Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 10 November 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee

10 November 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 10 November 2009 at 6:00pm.

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, J Procopiadis, Andrews, Belleli, Bowen, Hughes, Matson, Matthews (Chairperson), Nash, Notley-Smith, Seng, Smith, Stevenson, Tracey, White (Deputy Chairperson) & Woodsmith

 

Quorum:                           Eight (8) members.

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 13 October 2009

 

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

 

Urgent Business

 

Works Reports

W35/09     Cricket Nets in North and East Wards

W36/09     Migrant Hostel Site Subdivision

W37/09     Young Driver Education Programme

W38/09     Farnham Avenue, Randwick - Proposed Footpath - Petition

W39/09     Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee - Proposed Footpath - Petition

W40/09     Tree Removal - Outside 3 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington    

 

Closed Session

Nil 

 

Notices of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee

10 November 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W35/09

 

 

Subject:                  Cricket Nets in North and East Wards

Folder No:                   F2004/07850

Author:                   Hayley Segedin, Acting Co-ordinator Landscape Design     

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 9 June 2009, resolved (Smith/Andrews) that:

 

a)     Council officers report on the provision of cricket nets within North and East Wards;

 

b)     Council explore possible sites within the stated wards where construction of cricket nets would be viable; and

 

c)     the cost of constructing and maintaining cricket nets be reported back to Council.

 

Issues

 

The future provision of cricket level insofar as growth and participation, is identified in the Randwick City Recreation Needs Study 2008, as follows:

 

·           There has been overall growth in participation and interest in cricket in Sydney in the past 5 years.

 

·           Growth of 15% in South East Junior Cricket Association (main Randwick club affiliate) in the past 5 years.

 

·           Theoretical participation (2.2%) based on the estimated 2006 population is 2,692 people, which will grow to 2,886 people based on the estimated 2021 population. The moderate growth is not expected to significantly increase demand for ovals beyond current needs.

 

·           Benchmark data suggests that the existing provision of cricket ovals in Randwick City is not adequate for the existing population.

 

·           The telephone survey identified cricket as equal 17th participated sport by Randwick City residents, with no responses for cricket as a nominated activity for future participation.  This suggests that the future demand may be confined to junior ovals rather than ovals to accommodate additional senior cricketers.

 

·           There is a high level of satisfaction with the quality and distribution of existing playing fields, 88% indicating that their location and distribution was either ‘very good’ or ‘good’.

 

North and East Wards – locations suitable for cricket facilities

 

With the exception of Coogee Oval and Latham Park (both located in East Ward), North and East Wards open space consists of Beach and Coastal, Civic, Neighbourhood and Pocket open space (as classified in the Open space Plans of Management).

 

The parks and reserves identified within these classifications generally provide the following functions:

 

·           Encourage participation in outdoor recreation, such as kick about areas, playgrounds and picnic areas.

 

·           Provide facilities that encourage participation in passive outdoor recreation, such as seating areas and small playgrounds.

 

·           Provide facilities that encourage participation in water related recreation, such as walking trails, fishing viewing areas small grass and picnic areas.

 

·           Promote the use of space by the community as passive open space areas while ensuring the integrity of the spaces as places for ceremony and reflection.

 

Cricket facilities, such as cricket nets are more suitably located within regional and district parks. These spaces are generally defined by following principles:

 

·           Provide a diversity of recreational opportunity in both scale and type, and multi-use should be maximised.

 

·           Where appropriate, provide high grade facilities for participation in sporting activities, without minimising opportunities for access to open space by the community for informal or passive recreational activities.

 

Although Coogee Oval is listed as a regional park, there is limited open space within the boundary of the park to provide for cricket net facilities.

 

Latham Park however, would sufficiently cater for cricket net facilities. The site is mainly comprised of formal recreational activity such as bowling, tennis and football. A proposed location for cricket nets would be at the eastern part of the park (upper level) – refer attachment 1 – as the open space area is evenly surfaced, and is a suitable distance away from the surrounding residential areas.

