Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 12 April 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   12 April 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 12 April 2011 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor (M Matson), Andrews, Belleli (Chairperson), Bowen, Hughes, Matthews, Nash, Notley-Smith, Procopiadis, Seng, Smith, Stevenson, Tracey, White (Deputy Chairperson) and Woodsmith.

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members.

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 8 March 2011

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W6/11       Pioneers Park, Malabar - Encroachment

W7/11       Undergrounding of Power Cables

W8/11       Bardon Park    

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee                                                                                                   12 April 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W6/11

 

 

Subject:                  Pioneers Park, Malabar - Encroachment

Folder No:                   F2004/06879

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services     

 

Introduction

 

As part of the remediation works at Pioneers Park, Malabar, Council became aware that the owner of 6 Manwaring Avenue, Maroubra had developed a vegetable garden that encroached onto Pioneers Park. 

 

Issue

 

The owner of 6 Manwaring Avenue has built and developed a vegetable garden that encroaches onto Pioneers Park.  The garden had structures including mortar garden beds and a pergola.  Segmental concrete pavers have been placed on the ground between the garden beds.   In addition, there are numerous Styrofoam boxes placed within the area as individual planter boxes.

 

The encroaching vegetable garden has been built on the portion of land between the property and a chain wire fence.  The chain wire fence was erected by Council to provide a privacy buffer between Pioneers Park and the rear of properties backing onto the park. 

 

The property owner has kept the rear boundary fence.  The width of this parcel of land is approximately 4.5m. The vegetable garden is screened from park users by trees and shrubs.

 

When Council officers became aware of the encroachment, the owner was ordered to remove the pergola structure from the public land. In negotiations with the owner, Council staff have permitted the garden beds and the use of the land as a vegetable garden (subject to Council Approval) and subject to no significant structures being erected on the land and that the owner does not attempt to incorporate the public land into his property.  The owner has committed to maintaining the vegetable garden.

 

The vegetable garden does not create adverse visual impacts or other significant impacts to park users and neighbours.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

There are no financial implications of this report.

 


Conclusion

 

The adoption of the Asset Management Policy will set the framework for effective Asset Management principles and practices in line with objectives for Randwick City Council and its community.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council allow the vegetable garden at the rear of 6 Manwaring Avenue, Maroubra, to remain.

 

b)     Council write to the owner advising that in the case that the vegetable garden is neglected or the owner plans to sell the property, then Council will require the owner to remove the vegetable garden and restore the land to it previous turfed state.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Photographs

 

 

 

 


Photographs

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   12 April 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W7/11

 

 

Subject:                  Undergrounding of Power Cables

Folder No:                   F2004/07176

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Manager Technical Services     

 

Introduction

 

A report was presented to the Works Committee held on 14 September 2010 regarding undergrounding of power cables.

 

Subsequently, it was resolved as follows:

 

RESOLUTION:

 

That:

a)     Council provide authorisation to EnergyAustralia for the proposal to underground the power cables along Eastbourne Avenue, Clovelly to EnergyAustralia standards and specifications.

 

b)     the request for a funding contribution, to underground the power cables in Eastbourne Avenue, Clovelly, be refused.

 

c)     a report be brought back to Council investigating the viability of funding options for the undergrounding of power cables whereby the residents contribute to funding based on some adopted principles.

 

d)     that the report contain the cost to this Council of the undergrounding of all power cables in the City of Randwick.

 

This report discusses the issues and costs of undergrounding power cables throughout the City of Randwick.

 

Issues

 

Background

There is no large scale, formal government undergrounding program of existing overhead distribution cables in New South Wales (NSW). However, a large part of the distribution network has been undergrounded by distribution network service providers (DNSPs) such as EnergyAustralia. These programs are often initiated by the DNSPs themselves, or by third parties (such as local government and developers).

 

For the recent major developments in Randwick, we have required developers to underground distribution cables. This has been the case at the Prince Henry development, Department of Defence development off Bundock Street and more recently at Endeavour House.

 

In areas with existing overhead distribution cables, EnergyAustralia or private parties may initiate an underground power project. EnergyAustralia may initiate an underground power project in an area where supply reliability is below an acceptable standard. If a third party initiates a project, EnergyAustralia may either share the costs or require the third party to pay for all of it. This depends on the amount of benefits that EnergyAustralia would acquire from the undergrounding project, such as improved reliability and reduced maintenance costs.

 

In 2002, the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) of NSW reviewed the costs, benefits and funding of underground power to assist the NSW Government, who at the time was exploring the possibility of implementing an underground power program. At the end of the review, IPART concluded that:

General widespread undergrounding is only justified by cost-benefit analysis if the value of hard to quantify benefits such as improved amenity and environmental management is very high. If the program goes ahead, the Tribunal recommends that it be funded through a beneficiary pays approach, in which the majority of the costs [around 60 per cent] are recovered from property owners through local government charges, and the remainder from the state government and DNSPs. The Tribunal also recommends that local communities that place a relatively low value on amenity benefits such as views and other local benefits be able to opt out of the program.

 

Costs of Underground Power

The preliminary estimate for the undergrounding of power has been prepared on a like-for-like approach.  This means that all the overhead distribution cables are replaced with underground cables of the same or possibly greater capacity, on similar or even the same routes, using the existing sub-transmission system. The preliminary estimate does not consider any substantial changes that may be made to the configuration of the network.

 

However, in practice it is more likely that the underground power network will be modified to allow for reasonable future proofing of the design to build additional network capacity. The cost of major enhancements, such as additional high voltage reinforcement would have to be negotiated with the service provider, EnergyAustralia.

 

The largest initial cost of undergrounding is the removal of existing overhead cables and the installation of equivalent underground power cables. However, there are also costs associated with the connection or modification of existing equipment to provide underground power to each customer, which can be substantial in some cases.

 

In NSW we have Optus cables located on the above ground electricity network.  The undergrounding of power cables will also require the undergrounding of Optus cables.

 

Project costs vary depending on residential density, block frontage, ground conditions, power needs, traffic management requirements and in some cases street or verge topography.

 

Negative Impacts of Underground Power

Undergrounding of distribution power cables may have some potential negative effects, with some commonly cited ones including:

·      stranded asset costs for existing overhead facilities;

·      environmental damage, including soil erosion and disruptions of ecologically sensitive habitat;

·      electricity network operator employee work risks during vault and manhole inspections;

·      increased exposure to dig-ins despite campaigns such as dial-before-you-dig;

·      although interruptions may occur less frequently with underground power, when interruptions do occur, they last longer and more customers are impacted per outage;

·      susceptibility to flooding, storm surges, and damage during post-storm cleanup;

·      reduced flexibility for both operations and system expansion;

·      reduced life expectancy of underground cables when compared with overhead cables; and

·      higher maintenance and operating costs.

 

Overhead power cables, if maintained well, have infinite asset lives and do not need to be replaced, whereas underground power cables do have finite asset lives of 50 years or less and need replacement from time to time.

 

Benefits of Underground Power

There are a number of potential benefits that may accrue to the wider community when overhead distribution cables are placed underground. These benefits can be grouped into the following:

·      economic benefits (or the avoided costs) for the service provider;

·      quality of supply and reliability benefits to customers;

·      aesthetic benefits;

·      health and safety benefits; and

·      other benefits (road safety, property values, street lighting).

 

The improvement in aesthetics is one of the most commonly cited benefits of underground power. However, these are also the most difficult benefits to quantify.

 

When an area is converted to underground power, new street lights are designed and installed to meet Australian Standard AS1158. These new street lights have more efficient fixtures and optimised spacing which delivers brighter and more evenly lit streets, providing up to 15 per cent more efficient street lighting. However, this benefit is also likely to bring and additional cost for the City of Randwick.

 

From a safety perspective, underground power may result in avoided costs to the community, as the removal of electricity poles for overhead cables is likely to reduce the severity of motor vehicle accidents. However, street light poles will still be located on verges, but these are designed to be collapsible in the event that a motor vehicle hits them.

 

One of the other benefits of undergrounding power is that property values may increase. In Western Australia, the Valuer-General believes that underground power would, on average, increase property values between 1.25 per cent and 2.5 per cent, up to a maximum of 5 per cent depending on location.  However, a report from Hawaii prepared for the Hawaiian State Senate by the State‘s Legislative Reference Bureau of the State of Hawaii, found that the data on changes in property value due to undergrounded utilities was inconclusive.

 


Potential Economic Benefits for EnergyAustralia

There may be some savings, or avoided costs to EnergyAustralia as a result of undergrounding existing overhead distribution cables, such as reductions in:

·      operating and maintenance costs;

·      storm repair costs;

·      maintenance of street scapes and verges; and

·      costs associated with power interruptions.

 

·      The undergrounding of existing overhead electricity cables has the potential to improve the reliability of the electricity network as well as the quality of the supply of electricity that is provided to customers.

 

Preliminary Cost Estimate

The preliminary cost estimate for the undergrounding of power has been prepared to determine whether a Feasibility Study should be prepared taking into account the relevant factors including a Cost Benefit Analysis.

 

The total length of roads in Randwick City including local, regional and state is 318.2km. Generally power cables run along 1 side of our roads. However, we have underground power along approximately 10% of our roads. Therefore, there is approximately 287km of power cables in the Randwick local government area.

 

The general spacing between poles is 40m.  Therefore, we have approximately 7175 spans.  Estimated costs for undergrounding each span are $70,000 to $90,000.

 

On the basis of the above information, the preliminary cost estimate to underground the power in the City of Randwick is $575 million excluding contingencies and the Optus Cable works.

 

This equates to an average rate of $10,825 per dwelling.

 

Funding Options

 

There are numerous funding options available to pay for the cost of undergrounding power cables. The normal options available to Council include:

 

·      Introduction of a new levy (subject to approval by Department of Local Government)

·      Going into debt

·      Increasing fees and charges

·      Undertaking speculative entrepreneurial activities

·      Reallocation of the existing budget

 

However, due to the significant cost, only introduction of a levy, debt and speculative entrepreneurial activities would raise sufficient funds in a practical timeframe.

 

Should a decision be made to proceed with a feasibility study, the funding options will be explored further.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:        A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:       Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

Key Action:         Assets are managed strategically to deliver intergenerational equity and to meet Council’s obligation as the custodian of our community’s assets.

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

The report outlines a preliminary cost estimate and does not propose any expenditure at this stage.

 

Conclusion

 

The undergrounding of power cables provides several advantages in the provision of power to consumers.  With the exception of aesthetics, the main advantages lie with the distribution network service provider (EnergyAustralia within the City of Randwick.

 

However, EnergyAustralia has no plans to underground its power cables.

 

The preliminary estimate for the undergrounding of power cables throughout the City of Randwick is $575 million. This equates to an average rate of $10,825 per dwelling.

 

Due to the significance of the estimate, there are limited practical options to fund this project.  Should there be a desire to proceed with the project, then a feasibility study will need to be undertaken.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee                                                                                                   12 April 2011

 

 

Works Report No. W8/11

 

 

Subject:                  Bardon Park

Folder No:                   F2011/00008

Author:                   Jorde Frangoples, Director City Services     

 

Introduction

 

The Council at its ordinary Meeting of 22 February, 2011 resolved (Mayor, Cr M Matson) that:

 

a)     The Council report in relation to providing a suitable long-term location for Coogee Dolphins be brought forward from September 2011 to April 2011;

 

b)     The report assesses Coogee Oval, Latham Park and other suitable locations as possible long-term options but not Grant or Trenery Reserves;

 

c)     Council refers the completed assessment report on the Section 96 application to the Coogee Precinct Committee and the Coogee Dolphins prior to consideration by Councillors; and

 

d)     Notwithstanding clause a, Council grant permission for the Coogee Dolphins to continue training at Bardon Park for the rest of the 2011 season.

 

This report addresses points a) and b) of this resolution.

 

Issues

 

Background

 

The Coogee Dolphins Junior Rugby League Club has been training at Bardon Park, Coogee since mid 2007 when the sports lights were installed (DA/48/2007).

 

At the Works Committee (W34/10) meeting on the 7 December, 2010, Council considered a request from the Coogee Dolphins Junior Rugby League Club to use Grant Reserve as a training facility. 

 

The Council resolved that

 

a)     Council refuses the request from the Coogee Dolphins to move from Bardon Park to Grant Reserve; and

 

b)     A further report be brought back to Council in relation to the viability of the Coogee Dolphins using the outer at Coogee Oval or another suitable location.

 

This resolution was subsequently rescinded at the ordinary Council Meeting of 14 December, 2010.  The Council then resolved (Notley-Smith/Procopiadis) that:

 

a)     Permit training of the junior teams of the Coogee Dolphins to continue in Bardon Park on Tuesday and Thursday nights between 3.30pm and 7.00pm, between the months of March and September;

 

b)     Renovate the surface of the park to ensure a safe playing surface for the children and a well maintained surface all year round for all of the community;

 

c)     Ensure that the training lights are extinguished at 7.30pm sharp;

 

d)     Line mark the park for the designated football season only;

 

e)     Allow the erection of removable goal posts at the southern end of the park only, to be erected and removed on the days of training;

 

f)     Enter into negotiations with the Coogee Croquet Club to enable the Dolphin’s junior teams access to the Croquet Club toilet and storage facilities;

 

g)     Adjust the restriction on the numbers of children training to 60 at any one time;

 

h)     Not proceed with an amenities block in Bardon Park;

 

i)      Not proceed with any change of use to Grant Reserve;

 

j)      Continue to work towards finding a suitable long-term location for the Coogee Dolphins with a report to come back to Council on the options available by   September 2011

 

k)     Install further dog waste dispensers and garbage bins; and

 

l)      Funds be allocated for low impact landscaping such as shrubs, garden beds and seating to improve the amenity of the park for all.

 

Specific Issues

 

Since that time Council officers have renovated the playing surface, entered into negotiation with the Coogee Croquet Club to enable the Dolphin’s junior team(s) access to the Coogee Croquet Club toilet facilities. A dog waste bin and garbage bin has been installed, and a landscape plan for the park has been prepared. (A copy is attached to this report as attachment 1)

 

Additionally, Council Officers have lodged a S96 application, to modify the original consent (DA/48/2007) to alter the conditions to allow for line marking, erection of removable goal posts and increase in training numbers.

 

The Coogee Croquet Club have agreed to provide access to the toilet facility, subject to the construction of a separate entrance, fence door and some landscaping works.

 

An Overview of the City’s Sportfields/Parks

 

Whilst, this report deals with the traditional winter sports (Rugby League/Union, soccer and Australian Rules football it is worth noting that the City’s sporting facilities/parks also cater for bouche, archery, touch football, Netball, cycling and oztag.

 

Each winter sports season, Council Officers take bookings for its facilities.  These bookings include casual use, seasonal use and school use.  Generally, the summer season competition commences the 2nd week in September and runs until 2nd week in March. The winter competition season generally commences 1st week in April and ends in the 2nd weekend in August. 

 

A fee is charged for these bookings, as set out by the Fees & Charges adopted by Council each financial year.

 

It should be noted that Council takes bookings from the schools in the City, free of charge, if the use is during the day.

 

There are currently 11 facilities used for competition sports, not including Chifley Reserve. These facilities consist of 28 adult fields, 6 junior fields plus Alison Park, Baker Park, Grant Reserve, Bardon Park which are utilised for training only.

 

Maintenance Management

 

To ensure safe and sustainable playing surface, a limit on the hours of use for organised sports activities is determined by Council officers on a field basis. Periods of wet weather can have a detrimental effect on the quality of the playing surfaces and hence player safety.

 

Substantial damage can occur to a playing surface from a single days play following wet weather. This damage can have a long-term impact on the playing surface during the winter months.  The damage cannot be restored due to the lack of grass growth during winter. Thus, it makes it impossible to allow any further use. It is also financially unsustainable. Consequently, Council Officers ensure that sports fields/parks are withdrawn from competition and training when inundation of playing surfaces has occurred due to wet weather.

 

Council Officers consider the following factors when determining field allocation;

 

·        Operational capacity, i.e. rest periods, conditions of the playing surface and the subsoil.

·        The Intended use of the field

·        Any proposed capital works during the season

·        Previous use and whether terms and conditions of use have been met

·        Conditions of development approvals.

 

 

Operating costs

 

For the 2010-11 financial year Council allocated $1.27 Million in its operating budget for sports field/parks maintenance. The projected revenue is $187,606, hence the net cost is $1.08 Million.

 

 

The Condition of the Playing Fields

 

The 2008 Recreation Needs study by Stratcorp Consulting (point 9 page ix) found;

 

“ the condition of the outdoor sports fields is generally average to poor, caused mainly by overuse, the sandy profile of the soil and the drought”

 

 

In response Council has;

 

·           taken care and control sport fields/parks, such as Chifley, Yarra Oval and Pioneers Park to increase the amount of playing fields and passive recreation areas.

·           installed new lights and upgraded lights at Heffron Park, Nagle Park, Snape Oval, Yarra Oval and Pioneers Park.  This relieves the training burden on the existing fields.

·           created or upgraded sustainable watering systems at Heffron Park, Pioneers, Nagle Park, Chifley Sports Fields and Kensington Oval.

·           a comprehensive and better managed approach to wet weather closures.

 

Discussion at the sports committee have indicated that the playing surfaces have greatly improved over the last three years.  Recent inspection of many of the playing surfaces justifies this assessment.

 

Priorities for  allocation for Use

 

Council Officers apply the following criteria when deciding which user groups receive a field allocation:

 

·           School user groups during school days.

·           A historical allocation that is user groups that have had an identical booking for a number of years.

·           Randwick City based teams, that is teams which all or a large number are residents.

·           Not for profit and community based user groups.

·           Others

 

The greatest demand is Tuesday and Thursday nights during the week as it provides recovery after games and before the next weekend’s games.  The seasonal bookings include associations, such as South Sydney Juniors Rugby League, Randwick Junior Rugby Union and directly with clubs such as Randwick Rugby, Maroubra Saints AFL Club and Maroubra United Football Club.

 

Some of these clubs and associations have hundreds of members others have one or two teams for a total of 30 participants.

 

 

The Randwick City Council Sports Committee

 

The Council operates a sports committee that consists of Councillors, Council Officers and representatives from associations and/or clubs. The adopted terms of reference of this committee include the following aims:

 

·           To provide a forum for representatives from local sporting associations and council to discuss current issues and future needs of local sporting organisations.

·           To promote equitable access for the use of Council’s sporting grounds, facilities and kiosks.

·           To promote the involvement of members of al sports in the planning and decision making process to ensure the promotion, extension and improvement of sport and sporting facilities within the Randwick City area…etc.

 

The City’s sport fields/parks

  

The stratcorp recreation needs study (2008) made the following comments….

 

“In the preparation of the Randwick City Open space and Recreation Plan of Management Strategic Plan (1996), all open space was assigned a classification based on an assessment of setting, user type, vegetation type, size, furniture and facilities, within the open space and with consideration of access, accordingly, eight generic classifications were identified:

 

1.  Regional Parks

2.  District Parks

3.  Neighbourhood Parks

4.  Pocket Parks

5.  Beach and Coastal Reserves

6.  Civic Parks and Places

7.  Remnant Bushland Areas

8.  Roadside Reserves

 

This classification structure largely remains relevant today……..”

 

The majority of the sports field/parks are classified as either Regional or District parks, with the following exceptions:

 

·           Alison Park is classified as a Civic Park. It is currently used for Junior sport.

·           Grant Reserve is classified as a Beach and Coastal Reserve and used for school sport/training.

·           Bardon Park is classified as a Neighbourhood Park and is used for Junior training.

·           Woomera Reserve is classified as a Neighbourhood Park and is used for School sport and competition cricket (in the summer) on the weekends.

·           Burrows Park is classified as a Beach and Coastal Reserve and used for training and competition

·           Baker Park is classified as Neighbourhood Park and is used for Junior sports.

 

Neighbourhood parks are generally for informal recreational activities, the PoM notes that structured sport may also take place (but not high grade sports), especially for the purpose of meeting recreational needs of young people. 

 

The Assessment of other suitable long-term locations for the Coogee Dolphins training

 

Based on the original request from the Coogee Beach Dolphins Sports Club Association Inc. dated 26th October 2010 which proposed they move to Grant reserve (Attachment 2) they seek the following;

 

·           a training ground available 2 nights a week.

·           sport field lights,

·           a toilet facility,

·           a reasonable quality playing surface.

·           in the Coogee Basin area (verbal comments only)

·           enough room to accommodate 60 children

 

 

This criteria has been used for the assessment of all the sports fields/parks in the city not including Grant or Trenery Reserves (in accordance with part (b) of the resolution of council). The assessment is included as attachment 3.

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in Urban Deisgn and Development

Direction 5b:      A range of sporting and leisure activities

 

 

Financial impact statement

 

The landscaping works at Bardon Park outlined in attachment 1 is estimated at $60,000.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

The assessment table indicates that possible other long term options are:

 

1.     Coogee Oval (Coogee)

2.     Latham Park (Maroubra)

3.     Burrows Park (Clovelly)

 

Latham Park and Burrows Park require the removal of existing teams allocated these fields and are not in the Coogee basin. (attachment 4 shows the location of these sportsfields/parks).  They are currently fully utilised for competition and training, by Rugby Union, Rugby League and schools.

 

Coogee Oval remains as the possible alternative. Coogee Oval is unique in the City of Randwick. It hosts the Australian Rugby Union team, the Australian Rugby League team, the State of Origin teams visiting international Rugby Union/Rugby League teams and televised first grade Rugby Union games.

 

Since 1926 it has been the home ground for the Randwick District Rugby Union Football club. It is also the home of the Randwick Petersham Grade Cricket club.

 

Because the Cricket club utilises turf wickets at Snape Park, Kensington Oval and Coogee Oval Council has a maintenance agreement with the club. The Council contributes a maximum upper limit towards the preparation of the turf wickets annually to club. This agreement expires at the end of March 2012.  The agreement does not include other turf maintenance, such as fertilising, topsoil and returfing of the outer grounds.

 

The current lighting at Coogee Oval is not designed to Australian standards. To meet those standards for the outer area only it is likely to require:

 

·      4 light towers at a height of 25m

·      Upgraded switchboard

·      Conduits/trenching from the street grid.

 

At an estimated cost of $160,000.

 

As a consequence there is no night training on Coogee Oval. Although the Dolphins use the outer field for afternoon training (until it gets dark) because of the restrictions on Bardon Park.

 

Randwick Rugby and the Randwick – Petersham Cricket club have previously requested lights to be installed for night games and training.

 

At the Council meeting in December 2010 the representative of the Coogee Dolphins advised that they would require the use of the main field, if they where relocated to Coogee Oval. Council has held a firm position that no night training or games be allowed on Coogee Oval.

 

The unique soil profile of Coogee Oval means that the ground is closed due to inundation of the playing surface from wet weather. In the winter a temporary grandstand is erected along the eastern edge of the playing field to accommodate spectators, which encroaches on the ‘outer area’ leaving a small irregular space.

 

The ground hosts cricket finals most years which means the Rugby Union & Rugby League do not have access to the ground until after their competitions commence.

 

On this basis the best long-term location for a training ground for the Coogee Dolphins Junior teams is Bardon Park. Whilst, it is classified a neighbourhood park, junior sport/training activities also currently take place at many other parks that are not classified as District or Regional.

 

These include;

 

 

·      Alison Park

·      Grant Reserve

·      Woomera Reserve

·      Burrows Park

·      Baker Park

 

Bardon Park is a dog off leash park, again this is similar with many of our other sportsfields/parks that require multiple user groups to share the open space. Examples include;

 

·      Snape Park

·      Pioneers Park

·      Coral Sea Park

·      Burrows Park

·      Baker Park

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Coogee Dolphins Juniors continue to train at Bardon Park for two nights a week.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Concept Bardon Park

 

2.View

Letter from Coogee Dolphins dated 26 October 2010

 

3.View

Assessment Table of Long Term Options

 

4.View

District park map

 

5.View

Neighbourhood Parks map

 

6.View

Regional park map

 

 

 

 


Concept Bardon Park

Attachment 1

 

 


Letter from Coogee Dolphins dated 26 October 2010

Attachment 2

 

 



Assessment Table of Long Term Options

Attachment 3

 

 

Assessment Table Possible Long Term Options

 

Field/Location

Current Sporting Users

Toilets

Playing Surface

Lights*

Refers to Australian Standard sports field lights

Classification

Accommodate

60 Children

In the Coogee Basin

Other Comments

 

Grant Reserve, Coogee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not Considered in accordance with council resolution

 

Trennery Reserve, Coogee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not Considered in accordance with council resolution

 

Centennial Park,

Unknown

yes

poor

No

Regional

yes

No

Not under Council care & control.

 

Randwick Environment Park, Coogee

Nil

No

poor

No

Regional

yes

No

Not currently used by sports groups.

 

Coogee Oval, Coogee

Saturday Randwick Rugby,

Sunday South Sydney Rugby League

 

Yes

Excellent

No

Regional

Yes on main ground

yes

No training allowed by current users to preserve the quality of the playing surface and because there is no adequate lighting.

 

Heffron Park, Maroubra

Coogee United FC

Marist College Pagewood

South Sydney High school

Easter Region Catholic Primary School sport

St Spyridon High School

Heffron Hawks

Randwick Girls High School, etc

Yes

Fair to good depending on which field.

Yes not on all fields

Regional

Yes

No

Some fields in Heffron park do not have any sport field lighting thus restricted for winter training. Awaiting master plan works.

 

Kensington Oval, Kensington

Kensington Public School

South Sydney District Rugby league Training and competition.

Yes

Good

Yes

District

Yes

No

Ground is rested Monday and Saturday.

Includes turf cricket wickets in summer

 

 

Latham Park Maroubra (upper and lower)

Randwick Rugby

Randwick Rugby Juniors

Marcellin college

Sydney Bowmen

Yes

Average to Good

Yes

District

Yes

No

One field requires improved subsoil drainage.

Fields rested for 1 day a week.

Snape park, Maroubra (Upper and lower)

South Sydney District Junior Rugby League

Football NSW

Coogee Boys Prep. School

Randwick City Football club

Phoenix FC

Pagewood Botany FC

Yes

Main ground Good, Lower field poor.

Yes

District

Yes

No

Upper field rested 1 day includes Turf cricket wicket.

 

Lower utalised 3 days a week for training as per DA conditions.

 

Nagle park, Maroubra

Easter Region Catholic Primary School sport

Randwick Junior Rugby

Marist College Pagewood

ESPSSA

Yes

Good

Yes

District

Yes

No

2 fields lights can only used 3 nights a week as per DA conditions.

 

Coral Sea Park, (3 full size, 6 Junior fields) Maroubra

Maroubra United Football Club

Marcellin College

ESPSSA

Yes

Average

Yes

District

Yes

No

New Playing surface to be considered in the next financial year.

 

Pioneers Park, Upper and lower Malabar

Maroubra Saints AFC Junoirs and Seniors

ESPSSA

AFL NSW

South Sydney District Junior Rugby League

St Andrews Malbara

 

Yes

Upper and Lower Good

Yes

District

Yes

No

2 Rugby League Fields

1 AFL field lights can only be used 2 nights a week as per DA conditions.

 

 

Chifley Sports Fields, Chifley

Baseball only at the moment

Yes

Poor

No

District

Yes

No

Yet to be completed.

 

Paine Reserve,

UNSW FC

Rainbow Street Public School

Barnstoneworth FC

Locomotive Cove FC

 

Good

Yes

District

Yes

 

Reclassified from Neighbourhood to District as part of Recreation needs study.

 

Yarra Oval, Laperouse

South Sydney District Rugby League

Yes

Upper Good

Lower average

Yes – one field only

District

Yes

No

 

 

Burnie Park, Clovelly

Not possible for sport

yes

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

JV Dick Reserve

Not possible for sport

 

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

 

No

 

 

Barker Park

Schools

Yes

Poor

No

Neighbourhood

yes

No

Construction of toilets due this finacial year.

 

Bangor Park

 

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

 

No

 

 

Emily McCarthy Park

 

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Popplewell Park

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Gollan Park

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Quarry Reserve

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Woomera Reserve

Cricket and Schools

No

poor

No

Neighbourhood

Yes

No

 

 

Ella Reserve

 

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Bilga Crescent #4

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Macartney Oval Park

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Bob A Day Park

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Coast Memorial Park

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Memorial Reserve

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Purcell Park

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

 

 

Barwon Park

Nil

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

yes

No

 

 

Dr Walters Park

Not possible for sport

No

No playing surface

No

Neighbourhood

No

No

 

 

Burrows Park

Randwick Junior Rugby

Clovelly Crocodiles

Clovelly rugby Union

Yes

Fair

Yes

Beach and Coastal

Yes

No

Fully utilised by other teams

 

Alison Park, Randwick

Schools

Yes

Fair

No

Civic

Yes

No

 

 

 


District park map

Attachment 4

 

 

 



Neighbourhood Parks map

Attachment 5

 

 

 



Regional park map

Attachment 6