Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 10 May 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                    10 May 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 10 May 2011 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (M Matson), Andrews, Belleli (Chairperson), Bowen, Hughes, Matthews, Nash, Notley-Smith, Procopiadis, Seng, Smith, Stevenson, Tracey, White (Deputy Chairperson) and Woodsmith.

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members.

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 12 April 2011

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W11/11     Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity Area (HPAA)

W12/11     Ficus ‘Hillii’ outside 22 Day Avenue, Kensington

W13/11     Ficus ‘Hillii’ outside 17 Abbott Street, Coogee    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                    10 May 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W11/11

 

 

Subject:                  Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity Area (HPAA)

Folder No:                   F2010/00319

Author:                   Heidi Leadley, Community Road Safety Officer       

 

Introduction

 

In 2005 the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) introduced a 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity program to address issues associated with high pedestrian casualties.  The program has been introduced into other local council areas including Leichhardt, Waverley, and City of Sydney, as a means of reducing traffic speed and the potential for pedestrian and traffic conflict.

 

The program involves the creation of a gateway to the zone, as well as some traffic/road treatments and signage that slow traffic and make drivers aware of the changed driving conditions.

 

Council at it Works Committee in May 2010 resolved:

 

(Andrews/Woodsmith) that:

 

a)     Council supports the installation of 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity Areas within the City of Randwick.

 

b)     the 40km/h High Pedestrian Activity Areas be extended to include the hospitals precinct in High Street, Randwick.

 

b)     the Local Traffic Committee be requested to review the incidents of pedestrian and motor vehicle accidents in High Street and determine, if the safety measures at the pedestrian crossings are adequate.

 

Issues

 

Designs for the installation of the 40km/h HPAA in Coogee have been completed and are ready for public exhibition and installation.

 

The designs include:

 

§  A gateway treatment on the southern end of Arden Street near Carr Street.

§  Speed cushions on Arden Street between Carr Street and Coogee Bay Road.

§  Speed cushions on Arden Street between Alfreda Street and Dolphin Streets and a raised pedestrian crossing (wombat) across Alfreda Street.

§  Gateway treatment on the northern end of Arden Street, near Dolphin Street which includes the redesign of the median island to include a pedestrian facility.

§  A raised concrete threshold with pedestrian crossing across Vicar Street at Coogee Bay Road.

§  A gateway treatment on Coogee Bay Road with low lying shrub landscaping along the eastern nature strip to discourage pedestrian access.

 

 

A locality sketch is attached.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable City

Direction 6b:      Our town centres, beaches, public places and streets are safe, inviting, clean and support a recognisable image of our City.

Direction 6c:      The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programmes and strategies.

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction 9d:      Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The RTA has agreed to cover the full cost of the installation of this scheme, if it is completed in the 2010–2011 financial year.

 

Conclusion

 

Due to the expected positive effect on pedestrian safety, it is considered that the Council should support this initiative.

 

Recommendation

 

That the proposal for a 40km/h high pedestrian activity area speed limit, with the associated traffic devices, applying to parts of Arden Street and Coogee Bay Road, be endorsed for public exhibition and a report back to Council with outcomes.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Locality Map

 

 

 

 


Locality Map

Attachment 1

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                    10 May 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W12/11

 

 

Subject:                  Ficus ‘Hillii’ outside 22 Day Avenue, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 22 Day Avenue, Kensington, has written to Council requesting the removal and replacement of a mature Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside that property.

 

Issues

 

The subject tree is one of a group of eight planted in the nature strip along both sides of this section of Day Avenue that are more than 50 years old. This group of trees is in very good health and they contribute significant visual amenity to the adjacent streetscape.

 

The tree in question is approximately 18 metres in height with a canopy spread of around 18 metres. It is growing underneath overhead powerlines and branches have to be regularly pruned to maintain statutory clearances. This tree has had to be root pruned on at least three occasions to deal with root damage to adjacent infrastructure. Major root pruning was carried out, approximately three years ago, due to root damage to both the adjacent public footpath and the brick fence and driveway of No. 22 Day Avenue. At the time, the owner of the property cited a variety of problems associated with the tree including major plumbing works and sewer upgrades, repeated incidents of root damage to tiles in the property entranceway, replacement of the concrete driveway, modification of driveway gate due to root damage as well as regular sewer clearances to several adjacent properties by Council’s contract plumber.

 

Despite major root pruning in 2008, tree roots have once again entered the property (22 Day Avenue) and are causing serious structural damage within the property. There is now major uplifting of the pavers on the carport driveway which makes the driveway virtually unusable. This damage has resulted in the driveway gates being unable to be opened and the property owner has been forced to park outside her property. A quote (in the amount of $3850.00), to repair the driveway damage, has been provided to Council by the property owner.

 

Recent landscaping works along the western side of the property revealed a fig tree root approximately 15-18cm in diameter running along the entire length of the residence. This root has been severed but is indicative of the size of a number of roots that have entered the property.

 

There is also the ongoing issue of water ponding in the street and copious amounts of leaf litter and debris accumulating on the footpath and roadway. During the fruiting season this accumulation is considerably worse than normal. The range of problems being caused by the roots of this tree are typical for the species and as the roots increase in length and girth these issues will only get more serious and more costly to deal with.

 

Root pruning is only a temporary measure that will affect the tree’s health and vigour in the longer term, as well as allowing the intrusion of pathogens into the root system.  The installation of a tree root barrier is not a feasible option with this particular species of tree.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:       A healthy environment.

Direction 10b:      Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:         Implement policies, programs and strategies to manage                        environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

The cost to remove and stump grind this fig tree and to replace it with a super-advanced 100-litre replacement tree would be in the vicinity of $3,000.  The funds will come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The range and seriousness of problems associated with this particular Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree are typical of the species and they have been tolerated by adjacent property owners for well over a decade.