 

It should be noted that the District Park Generic Plan of Management does not include cricket facilities as a suitable activity for district parks, however the plan does identify the need to introduce new sports to district parks when there is a demand for them.

 

Central and South Wards - locations suitable for cricket facilities

 

In accordance with the strategic recommendations outlined in the Recreational Needs Study, Council is planning to propose cricket facilities (such as cricket ovals and nets) in the future upgrade of sites within the Central and South Wards. The parks identified as providing for such cricket facilities include Heffron Park, Chifley Sports Reserve and Pioneers Park (located in close proximity to the Malabar Headland rifle range).

 

In addition, Council will further investigate the possibility of cricket facilities in Barwon Park, Matraville as identified in the strategic recommendations also outlined in the Recreational Needs Study.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:       Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 5b:      A range of cultural, sporting and leisure activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost to install two cricket nets at Latham Park, including site preparation, fencing and installation of synthetic grass is in the vicinity of $40,000.  Maintenance is approximately $2,000 per annum.

 

Funding needs to be considered in future budgets.

 

Conclusion

 

The North and East Wards predominately comprise open space not conducive to cricket facilities.

 

Latham Park is a district park located in the East Ward that would most suitably cater for cricket net facilities.

 

The parks identified as providing for such cricket facilities include Heffron Park, Maroubra, Chifley Sports Reserve, Chifley and Pioneers Park, Malabar. This is in accordance with the strategic recommendations outlined in the Recreational Needs Study.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     funding for the construction of cricket nets in Latham Park, Maroubra, be considered in the Draft 2010-11 budget for Council’s consideration

 

b)     the upgrades of Heffron Park and Chifley Sports Reserve include provision for cricket nets.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Latham park - proposed location of cricket net facilities

 

 

 

 

 


Latham park - proposed location of cricket net facilities

Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee

10 November 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W36/09

 

 

Subject:                  Migrant Hostel Site Subdivision

Folder No:                   F2006/00582

Author:                   Barbara Todes, Manager Library Services     

 

Introduction

 

Council at its Works Committee meeting of 9 June 2009, resolved (Mayor, Cr B Notley-Smith/Tracey) that:

 

a)     Mirvac, in consultation with our City Library Historian, come up with a list of names that are appropriate for this site, including names related to post war immigration; and

 

b)     this list of names be brought back to Council for consideration.

 

Issues

 

The Local Studies Librarian liaised with a representative from the developer, Mirvac, regarding appropriate street names for the former Endeavour Hostel site, 88–102 Moverly Road, South Coogee. Following detailed discussions and investigations, the following street names have been recommended:

 

Renford – “King of the Channel” Maroubra resident Des Renford crossed the Cronulla channel 19 times and was crowned King of the Channel in 1976.

 

Cameron – Senator for NSW Doug Cameron spent his first 12 months in Australia at the Endeavour Hostel.

 

Albi – One of the two overseas sister cities, Randwick’s relationship with "Albi" (France) was established around the same time that the hostel was built.

 

Macdili – The name of the ship carrying the East Timorese refugees who arrived at Endeavour hostel in 1975.

 

Snedden – The Minister for Labour and National Service, Mr B. M Snedden, officially opened the Hostel.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 7:       Heritage that is protected and celebrated

Direction 7a:      Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated     

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Following extensive research and consultation, a list of street names has been suggested for the new development on the former Endeavour Hostel site, 88-102 Moverly Road, South Coogee, for Council’s approval. The names selected, namely Renford, Cameron, Albi, Macdili and Snedden, all have historical relevance to the site.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council approve the following names for use in the Endeavour Hostel subdivision, 88-102 Moverly Road, South Coogee -  Renford, Cameron, Albi, Macdili and Snedden.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee

10 November 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W37/09

 

 

Subject:                  Young Driver Education Programme

Folder No:                   F2009/00390

Author:                   Avril Jeans, Project Officer; Heidi Leadley, Community Road Safety Officer       

 

Introduction

 

Council’s Road Safety Officer and Community Project Officer (Youth) have identified a gap in service provision to young people who have been negatively impacted by the introduction of the Graduated Licencing Scheme requirement to complete 120 hours of supervised driving practice prior to being eligible to sit for their provisional drivers licence.

 

This gap has been addressed by other councils through a variety of programs including:

 

·       Drivin’ for Employment - City of Sydney. Assisting unemployed young people living in the City of Sydney to gain their learners and provisional driver’s licenses

·       Macarthur Young Drivers Assistance Program (MYDAP) An assistance scheme developed to provide access to vital resources for disadvantaged young people in the Macarthur area as they attempt to gain their drivers licence.

 

It is proposed that Randwick City Council offer funds and support to the Shack Youth Services to undertake a program that learns from the experiences of other councils and utilises some of the successful strategies of other programs.

 

 

 

Issues

 

The Randwick City Council Young Drivers Assistance Program will support young disadvantaged people to gain their learners permit and complete some of their log book hours with a professional driving school.  The program will be administered by the Shack Youth Services who will identify up to 10 young people and provide:

 

·       One on one sessions with a case worker to gain their learner’s permit,

·       Referral to Kingsford Legal Centre for problems with fines etc where necessary

·       Identification of literacy problems and referral to literacy programs where necessary

·       Vouchers for paid professional driving lessons

·       Workshops on safety

·       Presentations about alcohol and other drugs

·       Information sessions for supervising drivers (parents).

 

It is expected that participants and the community will benefit by:

 

·       Overcoming barriers to gaining a provisional drivers licence

·       Assisting young people to be better drivers

·       Increasing awareness of safety and reducing dangerous behaviours

·       Gaining a better understanding of the effects of alcohol & drugs while driving and the implications of current road rules and relevant laws.

·       Reinforcing the benefits gained through completing the 120 hours of driving experience

·       Greater community awareness of the importance of quality driver instruction and the log book requirement.

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A liveable City.

Direction 6c:      The safety of our community is paramount and is acknowledged and supported through proactive policies, programmes and strategies.

Outcome 2:       A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2b:      Enrich our range of community services that meet our community’s needs.

Direction 2c:      Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost to Council will be $5,000.  These funds will come from the current Road Safety Program 2009–10.

 

Conclusion

 

The Young Driver Education Program will provide an opportunity to assist our disadvantaged young people to be better, safer drivers. It will also create an opportunity to develop greater community awareness of the importance of quality driver instruction and will provide a cornerstone activity to build community safety awareness.

 

The proposed activities will provide continued visibility of Council’s commitment to enriching our range of community services and fostering a safer city.

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted and publicity relating to the program acknowledge Randwick City Council by displaying its logo.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee

10 November 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W38/09

 

 

Subject:                  Farnham Avenue, Randwick - Proposed Footpath - Petition

Folder No:                   F2006/00028

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Co-ordinator Engineering Services     

 

Introduction

 

Council has received a petition from residents of Farnham Avenue, Randwick. The petition relates to the proposed construction of a new footpath on both sides of Farnham Avenue as part of the 2009-10 Capital Works Program.

 

Issues

 

The construction of a new concrete footpath along Farnham Avenue, Randwick was identified as part of Council’s objective to construct footpaths along all streets. The footpath construction was placed in the 2009-10 Capital Works Program.  When planning the construction works, we sent a letter to residents advising them of the proposed work.  This notification was done in July 2009.

 

Farnham Avenue is a cul-de-sac off Alison Road.  There are 21 property addresses in Farnham Avenue and a property that shares a side boundary in Farnham Avenue. See the attached aerial photograph and proposed footpath.

 

The traffic volumes along Farnham Avenue are low. The existing footway is grass nature strip.  The overall condition of the footway is good.

 

Nature of Objections

The petition is supported by the owners representing 7 properties. The grounds for the objection are:

 

·           Previous objection to similar proposals.

·           A concrete footpath would increase overland flow and create greater impact to properties at the bottom of Farnham Avenue.

·           The nature strip is well maintained. Council assisted with planting of trees to improve the streetscape.

·           It is considered that a concrete footpath would have to be constructed with steps thus making access more difficult for mobility impaired persons or parents with prams.

·           If a path was to be constructed, it should be limited to the northern side only.

 

Assessment

Farnham Avenue is not a major pedestrian thoroughfare and is not along a pedestrian desired path.  A concrete footpath would benefit the residents and visitors of Farnham Avenue. 

 

Farnham Avenue has footpaths that drain to the kerb and gutter.  A concrete footpath would not significantly increase the overland flow and would have minimal impact on drainage.

 

Concrete footpaths provide a more appropriate surface for mobility, wet weather and steeper ground than grass.  It is considered that a concrete footpath be constructed on at least 1 side of the street to provide this access.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:        A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:       Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

Key Action:         Assets are managed strategically to deliver intergenerational equity and to meet Council’s obligation as the custodian of our community’s assets.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Construction of the concrete footpath along both sides of Farnham Avenue, Randwick is in the 2009-10 Capital Works program.

 

Conclusion

 

The objections received to the proposed construction of a concrete footpath along Farnham Avenue represent less than half the properties along the street.  Whilst the objections include points for not proceeding with the proposal, there appears to be some support for the project with the remaining owners/residents of Farnham Avenue.

 

On this basis, it is proposed that a concrete footpath be constructed on the northern side only to provide a suitable footpath surface along the street.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the proposed concrete footpath in Farnham Avenue, Randwick, as listed in the 2009-10 Capital Works program, be constructed on the northern side of Farnham Avenue.

 

b)     the savings be directed to footpath works in East Ward.

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Proposed footpath in Farnham Avenue, Randwick

 

 

 

 

 


Proposed footpath in Farnham Avenue, Randwick

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Works Committee

10 November 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W39/09

 

 

Subject:                  Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee - Proposed Footpath - Petition

Folder No:                   F2006/00028

Author:                   Joe Ingegneri, Co-ordinator Engineering Services     

 

Introduction

 

Council has received several letters and 2 petitions from residents of Edgecumbe Avenue and residents whose properties back onto Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee. The letters and petitions relate to the proposed construction of a new footpath on both sides of Edgecumbe Avenue as part of the 2009-10 Capital Works Program.

 

Issues

 

The construction of a new concrete footpath along Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee was identified as part of Council’s objective to construct footpaths along all streets.  The footpath construction was included in the 2009-10 Capital Works Program. When planning the construction works, we sent a letter to residents advising them of the proposed work.  This notification was delivered in July 2009.

 

Edgecumbe Avenue is a cul-de-sac off Dudley Street with 2 property addresses. See the attached aerial photograph and proposed footpath in Attachment A. A large apartment block with 32 units is located at the end of the street at 4-8 Edgecumbe Avenue.  The other property is at 5 Edgecumbe Avenue.  There are also 4 properties located along Brook Street that back onto Edgecumbe Avenue and another property located on Dudley Street with a side boundary along Edgecumbe Avenue. 

 

The traffic volumes along Edgecumbe Avenue are low. The existing footway is part grass nature strip, part landscaped area and part clay pavers.  The overall condition of each type of surface is good.

 

Nature of Objections

Council has received 2 petitions and 4 letters objecting to the construction of the footpath.  Each of the letter writers also signed 1 or both petitions. Overall, there are 9 properties represented in the letters and petitions received. The grounds for this objection are:

 

·           Privacy – vicinity of new footpath to property frontages

·           Safety – vehicles reversing across vehicular entrances do not have adequate site distance.

·           Undesirable activity – attraction of young scooter and bicycle riders.

·           Aesthetics – Nature strip is well maintained and concern regarding the removal of trees.

·           Need – considered that the pedestrian demand is along the access between the end of Edgecumbe Avenue and Brook Street and that rest of Edgecumbe Avenue has low pedestrian volumes.  On this basis, the expenditure is not warranted.


Assessment

Edgecumbe Avenue is not a major pedestrian thoroughfare.  However, it is considered that the units at the end of the street would generate moderate pedestrian traffic. Whilst a study has not been conducted, it is considered that the main pedestrian destination would be to Brook Street and subsequently to Coogee.

 

There is a parcel of land next to 144 Brook Street approximately 1.1m wide that runs between the end of Edgecumbe Avenue and Brook Street.  This land is owned by the NSW Department of Lands and provides pedestrian access between Edgecumbe Avenue and Brook Street.  The access provides a shorter route to Brook Street for pedestrians walking form further south and west of Edgecumbe Avenue. 

 

The footway on the western side of Edgecumbe Avenue was partially paved along the frontage of the units.  It is considered that a concrete footpath be constructed on the western side of Edgecumbe Avenue from this paved areas to Dudley Street to complete the link.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:        A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:       Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

Key Action:         Assets are managed strategically to deliver intergenerational equity and to meet Council’s obligation as the custodian of our community’s assets.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Construction of the concrete footpath along both sides of Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee is in the 2009-10 Capital Works program.

 

Conclusion

 

The objections received to the proposed construction of a concrete footpath along Edgecumbe Avenue do not represent the majority of properties.  Whilst the main points supporting the objection relate to privacy and safety, they are no different than at other locations throughout the city where concrete footpaths exist.

 

Edgecumbe Avenue is located along an apparent desire path to Coogee.  Pedestrians can use the access between Edgecumbe Avenue and Brook Street.  On this basis, it is proposed that a concrete footpath be constructed on the western side of Edgecumbe Avenue from Dudley Street to the existing paved footpath.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That:

 

a)     the proposed concrete footpath in Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee, as listed in the 2009-10 Capital Works program, be constructed on the western side of the street between Dudley Street and the existing paved footpath.

 

b)     the savings be directed to footpath improvement works in East Ward.

 

 

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Proposed footpath in Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee

 

 

 

 

 


Proposed footpath in Edgecumbe Avenue, Coogee

Attachment 1

 

 

 


 


Works Committee

10 November 2009

 

 

 

Works Report No. W40/09

 

 

Subject:                  Tree Removal - Outside 3 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 5 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, has written to Council detailing a variety of damages issues associated with the roots of a large Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the footpath outside 3 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington.

 

This correspondence includes a series of photographs that clearly show Ficus ‘Hillii’ tree roots growing between the wall and paintwork in the front bedroom of that property. This damage was verified by Council’s Tree Gang during recent trenching operations undertaken to assess tree root damage/intrusion.

 

Issues

 

The owners of 3, 5 and 7 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, first wrote to Council on 2 July 2006 requesting the removal of this particular street tree but this was not undertaken because several trees of the same species had been removed from the street around that same time.

 

The subject tree is approximately twelve metres in height with a canopy spread of around 20 metres. The tree is in good health and contributes significantly to the northern section of the Inglethorpe Avenue streetscape.  The tree not only provides habitat and food source for a variety of native birdlife and other fauna but attached photographs demonstrate that it provides important habitat for local children – i.e., there is a tree house in the canopy.  The tree has to be regularly pruned away from the overhead electricity mains to maintain statutory clearances, as well as periodically having to be pruned back from the adjacent residence.

 

Over the past decade the adjacent footpath has had to be repaired because of tree root damage and roots have now damaged the nearby kerb and gutter. Council’s Tree Gang has severed roots growing into both adjacent properties on several occasions but roots are so widespread and extensive that they are now pushing off the paint in the front bedroom at 5 Inglethorpe Avenue.  Council’s Tree Gang recently trenched along the frontage of this particular property and this revealed a number of large tree roots undermining and entering both properties at 3 and 5 Inglethorpe Avenue.

 

A report provided by Council’s Tree Gang clearly indicates that tree root damage is extensive and that the amount of root material required to be removed to deal with this damage would be extreme.  The report, in fact, highlights the fact that it would not be feasible to remove the amount of damaging tree root material required without affecting the health and long-term viability of the subject tree.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Financial impact statement

 

It is estimated that the removal of this tree and its replacement with a super-advanced alternative species will cost in the vicinity of $2,500. The required funds would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

This large street tree is an important visual component of the streetscape of Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington. It is also an important provider of habitat and food source for a variety of native birdlife and other fauna.

 

The tree is estimated to be at least sixty years old and up until this point every effort has been made to retain it, despite the fact that tree root damage has progressively increased in both frequency and severity.

 

The subject tree has been assessed as having high scenic amenity value and with providing important habitat and food source for a variety of fauna. Because of the damage being caused by its roots, the impact of removal on land degradation would be negligible.  Using Australian Standard ASDR99307 it has been calculated that the tree has an amenity value of $8,100. This relatively low amount is primarily due to its inappropriateness as a street tree specimen in the long-term and the fact that its roots are now causing serious and increasing damage to both private property and public infrastructure which is impacting directly on the lives of both adjacent property owners.  It has been calculated that the tree has a moderate hazard rating but this will increase as the tree ages and the impact of regular root pruning begins to become evident as the tree progressively declines in health.

 

Because of the size and amount of root material required to be removed to abate the range of damage now being caused by this tree, root pruning would be required to be both severe and excessive.  The permissible area allowable for any root pruning operation is calculated by deducting the critical root zone area from the total primary root zone area and converting that figure to a percentage.  Accepted industry practise dictates that root pruning is only ever to be undertaken where the total amount to be root pruned on any tree is determined to be less than twenty (20) percent of the primary root zone area.  To negate the damage being caused by the roots of this particular tree would involve the removal of approximately thirty-four (34) percent of the tree’s primary root zone area and this makes root pruning an unviable and unsafe option.

 

The only feasible long-term management option would be to remove this tree and to replace it with a more appropriate tree species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.  To retain the tree any longer will mean that the damage being caused to private property in particular is likely to increase quite sharply and this will inevitably cost Council a larger amount to deal with. Any such measures would only be a temporary solution, as it is impossible to sever the roots required to completely abate tree root damage. Because this species of tree does not represent at least fifty percent of total vegetative canopy cover within Inglethorpe Avenue its removal/replacement will not contravene Council’s resolution that “no more than five percent of Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) street trees be removed in any twelve-month period from streets where there are designated significant plantings of this species”.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 3 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington, be removed and replaced with a more appropriate species – as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the importance of the subject tree in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by the tree's roots.

 

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the importance of the subject tree in the streetscape and the range of damage being caused to both public infrastructure and private property by the tree's roots.

Attachment 1

 

 

Photograph showing significance of tree in Inglethorpe Avenue streetscape

 

Tree is being utilised by inventive local children as a ‘home away from home’

Tree roots have been severed in the past to minimise damage to driveway/footpath

 

Property frontage outside 3 Inglethorpe Avenue prior to Council trenching

Section of footpath required to be removed to assess tree root damage/intrusion

 

Ficus ‘Hillii’ root re-growth growing into 3 Inglethorpe Avenue, Kensington

Fig tree roots running along footpath area and into 5 Inglethorpe Avenue

 

Small roots running under fence at boundary between Nos 3 and 5

Several large roots wrapped around Telstra service wires and stormwater pipes

 

Root re-growth growing into both 3 and 5 Inglethorpe Avenue properties