Environment Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 14 February 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    14 February 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Environment Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 14 February 2012 at 6pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (S Nash), Belleli, Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Matson (Chairperson), Smith, Tracey, White and Woodsmith

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members

 

NOTE:    At the extraordinary meeting held on 22 May 2007, the Council resolved that the Environment Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Environment Committee Meeting - 6 December 2011

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Greening Randwick Reports

Nil

Environment Reports

E1/12        Sustainability education workshops and courses, Term 1, 2012

E2/12        Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payment (WaSIP) Program

E3/12        Energy and Greenhouse Management Plan

E4/12        External evaluation of Council's Compost Revolution trial

E5/12        Seeking Council support for the "One Person Can" environmental campaign    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    14 February 2012

 

 

Environment Report No. E1/12

 

 

Subject:                  Sustainability education workshops and courses, Term 1, 2012

Folder No:                   F2004/08350

Author:                   Fiona Campbell, Sustainability Education Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Sustainability education workshops and courses provided for Randwick residents during Term 1, 2012.

 

Issues

 

A number of sustainability education courses and workshops are being provided for Randwick residents during Term 1, January to April, 2012. These are being advertised and promoted through local media channels as well as via the Eastern Suburbs Evening College booklet delivered to every household. Courses are free of charge but bookings are required due to limited numbers.

 

Courses and workshops include:

 

Course / workshop

Venue

Date & Time

Brief description

Collaborative Consumption workshop

 

Barrett House
(part of 3-Council project)

Feb 8,

9.30am – 12.30pm

To assist people find ways to reduce consumption of natural resources

Sustainable Living (Living Smart) course

Randwick Community Centre

6 sessions, starting Feb 11 on

Saturdays,

1.00pm – 5.00pm

Innovative six week course providing participants with skills and knowledge to be more sustainable at home, work or school covering a  range of environmental issues

Organic Gardening course

Randwick Community Centre (permaculture garden)

5 sessions, starting 18 Feb on Saturdays, 1.00pm – 5.00pm

How to propagate plants for home or balcony gardens, control insect pests – this is a hands on course using Randwick’s permaculture garden

Eco friendly baby care workshop

Barrett House (part of 3-Council project)

March 7,

10.30am -12.30pm

Learn how to care for your baby or infant using eco friendly principles and practices

Composting workshop

Barrett House (part of 3-Council project)

March 27,

6.30pm – 8.00pm

Learn how to make compost, what to put in and what to keep out, includes troubleshooting and problem solving when your compost attracts insects, rodents or odours

 

In addition to these workshop times and courses, Barrett House continues to be open to residents for information sessions on the first Thursday of each month from 9.30am to 12.30pm and Council’s permaculture volunteers continue to volunteer at the Randwick Community Centre permaculture interpretative garden on the second Sunday of each month from 1.00pm to 4.00pm.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2(a):   Maintain a current understanding of our community’s needs.

Outcome 3:       An informed and engaged community.

Direction 3(c):   A community involved in shaping and enhancing our City.

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a):  Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Sustainability courses and workshops are organised and conducted as part of Council’s sustainability education component of the environmental levy program. Approximately $4,000 is allocated from this budget to facilitate training materials, on-site resources and promotion.

 

Conclusion

 

Community involvement and participation is a key activity of Council’s sustainability program. The above workshops and courses provide meaningful training and information to assist participants take the sustainability message and actions back to their homes, schools and workplaces. Many previous participants continue to be involved with Council programs or have become a part of the Community Centre volunteers helping out with the permaculture interpretative garden.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    14 February 2012

 

 

Environment Report No. E2/12

 

 

Subject:                  Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payment (WaSIP) Program

Folder No:                   F2009/00496

Author:                   Talebul Islam, Coordinator Strategic Waste     

 

Introduction

 

Under the Protection of the Environment (Waste) Regulation, the NSW Government has made some $205.8m available to local councils over five years (commencing 1 July 2011) through a Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payment (WaSIP) Program. The funds are aimed to assist councils to invest in actions and on programs that will improve waste avoidance, resource recovery, the use of secondary resources and waste outcomes, and that will deliver environmental sustainability across their local government area.

 

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of WaSIP funding and the projects receiving approval from the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH).

 

Issues

 

Source of WaSIP Funding

Under section 88 of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act a levy is charged by EPA for landfill disposal of waste. Approximately one-third of the income from this landfill levy is allocated to the WaSIP program and the remainder goes to consolidated revenue.

 

WaSIP standards

The Office of Environment and Heritage NSW, assisted by an Advisory Group, develops standards and reviews each year. Standards are cumulative. Councils meeting the standards are receiving WaSIP funding.

 

Among others, these on going standards include, kerbside collection of dry recyclables, council’s commitment towards a 66% landfill diversion and working toward achieving this goal by 2014, development and implementation of a Strategic Waste Action Plan (SWAP) and a Sustainability Action Plan (SAP), development and implementation of an integrated litter and illegal dumping management plan and development and implementation of separate sustainable fleet and procurement policies.

 

Through forward planning and implementing strategic actions Council has met all ongoing standards and is eligible for the current round of WaSIP funding.

 

New standards for Council to meet in 2011-12 are to:

 

·           Commence reporting on environmental sustainability performance

·           Implement a Sustainable Event Management Policy

·           Complete a Climate Change Risk Assessment for Council’s operations

·           Implement the Strategic Waste Action Plan that will contribute to 66% landfill diversion

·           Put in place measures to increase recovery of recyclables from residual bins

·           Put in place measures to decrease food organics going to landfill.

WaSIP Program for 2011-2012

Council has received $744,727 WaSIP funding for the 2011-12 financial year. From this year funding of $506,000 has been allocated to the Malabar Beach Water Quality Improvement project that will be undertaken jointly with Sydney Water. The Office of Environment and Heritage has approved the funding to be used on projects in the following areas:

 

·           Illegal dumping and litter management

·           Improved recycling in Department of Housing properties

·           Improved recovery of recyclables

·           Investigation of Alternative Waste Treatment options

·           Expanded public place recycling

·           Sustainable Procurement Policy

·           Energy and Water savings

·           Malabar Beach water quality improvement.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:    Healthy environment.

Direction 10d:  Sustainable alternative waste technologies and environmentally sound collection systems are identified and implements.

Direction 10e: Our communities are encouraged to implement waste minimisation strategies.

Direction 10f:   A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, reuse and water quality improvement is achieved.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The projects undertaken within the WaSIP program will help improve Council’s recycling and resource recovery performance, reducing illegal dumping and litter in the City and achieve sustainability outcomes.   Also, the investigation of an Alternative Waste Treatment project will allow Council to identify an option for achieving the NSW waste diversion target.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    14 February 2012

 

 

Environment Report No. E3/12

 

 

Subject:                  Energy and Greenhouse Management Plan

Folder No:                   F2005/00230

Author:                   Choonghan  Yeo, Sustainability Projects Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Randwick Council has recently completed its energy audit of the top energy consuming sites. Based on the audit results, new energy saving opportunities have been identified with relative short payback timeframes.

 

As part of a comprehensive and integrated approach towards energy management, it is proposed to merge Council’s existing Energy Savings Action Plan (ESAP) and our Local Greenhouse Action Plan (completed as part of our participation in the Cities for Climate Protection (CCP) Program) into a single strategic Energy and Greenhouse Management Plan. This will bring energy savings as well as potential renewable energy projects under one umbrella.

 

Issues

 

The main components in the Energy and Greenhouse Management Plan (EGMP) will be:

 

·           Inclusion of existing corporate plans and commitments (i.e. 20% energy reduction);

·           Identifying energy saving options (including improved energy management) for top 4 energy consuming sites, which account for around 80% of Council’s energy consumption (excluding street lighting);

·           Investigation in renewable energy options;

·           Improving staff behaviour towards energy consumption and conservation – awareness and training opportunities to encourage energy efficiency practices around Council;

·           Improving on monitoring progress and reporting on energy saving outcomes and achievements.

 

The plan is intended to prioritise and estimate the costs of new energy efficiency projects against dollar or energy savings to be achieved. This prioritisation will then be used to guide implementation, timetabling and budgeting processes; as well as assist in preparing for any new or existing external funding opportunities.

 

Updates on the plan will be provided to the Council on a regular basis.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10(a):  Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable    practices.

Direction 10(g):  Greenhouse Gas Emissions are reduced.

 


Financial impact statement

 

The identified energy conservation actions and Council’s responses to Climate Change are funded with the Climate Change Budget under the Environmental Levy as well as external funding such as the Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payment (WaSIP).

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed Energy and Greenhouse Management Plan (EGMP) will provide a stronger strategic approach to achieve Council’s energy reduction and potentially renewable energy goals and to monitor and report on outcomes such as costs and energy savings being delivered.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and Council endorse the preparation of the proposed Energy and Greenhouse Management Plan (EGMP).

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    14 February 2012

 

 

Environment Report No. E4/12

 

 

Subject:                  External evaluation of Council's Compost Revolution trial

Folder No:                   F2008/00385

Author:                   Richard Wilson, Ecological Footprint Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

To provide an overview of the external evaluation of the 3-Council Compost Revolution program, conducted in 2011 by Hyder Consulting.

 

Issues

 

Over a 12 month period from August 2009, 580 households across Randwick and Waverley joined the Compost Revolution trial, with the aim of removing organic food waste from household rubbish bins. The results of the trial saw 115 tonnes of food waste diverted from landfill.

 

Waste management consultants, Hyder Consulting, were engaged to prepare an independent evaluation of the Compost Revolution for the 3-Councils. The evaluation was intended to document current residential waste management practices, results of the Compost Revolution trial and potential benefits of a wider roll-out of this program across the 3-Councils participating in the Ecological Footprint project.

 

Key results of the evaluation

 

Hyder’s evaluation of audits carried on participating householders’ garbage bins ‘before’ and ‘after’ the trial revealed that the Compost Revolution influenced positive behavioural change, as well as achieving a significant reduction in food waste from household rubbish bins (Table 1).

 

Table 1: Reduction of avoidable and unavoidable food waste in the residual waste bin between Audit 1 and Audit 2

 

 

Weight (kg)

Weight diverted (kg) per household

Percentage (%) reduction

Avoidable food waste

69.69

1.16

33%

Unavoidable food waste

68.28

 

1.14

 

61%

 

All food waste

137.97

2.30

43%

Avoidable = unused/still packaged food items and leftovers

Unavoidable = preparatory and meat/bones

 

Hyder’s evaluation calculated the potential waste, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and cost savings of the Compost Revolution if it was rolled out over a four year period to achieve a participation rate of 20% and 40% households across the 3 Council areas (Table 2).

 


Table 2: Calculated waste, GHG emissions and cost savings per year

 

Potential benefits

Expanded to 20% of households

Expanded to 40% of households

Organic waste diverted from landfill

3,640 tonnes

7,280 tonnes

Reduction of GHG emissions

7%

14%

Operational

cost savings

($979,559*)

($2,057,117*)

(*Over 4 year timeframe)

 

Hyder also developed and evaluated the project performance using four Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) Indicators comparing householder performance (knowledge, commitment and participation) at the beginning of the trial to their performance at the completion of the project (Table 3).

 

Table 3: ESD outcomes

 

ESD indicator

Baseline performance

Project performance

Food waste avoidance

Poor

Excellent

Gardening and local food production

Uncertain

Excellent

Social capital

Poor

Excellent

Enhanced household waste management

Uncertain

Excellent

 

To assist in the continuation and expansion of the Compost Revolution program and its results, an online composting tutorial has been developed. This web based learning tool enables residents to complete the tutorial and demonstrate an understanding of composting techniques. Since its commencement, more than 700 householders have registered and completed the tutorial. In addition to this electronic learning tool, 25 additional community composting and worm farming workshops will be conducted over the next six months.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10(a): Council is leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

Direction 10(d):  Sustainable alternative waste technologies and environmentally sound collection systems are identified and implemented.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The Compost Revolution is currently funded via a continuation of the 3-Council Ecological Footprint Program. Each Council is contributing approximately $63,000 to the project, allocated primarily from Council’s Waste Levy and Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payment (WaSIP) Program.

 

Expansion of the compost revolution project to 20% or 40% of the 3 Council area is estimated by Hyder Consulting to provide cost savings in the order of $1 million or $2 million per year.

 


Conclusion

 

The Hyder report reveals there are significant savings in costs, waste volumes and greenhouse gas emissions from an expansion of the Compost Revolution program across the 3-Council areas. In addition, this program has generated community enthusiasm and momentum for these householders to participate and support broader sustainability initiatives and environmental projects.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    14 February 2012

 

 

Environment Report No. E5/12

 

 

Subject:                  Seeking Council support for the "One Person Can" environmental campaign

Folder No:                   F2004/08350

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

Seeking Council support for the “One Person Can” environmental campaign.

 

Issues

 

Council has been approached to assist in the promotion of, and to encourage residents to participate in, the “One Person Can” environmental campaign. The campaign aims to encourage residents taking personal actions to protect the environment to register these steps via an on-line survey. Survey results are then used to assist other people to take similar actions and so increase the level of community involvement and participation in protecting and conserving our natural resources, to reduce waste etc.

 

The “One Person Can” website enables the number of actions being taken by residents to be mapped by local government area as a useful way of motivating others. Council will be able to consider these results by promoting programs and / or linking community members to the range of environmental initiatives underway or potentially including programs identified as community actions being taken. including our sustainable living workshops and courses, our 3-Council collaboration project to reduce our overall ecological footprint, our business water audits and our composting revolution project for residents.  The “One Person Can” campaign fits in well with these extensive sustainability efforts.

 

There is no charge to Council or to residents to be involved and the survey is short and straightforward for residents to fill in on-line. The website address is http://www.onepersoncan.org .

 

The thinking behind the development of the website and the campaign is that so many people may feel their own individual or single actions to reduce their environmental impact are not important but by logging on and looking at the site, the opportunity is to be motivated and inspired by the great numbers of people who are concerned on environmental issues and are taking steps in their own lives to do what they can.  

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2(a):   Maintain a current understanding of our community’s needs.

Outcome 3:       An informed and engaged community.

Direction 3(c):   A community involved in shaping and enhancing our City.

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a)   Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sound practices.

 


Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

While there are numerous campaigns and events that try and encourage environmental awareness, the “One Person Can” campaign appears to be an effective way for a wider take up of actions and steps by individuals and a way for them to increase their involvement in environmental protection and conservation initiatives. 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council agrees to support the “One Person Can” campaign to residents; and

 

b)     Communications and Sustainability staff identify appropriate areas for this campaign to be promoted to our residents.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil