Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 9 August 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                  9 August 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 9 August 2011 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (M Matson), Andrews, Belleli (Chairperson), Bowen, Hughes, Matthews, Nash, Notley-Smith, Procopiadis, Seng, Smith, Stevenson, Tracey, White (Deputy Chairperson) and Woodsmith.

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members.

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 12 July 2011

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W25/11     Annual Air Monitoring of Fibro Fragments (Asbestos Issue)............................

W26/11     Buildings for our Community - Des Renford Aquatic Centre Indoor Multi-Purpose Fitness Facility Project

W27/11     Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity Area Consultation Outcomes    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Sima Truuvert

ACTING General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                  9 August 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W25/11

 

 

Subject:                  Annual Air Monitoring of Fibro Fragments (Asbestos Issue)

Folder No:                   F2008/00197

Author:                   Zaman Shamsuz, Environmental Engineer     

 

Introduction

 

At its Ordinary Council Meeting held on 25 March 2008, Council resolved:

 

“(Matson/Woodsmith) that the sampling and testing program continue at Heffron Park once per year.”

 

Issues

 

Council has conducted annual air monitoring at six locations during asbestos removal in Heffron Park on 30 June 2011. Six air sampling instruments have been installed at the following locations.

 

These areas were identified in the asbestos inspection survey report dated 5 June 2011 as follows:

 

§  Area No. 1. Waypoint 60 - 97, Netball Courts (west),

§  Area No. 2, Waypoints 98 - 120, Seven tree Hill, South West of Netball Courts.

§  Area No. 3. Waypoints 405 – 419, Sand Drainage Basin.

§  Area No.4 Waypoints 263 - 271, Sports Centre Overflow Carpark, (north of Sports Centre).

§  Area No.5 Waypoints 134 – 137, Area North of sand Basin, (adjacent the cycle track finishing straight).

§  Area No.6 Waypoints 250 - 263, Gymnasium and Sports Centre (Bunnerong Road.

 

Sampling has been conducted by Pickford & Rhyder Consulting Pty Ltd and analysis in NATA endorsed laboratory. Filters have been examined in accordance with the April 2005 National Occupational Health & Safety Commission "Guidance Note on the Membrane Filter Method for Estimating Airborne Asbestos Fibres" (2nd Edition), as per Laboratory Method MFM/1.

 

The results for airborne asbestos samples taken are below the detection limit of the method of 10 fibres per 100 fields or less than 0.01 fibres per millilitre of air, and are therefore completely satisfactory. These results indicate that no measurable amounts of airborne fibres were present.

 

Annual Asbestos inspection and removal

Pickford Ryder Pty Ltd was engaged to carry out annual asbestos cement inspection survey in the entire park on 24 May and 1-2 June 2011. Lidoran Environmental Services, a licensed asbestos removal contractor, was engaged to remove all visible AC fragments from the surface of the soil through handpicking, on 28-30 June 2011, from locations mentioned in the annual asbestos survey report prepared by Pickford Ryder Pty Ltd. A visual clearance inspection was also conducted by Lidoran Environmental Services and Pickford Ryder Pty Ltd on 30 June 2011 after removing visible asbestos from the surface of the soil in the park.

 


Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

Key Action:       Assets are managed strategically to deliver intergenerational equity and to meet Council’s obligation as the custodian of our community’s assets.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

The cost to complete the Annual asbestos survey in the entire park, clearance inspection and air monitoring is $10,675.50 GST exclusive.

 

The cost of asbestos removal by Lidoran Environmental Services is $22,090.00 GST Exclusive

 

Conclusion

 

Air monitoring was conducted, during annual asbestos removal, in the entire park. The test results indicate that no measurable amounts of airborne fibres were present in air in the Park.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Visual Clearance Inspection Report

 

2.View

Annual Asbestos Monitoring Report and Certificate of Analysis - Airborne Asbestos Fibres

 

3.View

Annual Asbestos Inspection Survey, Heffron Park, June 2011

 

 

 

 


Visual Clearance Inspection Report

Attachment 1

 

 




Annual Asbestos Monitoring Report and Certificate of Analysis - Airborne Asbestos Fibres

Attachment 2

 

 



Annual Asbestos Inspection Survey, Heffron Park, June 2011

Attachment 3

 

 
























Works Committee                                                                                                  9 August 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W26/11

 

 

Subject:                  Buildings for our Community - Des Renford Aquatic Centre Indoor Multi-Purpose Fitness Facility Project

Folder No:                   PROJ/10574/2011

Author:                   Hayley Segedin, Buildings for our Community Projects Coordinator; Reece Heddle, Manager Aquatic Services     

 

Introduction

 

The Des Renford Aquatic Centre is an award winning facility located within Heffron Park, Maroubra. The Centre is owned and operated by Randwick City Council. The Centre attracts over 450,000 visitors annually and is operated at maximum capacity, providing both water and dry land activities. The Centre includes a 50 metre outdoor Olympic pool, a 25 metre indoor competition pool, a 25 metre indoor program/training pool, outdoor wading and toddlers’ pools, a kiosk/café, car parking and BBQ, lawn and shade areas (see attachment 1).

 

In April 2009, The Heffron Park Plan of Management (“the HPPM”) was adopted to ensure that development within Heffron Park is relevant to the community’s current and future sporting and recreational needs and is compatible with the public purpose, identified values and features of Heffron Park. The HPPM applies to all land within Heffron Park, including that occupied by the Centre, and provides guidelines for the upgrade of the Centre with a new gym, aerobics area, crèche, administration offices and entrance area.

 

The Des Renford Aquatic Centre Indoor Multi-Purpose Fitness Facility Project is a major project, scheduled for 2011-12 and 2012-13, forming part of Council’s Buildings for our Community Program.

 

Issues

 

The Project

In March 2011, Council engaged an architect consultant to prepare a design concept and formulate documentation for the Project.  A preliminary concept proposal has now been completed.

 

The Project brief was aligned with the HPPM guidelines and included a gym, a crèche, an administration area and an entrance area. It was proposed that the gym comprise a spin room and an aerobics studio and that the administration area include offices, a meeting room, toilet facilities and associated retail space. At present, the kiosk also operates as the entrance so, with the provision of a new main entrance, this facility will be refurbished.

 

In developing a concept proposal for the Project, a number of key objectives have been identified, including the following:

 

·                Both the aquatic and fitness facilities are located in one cohesive centre.

·                The newly located main entrance to the Centre provides a strong sense of arrival.

·                A focus or meeting place is formed within the Centre.

·                There is functionality and ease of access between areas in the Centre and the overall site.

·                Consideration has been given to the site, existing facilities and surrounds.

·                The gym, aerobics studio and crèche are of a nominated floor size area to attract a predetermined number of annual memberships for the Centre.

 

A preliminary concept proposal has been developed in response to the Project brief and objectives (see attachments 2, 3 & 4). The design consideration and key features of this proposal include the following:

 

·                In order to make efficient use of floor space and to minimise its footprint, the building comprises two levels. The administration area, crèche and aerobics studio are located on the lower level. The gym (with cardio, weights resistance and free weights training area) and a spin room occupy the upper level, including some office space.

 

·                An atrium allows natural light down through the building, linking the two levels. This also creates the focal point within the building, which would be utilised as a meeting, waiting and sales area.

 

·                The control point of the building has been relocated away from the existing kitchen towards the front entrance, with the upgraded kitchen and café being central to the fitness and aquatic areas and having close access to the outside pool amenities area which will be upgraded.

 

·                There is also easy circulation and access between the rooms, spaces and levels.

 

·                The crèche is orientated away from the Centre and includes a quiet room and access to the outside.

 

·                The building’s location provides a clear and direct link from the car park into the Centre, as well as to the designated outside areas and to the existing change rooms and toilet amenities.

 

·                The north orientation provides views across the park and privacy for neighbours.

 

·                The structural elements of the building give it an interesting and iconic character conveying a fresh modern image.

 

For the next stage of the Project, Council plans to consult the community and stakeholder groups by way of an extensive five week public exhibition, which will run between 1 August and 2 September 2011.

 

In order to provide a framework for the public exhibition, a consultation and communications plan has been developed. The action list for that plan includes a leaflet distribution, advertising in the Southern Courier, a Maroubra central precinct and Matraville precinct committee briefings, a site display, creation of a website page, media briefing and releases and an on site “drop-in” day for the public.

 

The purpose of the public exhibition is to provide information about the proposal and to gain community and stakeholder input about the functions and programs for the Centre. During the public exhibition, the community and stakeholders will have an opportunity to view the proposal and provide feedback on the Project. This will assist in preparing the development application in which the community and stakeholders will have opportunity to further comment on the details of the Project.

 

Once the public exhibition is closed, all feedback will be assessed and reported in the form of a report to Council.

 

The public exhibition is one of a number of steps which are to be undertaken throughout the duration of the Project delivery. It is anticipated that the planning stage of the Project, including the public exhibition, development application assessment and tendering, will take twelve months to complete. The construction phase will then take an additional twelve months.  The project is anticipated to be completed (and the Centre be operational) by mid 2013.

 

Financial Capability

In relation to this proposal Council has developed a financial model which indicates the financial performance of the new Centre once operational. This financial modelling has been obtained using industry benchmarks; floor size of the gym facility versus membership numbers; utilising a mid-range fee structure and taking into account operating strategies so that the centre has a unique point of difference.

 

The Centre currently averages 10,000 visits per week which is a significant advantage in ensuring the membership numbers required to achieve the financial forecast are accomplished.

 

This financial modelling has taken into consideration the following:

 

·                Resourcing and staff costs including on-costs.

·                Contracts, materials, utilities, telephone and licence fees.

·                Depreciation related costs such setting aside funding to replace gym and other equipment

·                Internal charges of $241,000 rising by CPI each year. The Centre will also recover the cost of Council’s internal support.

·                Income wise, utilising moderate membership and casual attendance numbers;

·                The bottom line result after all the above, initially paying back the loan.

 

The result of the financial modelling shows after all income of $2.1 million minus expenses of $1.1 million is a profit of $989,000 in the first year of the Centre being operational. A summary of the financial modelling is provided in graphical representation below:

The deprecation illustrated in this graph represents the funds which will be put aside to replace equipment as required, hence no further draw on Council’s resources.

 

The internal charges indicate Council’s recoup of the internal charges including CPI increases per annum which will go back to Council’s general fund. That $2.98 million is borrowed from the Infrastructure Reserves and this loan will be repaid from the operating result within 5.3 years from the time the Centre opens.

 

It should be noted that Council proposes to borrow $2.98 million from the Infrastructure Reserves to partly fund the project (project funding sources are detailed in the Financial Impact Statement section of this report).

 

The graph indicates that this loan will be repaid within the first 5.3 years of the centre being operational. The graph also shows that the after 5.3 years the Centre will generate a significant profit per annum returned to Council.

 

Council has also investigated the feasibility of whether Council should purchase or lease gym equipment. The leasing option would reduce the up front cost by $1 million, but would reduce the return to Council significantly. A snapshot of this scenario is provided in the following graph:

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 3:        An informed and engaged community.

Direction 3a:       Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide services.

Key Action:         Provide information to the community on the Council’s services and activities using effective communications methods.

Outcome 4:        Excellence in Urban Design and Development.

Direction 4a:       Improved design and sustainability across all development.

Key Action:         Achieve excellence in the design quality of new development.

Outcome 5:        Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction 5b:       A range of sporting and leisure activities.

Key Action:         Introduce and maintain a diverse range of programs to increase attendances at Des Renford Aquatic Centre from year to year.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Preliminary Project Cost

The preliminary cost estimates prepared by a quantity surveyor indicate that the total Project cost is in the vicinity of $8.3 million. The breakdown of costs in relation to the Project delivery is listed in the table below:

 

Preliminary Project Cost Estimate

Construction

$

6,050,000.00

Contingency 10%

$

605,000.00

Authority fees

$

45,000.00

Consultant fees

$

445,000.00

Gym equipment

$

1,000,000.00

Audio equipment

$

80,000.00

Furniture and lockers

$

50,000.00

Total Project Funding Sought

$

8,275,000.00

 

The cost estimate shows that the building cost alone, including a 10% construction contingency, is approximately $6.65 million.

 

There are also a number of additional items such as consultancy fees, authority fees, purchase of gym equipment and internal fixtures (audio visual equipment systems, lockers and office furniture).

 

It should be noted that if the Project is staged over a number of years or is delayed, significant increases in the Project budget could result as construction costs can escalate up to 15% annually and gym equipment costs increase similarly.

 

Proposed Funding

Within the Buildings for our Community Program there is a total of $2.32 million allocated across two financial years towards the Project. Of this total amount, $1.82 million is available in 2011-12 and $500,000 in 2012-13.

 

In order to cover the Project shortfall, it is proposed that Council funding is sought from a number of internal sources.  These are:

 

·                That $2.98 million is borrowed from the Infrastructure Reserves, with the loan to be repaid within 5.3 years from the time the Centre is completed and operational.

 

·                That $1.5 million be allocated to the Project from Section 94 Reserves and $1.5 million from General Revenues.

 


A summery of the proposed funding is presented in the table below:

 

Proposed Funding

Buildings for our Community

$

2,320,000.00

Infrastructure Reserves

$

2,980,000.00

Section 94

$

1,500,000.00

General Reserves

$

1,500,000.00

Total Project Funding Sought

$

8,300,000.00

 

Conclusion

 

The existing Centre is a popular venue located in the Heffron Park sporting precinct. The Centre was first established almost 50 years ago, with a number of additions and upgrades carried out over the ensuing years.

 

Though it remains vibrant and functioning, the Centre is in need of a substantial upgrade.  The provision of a fitness facility to cater for the local community has been recognised as a major asset to complement the aquatic amenities of the Centre and as part of the overall redevelopment of Heffron Park.

 

Provision of the new fitness facility is a major extension to the existing Centre and the building refurbishment will provide not only a new front door to the Centre but also an exciting new face for the tired existing building which is a major landmark for the precinct.

 

The fitness facility will be designed to address the needs of the existing users as well as to attract new members from the community to enable them to enhance and improve their health, fitness and wellbeing. The existing Centre is a family orientated facility, and the new additions are aimed to maintain a local community focus.

 

Once the Project is complete, the internal loan will be repaid within 5.3 years and the Centre will then generate an annual profit in excess of $600,000.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

 

a)            Borrow $2.98 million from the Infrastructure Reserves, with the loan to be repaid within 5.3 years from the time the Centre is completed and operational.

 

b)            Review S.94 Schedule of works by allocating $1.5 million from Section 94 Reserves to this project.

 

c)            Allocate $1.5 million from General Reserves.

 

d)            Publically exhibit the Proposal and report the outcome of the public exhibition to Council.

 

e)            Council prepare and submit a Capital Expenditure Review to the Division of Local Government as per the guidelines issued pursuant to Section 23A of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Site plan

 

2.View

The Proposal - plan drawings

 

3.View

The Proposal - perspectives

 

4.View

The Proposal - perspectives (upper and lower level)

 

 

 

 


Site plan

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adobe Systems

 

Des Renford Aquatic Centre - aerial photograph showing the existing buildings, outdoor pools, shade structures, lawn and BBQ areas. The adjacent site features within Heffron Park include sports fields, playground and a cycling criterion track. The site is bounded by Jersey Road and Robey Street.


The Proposal - plan drawings

Attachment 2

 

 

 

 

The Proposal (lower level) - includes the administration area, aerobics studio, café/kitchen and crèche.

Adobe Systems

The Proposal (upper level) - includes cardio, resistance and free weights training area and spin room.


The Proposal - perspectives

Attachment 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aerial perspective - showing the Proposal in relation to the Centre and surrounding area

 

 

 

North western perspective - showing the Proposal from the entrance of the car park


The Proposal - perspectives (upper and lower level)

Attachment 4

 

 

 

Aerial perspective (lower level) - includes the administration area, aerobics studio, café/kitchen and crèche.

 

 

Aerial perspective (upper level) - includes cardio, resistance and free weights training area and spin room.


Works Committee                                                                                                  9 August 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W27/11

 

 

Subject:                  Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity Area Consultation Outcomes

Folder No:                   F2010/00319

Author:                   Heidi Leadley, Community Road Safety Officer       

 

Introduction

 

In 2005 the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) introduced a 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity program to address issues associated with high pedestrian casualties.  The program has been introduced into other local council areas including Leichhardt, Waverley, and City of Sydney, as a means of reducing traffic speed and the potential for pedestrian and traffic conflict.

 

The program involves the creation of a gateway to the zone, as well as some traffic/road treatments and signage that slow traffic and make drivers aware of the changed driving conditions.

 

Council at its Works Committee Meeting held on 10 May 2011, resolved:

 

“(Andrews/Procopiadis) that the proposal for a 40km/h high pedestrian activity area speed limit, with the associated traffic devices, applying to parts of Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road, be endorsed for public exhibition and a report back to Council with outcomes.

 

Issues

 

The designs and information about the proposed high pedestrian activity area were on public exhibition from 24 May until 8 June 2011.

 

A total of 15 submissions were received during and after the closing of the exhibition period.

 

Of these submissions 11 generally supported the installation of the zone and offered some opinions in relation to the design and placement of the proposed devices.  Four of the submissions suggested that the zone be extended to the whole of Coogee or at least to include Dolphin Street, Mount Street and along Coogee Bay Road to after Brook Street.

 

Two submissions rejected the proposal outright, and were of the opinion that money could be better spent elsewhere.

 

Some concerns were raised about the proposed speed cushions and gateway treatment having an impact on buses and on the bike event that has previously been held in Coogee. Two submissions were concerned about the placement of the median fencing on Arden Street, but at the same time another one requested an extension of the fencing the length of the zone in Arden Street.

 

There were also three submissions which requested a pedestrian crossing at Dolphin and Arden Streets.

 

From 2002 – 2007 there were 15 pedestrian / vehicle crashes in the study area of Coogee Bay Road and Arden Street, fortunately, none of them were fatal. 

 

Sydney buses were consulted during the design phase of the project and concerns about bus movements have been addressed as part of the design.

 

The speed cushions that are proposed can be removed if needed, with little impact on the road surface after removal to accommodate any future bike events.

 

For the RTA to fund the project, they have required the placement of an 8.4 metre length of median fencing adjacent to the gateway treatment in Arden Street, just north of Carr Street.   The fencing is placed at this location to ensure that pedestrians do not interpret the line marking and road treatment as a zebra crossing facility.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable City.

Direction 6b:      Our town centres, beaches, public places and streets are safe, inviting, clean and support a recognisable image of our City.

Direction 6c:      The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programmes and strategies.

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction 9d:      Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The RTA has agreed to cover the full cost ($188,500) of the installation of the devices.

 

Conclusion

 

With consideration given to the generally supportive nature of the submissions and the expected positive effect on pedestrian safety, in reducing the incidents and severity of crashes that involve pedestrians at this location, it is recommended that the installation of the devices is supported.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the 40km/h High pedestrian activity area, including associated devices, generally as detailed in the community consultation plan, be installed in Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road, Coogee.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Table of submissions

 

2.View

Detailed Plan

 

3.View

Proposed Treatment 1

 

4.View

Proposed Treatment 2

 

5.View

Proposed Treatment 3

 

6.View

Proposed Treatment 4

 

7.View

Proposed Treatment 5

 

8.View

Proposed Treatment 6

 

 

 

 


Table of submissions

Attachment 1

 

 

Arden Street / Coogee Bay Road 40km/h HPAA

Consultation submissions summary table

 

No

Respondent

Issues

Response to issues

1

D01293849

1.  Illogical / Council should spend it’s money better

2.  Speeds are already slow most of the time

 

This proposal addresses a major factor associated with pedestrian crashes, ie the speed of vehicles.  Speed counts indicate that speeds at night regularly exceed 60km/h

 

2

D01289434

1.  Why does it exclude Dolphin Street?

 

 

2.  Lower plant height at Dolphin / Arden Street roundabout

 

Thankfully Dolphin Street has no recorded pedestrian / vehicle incidents as compared to Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road.

The site lines at Dolphin Street / Arden Street intersection will be examined.

3

D01295385

1.  Remove speed cushions

 

2.  Request extension of median fencing all the way along Arden Street

 

 

The speed cushions are a necessary physical components required to induce reduced speeds.

This is not supported as it would impact on bus manoeuvring whereby buses occasionally are required to overhang the median island as they access or leave the bus zone

4

D01294787

1.  Remove median fencing on Arden Street

 

The proposed 8.4m length of pedestrian fencing will remove the likelihood that pedestrians will perceive one of the devices as a zebra crossing.

 

5

D01290597

 

1.  I think this is a good idea

 

6

D01289897

 

1.  Extend on Coogee Bay Road to after Brook Street

2.  Place slowing device before pedestrian crossing

 

The section of Coogee bay Road west of Brook street was not identified as having a pedestrian crash history and does not meet the RTA criteria for a 40km/h HPAA limit.

 

7

D01289953

1.  There are no pedestrian issues.  The issues in this area are lack of parking.

The pedestrian crash records and injury rates indicate that there is a pedestrian safety issue.

 

8

D01291797

1.  Extend throughout Coogee

 

The other areas in Coogee do not meet the RTA criteria for the 40km/h limit.

 

9

D01295132

1.  Does not support median fencing

The proposed 8.4m length of pedestrian fencing will remove the likelihood that pedestrians will perceive one of the devices as a zebra crossing.

 

10

D01295334

1.  Extend to include Mount Street or extend school zone during school hours

 

The other areas in Coogee do not meet the RTA criteria for the 40km/h limit.

 

11

D01296539

1.  Speed cushion would be an issue for any future bike event

2.  Bus access, they sometime mount the median

 

If required for future bicycle events the speed cushions could be temporarily removed.

The proposed 8.4m length of pedestrian fencing will remove the likelihood that pedestrians will perceive one of the devices as a zebra crossing.

 

12

13

D01296029

D01297072

1.  Make Coogee Bay Road east of Brook into a 10km/h shared zone

 

 

2.  Suggested installation of pedestrian crossing at Dolphin and Arden

3.  Concern about speed cushions on cyclists and need to reduce all heavy and through traffic on Arden Street including buses

Altering complete priority to pedestrian movements would result in a shifting of the major traffic flow from the commercial section of Coogee Bay Road into the parallel restricted streets and is accordingly, not supported.

This is not supported at this time due to the likely adverse pedestrian safety implications.

Speed Cushions induce reduced speed for the drivers of most vehicles whilst allowing easier transition by buses, cyclists and emergency vehicles.

 

14

D01297522

Please consider extending the zone to Mount Street

(loved one was seriously injured on riding a bike at this point)

Limit the number of car spaces that are removed as part of this project

The other areas in Coogee do not meet the RTA criteria for the 40km/h limit.

 

Maintaining the maximum number of parking spaces along the road has been a strong consideration of this project.

 

15

D01303903

Not in favour of speed cushions or gateway treatment because of concerns for bus congestion *

Submitted after consultation closed

Speed Cushions induce reduced speed for the drivers of most vehicles whilst allowing easier transition by buses, cyclists and emergency vehicles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Detailed Plan

Attachment 2

 

 

 



Proposed Treatment 1

Attachment 3

 

 

 


Proposed Treatment 2

Attachment 4

 

 

 


Proposed Treatment 3

Attachment 5

 

 

 


Proposed Treatment 4

Attachment 6

 

 

 


Proposed Treatment 5

Attachment 7

 

 

 


Proposed Treatment 6

Attachment 8