been assessed as having important scenic and amenity value and with providing habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the damage being caused by its roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Because of the size and amount of root material required to be removed from the tree to effectively deal with the damage being caused by its roots, root pruning is not considered a viable long term option. This is supported by the findings and recommendations of Council’s Tree Gang arborists when a trench was recently dug adjacent to where the tree is located.

 

The only feasible long-term management option would be to remove the tree entirely and to replace it with a more appropriate tree species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 11 Quail Street, Coogee, be removed and replaced with an advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the scale of the subject tree in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused by its roots.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the scale of the subject tree in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused by its roots.

Attachment 1

 

 

View of Ficus ‘Hillii’ from Quail St – note severe pruning around wires and off property

 

Large tree roots undermining footpath and entering front of unit block

Large numbers of fig tree roots fan out from base of tree into neighbouring property

Fig tree roots undermining brick front fence and intruding into terracotta sewer pipe

 

Fig tree root entering property and surfacing in front lawn area adjacent entranceway

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                             4 December 2012

 

 

Works Report No. W31/12

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 77 St Marks Road, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 77 St Marks Road, Randwick, wrote to Council on 6 June 2012 advising of a range of ongoing and increasing damage to her property and adjacent public infrastructure which was being caused by the roots of a mature Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree growing on the nature strip outside that property.

 

On 11 September 2012 the owner of 79 St Marks Road, Randwick, emailed Council detailing several issues involving damage to her property which she asserts has been caused by the roots of the same Council street tree.

 

Issues

 

These two property owners have nominated a range of damage being caused by the roots of this fig tree, including the cracking and undermining of their front brick fences, ongoing and increasing damage to the Council footpath, damage to the internal pavers and driveway into 77 St Marks Road and ongoing and increasingly frequent sewer blockages.

 

The subject tree is approximately sixteen metres in height with a canopy spread of between sixteen-eighteen metres. It is one of several significant trees of the same species planted along the eastern side of the street. It is in good health and contributes significantly to the St Marks Road streetscape. It is also an important provider of habitat and food source for a variety of native birdlife and other fauna.

 

Over the past decade the adjacent footpath has had to be repaired on a number of occasions because of tree root damage but roots continue to enter adjacent properties as well as causing ongoing and increasing damage to public infrastructure. There have been serious and ongoing sewer blockages within the property at 77 St Marks Road since early 2009 and these have become much worse during that relatively short period. Roots from the tree form a huge mass that has completely undermined the surrounding footpath area, driveway and adjacent brick fences. Council recently trenched along the front of both properties and this revealed a number of large fig tree roots entering those properties.

 

Council’s Tree Gang advises that it would not be possible to remove the amount of damaging tree root material required to abate the damage being caused by the roots of this tree without seriously compromising its stability and long-term viability.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:       Develop and implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of the Hill’s Weeping fig outside 77 St Marks Road, Randwick, and its replacement with a super-advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) would cost in the vicinity of $3,000. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The mature Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree growing outside 77 St Marks Road, Randwick, has significant visual and historic significance. The tree is estimated to be approximately sixty years old and up until this point Council has been committed to retaining it, despite the fact that associated tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity. The subject tree has been assessed as having significant scenic and amenity value and with providing important habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the damage being caused by its roots, however, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible. Because of the size and amount of root material required to be removed from this tree to effectively deal with the damage being caused by its roots, root pruning is not in any way a viable option. This is supported by the findings and recommendations of Council’s Tree Gang arborists when a trench was recently dug adjacent to where the tree is situated.

 

The severance of roots along the adjacent property boundaries in such close proximity to the trunk of the tree could result in its death or cause destabilization of the root plate due to the removal of supporting structural roots as well as vital feeder root mass. When used to attempt to control the spread of fig tree roots, root barriers are often effective for a limited time only before new roots either grow over or underneath any such barrier. Effectively, therefore, the only practical long-term management option would be to remove the subject tree and to replace it with a more appropriate tree species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

The removal of this tree will certainly have a detrimental impact on the St Marks Road streetscape that will in no way be able to be significantly mitigated by the planting of an advanced replacement tree. However, Weeping Lilly Pillys are a fast growing species that will attain a sizable dimension at maturity and they replicate to some degree the shape and broad domed growth habit of the Hill’s Weeping fig species.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 77 St Marks Road, Randwick, be removed and replaced with an advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly) – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the importance of the subject tree in the streetscape and the damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by its roots

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the importance of the subject tree in the streetscape and the damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by its roots

Attachment 1

 

 

Fig tree outside 77-79 St Marks Road is significant in the streetscape

 

 

Sizable fig tree roots run along the length of the frontages of 77 and 79 St Marks Rd

Fig tree roots undermine the driveway and vehicular entrance into 77 St Marks Rd

 

Mass of large diameter fig roots have undermined the adjacent footpath and driveway

Numerous fig tree roots have undermined the front brick fence at 77 St Marks Rd

 

Several large fig roots have undermined and damaged the front brick fence at 79 St Marks Rd

 

 

Fig tree roots are damaging and entering the front of both 77 and 79 St Marks Rd

 


Works Committee                                                                                             4 December 2012

 

 

Works Report No. W32/12

 

 

Subject:                  Buildings for our Community - upcoming 2012-13 and 2013-14 projects

Folder No:                   F2010/00044

Author:                   Hayley Segedin, Buildings for our Community Projects Coordinator; Sarah  Harmston, Buildings for our Community Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The Buildings for our Community program has identified several upcoming projects where the allocated budget does not align with the required building upgrade works to meet user needs and legislative requirements.

 

It is proposed that the surplus from some projects be directed towards projects experiencing difficulties in meeting their basic requirements with allocated funds.  Overall funding shortfall is recommended to be allocated from Infrastructure Reserves and repaid with savings from future Buildings for our Community projects.

 

Such an approach allows each project in the BFOC program to be delivered to community expectations, while minimising the impact on Infrastructure Reserves of individual funding shortfalls.

 

Issues

 

Buildings for our Community (BFOC) program

The Buildings for our Community program commenced in July 2010, and is currently in its third year of project delivery.  The program has so far delivered the following completed upgrade projects:

 

Year 1 Projects (2010-11)

 

·        Coogee Surf Life Saving Club

·        Clovelly Surf Club

·        South Maroubra Surf Club

·        New Pioneer’s Park amenities building (upper field)

 

Year 2 Projects (2011-12)

 

·        SOS Preschool

·        Maroubra Surf Club

 

Year 3 Projects (2012-13)

 

·        Clovelly Beach Inspectors Office

·        KU Randwick Coogee Preschool

·        Moverly Children’s Centre

·        Rainbow Street Childcare Centre

·        Duffy’s Corner Occasional Childcare

·        KU Peter Pan La Perouse

 

Works currently under construction through Buildings for our Community include the new fitness facility at the Des Renford Aquatic Centre and a new toilet building requested by the community for Baker Park, Coogee.  A new sports amenity building in Heffron Park to cater for sporting groups and park patrons is also due to commence construction in early 2013.

 

Documentation is currently underway for the remaining Year 3 projects in the 2012-13 financial year, including:

 

·        Maroubra Senior Citizen’s Centre

·        Nagle Park amenities building

·        New Chifley Sports Reserve amenities buildings

·        Coral Sea amenities building

·        Pioneers Park amenities building (lower field)

 

Concept planning has commenced for the 2013-14 BFOC projects, including:

 

·        Coogee Senior Citizens Centre

·        Heffron Park Central West amenities building

·        New childcare centre at Popplewell Park

·        Randwick City Council Nursery greenhouse, potting shed and shadehouse buildings

·        Clovelly Childcare Centre Inc

·        South Maroubra Surf Club toilets

·        Cromwell Park toilets

·        Little Bay toilets

·        Randwick Town Hall

·        Heffron Park Football Field amenities

·        Mahon Pool amenities

·        James Bundock fountain

·        Randwick Cemetery toilets and storage

·        Jeff Sayle Pavilion at Latham Park.

 

Project specific funding

Through identifying building shortfalls, and having these items documented and costed, several current BFOC projects have been identified as not aligning with their budgets.  This can be influenced by a range of factors, including: building age, level of maintenance, changing building code standards, escalating building costs or stakeholder requirements. 

 

It is the recommendation that budget surplus from refurbishments to the newer Little Bay toilet block and the Jeff Sayle Pavilion be directed towards the shortfall encountered by the upgrade works to Pioneers’ Park (lower) and Nagle Park amenities building, and to Maroubra Senior Citizens Centre.

 

1.     Toilet building, Little Bay

The amenities building at Little Bay is only three years old, having been built as part of the adjacent Landcom development.  The existing shower at the site is proposed to be relocated to allow an additional toilet to be installed.  A shower installed at beach level will decrease the tracking of sand up the stairs to the toilet building, and improve the long-term deterioration to its structure due to water damage to the timber floor and walls.  An additional toilet is considered to be an improvement for the public using the site.

 

Of the $200,000 allocated towards this project, a total of $60,000 is proposed to be spent.  This allows $140,000 to be allocated towards other Buildings for our Community projects.

 

 

 

2.     Jeff Sayle Pavilion, Latham Park

The Jeff Sayle Pavilion was built around twelve years ago, and with some minor works can continue to meet current community standards.  A new stainless steel kitchen to current Food Safety Standards is proposed, as well as an upgrade to the change rooms, external floor finishes, windows, and window screening systems.

 

Overall, the facility has been kept in good condition with maintenance work in recent years mostly undertaken to the external fabric of the building.

 

Of the $250,000 project budget allocated, a total of $110,000 is proposed to be spent.  An additional $140,000 from this project may be allocated towards other Buildings for our Community projects.

 

3.     Amenities Building, Pioneers Park (lower)

This brickwork building with concrete roof was built in the 1960s, and is in need of an upgrade. New energy-efficient lighting and water-efficient fittings are to be installed, the shower areas are to be tiled with new partitions and benches installed, window openings are to be enlarged to improve light and ventilation.  A new roof will be constructed over the existing flat concrete roof to protect against water ingress in the aging concrete, provide shelter for spectators, and to modernise the aesthetic of the building.

 

No additional storage or accessible toilet is proposed to be built; the lower Pioneers Park building is one of three buildings servicing the park, including the new amenities building built in 2011. 

 

In recent years, an awning structure was added to the adjacent clubhouse facility providing shelter and an extended spectator area across the building frontage.

 

A sum of $155,000 has been allocated to the project. Against costing of $260,000, this represents a shortfall of $105,000.

 

4.     Amenities Building, Nagle Park

Of a similar vintage and layout to the Pioneers park building, the Nagle Park amenities building is also constructed of brickwork walls and concrete roof.  The scope of works is as for Pioneers Park, but with additional storage rooms to accommodate sporting groups’ requirements. 

 

A sum of $150,000 has been allocated to the Nagle Park upgrade.  With costing of $450,000 this represents a shortfall of $300,000.

 

5.     Maroubra Senior Citizens’ Centre

The Maroubra Senior Citizens’ Centre is one of Randwick City Council’s most popular halls. Under the Buildings for our Community program, it will receive an upgrade to address deficiencies in its facilities against Accessibility and Food Safety Standards.  The grade of the existing entry ramp is not compliant, nor is the entry stair arrangement.  No accessible toilet is currently provided, especially important in a facility catering for our Seniors. 

 

The scope of works for the Centre is therefore to provide a new entry ramp and stairs, an updated kitchen to Food Safety Standards and a new accessible toilet.  Asbestos in the façade and eaves linings will be removed.

 

Due to the popularity of the hall, upgrading the energy efficiency of the facility will be undertaken through funding from Randwick City Council’s Sustainability team, including skylighting, installation of insulated ceiling tiles, photovoltaic cells and new energy efficient lighting. 

 

A budget of $125,000 has been allocated to Maroubra Senior Citizens’ Centre.  The cost of works is $375,000, of which $28,500 will be funded from Sustainability.  The BFOC budget shortfall for the project is therefore $221,500.

 

Financial summary

 

BFOC Financial Year

Project

Budget

Costing

Planning + Construction

Costs against BFOC budget

2013-14

1. Little Bay toilet

$200,000

$60,000

+$140,000

2013-14

2. Jeff Sayle Pavilion

$250,000

$110,000

+$140,000

2012-13

3. Pioneers Park amenities

$155,000

$260,000

-$105,000

2012-13

4. Nagle Park amenities

$150,000

$450,000

-$300,000

2012-13

5. Maroubra Senior Citizens Centre

$125,000

$346,500

-$221,500

 

Overall budget standing

 

-$346,500

 

It is proposed that the overall budget shortfall of $346,500 be met with Infrastructure Reserve funding and repaid with savings from Buildings for our Community projects in future years.

 

Coral Sea Park Amenities building

It should be noted that Coral Sea Park has been allocated $300,000 under BFOC Year 2012-13 funding.

 

Concept plans and costing have been prepared in consultation with Maroubra United Football Club.  The concept plans include an overall upgrade to the building, as well as the provision of a new accessible toilet, storage room, club room and canteen.

 

The Maroubra United Football Club has seen a rise in the number of female participants to the sport with an increase of 30% in the last five years, resulting in eighteen female soccer teams. Because of the growing numbers of female soccer participants there is also a need for female change facilities to be incorporated. 

 

This project is programmed for the end of 2013, and will be the subject of a separate report to Council.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is proposed that funding of $626,500 will be borrowed from Council’s Infrastructure Reserves to pay for the upfront cost of Pioneers Park & Nagle Park amenities and Maroubra Senior Citizens Centre in the current financial year.

 

Of this total amount, $280,000 will be paid back to the Infrastructure Reserves in 2013-14 from the projected surplus in funding from the Little Bay toilet and Jeff Sayle Pavilion projects.

 

Therefore, the net financial impact is $345,500. It is proposed that this amount will be repaid to the Infrastructure Reserves with savings from other Buildings for our Community projects in future years.

 

Conclusion

 

The Buildings for our Community Program has already seen the delivery of several well received community facility buildings. A number of upcoming projects outlined in this report demonstrate that the allocated budget does not align with building upgrade requirements. The proposed budget adjustments will ensure that these projects are also delivered to meet the building needs, building code standards and community expectations.

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)    $626,500 be borrowed from Council’s Infrastructure Reserves to pay for the upfront cost of Pioneers Park & Nagle Park amenities and Maroubra Senior Citizens Centre in the current financial year.

 

b)    $280,000 be repaid to the Infrastructure Reserves in 2013-14 from the projected surplus in Buildings for our Community funding from the Little Bay toilet and Jeff Sayle Pavilion projects.

 

c)    savings of $345,500 from future Buildings for our Community projects be repaid to the Infrastructure Reserves.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Location and site photos - Little Bay toilet, Jeff Sayle Pavilion, Nagle and Pioneers Park amenities and Maroubra Senior Citizen Centre

 

 

 

 


Location and site photos - Little Bay toilet, Jeff Sayle Pavilion, Nagle and Pioneers Park amenities and Maroubra Senior Citizen Centre

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

1.  Little Bay toilet - location and photo showing existing facility

 

 

 

 

 

2.  Latham Park amenities - location and photo showing the existing Jeff Sayle Pavilion

 

 

 

 

 

3.  Pioneers Park - location and photo showing existing amenities building located at the lower park

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.  Nagle Park - location and photo showing existing amenities building

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.  Maroubra Senior Citizens Centre - location and photo showing the building frontage