Environment Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 6 December 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    6 December 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Environment Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 6 December 2011 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (S Nash), Belleli, Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Matson (Chairperson), Smith, Tracey, White and Woodsmith

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members

 

NOTE:    At the extraordinary meeting held on 22 May 2007, the Council resolved that the Environment Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Environment Committee Meeting - 8 November 2011

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Greening Randwick Reports

Nil

Environment Reports

E21/11      Reporting on completion of water conservation and efficiency projects in Randwick

E22/11      Sydney Coastal Council Group's Coastal Adaptation Project

E23/11      Summer Activites 2012 update.

E24/11      Overview on the State of the Environment Supplementary Report 2010-11    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    6 December 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E21/11

 

 

Subject:                  Reporting on completion of water conservation and efficiency projects in Randwick

Folder No:                   F2008/00199

Author:                   Zaman Shamsuz, Environmental Engineer     

 

Introduction

 

Over the months leading up to July 2011, Council staff were in discussion with Sydney Water over potential external grants funding to assist Council bring forward stormwater re-use and related projects planned by Council. As a result of these discussions, Sydney Water agreed to provide grants funding to Council and a paper was submitted to Council in July seeking approval of this grant under specific financial arrangements relating to the environmental levy budget and Council’s infrastructure fund.

 

On July 12, 2011, Council resolved (Notley-Smith/Matson, M14/11 refers) ‘that Council:

 

a)     approves the signing of the funding agreement with Sydney Water for the amount of $591,000 as referred to in the report;

 

b)     endorses utilisation of a maximum of $241,000 of reserve funding to meet the shortfall in matching contributions to the Sydney Water funding available to Council;

 

c)     notes and approves transfer of $241,000, or actual funds used, back to Council’s infrastructure fund from the 2012-13 environmental levy program;

 

d)     notes these works will be completed by September 30, 2011; and

 

e)     project outcomes will be reported back to Council on completion.’

 

This report advises Council of the works completed via this funding from Sydney Water and Council contributions.

 

Issues

 

Through the additional Sydney Water funding offered to Council, Council has been able to bring forward a number of major water conservation and efficiency projects planned for different parks and reserves across the City. To meet the shortfall in matching contributions Council approved the borrowing of a maximum of $241,000 from the Infrastructure Fund which is to be repaid from the 2012-2013 environmental levy program.

 

Projects completed with the Sydney Water funding and Council contributions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location

 

Project description

 

Total cost

Sydney Water funding used

Burrows Park

Clovelly

Stormwater harvesting and irrigation upgrading

$266,644

$133,322

Arthur Byrne Maroubra 

Irrigation upgrading and pump replacement

$21,279

$10,640

Nth Maroubra

Replacement of town water with bore water for irrigation

$5,200

$2,600

Yarra Oval

Irrigation upgrading

$9,872

$4,936

Various parks

Remote control irrigation and pump systems

$85,265

$42,633

Coogee beach

Stormwater harvesting and irrigation upgrading

$426,405

$213,202

Cromwell Park

Stormwater harvesting and irrigation upgrading

$170,909

$85,455

 

Total

 

 

$985,575

 

$492,787

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:         A healthy environment.

Direction 10f:        A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, re-use and water quality improvements is adopted.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Total project costs are $985,575 with external funding provided by Sydney Water totalling $492,787. The remaining $492,788 was funded from existing capital works projects and environmental levy funding and includes $241,000 borrowed from Council’s Infrastructure fund and to be paid back from the 2012-13 environmental levy program.

 

Conclusion

 

The additional external funding from Sydney Water and matching contribution from Council has enabled almost $1 million of water saving projects to be brought forward from future years of the environmental levy and capital works program. Completion of these projects is expected to contribute to water savings in the order of 50 million litres of potable water per annum. These savings will be reported to Council in future years as all newly completed works include separate water metering and accounting.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    6 December 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E22/11

 

 

Subject:                  Sydney Coastal Council Group's Coastal Adaptation Project

Folder No:                   F2006/00362

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

Many coastal Councils around Australia are examining issues related to the possible social, environmental and financial impacts they may need to take into consideration from increased storm events, storm or tidal surges or other changes that may occur over coming decades if predictions about climate change are realised. Taking these matters into account and incorporating them into Council planning processes, planning instruments, management plans etc is increasingly referred to as coastal adaptation.

 

The purpose of this paper is to advise Council of a major Coastal Adaptation project being conducted by Sydney Coastal Council’s Group (SCCG) on behalf of their member Councils.

 

Issues

 

On 15 November, 2011, Sydney Coastal Council’s Group commenced a Coastal Management and Planning project involving all member Council’s. This is one of
3 projects awarded to the Sydney Coastal Councils Group funded by the Commonwealth intended for completion by June 2012.

 

This project, known as “Prioritising Coastal Adaptation and Development Options for Local Government” aims to;

 

§ Improve understanding and establish consistent criteria used by Local Government for coastal management decision-making;

§ Enhance the capacity of coastal decision-makers to evaluate and act on social, economic and environmental interests at the Local Government scale;

§ Improve on-ground decision-making through the development of practical software tools at the Local Government scale.

 

In follow up to the workshop which was used to start collecting data from the 14 out of 15 Council members attending, consultants will;

 

§ Send out a short online survey to Councillors, Management and Council staff to collect further data on what SCCG members would find useful and important in relation to coastal planning and management; and

§ Plan for a briefing and feedback session to Councillors and Council staff in February or March 2012 on what the data is beginning to show.

 

Councillors may wish to complete the online survey as it is received by SCCG member Councils. The project consultants are keen to obtain the widest participation possible in this brief online survey.

 

 

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable city.

Direction 6(a):   Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

This project by the Sydney Coastal Councils Group has the potential to be of great assistance to Councils seeking to improve their management of the coast and will build on Randwick Council’s own Coastal Adaptation project completed in 2010. 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    6 December 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E23/11

 

 

Subject:                  Summer Activites 2012 update.

Folder No:                   F2010/00432

Author:                   Helen Morrison, Sustainability Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Council has been running a Summer Activities Program in January each year since 2006. The activities aim to educate and improve coastal and marine conservation by providing participants opportunities to experience Randwick’s unique marine and coastal environment with specialist guides and instructors. The success and popularity of the summer program has resulted in additional marine and coastal education and activity programs running in Autumn and Spring of each year over the past two years.

 

This report provides Council with an update on the new format for our Summer Program in January 2012 and seeks endorsement of additional benefits being provided to Randwick residents participating in the summer program.

 

Issues

 

Council’s summer program has become very popular and successful because it provides unique opportunities for appreciating the marine and coastal habitats firsthand through activities that include snorkelling, coastal walks and talks, learning to surf, learning about tides and rips, sustainable fishing clinics and visits to Cooks Landing at Kamay beach via boat trips from La Perouse.

 

The 2012 program will focus each day’s activities around five unique beach precincts; Clovelly, Coogee, Maroubra, Malabar/ Little Bay and La Perouse. This focus enables participants to fully appreciate the coastal area where the activities take place and focuses the Council’s resources for the day. Each activity is tailored to the particular coastal environment and local conservation messages delivered by the marine and coastal experts and contractors engaged. There is a small cost per person where equipment is required, otherwise activities are generally free of charge. Bookings will be required due to the popularity of the program.

 

It is intended to conduct the 2012 program from Monday 9 to Friday 13 January with an extra day held on Thursday, January 19, 2012. The locations relevant to each day include:

 

Location

Date

Type of activities being held

Coogee

Jan 9

Coastal walks and talks

Maroubra

Jan 10

Rockpool walks, presentations, learn to surf

Malabar / Little Bay

Jan 11

Sea kayaking, coastal and rockpool walks, fishing clinics

La Perouse

Jan 12

Adventure boat trips, snorkelling, sea kayaking, fishing clinics and Aboriginal heritage tours

Clovelly

Jan 19

Snorkelling

 

Additional benefits are being provided to residents participating in the summer program with an opportunity to;

 

·      Visit the La Perouse Museum on any weekend during January 2012 free of charge; and

·      Visit the Marine Discovery Centre at Bondi for a discounted family entrance fee of $10 instead of $25.

 

Residents must present a confirmation of a booking in Council’s summer program to receive these offers. Council will then be invoiced separately at the end of the program for a maximum amount of;

 

·      $1,000 to National Parks and Wildlife for entrance to the La Perouse Museum; and

·      $2,000 to Marine Discovery Centre Bondi for the discounted entrance fee.

 

Advertising of our program is included in the brochure and social media being set up by the Sydney Coastal Councils Group in their supporting promotion of each of their member Council’s summer activities program.

 

The not-for-profit, Conservation Volunteers Australia, is also running a number of educational guided walks and tours during December and January for Randwick residents. They are charging a small fee to cover their costs. Their program supplements the range of activities provided by Council.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A Vibrant and Diverse Community.

Direction 2(b):   Enrich our range of community services that meet our communities needs.

Direction 2(c):   Strong partnerships between the Council, community groups and government agencies.

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10a:    The Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The budget allocated to our Marine and Coastal Discovery Program is approximately $16,000 from the Community Education budget of the environmental levy program.

 

Conclusion

 

The Coastal program to gain popularity by fostering stronger relationships between the community and the Council and local organisations providing venues and our specialist and expert contractors e.g marine experts from UNSW, local surf life saving clubs, National Parks and Wildlife services and local businesses.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council endorses the special offers being provided to residents for free entrance to La Perouse Museum and discounted entrance to Marine Discovery Centre Bondi and the invoicing to Council to the maximum amount of $1,000 by National Parks and Wildlife Service and $2,000 by Marine Discovery Centre Bondi for these discounted offers during Randwick’s summer activities program.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 


Environment Committee                                                                                    6 December 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E24/11

 

 

Subject:                  Overview on the State of the Environment Supplementary Report 2010-11

Folder No:                   F2009/00245

Author:                   Choonghan  Yeo, Sustainability Projects Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Under the Local Government Act (1993), Local Councils in NSW are required to prepare a comprehensive State of the Environment (SoE) report every 4 years and supplementary SoE reports in the years in between. The purpose of these reports are to assist Councils and their communities in the strategic planning and improved management of their local environments and to better understand and respond to the human impacts on a range of local environmental issues. Supplementary reports provide annual updates to Council in between the 4-yearly comprehensive SoE report.

 

With the reforms established in NSW from the integrated planning and reporting framework there are opportunities for Councils to better integrate their SoE reporting with Annual Reports, Community Strategic Plans and Management Plans. Randwick is considering ways to improve the integration of SoE findings ahead of the comprehensive SoE report required by the end of 2012

 

This report aims to provide Council with an overview of the 2010-11 State of the Environment Supplementary Report (see attached).

 

Issues

 

The key findings in this Supplementary SOE report include:   

 

Issue

2010-11 status/result

Change since last year

Trend over last 5 years

Other comments

Greenhouse gas emissions

12,721 tonnes of CO2-e

Reduction of 45 tonnes of CO2-e

Reduction of 6.5%

Efficiency programs in place + 70kWs of solar panels at various sites

Energy consumption

68,340 gigajoules (GJ) consumed

Reduction of 264 GJ

Reduction of 18%

 

See above

Water consumption

91,122 kilolitres (kL) consumed

Reduction of 25,189 kL of potable townwater

Reduction of 25%

Additional savings have been achieved through investment in stormwater re-use and borewater projects and the use of non-potable water resulting in savings of 287 million litres of water.

Beach Water Quality

Good water quality  reported in Coogee, Maroubra, Clovelly and Little Bay beaches.

Same

Mostly same

Poor water quality has been reported in Malabar Beach. Randwick Council and  Sydney Water are currently undertaking a project aimed at removing the contamination. Due for completion early in 2012. 

Resource Recovery

19,529 tonnes of recycling collected

38% recovery rate

Mostly same

Chemical cleanouts and hardwaste collection services also provided

Biodiversity

15,536 hours from volunteers for bush regeneration

Reduction of 1,718 hours

Slight reductions over time period

Council continues to manage the natural areas under its control according to best practice as recommended by State and Federal government publications and protocols, particularly in relation to the endangered ecological communities, Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub and Sydney Freshwater Wetlands and the various endangered flora and fauna species of the area.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:             A healthy environment.

Direction 10(c):                 Land use planning and management enhances and protects biodiversity and natural heritage.

Direction 10(d):                 Sustainable alternative waste technologies and environmentally sound collection systems are identified and implemented.

Direction 10(f):                  A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, reuse and water quality improvements is adopted.

Direction 10(g):         Greenhouse gas emissions are reduced.

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick Council continues to demonstrate a strong commitment to environmental sustainability and invest extensively in practical and on-ground efforts to deliver stronger sustainability outcomes for the Council, community, and the natural environment. This is shown by our continuous improvement of environmental performance over the last few years. A more detailed and comprehensive assessment of Council’s environmental performance, initiatives and achievements will be discussed under the Comprehensive State of the Environmental Report to be prepared by the end of 2012.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

State of the Environment Supplementary Report 2010-11

 

 

 

 


State of the Environment Supplementary Report 2010-11

Attachment 1

 

 

State of the Environment

 

Supplementary Report 2010-11

 


 

State of the Environment Report – Supplementary, 2010 - 2011

 

Background

 

This state of the environment (SoE) supplementary is to be read in conjunction with the Council’s Annual Report to comply with the NSW Government’s new integrated planning and reporting framework as well as meeting statutory requirements for each Council to report on the state of their local environment. 

 

The purpose of the supplementary SoE is to:

 

  identify and update any new environmental issues arising since the last supplementary report

  report on trends related to the impacts of these environmental issues; and

  highlight key actions undertaken in response to these environmental issues.

 

Relationship of SoE Supplementary

 

Council’s SoE reporting is intended to usefully guide and inform on the relevant outcomes and objectives of Council’s 20-year, strategic City Plan. The key area of City Plan relevant to SoE reporting remains:

 

Outcome 10:     A healthy environment; and to a lesser extent

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport

 

It is not intended that the SoE supplementary repeat the level of information and data found in these two recent Randwick Council publications, but merely provide an update as the legislation and reporting framework allows.

 

Energy consumption and Greenhouse gas emissions

 

Council’s energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions

 

Council’s greenhouse gas emissions continue to decrease gradually, figure 1 below shows the change in greenhouse gas emissions over the reporting period. The greenhouse gas emissions for the financial year of 2010/11 are 12,721 tonnes of CO2-e which is a decrease of around 45 tonnes or 0.3% from the previous year. Over the last 5 years, we have achieved a carbon reduction of around 6.5%.

 

 

This trend correlates with our energy consumption where we have a total energy consumption of 68,340 gigajoules which is a decrease of 264 gigajoules or 0.4% (refer to figure 2). Over the last 5 years, we have achieved a reduction of 18% in energy consumption. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Updating Council responses on energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions

 

In June 2010, Council has installed a 10 kW solar panel on the rooftop of our Administration Building. The new solar panels will help generate approximately 14MWh worth of electricity over the year. Council has also recently completed an energy audit of our top ten energy consumption sites as part of the review of our existing Energy Saving Action Plan. Potential energy-saving measures such as lightings switch and BMS upgrades are identified through the audit and will be implemented from the financial year of 2011-12 onwards

 

Water

 

Council’s water consumption

 

Council’s potable water consumption for 2010-11 is 91,122 kilolitres (kL), which is a decrease of 25,189 kL from last year. Over the last 5 years, we have achieved total water saving of 30 million litres of water or 25% reduction (refer to figure 3).

 

 

 

Additional savings have been achieved through investment in installing rainwater tanks, bore water and stormwater harvesting and re-use projects. These projects are listed in the figure below and they are achieving approximately 287 million litres of water savings. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Water Savings (Approximately) , Unit Litre

Water Saving Project/Activities

 Savings in Litre (approx)

Recycled Water and Stormwater Harvesting

Depot waste water treatment plant

1.5 million

Stormwater Harvesting at Nursery, Kensington

2 Million

Stormwater  Harvesting  at Coogee Oval and Goldstein Reserve

18 Million

Stormwater Harvesting at Pioneers Park

25 Million

Stormwater Harvesting at Nagle Park

12 Million

Stormwater Harvesting at Clovelly.

10 Million

Backwash Wastewater and Bore Water Recycling and Reuse System at Des Renford Aquatic Centre.

15 Million

Total water Savings per year

83.5 Million

 Town Water Replaced with Bore Water

Arthur Byrne Reserve, Maroubra

9 Million

Burrows Park , Clovelly

3.5 Million

Snape Park, Maroubra

8 million

Kensington Oval, Kensington

13 million

Paine Reserve, Randwick

5 Million

Latham Park, South Coogee

25 Million

Heffron Park, Maroubra

100 million

Coral Sea Park, Maroubra

17 million

John Shore, Maroubra

9 Million

RCC Community Centre, Randwick

3 Million

Roadside Gardening and Waste Recycling Centre

10 Million

Total water Savings per year

203.5 Million

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rainwater Tanks

Tank Capacity

 Council Depot

67,900L

Burrows Park

9,000L

Matraville Recycling Centre

10,000L

Malabar Library

10,000L

Des Renford Aquatic Centre

20,000L

Council Admin Building, Randwick

20000L

Total Capacity of Tanks

137,000L

 

Figure 4: Water-savings achieved through non-potable water consumption

 

 

Updating on Council water re-use and recycling initiatives

 

Further investments on stormwater harvesting systems are happening in various parks including Cromwell Park, Malabar; Burrows Park, Clovelly; Grant reserve, Coogee and an upgraded water irrigation system for Coogee Oval and Goldstein Reserve. Council has also recently completed a water audit of our top ten water consumption sites as part of the review of our existing Water Saving Action Plan. Potential water-efficiency measures are identified through the audit and will be implemented from the financial year of 2011-12 onwards.

 

Updating on beach water quality issues

 

The NSW Government’s Beachwatch program routinely monitors bacterial levels of 36 ocean beaches and one lagoon in the Sydney ocean beaches region. Recreational water quality is measured using two types of bacteria: enterococci and faecal streptococci, which are indicators of sewage contamination.

Of the 5 main beaches monitored in Randwick, Clovelly beach, Coogee beach, Maroubra beach and Little Bay beach all achieve a beach suitability grade of good which indicates good water quality.

 

Malabar Beach is the only beach which indicates exceedences of water quality parameter under certain circumstances. Investigations have established this is mainly due to faecal contamination discharged from the stormwater drain on the northern side of the beach. This drain flows following light rainfall and although it is not highly polluted, bacterial levels in the discharge are sufficiently elevated to raise levels in the bay to values unsuitable for swimming at certain times (refer to graph below). Randwick Council is currently working with Sydney Water through funding from the Waste and Sustainability Improvement Program to address the issue and bring the water quality of Malabar beach to the same standard with the other beaches. This work will be completed in 2011-12 with investment of more than $2 million.

 

 

 

 

Figure 2: Microbial assessment at Malabar Beach

 

Waste

 

Updating on Council’s resource recovery initiatives

 

In 2010-11, the total tonnage for recycling is 19,529 tonnes which is a slight decrease of 529 tonnes from the previous year. The decrease in recycling tonnages can be attributed to the reduction in waste tonnage which stands at 31,478 tonnes, a decrease of 1,236 tonnes. Our overall resource recovery rate continues to be around 38 percent, still some way to achieving the 66 percent target set by NSW government legislation by 2014 (refer Figure 3 below).

 

Two chemical cleanout days have been held at Clovelly beach carpark and Heffron Park carpark respectively. 27 tonnes of hazardous waste was collected at Clovelly beach carpark in May 2011, which is an increase of 3 tonnes or 12 percent from the last cleanout event in May 2010.

 

 

Through the Waste and Sustainability Improvement Program (WaSIP), additional resource recovery projects including Public Place Recycling and working with Department of Housing to enhance resource recovery are being carried out in Financial Year of 2010-11. 

 

Biodiversity

 

Updating Council’s biodiversity conservation and habitat protection initiatives

 

Bush regeneration by specialist contractors is undertaken in 22 bushland reserves.

Bushcare Volunteers are supported by council in 9 of these reserves. The amount of hours provided by these volunteers is included in Table 2

 

Table 2: Number of bush regenerations hours committed.

 

 

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Council land

14,732

15,190

 

17,036

15,550

15,263

14,603

 

Non-Council land

4,824

~ 1,333

 

6,304

1,730

1,058

933

TOTAL

19,556

~ 16,523

23,340

17,280

16,321

15,536

 

The newest area added to Council’s bush and reserve responsibilities is Randwick Environmental Park. The Plan of Management governing the Randwick Environmental Park aims for the protection, conservation and enhancement of bushland and wetland features of the Park while allowing a range of passive recreational opportunities.

 

Council continue to manage the natural areas under its control according to best practice as recommended by State and Federal government publications and protocols, particularly in relation to the endangered ecological communities, Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub and Sydney Freshwater Wetlands and the various endangered flora and fauna species of the area.

 

Revegetation

 

Revegetation is undertaken on 6 sites adjoining bushland remnants along the coast and continues the expansion of fauna habitat.

 

Council continues to support 5 community volunteer groups planting and maintaining native landscaping in council parks.

 

Wildlife Watch

 

Council commenced this new volunteer program to tap into the community’s extensive knowledge of native fauna.  Participants report sightings to Council of native birds, frogs and reptiles according to the Australian Wildlife Atlas’ protocols.

 

Surveying and Monitoring

 

Data on local organisms in natural areas was collected by Council staff, Council’s bush regeneration contractors and volunteers in the Wildlife Watch program.  This information was added to the existing databases under the following headings;

 

 

The expansion of the area of the bushland remnants and improvements in their condition as a result of bush regeneration activities are monitored on a monthly and yearly basis.

 

Conclusion

 

Council continues to demonstrate a strong commitment to environmental sustainability and invest extensively in practical and on-ground efforts to deliver stronger sustainability outcomes for the community and the natural environment. This is shown by our continuous improvement of environmental performance over the last few years.

 

As part of the integrated reporting framework, Council is continuing its improvement in the harmonisation of indicators and datasets used with a medium to long term view aimed at enabling a quicker response to issues as they arise and a wider level of understanding of environmental and social issues needing policy and practical changes to be made. The harmonisation of indicators and details of Council’s environmental performance, achievements and initiatives will be further discussed under the Comprehensive State of the Environment Reporting in 2012.