Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 1 December 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee

1 December 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 1 December 2009 at 6:00pm.

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, J Procopiadis, Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, Hughes, Matson, Matthews (Chairperson), Nash, Notley-Smith, Seng, Smith, Stevenson, Tracey, White (Deputy Chairperson) & Woodsmith

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members.

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 10 November 2009

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W42/09     Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig)
UNSW - adjacent to Gate 8 - High St, Kensington

W43/09     Booking/Hiring of Sporting Fields

W44/09     Gum tree removal in Bieler Park, Randwick

W45/09     Randwick Bike Plan and Inner Sydney Regional Bike Plan    

 

Closed Session

Nil

 

Notices of Rescission Motions

Nil

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee

1 December 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W42/09

 

 

Subject:                  Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig)
UNSW - adjacent to Gate 8 - High St, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/07809

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has made application under the provisions of Randwick City Council’s Tree Preservation Order 2005 for consent to remove a very large and significant Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig) located to the west of Gate 8 within the Morven Brown Car Park, High Street, Kensington. 

 

Issues

 

The subject tree is one of three very large and significant Moreton Bay figs located on the High Street frontage of the University of New South Wales. All three trees are listed on Council’s Register of Significant Trees and this particular tree is referenced within that document as Tree no 35aak.

 

The tree is approximately 20 metres in height with a canopy spread of around 22 metres. It is between 100-120 years old and was most likely planted as part of the original plantings undertaken during the construction of Kensington Racecourse (c. 1896).

 

The tree is listed on Council’s Register of Significant Trees as having a broad range of significance attributes, including cultural/historic/visual/aesthetic/biodiversity values.

 

The canopy of the tree is in relatively good condition and it extends across both the adjacent car park area and onto High Street. There is some deadwood within the canopy and the tree has been periodically pruned over many years to deal with this ongoing management responsibility.

 

Although the tree is surrounded by a variety of other tree species it is the most prominent in this section of High Street and as such has considerable amenity value. It is also a very important provider of habitat for a variety of birdlife and other native fauna.

 

However, as a result of recent concerns about the stability and safety of the tree, the UNSW had a professional arborist inspect the tree and he has found significant and extensive decay within the trunk and basal area of the tree that compromises both its structural integrity and retention. 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 


Financial impact statement

 

Because the subject tree in growing within the UNSW grounds there is no direct financial impact for Council.

 

Conclusion

 

This tree has recognised arboricultural and heritage significance and as such has been placed on Council’s Register of Significant Trees.

 

However, an arborist’s report provided to Council by the UNSW advises that the tree has extensive basal decay and that it has a history of recent branch drop. In order to better define the extent of decay observed during the arborist’s initial Visual Tree Assessment (VTA) a Resistograph test was undertaken in conjunction with that inspection/assessment.

 

The purpose of a Resistograph test is to detect decay and to ascertain the residual wall thickness of any tested tree/s. The residual wall thickness is the amount of soundwood available to actually support a particular tree and a total of 30% or less is highly likely to result in the tree’s failure – particularly in the case of large senescing trees.

 

In this particular situation, however, because of the large buttress roots around the base of the tree and the impact those roots would have on allowing an accurate reading, Resistograph tests were only undertaken on the actual buttress roots to indicate the extent of decay in those roots.  Testing revealed that the north-eastern buttress root contains over 30% decay and as such it is structurally compromised. Standard drilling also indicated decay in the north-western buttress root.  An illustration providing an indicative interpretation of cross section test results is provided in the report which details test points and decay sites and the amount of decay present. This sketch is not to scale and is only indicative of test results.  An inspection undertaken by myself on 16 November 2009 revealed a very large cavity within the lower trunk of the tree that is open on the north, east and west sides of the tree. This cavity allows daylight to be seen looking from east to south and from north to south.  Laser testing undertaken by the UNSW arborist revealed that this cavity extended approximately three (3) metres above ground and limited excavation with a shovel indicated that decay extended at least 300mm underground.

 

As a result of the submission to Council of an application to remove the tree – and because of the recognised significance of the tree – Council commissioned an independent AQF5 qualified arborist to undertake an inspection of the tree and provide a Picus Sonic Tomograph report detailing the extent of identified internal decay.  A Picus Sonic Tomograph provides a very accurate x-ray type cross section of a tree trunk/branch that clearly shows any active fungus and/or decayed wood, as well as both altering wood and soundwood within any test area.  This test revealed that at 300mm above ground level only 15% of the tree’s trunk consisted of soundwood. Active fungus and decayed areas constituted approximately 76% of the test area with nine (9) percent made up of altering wood – ie, wood being altered by fungus attack.  The active fungus/decay area encompasses the entire base of the tree with the only remaining soundwood located on the eastern side of the trunk within only two buttress roots.  This excessive amount of decay has made the base and root system of the tree structurally unsound, with the only soundwood located within a small buttress root area on the eastern side of the base of the tree.  The Picus test result findings suggest that there are no large structurally sound roots to support the mass of the tree on the northern, western or southern sides of the tree.  This report also supports the findings of the UNSW arborist’s report that it is possible to see daylight through several of the large basal cavities and that extensive decay extends from ground level to at least 2-3 metres above ground level.

 

A Council private trees assessment data sheet assesses this tree as having significant environmental/scenic amenity and important habitat and food source provision. The effect of removal on soil stability and land degradation has been assessed as negligible.

 

Because of the compromised structural integrity of the subject tree it has been calculated as having a high hazard rating. This rating takes into account factors such as failure potential, size of part and target usage.

 

Using Australian Standard ASDR99307 this tree has been calculated as having an amenity value of $57,600. This figure would certainly be much higher if the tree had a longer safe useful life expectancy and there were not a large number of other mature/established trees within the immediate vicinity that could mitigate to some degree the loss of visual amenity should the tree be removed.      

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the diseased and structurally unsound Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig) growing within the University of New South Wales carpark area to the west of Gate 8 in High Street, Kensington, be removed because of the risk to public safety and that it be replaced with an appropriate number of native tree species.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

UNSW Application to remove tree and ENT Tree Consultancy Report

 

 

2.View

Australian Tree Consultancy Pty Ltd Picus Sonic Tomograph Report

 

 

3.View

Excerpt from Council's Register of Significant Trees

 

 

4.View

Council Private Assessment Data Sheet

 

 

5.View

Eview Ariel Photograph of Ficus Macrophylla

 

 

 

 

 


UNSW Application to remove tree and ENT Tree Consultancy Report

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 













 


Australian Tree Consultancy Pty Ltd Picus Sonic Tomograph Report

Attachment 2

 

 






 


Excerpt from Council's Register of Significant Trees

Attachment 3

 

 

Significant Trees: Other Government/Institutional

SURVEY DATA SHEET

 

Randwick City Council                                                                           MAP REFS: E 02-03 & F 02-03

Register of Significant Trees                                                                                          DATE: 15.06.06

PRECINCT 3:  KINGSFORD

 

 


University of New South Wales (UNSW) – 330 Anzac Parade, Kensington

 

 


SUMMARY OF SCHEDULED ITEMS (CULTURAL PLANTING)

 

SCHEDULED ITEMS:            INFORMAL GROUPS/ROW PLANTING & SINGLE SPECIMENS

SIGNIFICANCE:                      INDIVIDUAL/GROUP – LGA

 

Group A: Fig Tree Lane (Old Tote) and Fig Tree Theatre group

35a-e  5 №     Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)

 

Group B: Anzac Parade main entrance and the Squarehouse

35f-h  

35j-n   8 №     Port Jackson Figs (Ficus rubiginosa f. rubiginosa)

35i       1 №     Port Jackson Figs (Ficus rubiginosa f. glabrescens)

35o-p  2 №     Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)

 

Group C: Main pedestrian entrance/avenue (Anzac Parade)

35q-z              

35aa-ah                       18 №   American Cottonwoods (Populus x canadensis cv. ‘Marilandica’)

 

Group D: High Street boundary and B14 Hut area (lower campus)

35ai-az                                                 

35aaa-aah     22 №   Hill’s Weeping Figs (Ficus microcarpa var. hillii)

35aae-aah     4 №     Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)

 

Group E: High Street boundary (upper campus)

35aai-aak       3 №     Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)

35aal               1 №     Cork Oak (Quercus suber)

 

Group F: Barker Street boundary (lower campus)

35aam                         1 №     Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla)

35aan-aao     2 No    Port Jackson Figs (Ficus rubiginosa f. rubiginosa)

 

Group G: Other individual specimens on campus

35aap              1 №     Port Jackson Fig (Ficus rubiginosa f. glabrescens)

35aaq              1 №     Queensland Kauri Pine (Agathis robusta)

 

Other tree components/associates

Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus)

Hill’s Weeping Figs (Ficus microcarpa var. hillii)

London Planes (Platanus x acerifolia)

Lombardy Poplar (Populus nigra var. Italica)

 


DESCRIPTION OF SCHEDULED TREE SPECIES

 

Botanical Name:                    35a-e, 35o-p, 35aae-aak, 35aam - Ficus macrophylla

Common Name:                    Moreton Bay Fig

Significance Attributes:         native rainforest specimen planting

                                                   cultural/historic and social

                                   visual/aesthetic (local/streetscape and campus)

                                                   biodiversity value

Origin:                                       ornamental/cultivated (SE Qld to NSW Shoalhaven region)

 

Location:                                  Single species row plantation, informal groups and individual

specimens occur within Groups A, B, D, E, and F (refer to Group

descriptions). 5 No. trees planted in a row along Fig Tree Lane (off

High Street), 2 No. on Anzac Parade boundary (near Squarehouse),

1 No. in the B14 Hut area, 2 No. adjacent to High Street (upper

campus) and 1 No. near Barker Street boundary (lower campus).

Extent of Influence:              Canopies and root zones are largely confined to this property. Specimens growing adjacent to boundaries may have canopies which extend over the public verge and partially over the roadways (Anzac Parade and High Street frontages). The root zones of these figs are likely to extend to a similar or possibly larger area of influence.

Height:                                      16-30 metres

Canopy Spread:                     18-35 metres

Trunk Diameter:                     900-2700mm @ 1.0 metre above ground level (up to 4000mm

buttressed bases).

Estimated Age:                       100-120 years+

Condition/Health:                   Most of these figs appear to be in fair to good health and condition.

Canopies are generally dense following recent rains. There is some

dead wood present in the upper crowns and a low to medium level of

fig psyllid damage to leaves.

Management

Recommendations:  For further detailed assessment of health, condition and tree

management recommendations, a qualified arborist should be

consulted.


Botanical Name:                  35f-n, 35aan-aap - Ficus rubiginosa f. rubiginosa and f. glabrescens

Common Name:                    Port Jackson Fig

Significance Attributes:         native rainforest specimen planting

                                      cultural/historic and social

                      visual/aesthetic (local/streetscape and campus)

      biodiversity value

Origin:                          ornamental/cultivated (form rubiginosa northern NSW to Illawarra

and form glabrescens Qld & northern NSW)

Location:                     Single species row plantation/ informal groups and individual

specimens occur within Groups B, D, and G (refer to Group

descriptions). 4 No. figs are planted in a row either side of main

entrance off Anzac Parade, 1 No. in the B14 Hut area and 1 No.

adjacent to the Red Centre building.

Extent of Influence:              Canopies and root zones of figs growing adjacent to the Anzac Parade boundary extend to the public verge/ carriageway. Otherwise, canopies and root zones are largely confined to this property.

Height:                                      10-18 metres

Canopy Spread:                     12-22 metres

Trunk Diameter:                     900-1000mm @ 1.0 metre above ground level

Estimated Age:                       60-90 years+

Condition/Health:                   Most of these figs appear to be in fair to good health and condition.

Canopies are generally dense following recent rains.

Management

Recommendations:  For further detailed assessment of health, condition and tree

management recommendations, a qualified arborist should be

consulted.



Botanical Name:                    35q-z, 35aa-ah - Populus x canadensis cv. ‘Marilandica’

Common Name:                    American Cottonwood

Significance Attributes:         avenue planting of exotic deciduous species

                                      cultural/historic and social

                                      visual/aesthetic (local/park and streetscape)

Origin:                          ornamental/cultivated (North America – group of hybrids of Populus

deltoides and Populus nigra)

Location:                     Single species avenue plantation on lawns adjacent to the main

pedestrian entrance off Anzac Parade (lower campus).

Extent of Influence:    Canopies and root zones are confined to this portion of the campus.

Height:                                      16-18 metres

Canopy Spread:                     10-12 metres

Trunk Diameter:                     600-800mm @ 1.0 metre above ground level

Estimated Age:                       40-50 years+

Condition/Health:                   The trees appear to be in generally good condition with minimal

pruning to the upper canopies.

Management

Recommendations:  For further detailed assessment of health, condition and tree

management recommendations, a qualified arborist should be

consulted.


Botanical Name:                    35ai-az, 35aaa-aad - Ficus microcarpa var. hillii

Common Name:                    Hill’s Weeping Fig

Significance Attributes:         row of evergreen broadleaf species

                                      cultural/historic and social

                                      visual/aesthetic (local/streetscape)

Origin:                          ornamental/cultivated (F. microcarpa – India to north-eastern

Australia – var. hillii of cultivated origin)

Location:                     Row planting adjacent to High Street boundary (lower campus),

immediately east of Anzac Parade intersection.

Extent of Influence:              Massed canopies extend over this portion of UNSW campus, public verge/ footpath and roadway. Root zones are likely to extend throughout a similar area.

Height:                                      15-18 metres

Canopy Spread:                     12-20 metres

Trunk Diameter:                     600-1000mm @ 1.0 metre above ground level

Estimated Age:                       up to 40-50 years+

Condition/Health:                   Most of the figs appear to be in generally good health and condition

with minimal pruning to canopies. There is little dead wood present

in the crowns.

Management

Recommendations:  Generally, no immediate threats or problems evident under current

management practices, however the vigorous growth pattern and

extensive root network of this species needs to be monitored. In

recent years, local populations of this species have been affected by

a range of soil-borne diseases causing root rot, particularly fungi

such as Phytophthora cinnamomi, Armillaria luteobubalina and

Phellinus sp. Accordingly, these figs should be inspected periodically

by a qualified arborist.

 

 


STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) was founded on the former site of the Kensington Racecourse. In 1890, an area of 60 acres (23.6 Ha) of Crown land was leased by the Rosehill Racing Company Limited on Broad Road (later to become Anzac Parade), Kensington. The lease was later transferred to the Kensington Recreation Ground Company (c. 1896).  The site was levelled and two grandstands constructed for members and the public. Moreton Bay Figs were planted as part of this early development phase. For more than half a century, a lake was retained within the south-western corner of the racetrack (later filled for the ‘Village Green’). The racecourse provided an important venue for many varied fixtures including horse and dog racing, polo matches, cricket, football, lacrosse, foot races and picnic days. In 1917, a three-storey totalisator (‘The Old Tote’) was added on the northern side of the course. In 1890 and 1900, the site was used as a camp by the Bushman’s Contingent for the Boer War. During World War II, the army again established a camp on the site and racing ceased. Following the war, the site was used as a migrant hostel. In 1950, the NSW Premier, Hon. J. McGirr set aside the site for establishment of the New South Wales University of Technology, later to become known as the University of New South Wales. 

 

The university campus extends over an area bounded by High Street, Botany Street, Barker Street and Anzac Parade, including the National Institute of Performing Arts (NIDA) on the western side of Anzac Parade. The campus contains an important collection of significant trees dating from the early days of racing in the late Victorian era (1890s) through to the Post War period (1940s to 1960s). These trees provide historic markers in the landscape, describing the way the campus developed over time. As a group, they are considered to have significance at the Randwick LGA level in terms of their historic, cultural, social, commemorative, educational, biodiversity, aesthetic and visual values.

 

Most of the university’s significant trees are located within the lower campus and many have historic links with the Kensington Racecourse and the Old Tote building in Fig Tree Lane. This building, constructed as a totalisator (1917), was used by the army during WWII and later as a migrant hostel, followed by headquarters for the university’s army unit and the National Institute of Dramatic art (NIDA) as the Old Tote Theatre. NIDA used the building for over 40 years before moving to their current address on the western side of Anzac Parade. It is believed that the mature row of Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla) was transplanted in 1896 (or possibly even earlier in 1893) during the initial development of the racecourse. These 100-year old figs are now exceptionally tall specimens and amongst the tallest representative examples of this species in the Randwick LGA. They have an expansive, contiguous canopy which creates a dramatic sense of enclosure and vertical scale in this relatively confined space. They are outstanding elements within this historic and culturally significant landscape precinct. Other mature Moreton Bay Figs in High Street, Barker Street and along Anzac Parade (near the Roundhouse) are also believed to date from the early development of Kensington Racecourse (G. Blaxland, pers. comm.). All of these figs are of outstanding proportions and scale.

 

These figs combine with other massed planting of Hill’s Weeping Figs (Ficus microcarpa var. hillii) and Port Jackson Figs (Ficus rubiginosa f. glabrescens) around the university huts. Most of these figs possibly date from the 1950s Post-War period during the early establishment of the NSW University of Technology. During the 1950-1960s period, the campus landscape was created by the landscape architect, Professor Peter Spooner, who later established the first School of Landscape Architecture in Australia (1974). The deciduous avenue of American Cottonwoods (Populus X canadensis cv. ‘Marilandica’)  was established in 1962 and now forms one of the finest single species avenues in the Randwick LGA (Leeson, J., pers. comm., 14.06.06).

 

Other significant trees include a Queensland Kauri Pine (Agathis robusta) on the bio-med lawn (upper campus), a Port Jackson Fig (Ficus rubiginosa f. glabrescens) near the Red Centre building (mid-lower campus) and a Bunya Pine (Araucaria bidwillii) on the western campus. The Queensland Kauri Pine (20 metres in height/ 4 metres canopy spread/ 400mm DBH) and Bunya Pine (15 metres in height/ 10 metres canopy spread/ 600mm DBH) are both native rainforest species of ornamental and amenity value but are not particularly large or significant as individual specimens. Nevertheless, the Kauri Pine is a commemorative Post-War period planting (planted possibly in 1954 by HRH Queen Elizabeth II) and the Bunya Pine may have associations with the voluntary army unit stationed in these grounds during the 1940s.

 

The Cork Oak (Quercus suber) located near the High Street boundary (Gate 7) is an uncommon botanical specimen in the Randwick locality but again, this tree is a relatively recent addition and not particularly large for this species. Similarly, a Cape Chestnut (Calodendron capense), located on the Botany Road frontage is believed to be a rare cultivar with massed white flowers rather than the usual pink floral display. This ornamental exotic species is quite common throughout the Randwick LGA.

 

The UNSW campus contains a broad range of Post-War period (1940-1960s) planting including row plantations of native Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus), informal groupings of Hill’s Weeping Figs (Ficus microcarpa var. hillii), London Planes (Platanus x acerifolia), Lombardy Poplar (Populus nigra var. Italica) and other common ornamental species. During the late 1960s to early 1990s period many Eucalypts of generic origins were planted throughout the campus including the very tall growing Flooded Gums (Eucalyptus grandis) located on the lower campus near the Roundhouse (known originally as ‘the Union’ opened in 1961). These trees make an important contribution to the landscape character and amenity of the campus as contextual elements. During the 1990s, the university commenced a major building and refurbishment program which has transformed many of the older buildings and outdoor precincts with new landscaped spaces and further planting. These successive overlays are considered to be broadly supportive of the earlier landscape context and aesthetic character. Future development is being guided by the recently completed “Campus 2020 – UNSW Kensington Campus Masterplan” (Sept. 2005). With the current rate of development on the campus, it is important that the identified historic precincts and their significant trees are adequately protected and managed appropriately for future generations.

 

 

 

 

 


 


University of New South Wales

Fig Tree Lane (Old Tote) and Fig Tree Theatre group

 Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)

 


UNSW – Main pedestrian entrance/avenue (Anzac Parade)

American Cottonwoods (Populus x canadensis cv. ‘Marilandica’)

 


UNSW – Anzac Parade, near the Squarehouse

Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)

 


UNSW – Barker Street (lower campus)

Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla)

 


Council Private Assessment Data Sheet

Attachment 4

 

 

 

 

Private Trees - Tree Assessment Data Sheet

 

 

Address – UNSW – adjacent Gate 8 Carpark Entrance - High Street, Kensington

 

 

Species – Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig) – x 1

 

 

TREE TYPE

 

 

 

 

 

 

TREE STATUS

 

 

 

 

 

 


TREE LOCATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                 GIS (x)

 

 

 

 

                 GIS (y)

 

 

ASSESSMENT DATE – 16 November 2009

 

ASSESSMENT TYPE

                                                                                                                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TREE DETAILS               Height (m)                              Width (m) 

                                                                                 

Canopy

Branches

Leaves

Roots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ground Surface

Tree Condition

Root Damage  

Root Damage Severity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES – This tree is highly significant and is listed on Council’s Register of Significant Trees.

It is between 100-120 years old and was probably planted during the early development of

Kensington Racecourse. However, the base of the tree contains significant internal decay

(active fungus and decay area constitutes 76% of basal area) and because of the high traffic

area in which it is located it constitutes a very serious liability concern.


 

 

TREE DEFECTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEFECT LOCATION/S

 

 

 

 

 

OBSTRUCTIONS/RESTRICTIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAZARD FACTORS/RATING

 

Score

 

 

Failure potential

 

 

 

 

 

Target usage

 

 

 

 

 

Size of part

 

 

 

 

Total -

(Failure potential + Target usage + Size of part)

 

RATING

 

    

 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

 

Environmental/Scenic Amenity

 Habitat/Foodsource Provision

Effect of Removal on soil

stability/land degradation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amenity Valuation  (ASDR99307)

Factors 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 5 x 6 x 7 x $50 (increment value)

 

1 (size of tree)

 

 

 

 

2 (S.U.L.E)

 

 

 

 

3 (importance in
 landscape)

 

 

 

 

4 (other trees)

 

 

 

 

5 (relation to                     setting)

 

 

 

 

6 (form)           

 

 

 

 

7 (special factors)

 

 

 

 

         

TOTAL $57,600

 

                        

RECOMMENDED ACTION/WORKS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Eview Ariel Photograph of Ficus Macrophylla

Attachment 5

 

 

 


Works Committee

1 December 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W43/09

 

 

Subject:                  Booking/Hiring of Sporting Fields

Folder No:                   F2004/06051

Author:                   Peter Stone, Manager Infrastructure Services     

 

Introduction

 

The booking of Council’s sporting fields is undertaken on either a seasonal or casual basis and occurs for both the winter and summer seasonal sports.  It is proposed to amend the existing Sports Committee Terms of Reference in order to allow local only soccer clubs to participate in the Committee.

 

Issues

 

The Sports Committee members, together with the Mayor, three Councillors and Council officers, comprises representatives from sports associations that conduct their competitions either all or partly within the Randwick City LGA involving Randwick City based clubs and, clubs where those clubs are the only sporting bodies playing a particular sport within the Randwick LGA. Examples are Australian Rules and Baseball.

 

Membership of the Committee is in accordance with the Terms of Reference “Part 8 Eligibility for Appointment”.

 

However, it has been recognised recently, that there is a need for the Randwick based soccer clubs to have individual representation to the Sports Committee and Council for assistance with facility development and hire for each winter season.

 

It has been established that there are approximately 11 soccer clubs based in the Randwick LGA that compete within the Eastern Suburbs Football Association (ESFA) seasonal competition.

 

The ESFA competition comprises a total of approximately 35 clubs which are allocated various grounds for competition and training from within the Randwick LGA, surrounding local government areas and, the Centennial Park precincts. Currently, all facilities are booked by ESFA and allocated to the member clubs for use during the season.

 

Given the large number of clubs within ESFA, the Randwick based clubs should have direct and individual representation to Council particularly with regard to facility hire for competition and training to ensure that they have reasonable and equitable use of Council’s sports facilities.

 

It is suggested therefore that the Terms of Reference be amended to read:

 

“5.   MEMBERSHIP

 

       Membership of the Committee shall consist of no more than 15 and no less than six representatives of sporting peak bodies or associations, except for soccer, which will be represented by local Randwick based clubs. 

 

       The representatives of sporting peak bodies or associations will be residents of Randwick or members of local sporting peak bodies or associations and/or facilities servicing the Randwick City area.

 

       Council staff representatives will include:

 

5.1     Manager, Infrastructure Services and any other Officer nominated by Council.

 

5.2     Three Councillors and the Mayor.

 

       Depending on the nature of issues raised, it may be necessary to invite relevant departmental staff to attend particular meetings.

 

8.     ELIGIBILITY FOR APPOINTMENT

 

       Randwick City Council seeks members of the sporting community who are the peak representative for their sport association or club where that club is the only sporting body playing a particular sport within the Randwick LGA and from soccer clubs based in the Randwick LGA.”

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the                             community expectations and defined levels of service.

Key Action:       Assets are managed strategically to deliver intergenerational equity                 and to meet Council’s obligation as the custodian of our community’s                 assets.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact from this matter at this time.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed amendment to the Randwick City Council Sports Committee Terms of Reference as noted in this report will allow better communication between Council and Randwick based soccer clubs towards more reasonable and equitable use of their Council’s sports facilities

 

Recommendation

 

That the Randwick City Council Sports Committee Terms of Reference as amended be adopted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Randwick City Council Sports Committee Terms of Reference

 

 

 

 

 


Randwick City Council Sports Committee Terms of Reference

Attachment 1

 

 

 

RANDWICK CITY COUNCIL SPORTS COMMITTEE

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

1.      NAME

 

       The Committee shall be known as the Randwick City Council Sports Committee.

 

2.      AIMS

 

       To provide a forum for representatives from local sporting associations and Council to discuss current issues and future needs of local sporting organisations.

 

       To promote equitable access for the use of Council’s sporting grounds, facilities and kiosks.

 

       To promote the involvement of members of all sporting facilities in the planning and decision making process to ensure the promotion, extension and improvement of sport and sporting facilities within the Randwick City area.

 

       To provide a forum for discussion on problems of mutual interest between member associations.

 

       To promote and encourage the social fellowship of its members.

 

3.      OBJECTIVES

 

       To ensure that Council policies and programs are consistent with Commonwealth and State Government Legislation and Best Practice relevant to the full range of local sporting and recreational needs;

 

       To develop a Randwick City Council checklists, code of conduct and terms of reference;

 

       To comment on Council planning instruments; including Plans of Management, Development Control Plans (DCPs), Local Environmental Plans (LEPs), Strategic Plans in relation to sporting facility access;

 

       To assist Council in effective policy development through the provision of comprehensive advice in relation to sport;

 

       To encourage participation from members of all sporting associations in Council’s decision making processes;

 

       To assist Council in the identification of current and future sporting needs for the community;

       The maintenance of a directory of the associations comprising the Sports Committee and associated activities (i.e. maintenance).

 

4.      DETERMINATIONS

 

       The committee shall be an advisory body, operating on a consensus basis, which submits recommendations for consideration by Randwick City Council.

 

5.      MEMBERSHIP

 

       Membership of the Committee shall consist of no more than 15 and no less than six representatives of sporting peak bodies or associations, except for soccer, which will be represented by local Randwick based clubs. 

 

       The representatives of sporting peak bodies or associations will be residents of Randwick or members of local sporting peak bodies or associations and/or facilities servicing the Randwick City area.

 

       Council staff representatives will include:

 

5.1     Manager, Infrastructure Services and any other Officer nominated by Council.

 

5.2     Three Councillors and the Mayor.

 

       Depending on the nature of issues raised, it may be necessary to invite relevant departmental staff to attend particular meetings.

 

6.      RESPONSIBILITIES OF MEMBERS

 

       Members are requested to ensure effective and timely communication between the organisation, the teams they represent and the Committee.

 

       The Committee is a working committee and, therefore, it is anticipated that some tasks will need to be undertaken by members outside of meetings.

 

7.      RESPONSIBILITIES OF COUNCIL

 

       Council will provide secretarial support, including minute taking and professional officer support, as appropriate.

 

8.      ELIGIBILITY FOR APPOINTMENT

 

       Randwick City Council seeks members of the sporting community who are the peak representative for their sport association or club where that club is the only sporting body playing a particular sport within the Randwick LGA and from soccer clubs based in the Randwick LGA.

 

9.      TENURE OF MEMBERSHIP

 

       Review of membership should be undertaken on a regular basis.

 

10.   PROCEDURES AND PROCEEDINGS

 

       Meetings of the Committee shall be four times a year, two at the start of each season and two mid-seasons.

 

       A quorum of the Committee shall be six members with voting rights.

 

       In relation to any procedural matter, the ruling of the Chairperson shall be final.

 

       The Committee shall undertake an annual review and forward planning process to determine future directions and establishment of priorities.

 

       Other interested individuals are welcome to attend meetings as observers but are recognised with consent of the Chairperson.

 

11.   NOTICE OF ORDINARY MEETINGS

 

       Members of the Committee shall receive at least ten working days written notice of ordinary meetings and such notice shall include an agenda of that meeting.

 

12.   MINUTES OF MEETINGS

 

       Minutes of meetings shall be made available to any interested residents for inspection and shall be published on Council’s internet website.

 

13.   NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETINGS

 

       Should the need arise of a special meeting to consider a matter considered particularly urgent, a special meeting to consider only that particularly urgent matter, may be called by the Chairperson and two other committee members.

 

14.   ATTENDANCE AT MEETINGS

 

       Members may, in consultation with the Committee, request that an invitation be extended to a particular individual to attend a future meeting as a visitor, when it is considered that the visitor may be in a position to contribute to the proceedings.

 

15.   AMENDMENTS TO TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

       These Terms of Reference shall only be amended by Council recommendation.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee

1 December 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W44/09

 

 

Subject:                  Gum tree removal in Bieler Park, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

During an inspection undertaken recently to assess the possible impact that a proposed new playground area might have on existing park trees within Bieler Park, Randwick, Council staff noticed that a very large and healthy Eucalyptus species (Gum tree) growing on the southern side of the park had a large inclusion through the middle of the trunk approximately one metre above ground level.

 

This tree is very prominent in the park but the size of the two co-dominant central leaders and the actual location of the inclusion caused me some concern.

 

An adjacent Corymbia citriodora (Lemon-scented gum) has a large wound in the trunk and a tear where a large branch had fallen and there are some concerns about the structural integrity of this tree.

 

Both these trees are located between a set of swings and the playground area within the park and are the subject of continual high traffic movement underneath.

 

Issues

 

As a result of the inspection and because of the size of the larger tree in particular, Australian Tree Consultants Pty Ltd were requested to provide Council with an assessment and report on both trees as well as providing a Picus Sonic Tomograph report on the larger gum.

 

The Lemon-scented gum was assessed as being in fair-good health and worthy of retention, with only a minimal amount of remedial pruning required to make the tree safe. The tree has calloused around two large wound areas and is compartmentalising tissue damage on all sides of those wounds, which is a clear indication that the tree is healthy and growing vigorously.

 

The larger gum tree has been assessed as being mature and in a healthy condition. There is no discernable deadwood within the canopy and less than five percent tip dieback is present. In fact, the tree has approximately 90 percent of the expected live foliage coverage for a Gum tree of this age. However, the single trunk at the base of the tree bifurcates at one metre above ground level and there is a bark inclusion that extends down between the two trunks to approximately 500mm above ground level. Tissue swelling is located on the southern side of the trunk at the site of bifurcation but no parting between the inclusion was visible at the time of inspection. There were also no other defects visible within the trunk or canopy of the tree when it was inspected.

 

A similar inclusion was discovered in the trunk of a very large and apparently healthy Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing adjacent to Malabar Road, South Maroubra, which recently failed without warning when half the tree simply collapsed onto an adjacent open space area.

 

Fortunately, no-one was killed or seriously injured in that episode, but the point is that there was no visible indication that tree was anything other than healthy.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction10b:     Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the cost to undertake the required maintenance pruning of the Lemon-scented gum and to remove the large Gum and replace it with one-two super-advanced native trees would be in the vicinity of $2,500. The required expenditure would come from Council’s Parks and Recreation maintenance budget.

 

Conclusion

 

Although the larger Gum tree has matured with a large inclusion which, at this stage, shows no shows of opening or splitting, the tree remains structurally compromised and potentially dangerous.

 

A Picus Sonic Tomograph report indicates there is definitely a bark inclusion between the two trunks and that there is some bark-to-bark contact within that inclusion. However, this contact does not extend throughout the entire traverse of the inclusion. Despite the size of this inclusion the Picus Tomograph results indicate that 94% of the test area consists of soundwood and that only around one percent of the test area is affected by fungal disease. As a result of these findings Australian Tree Consultants Pty Ltd concludes that the tree has high visual amenity and is retainable within its location with some recommended arboricultural works to lessen the incidence of any trunk failure at the site of the inclusion. These works include the installation of a bolting system at the site of the inclusion, in conjunction with a static cable system within the upper canopy as a back up should a failure occur. Bi-yearly inspections are recommended to monitor the tree and the installed cable and bolt system.

 

The report also recommends the installation of a static cable in the upper canopy of the Lemon-scented gum to retain a large limb should failure occur but this will not be required because the tree can be pruned to negate this risk. Council staff are very reluctant to install any such management system within either of these trees as it could not be guaranteed to work effectively and should the larger tree fail it could be catastrophic to young park users. This is particularly relevant to this situation, where a large number of small children utilise the park in which the tree is located. There is also the concern that installing such a system could be seen as an admission by Council that a cabled tree has a structural defect that it was aware of and that it has not acted responsibly by removing a potentially serious risk to persons and/or property.

 

Although the large Gum is prominent in the landscape there are a large number of established trees growing within the immediate vicinity that would negate to some degree the loss of visual amenity and habitat should this tree be removed. 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council removes the large Eucalyptus species (Gum tree) growing on the southern side of Bieler Park, Randwick, and replaces it with a Gum tree species such as a Eucalyptus haemastoma (Scribbly gum).

 

Attachment/s:

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the size of the two subject gum trees and their prominence in the landscape.

 

 

2.View

Arborist's Report on the two gum trees in Bieler Park

 

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the size of the two subject gum trees and their prominence in the landscape.

Attachment 1

 

 

 

Large Gum tree is in very good health and is prominent in the park/landscape

Large elongated inclusion in trunk - viewed from northern side of tree

 

Inclusion viewed from the south side of the Gum tree

Two Gum trees viewed from the southern side of Frenchmans Rd, looking north-east

 

Trees viewed from the eastern side of the park looking westward

Evidence of large snapped branch in canopy of smaller Lemon-scented gum

 

Wound in trunk of Lemon-scented Gum showing compartmentalisation taking place


Trunk inclusion in large Ficus ‘Hillii’ in Malabar Rd – unnoticed until tree failed

 

Entire western section of fig tree simply fell to the ground without warning

 


Arborist's Report on the two gum trees in Bieler Park /

Attachment 2

 

 














 


Works Committee

1 December 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W45/09

 

 

Subject:                  Randwick Bike Plan and Inner Sydney Regional Bike Plan

Folder No:                   F2004/08002

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport     

 

Introduction

 

Randwick City Council has been working closely with the City of Sydney (CoS) Council (and various other councils) to develop the Inner Sydney Regional Bike Plan.

 

The aim of developing the Inner Sydney Regional Bike Plan is to collate all 13 inner Sydney council’s bicycle plans and identify gaps between Council areas in terms of cycle routes, lane types and implementation timing and to develop methodologies and strategies to address these gaps.

 

The Inner Sydney Regional Bike Plan will also form the basis on which the CoS will seek Federal and State funding to roll out physically separated cycleways into and out of the city, including within neighbouring Council areas.

 

It is considered that support should be given to this initiative as Randwick City Council is committed to improving cycling facilities to increase sustainable transport options.

 

Issues

 

Council is currently in the process of implementing bike routes within the Randwick Council area as described in the Randwick Bike Plan Update. The Randwick Bike Plan Update, endorsed by Council in 2008, provides guidance to Council’s existing and proposed bicycle routes and priorities for their construction.

 

With the changing focus in providing safe, efficient, attractive and sustainable transport options, current best practice is to physically separate cyclists from other forms of traffic.

 

Issues that are faced when introducing physically separated cycleways are:

 

·           Funding availability;

·           Existing infrastructure constraints;

·           Linking into existing bike routes;

·           Approval from other authorities;

·           Provision of end of trip facilities.

 

Randwick Council will continue implementing the current cycle routes as per the priorities in the Bike Plan via linemarking and signposting installations. As funds permit, Council will investigate retrofitting existing infrastructure with physically separated cycle lanes in high demand locations and at squeeze points. 

 

Randwick City Council will also actively work with CoS to integrate the cycle networks across Council boundaries to ensure a smooth transition for cyclists between Council areas.

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:        Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9a:       A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycle ways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities.

Direction 9d:       Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

 

Financial Impact Statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter, at this time.

 

Conclusion

 

The City of Sydney’s proposal to develop the Inner Sydney Regional Bike Plan provides an opportunity to create a integrated, strategic cycle network which should be supported by Council. By ensuring that appropriate links are provided between the cycle networks, and that Councils continue to implement safe, efficient and attractive routes, improvements can be made to sustainable transport modes and increase the number of people actively using cycle routes in the City of Randwick, the City of Sydney as well as in other inner city councils.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     Council commit to working collaboratively with inner city councils, with the City of Sydney acting as the lead agency, to integrate the cycle route planning and networks and

 

b)     Council agree, in principle, to future implementation of separated cycle facilities, which would be the subject of further reports.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Bike Plan Update Construction Routes

 

 

 

 

 


Bike Plan Update Construction Routes

Attachment 1