 

However, the impacts are ongoing and increasing in seriousness and if the tree is not removed at some point in the very near future, they are likely to cost Council a considerable amount of money throughout the remaining lifetime of the tree.

 

The problems cannot be isolated and root pruning is only a temporary measure that has both long-term impacts on the health of the tree and liability implications for Council.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree growing on the nature strip outside 22 Day Avenue, Kensington be removed and replaced with an advanced 100-litre Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly).

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing tree root damage and the significance of the tree in the streetscape.

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing tree root damage and the significance of the tree in the streetscape.

Attachment 1

 

 

Footpath slab outside 22 Day Ave once again raised by fig tree roots

 

Fig tree root recently severed from along western side of property

Concrete removed from inside the property to remediate tree root damage/intrusion

 

Fig tree root cracking concrete slab underneath driveway pavers

Ponding and leaf litter accumulation an ongoing issue outside property

 

Stormwater pit regularly blocks because of leaf litter accumulation

 


Damaged footpath regularly patched because of root damage

 

Recently replaced footpath and driveway slab

Canopy has to be regularly pruned around powerlines

 

Street light situated immediately adjacent to tree

 

Subject tree is highly significant in Day Ave streetscape

 

Streetlight is surrounded by large Ficus ‘Hillii’ branches

 

Tree is one of eight in this particular section of Day Avenue

 

Recently installed stormwater lintel – note cracked roadway


Fig tree roots have extended well into the property at 20 Day Avenue

 


Works Committee                                                                                                    10 May 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W13/11

 

 

Subject:                  Ficus ‘Hillii’ outside 17 Abbott Street, Coogee

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 17 Abbott Street, Coogee, has written to Council requesting the immediate removal of a mature Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside that property.

 

Issues

 

The subject tree is one of a number planted in the nature strip along both sides of the street more than 50 years ago. This group of trees is generally in good health and they contribute significant visual amenity to the streetscape.

 

The tree in question is approximately 16 metres in height with a canopy spread of around 12 metres. It is growing underneath overhead powerlines, service wires and a street light and branches have to be regularly pruned to maintain statutory clearances.

 

The adjacent property owner has regularly requested that large branches overhanging into her property be removed to facilitate more light entering the residence and to negate the amount of leaf litter collecting inside the property.

 

This tree has had to be root pruned on at least three occasions to temporarily deal with root damage to adjacent infrastructure and as much root pruning as is considered possible has been undertaken within the last two months. Major roots that were severed only two years ago have regrown to a larger diameter than prior to cutting which is not uncommon with this tree species.

 

Prior to the most recent root pruning, roots had grown into the front of the property and had even undermined the tiles on the front veranda. The sheer girth of the trunk and root ball area has also dislodged a number of sandstone capping blocks on an adjacent heritage sandstone wall located to the north of the subject tree.

 

The range of problems being caused by the roots of this tree are typical for the species and they are exacerbated by the confined area in which the tree is growing. Council’s Tree Gang recently trenched along the front of this property and discovered a number of large tree roots travelling into the property. Because of the size of the tree and the confined area in which it is growing, only one intruding tree root was severed. Several others are still growing under the fence and into the property but these are unable to be severed as that would render the tree unstable. It would also have a detrimental impact on the health and long-term viability of the tree.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:             A healthy environment.

Direction 10b:                   Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:                       Implement policies, programs and strategies to manage          environmental risks and impacts.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost to remove and stump grind this fig tree would be in the vicinity of $3,000.  The funding will come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

The range and seriousness of problems associated with this particular Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree are typical of the species and they have been tolerated by adjacent property owners for well over a decade. However, they are ongoing and increasing in seriousness and if the tree is not removed within the very near future they are likely to cost Council a considerable amount of money well into the future.

 

These problems cannot be isolated and further root pruning is unable to be undertaken because of long-term impacts on the health of the tree and liability implications for Council.

 

Of growing concern is the increasing damage to an adjacent heritage sandstone retaining wall and the liability issues this now presents to Council. Because of the location of the tree and the size of the root ball area this damage will be unable to be rectified into the longer term if the tree remains.

 

Two Syzygium luehmannii (Small-leafed Lilly Pillys) were planted either side of this tree some years ago and these are now four-five metres in height. They would mitigate to some degree the loss of visual amenity that would be created if the large Hill’s Weeping fig were to be removed. The removal of this tree will not contravene Council’s resolution that “no more than five percent of Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street trees be removed in any twelve-month period from streets where there are designated significant plantings of this species”.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree growing on the nature strip outside 17 Abbott Street, Coogee, be removed.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing tree root damage and the significance of the tree in the streetscape

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing tree root damage and the significance of the tree in the streetscape

Attachment 1

 

 

Domestic service wires running through the canopy of the Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree

 

Tree viewed from directly in front of 17 Abbott Street – note shading of residence

Canopy grows through overhead powerlines, service wires and street light/power pole

 

Canopy has to be regularly and severely pruned away from roof of residence

Uplifted footpath slabs regularly lifted by adjacent street tree roots

 

Capping of adjacent sandstone retaining wall dislodged by fig tree roots

Very confined area surrounding root ball and buttress roots of street tree

 

Ficus ‘Hillii’ viewed from the western side of Abbott St – note wires and property overhang

Damaged footpath slabs very recently replaced because of tree root damage

 

Exposed Ficus ‘Hillii’ tree roots entering adjacent residential properties

 

Tree root regrowth on Ficus ‘Hillii’ root severed only two years ago

 

Tree roots in very close proximity to root buttressing and root ball on Ficus ‘Hillii’

 

 

Young Syzygium luehmanni located to the east of Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Syzygium luehmanni located to the west of Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree