Environment Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 13 September 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                 13 September 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that an Environment Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 13 September 2011 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (M Matson), Belleli, Hughes (Chairperson), Matthews, Smith, Tracey, White and Woodsmith (Deputy Chairperson).

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members.

 

NOTE:    At the extraordinary meeting held on 22 May 2007, the Council resolved that the Environment Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Environment Committee Meeting – 12 July 2011

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Greening Randwick Reports

Nil

Environment Reports

E9/11        Household Chemical CleanOut Results May 2011

E10/11      Proposal to purchase Australian sourced Carbon Offsets - Accredited Project

E11/11      Waste and Susainability Improvement Payments Program

E12/11      Results to date of the 3-Council Business Water Audit Program

E13/11      'Greening Kooloora' project at Kooloora Community Centre    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Environment Committee                                                                                 13 September 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E9/11

 

 

Subject:                  Household Chemical CleanOut Results May 2011

Folder No:                   F2008/00413

Author:                   Guada Lado, Waste & Sustainability Education Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Household hazardous waste (including; medicine, insecticide, pesticide, herbicide, paint, etc.) puts landfill operators at risk, when disposed of with general waste destined for landfill.  Also, some household chemicals can contaminate and make kerbside collected garden organics unsuitable for composting. To provide the residents of the City with an opportunity for safe disposal of such chemicals, Council jointly with the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) (formerly the Department of Environment and Climate Change (DECCW)), organised a household chemical collection at Clovelly Beach car park on 7 May 2011.

 

The purpose of this report is to inform council on the quantity of chemicals collected and of the participation of residents in this event.

 

Issues

 

Each year Council organises two household hazardous chemical collections in partnership with OEH. The first chemical collection for 2011 was held on 7 May this year.  The event was advertised in the Southern Courier and a brochure was distributed via Council’s Customer Service Centres, Recycling Centre, Council’s libraries and local hardware stores.

 

Chemsal, a qualified hazardous chemical management contractor, managed the collection process on behalf of the NSW Government’s OEH.

 

The second event for the year will take place on 8 October 2011.

 

Participation and amounts collected:

Over 800 residents visited the collection site on the day to drop-off their unwanted household chemicals.

 

About 57% of these residents used this service for the first time and 43% had used it previously.

 

Almost 27,000 kgs of household chemicals were collected. Of the collected chemicals, 44% was water based paint, 29% oil based paint, and 5% lead acid batteries.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10(a):  Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

Direction 10(b):  Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

 

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

The event was funded by the Office of Environment and Heritage. There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Household hazardous chemical collection helps reducing the risk of such chemicals entering waste streams.

 

During this event over 27,000 kgs of household chemicals were collected and more than 800 residents participated in the event.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Chemsal Report - Chemical CleanOut Collection Results - Clovelly Beach Carpark - May 2011

 

 

 

 


Chemsal Report - Chemical CleanOut Collection Results - Clovelly Beach Carpark - May 2011

Attachment 1

 

 

Randwick (Clovelly) CleanOut Collection ‘Snapshot’ Results

7 May 2011

 

Summary:

Total of items collected:         26,887.9 kg         

Number of people attended:   833

 

Total of materials collected by type:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How did attendees hear about this CleanOut collection?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of attendees that had used CleanOut before:

 


If attendees had used CleanOut before, how long ago was this?

 


Environment Committee                                                                                 13 September 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E10/11

 

 

Subject:                  Proposal to purchase Australian sourced Carbon Offsets - Accredited Project

Folder No:                   F2006/00176

Author:                   Choonghan  Yeo, Sustainability Projects Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Council’s analysis of its annual greenhouse gas emissions indicated a shortfall from its annual 4 percent reduction target. To make up for this difference an original  proposal via Mayoral Minute 17/11 in February 2011 proposed that Council purchase carbon offsets from overseas whereas Council resolved (Smith / Woodsmith) “that Council defer such a purchase until an Australian project is identified that complies with the required Australian Carbon Offset Standard”.

 

In follow up via Mayoral Minute 142/11 in June 2011 whereby an Australian offset project was identified potentially complying with the above offset standard, Council resolved “that Council receive and note this report and following accreditation, a report be brought back to Council for the purchase of approximately 600 tonnes of carbon offsets from this Australian based project”.

 

Issues

 

Through the Local Government Emissions Trading Scheme developed by Randwick, Council has a 4% annual greenhouse gas reduction target. In previous year’s, Council has purchased carbon offsets to make up for the gap or shortfall in achieving its annual greenhouse gas reduction. This enables organisations to reach their overall carbon ‘budget’ through the combination of energy savings and offsets purchased. In the past, offsets were only available for purchase from overseas projects but following a new Australian standard and accreditation processes by the Australian government it has become possible to buy locally sourced carbon offsets.

 

Confirmation has been received that carbon offsets provided via Climate Friendly in its Improved Forestry Management Project located in Tasmania, has gained accreditation from the ‘Domestic Offsets Integrity Committee’ of the Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency under the current version of the ‘National Carbon Offset Standard’ (NCOS).  This means that offsets generated will be officially recognised as an ‘Australian’ offset and any greenhouse gas reduction will be additional to Australia’s international (Kyoto) reduction target. It is worth noting that this is the first and only Australian project to be accredited under the Voluntary Carbon Standard, which is an internationally recognised carbon offset standard. 

 

A revised quote has been provided from Climate Friendly to match Council’s estimated shortfall for 2009-10 which was 710 tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2-e) emissions. The current cost for purchasing 710 tonnes of carbon offsets is approximately $11,637 (inclusive of GST).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A healthy environment.

Direction 10g:    Greenhouse gas emissions are reduced.

Financial impact statement

 

The cost for purchasing 710 tonnes worth of carbon offsets will be $11,637 based on the current carbon price of $16.40 per tonne. It is proposed to pay this from the climate change budget of Council’s environmental levy program.

 

Conclusion

 

Following accreditation from the Federal Government, the credits generated by the Improved Forestry Management Project are recognised as ‘Australian’ offsets enabling Council to purchase the carbon offsets and know with confidence that it is contributing to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in Australia.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council approves the purchase of 710 tonnes of Australian carbon offsets from Climate Friendly as outlined above.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                 13 September 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E11/11

 

 

Subject:                  Waste and Susainability Improvement Payments Program

Folder No:                   F2009/00496

Author:                   Talebul Islam, Coordinator Strategic Waste     

 

Introduction

 

Under s88 of the NSW Protection of the Environment Operations Act 2007, Council pays a levy to the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) for disposal of waste at landfill. Currently the levy is $82.30 per tonne. The NSW Government is giving part of this money back to local government through a Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payment (WaSIP) Program. Through this program the NSW Government will invest some $237million to assist Sydney Metropolitan councils invest in actions and programs that will improve waste avoidance, resource recovery and waste management outcomes and deliver improvements in environmental sustainability. This program will continue until 2016.

 

To qualify for this funding, Council is required to meet certain standards and criteria set by the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH). Total funding available for the yearly WaSIP program is allocated to eligible councils in proportion to their population.

 

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of our progress in meeting the WaSIP standards.

 

Issues

 

Ongoing WaSIP standards

On commencement of the WaSIP program a number of standards required of Councils were of an ongoing nature and a number were specific to each year. The ongoing WaSIP requirements included:

 

·           Provision of a kerbside recycling collection service for residents;  

 

·           Provision of baseline information and data to OEH including, for example, tonnages of dry recyclables and garden organics collected for recycling and residual waste collected within Randwick;

 

·           New collection and mobile garbage bin contracts and disposal contracts that comply with Australian and OEH Departmental standards;

 

·           Waste-Not DCP (or a policy of similar nature) (relating particularly to improved management of building and demolition waste).

 

Standards for 2009-10

The 2009-10 financial year WaSIP standards to be met by each Council included:

 

·           Development and implementation of a Strategic Waste Action Plan (SWAP) with performance milestones indicating how Council plans to achieve the mandatory 66% landfill diversion target;

       

·           Development of a Sustainability Action Plan (SAP), with measurable actions and targets for Council to achieve.  

Standards for 2010-11

The new 2010-11 financial year WaSIP standards to be met by each Council included:

 

·           Completion of a household residual waste and recycling composition audit (to be submitted by November 2011);

 

·           Preparation of an Illegal Dumping and Litter Management Plan;

 

·           Delivery of a garden organics recycling service;

 

·           Energy and water audits of Council facilities;

 

·           Policy statement to reduce emissions from Council’s vehicle fleet;

 

·           Policy statement to increase sustainable procurement by Council;

 

·           Policy statement to increase sustainable outcomes for Council events.

 

To date, Council has achieved each of the ongoing and annual standards required to satisfy ongoing WaSIP payments from the NSW Government with the exception of the household audit above which has been completed for Council and will be submitted by the November 2011 due date.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10A:    A healthy environment.       

Direction 10e:    Our community is encouraged to implement waste minimisation strategies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

WaSIP payments are provided to Council from the NSW Government.

 

Conclusion

 

Council continues to comply with the standards and criteria set to receive its WaSIP payments from the NSW Government.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                 13 September 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E12/11

 

 

Subject:                  Results to date of the 3-Council Business Water Audit Program

Folder No:                   F2009/00494

Author:                   Richard Wilson, Ecological Footprint Project Officer     

 

Introduction

 

As part of the 3-Council Ecological Footprint project collaboration between Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra Councils, Sydney Water provided funding for a Sustainable Business Project Officer to work with local businesses using high volumes of drinking water. The Project Officer is currently hosted by Woollahra Council but his role requires him to work across each of the 3 Council areas.

 

This report provides an overview of current results of this 3-Council Sustainable Business Program.

 

Issues

 

The 3-Council Sustainable Business Program initially required the Project Officer to identify and work with established businesses using between 10,000 and 80,000 litres of town water a day e.g. hotels and restaurants. The target agreed with Sydney Water at the start of the program was to seek involvement of at least 50 local businesses.

 

Each participating business is provided with a detailed water audit involving the installation of data logging equipment that monitors water use over a number of weeks. As a result, these businesses gain a much better understanding of their water use and the opportunities to achieve water savings with close support provided to make a number of the changes identified.

 

Sydney Water has confirmed the water saving results achieved for Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra businesses exceeded their own aims and objectives.

 

No. of participating businesses

Water savings identified

Cost of Implementing savings identified

Savings off water bills for businesses

 

 

87 local businesses

 

By LGA:

Woollahra - 17

Waverley - 19

Randwick – 51 (12 + 39 at Pacific Square)

 

 

283,000 litres / day

 

$11,334

 

$231,611

 

 

Costs associated with implementing the water savings were generally provided by the businesses themselves with some support from Sydney Water.

 

 

Project extension

 

The success of the project between the 3 Councils has prompted Sydney Water to extend the offer of financial support for an additional 2 years. The Project Officer is also being encouraged to seek participation of small businesses tripping a lower initial threshold of water use. This will enable smaller businesses to gain access and potential benefit of the program.

 

A communications strategy for the next 2 program is currently being finalised across the 3 Councils. Businesses will be directed to register their interest in the next program via the 3-Council website (www.reduceyourfootprint.com.au ).

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 8:       A Strong Local Economy

Direction 8(b):   Vibrant town centres that adequately serve the community and foster support for local business activity

 

Outcome 10:     A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10(a): Council is leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

10(d) Sustainable alternative waste technologies and environmentally sound collection systems are identified and implemented.

10(f): A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, reuse and water quality improvements is adopted.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Funding provided by Sydney Water was $103,500 includes the first year salary of the Project Officer salary and funding to assist in implementation of water saving initiatives across the participating businesses. The second year salary costs are funded jointly by the 3 Councils as part of the extension of the 3-Council Ecological Footprint Program.

 

Conclusion

 

The Sustainable Business Program enables financial and technical support to be provided to local businesses with a key feature of the results to date showing significant financial savings for businesses (savings of $231,611 off water bills) as well as measurable environmental benefits. This project continues to demonstrate the benefits of the 3-Council collaboration and its objectives to reduce water and energy consumption and waste generation across Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs.

 

The 3 Council collaboration provided important leverage in obtaining the additional resources offered by Sydney Water and the results achieved for local businesses.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That this report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee                                                                                 13 September 2011

 

 

Environment Report No. E13/11

 

 

Subject:                  'Greening Kooloora' project at Kooloora Community Centre

Folder No:                   F2011/00302

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

As reported previously to Council, Randwick together with 3 other Councils and Housing NSW were successful in receiving external funding from the NSW Government’s Environment Trust to deliver a range of sustainability projects for low income and public housing communities within each of their local government areas.

 

Randwick’s Stage 1 projects have focussed on a number of community garden projects in the southern areas of the City, particularly at La Perouse, South Coogee and Malabar.

 

A key project in the Stage 2 round of funding is the ‘Greening Kooloora’ project aimed at building on the extensive community network established at Kooloora Community Centre with an objective to demonstrate a range of sustainability features at Kooloora itself and also assist public housing tenants using the Community Centre to reduce their own energy consumption and make savings on their energy bills.

 

This report is seeking additional resources from Council for the ‘Greening Kooloora’ project and the intention to enhance Kooloora as Randwick’s southern sustainability ‘hub’ (i.e. as with Barrett House in the north and Randwick Community Centre in the central areas of the City). In becoming the southern ‘hub’ for sustainability, Kooloora Community Centre will be facilitating a much wider group of public housing tenants to achieve practical energy and cost savings in their homes as a key outcome of this project.

 

Issues

 

The stage 2 funding provided for the ‘Greening Kooloora’ project from the NSW Government’s Environmental Trust is approximately $36,000 and will deliver the following:

 

·      ‘Sustainability on a Shoestring’ workshops delivered on-site at Kooloora Community Centre to show residents practical and affordable ways of being more sustainability around the home with a focus on reducing energy and achieving  savings on their bills (these workshops have already been developed and delivered in the other participating Council areas with great success in achieving savings for public housing residents);

 

·      a ‘model’ sustainability house (table-sized) for use during these workshops and in separate information sessions for Kooloora’s community user groups to provide hands-on learning about how water and energy savings measures can make a difference around the home;

 

·      real-time energy monitoring software of appliances and lighting in Kooloora itself to show community users and residents the advantages of ‘turning off’ electrical appliances, lights, computers etc.

 

Housing NSW is contributing with existing programs offered through Kooloora including:

 

·      the low income energy audit program for public housing residents;

 

·      energy payment vouchers for residents facing difficulties paying higher energy bills, particularly over winter; and

 

·      Housing NSW has also indicated it’s willingness to contribute toward installation of photovoltaic solar panels on the roof of Kooloora to assist in the community centre’s demonstration capacity as a sustainability and learning ‘hub’ for its community (see below).

 

A key area which is unable to be funded through the external grant is physical changes within the homes of public housing tenants i.e. draught protectors, changeovers to small or more energy saving appliances, behavioural changes, increased understanding of energy consumption etc.

 

It is proposed to provide a small level of funding to support public housing tenants who participate in the ‘sustainability on a shoestring’ workshops at Kooloora utilising the energy saving budget of Council’s environmental levy program. Previous Council incentives and rebates have not targeted this sector of the Randwick community.

 

The proposal will support the wide network and relationship Kooloora Community Centre has with its local residents. The funding proposed is for an amount up to $10,000 to assist residents save money on their energy bills by gaining a comprehensive understanding of their energy consumption. This will be carried out by installing energy saving meters within the units of those attending the workshops and are willing to commit to energy saving behavioural changes. The cost of each meter (at a bulk purchase price) is approximately $150. Once installed and used by the resident, savings in energy costs have been found to be around 20% per annum.

 

With approximately 20 to 30 people able to attend each workshop and around 4 workshops to be held at Kooloora there is an assumption that not all will want to have a meter installed.

 

An early trial will be conducted on an existing block of public housing units as part of this project in order to establish a sensible and straightforward process for this assistance to be provided to tenants through Kooloora Community Centre. These outcomes will be reported to Council.

 

As mentioned above, Housing NSW has also indicated a willingness to support the installation of photovoltaic solar panels on the roof of Kooloora Community Centre to facilitate its wider focus as a sustainability hub for residents. Council’s support of this project and the support that Kooloora Community Centre provides to the local community would be enhanced substantially by contributing to the solar panel installation on the roof of the Centre. Quotes received would enable a 4 kilowatt solar panel array to be installed, including an online data logger which would feature in the real-time energy monitoring within Kooloora. The total price of this system is approximately $15,500 so subject to Housing NSW funding half of this cost, Council’s contribution would be around $7,750 (excludes GST). A net meter installed with these solar panels would also ensure an energy and cost saving for Kooloora Community Centre.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2(b):   Enrich our range of community services that meets our community needs.

Direction 2(c):   Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The ‘Greening Kooloora’ sustainability project is receiving approximately $36,000 in external funds, with project completion and acquittal required by 30 June 2012. It is proposed to provide up to $10,000 to support the installation of energy saving meters and $7,750 for the installation of solar panels at Kooloora, subject to equal funding from Housing NSW. This funding would be paid through the energy saving budget of Council’s environmental levy program. Residents will be required to demonstrate a commitment to achieving energy saving changes by attending the workshops provided at Kooloora as part of this project.

 

Conclusion

 

The four participating Councils in this project, with Housing NSW, have been sharing their various experiences in how to support improved sustainability outcomes amongst public housing communities. The approach developed for the ‘Greening Kooloora’ project has been built around this shared learning and has been approved by the funding body and the project Steering Group represented by all participating Councils and agencies.

 

The project also builds on and enhances Kooloora Community Centre and the trust and focus it has developed over many years with its extensive network of public housing tenants, user groups, their families and local community.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council approve the allocation of up to $10,000 to assist in the installation of energy saving meters for local residents participating in the sustainability workshops at Kooloora Community Centre as outlined in this report and commencing with a trial by November 2011;

 

b)     Council approve $7,750, subject to equal funding from Housing NSW, for the installation of solar panels on Kooloora Community Centre as part of the ‘Greening Kooloora’ project; and

 

c)     the results of this trial and outcomes of the project are reported back to Council on a regular basis.

                                                                                                      

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil