Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 11 November 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

 

4 November 2008

 

 

Works Committee Meeting

 

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 11 November 2008 at 6:30 p.m.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, B Notley-Smith, Andrews (Chairperson), Belleli (Deputy Chairperson), Bowen, Hughes, Matson, Matthews, Nash, Procopiadis, Seng, Smith, Stevenson, Tracey, White & Woodsmith

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members.

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

Works Committee Meeting - 12 August 2008

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Works Reports

W20/08     Council - owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) outside 40 - 44 Hooper Street, Randwick

W21/08     Council - owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) growing adjacent to 51 Hannan Street, Maroubra

W22/08     Council - owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) growing outside 8 Helena Street, Randwick

W23/08     Dealing with Graffiti on Electrial Sub Stations Throughout Randwick City

W24/08     Des Renford Aquatic Centre - Filtration Upgrade

W25/08     Barriers Erected by Public Utility Providers

W26/08     Request for Alcohol Ban in Bieler Park, Randwick    

 

Closed Session

Nil

Notices of Rescission Motions

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W20/08

 

 

Subject:                  Council - owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) outside 40 - 44 Hooper Street, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

Council has approved a Development Application at 44 Hooper Street, Randwick, which includes the construction of a three-metre wide crossover and driveway into the property. The construction of the driveway will involve the severing of an extremely large tree root from a Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing adjacent to where the driveway is to be installed.

 

In conjunction with this, Council’s footpath maintenance gang has had to remove a large section of damaged footpath outside 40-42 Hooper Street, Randwick, which has revealed that a very large tree root from the same tree is responsible for the damage to the footpath. 

 

Issues

 

The tree concerned is in very good health and is approximately 18 metres tall with a canopy spread of between 18-20 metres. Although the tree is one of only two of this species growing along the north side of this section of Hooper Street, its good health and size make it very significant within the street.

 

The tree is growing immediately adjacent to a powerpole and a series of domestic service wires and has to be regularly pruned to maintain the statutory clearances from these wires. A predominant amount of the canopy is growing on the southern side of the tree and overhangs the roadway.

 

The builders undertaking works within 44 Hooper Street have already had to remove several large tree roots to facilitate approved construction works and indications are that a number of large roots are travelling underneath the actual residence.

 

There is an absence of large street trees growing along this section of the street and its removal would cause a significant loss of amenity and wildlife habitat. This could be negated to some degree with the planting of several super-advanced tree species of a type nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

The subject tree has been assessed as having a moderate risk potential. It has also been assessed as having a medium hazard rating when issues such as failure potential, target rating and the size of any potential branch failures are considered.

 

It has been acknowledged as having significant scenic/environmental amenity and as providing important habitat/food source. Conversely, the effect of removal on soil stability/land degradation would be negligible.

 

This tree has been assessed by a Council tree officer as having an amenity value of $21,600 – using the Standards Australia AS – DR99307 valuation guide.

 

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction:           Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The total cost to remove and stump grind the subject tree and to re-instate the nature strip, footpath and surrounding infrastructure would be approximately $3,000 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

This species of tree is entirely inappropriate for growing in a confined nature strip situation such as this, immediately adjacent to brick fences, a concrete footpath and residential driveways.

 

The footpath adjacent to the tree has been severely damaged over a long period and has had to be recently removed. This has revealed a very large root from the fig tree to be responsible, which would need to be severed to allow re-instatement of the footpath.

 

Less than two years ago all major roots on the western side of this tree were severed to allow the replacement of a driveway that had been all but destroyed by tree roots.

 

As stated previously, Council has approved a range of development works at 44 Hooper Street, Randwick, including the construction of a concrete driveway that will also require the severing of several very large fig tree roots to allow these works to be completed.

 

The removal of all the root material required to re-instate the footpath and to construct the driveway adjacent to where the tree is situated, coupled with the fact that a number of large tree roots were only relatively recently severed on the western side of the tree, will seriously compromise the stability and long-term health of this tree.

 

This is exacerbated by the fact that the majority of the tree’s canopy is overhanging the roadway and the roots that require pruning or severing are on the opposite side of the tree.

 

Council’s Tree Gang arborist has inspected the roots of the subject tree and is of the opinion that to sever all the roots required to complete approved or required works would render the tree unstable.

 

The only effective long-term solution to dealing with the range of problems being caused by the roots of this tree would be to remove it completely and replace it with several super-advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) – as per Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

It should be pointed out that two trees of the same species were removed from the corner of Hooper Street and Carrington Road because of structural damage to an adjoining property that totalled tens of thousands of dollars.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That approval be granted to remove the large Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside 40-44 Hooper Street, Randwick, and that it be replaced with several more appropriate tree species as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Several photographs detailing the streetscape significance of the Council-owned Ficus 'Hillii' and the size and extent of tree roots that require removal

 

 

 

 

 


Several photographs detailing the streetscape significance of the Council-owned Ficus 'Hillii' and the size and extent of tree roots that require removal

Attachment 1

 

 




 


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W21/08

 

 

Subject:                  Council - owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) growing adjacent to 51 Hannan Street, Maroubra

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 51 Hannan Street, Maroubra, has written to Council requesting the removal of a mature Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street tree growing in the nature strip in Gale Road, adjacent to his property.

 

The property owner has also requested that Council “make good” with repairs to his property which he considers have been caused by the roots of this fig tree and another that was removed in August 2006.

 

Issues

 

This particular tree has been a problem for a number of years not only for Council but also for the owner of 51 Hannan Street, Maroubra, with the problems ranging from blocked and damaged sewer pipes to structural damage to the side and front fence, driveway, footpath, etc.

 

The subject tree is a very healthy, mature specimen approximately 12 meters in height with a canopy spread of 12-15 meters. It is one of a very sporadic number of this species of tree growing along Boyce Road.

 

The roots of the tree have damaged the adjacent footpath area over a number of years and several footpath slabs adjacent to where it is growing have only recently been repaired to negate an unacceptable and increasing trip hazard.

 

Within the past five years Council has removed eight trees of the same species in the immediate area – five in Gale Road, one in Boyce Road and two in Everett Street – and the owner of the property opposite this one, on the corner of Gale Road and Royal Street, regularly writes to Council detailing the range of issues associated with two trees of the same species growing adjacent to his property.

 

Specifically, a tree of the same species and similar dimensions growing just meters to the east of the tree growing adjacent to 51 Hannan Street was approved for removal by Council in August 2006 because of similar problems and damages issues.

 

The owner of the property is 97 years old and rightfully considers that he should not have to deal with the ongoing and costly damage that the roots of this tree are causing.

 

This tree has been inspected and assessed by a Council tree officer and a copy of the relevant assessment/data sheet is attached for your information. It has been assessed as having a low-medium risk potential.

 

It has also been assessed as having a moderate-medium hazard rating when issues such as failure potential, target rating and the size of any potential branch failures are considered.

 

This particular street tree has high scenic/environmental amenity and provides above average habitat and food source. The effect of removal on soil stability/land degradation would be negligible.

 

The tree has been calculated as having an amenity value of $12,150 – using the Standards Australia AS – DR99307 valuation guide.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship to the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:    Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The total cost to remove and stump grind this tree and to re-instate the damaged nature strip area would be in the vicinity of $2,000 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

The cost of any recurrent damage to private property that may have been caused by this tree and/or the one that was removed in 2006 would need to be assessed by an appropriately qualified insurance assessor.

 

Conclusion

 

This particular Council owned street tree is causing, and will continue to cause, a range of problems and infrastructure damage typical of the species.

 

The only feasible long-term method of dealing with these issues in an effective manner and of ensuring they do not continue to get worse would be to remove the subject tree and to replace it with a more appropriate species – as per Council’s Street Tree Masterplan. 

 

When a tree of the same species growing adjacent to this tree was removed in August 2006 there were three Tuckeroos planted as replacements and it is planned that two trees of the same species would be planted to replace this tree.

 

There is a large and healthy Cedrus pine growing within the front of the adjacent property that would negate to some degree the loss of important visual amenity should approval be granted to remove this tree.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council-owned Ficus microcarpa var. ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip adjacent to 51 Hannan Street, Maroubra, be removed and replaced with an appropriate number of native trees in accordance with Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the significance of the Council owned Ficus 'Hillii' in the streetscape and the damage caused to private property and recently repaired footpath slabs. Copy of the Council tree assessment / data sheet.

 

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the significance of the Council owned Ficus 'Hillii' in the streetscape and the damage caused to private property and recently repaired footpath slabs. Copy of the Council tree assessment / data sheet.

Attachment 1

 

 





 


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W22/08

 

 

Subject:                  Council - owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) growing outside 8 Helena Street, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owner of 8 Helena Street, Randwick, has once again written to Council requesting the removal of the Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside his property and for it to be replaced with a more appropriate tree species.

 

Issues

 

This tree has been root pruned a number of times over the past two decades by Council’s tree gang because of root damage that was being caused to the adjacent footpath area. Roots have also undermined the front fence of the property and have caused cracking to the entranceway inside the property.

 

Tree roots have also had to be cleared from the sewerage pipes within the property over a protracted period of time and have now travelled underneath the residence and its foundations. The tree has been pruned away from the property alignment on a number of occasions and has also regularly been pruned away from the overhead electricity mains.

 

The tree has been assessed as having a low risk potential. It has also been assessed as having a medium hazard rating when issues such as failure potential, target rating and the size of any potential branch failures are considered.

 

It has been recognised as having high scenic/environmental amenity and with providing important habitat/food source. The effect of removal on soil stability/land degradation would be negligible.

 

The tree has been calculated as having an amenity value of $16,200 – using the Standards Australia AS – DR99307 valuation guide.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:     Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The cost to remove and stump grind this tree and to replace it with a 100-litre super-advanced replacement tree would be in the vicinity of $2,500. This money would come from Council’s tree management budget.

 


Conclusion

 

The problems associated with this tree have been getting progressively worse over a period of at least ten years and a report was considered by Council in relation to its removal on 11 October, 2005.

 

At that time there was some infrastructure damage being caused by roots to the adjacent footpath, kerb and gutter and there was also some undermining of the nearby front fence. It was noted that the tree also had to be regularly pruned away from the property alignment and overhead powerlines.

 

Sewer blockages have occurred over a protracted period and these now average 3-4 per year. Although this probably indicates that the sewerage system needs upgrading.

 

Because of the prominence of this tree in the streetscape and the fact that its roots had at that time caused only relatively minor infrastructure damage to both public and private property, Council resolved in 2005 that the tree be retained until there was a more compelling case for removal.

 

This was particularly the case since two large trees of the same species had only recently been removed and stump ground in Helena Street and the removal of this particular tree would have exceeded the limit set by Council resolution that no more than five percent of canopy cover in any significant streetscape be removed in any twelve month period.

 

However, the situation has changed markedly within the past three years and the owners have written to Council requesting that because of an increase in root intrusion into their property and the damage that this has caused that Council remove the tree and effect repairs to their property.

 

The problems being experienced by the property owners are only going to get worse and if the tree is not removed it could prove to be very expensive for Council in the longer term.

 

At the very least the adjacent footpath area will need to be uplifted and any invading tree roots severed. This ongoing root pruning procedure has serious implications for the long term health and stability of this large tree species and allows the introduction of fungal pathogens into the base of these trees.

 

The only effective long-term management option in relation to this particular tree would be to remove it and replace it with a more appropriate species - as has been the case with a number of Ficus ‘Hillii’ street trees in the same street.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside 8 Helena Street, Randwick, be removed and replaced with a more appropriate species.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W23/08

 

 

Subject:                  Dealing with Graffiti on Electrial Sub Stations Throughout Randwick City

Folder No:                   F2008/00195

Author:                   Mark Bush, Manager Waste & Cleaning Services     

 

Introduction

 

At the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 26 August 2008 a motion pursuant to notice resolved (Belleli/Nash):

 

“that a report is brought to Council on dealing with graffiti on electricity sub stations through our City.”

 

Issues

 

Cleaning of graffiti on Electrical Sub Stations.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6b:      Our town centres, beaches, public places and streets are safe, inviting, clean and recognisable image of our City.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

Energy Australia’s graffiti management policy requires all customers to contact their Call Centre to lodge graffiti complaints, including Councils.

 

These requests are forwarded to Energy Australia contractors and are removed.

 

Energy Australia does not allow customers to remove the graffiti themselves as it creates Occupational Health & Safety concerns.

 

Recommendation

 

That this report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W24/08

 

 

Subject:                  Des Renford Aquatic Centre - Filtration Upgrade

Folder No:                   F2006/00110

Author:                   Reece Heddle, Manager Des Renford Aquatic Centre     

 

Introduction

 

The Des Renford Aquatic Centre (DRAC) has, over the past 8 months, had to urgently close the Competition Pool (Indoor 25 metre Pool) on two occasions and the Training Pool on one, due to the detection of bacteria - Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. Whilst the levels obtained have been extremely low, they are outside the Health Department Guidelines and action has needed to be taken.

 

Every effort has been made by the facility to eliminate this bacteria from the water, including emptying the Training Pool and chemically cleaning all areas, replacing all sand in the filters in both indoor pools, a rigorous cleaning regime, weekly super-chlorination and weekly shock dosing alternating between Sodium Monopersulfate and Potassium Monopersulfate. But despite this the NSW Department of Health has continued to obtain positive results from time to time despite the facilities own independent results being clear.

 

A consultant was engaged to review the current filtration system of all the pools within the facility. From this review, it has become clear that the facilities filtration system is not capable of maintaining Health Department Guidelines, particularly the required turn over rates of each pool. This turn over rate is directly related to the size of the filtration system and cannot be solved by changes to operating procedures.

 

The facility is now 43 years old, with the indoor sections now over 20 years old. The design of the pools and filtration system did not take into consideration the massive increase in usage, the changes in Health Department Guidelines and are all still in original configuration, with only minor alterations over this time.

 

Issues

 

The Training pool will continue to struggle to maintain guidelines and provide the service to the community under the current filtration system. The public usage of this pool has exceeded expectations of the original design and subsequently the filtration system struggles to maintain Health Department Guidelines. The facility management has introduced stringent operating systems, such as backwashing each filter twice daily, to maintain these guidelines however, the system is not capable of the turnover rates required. Major renovation of this pool is required to ensure the facility is able to easily maintain the guidelines.

 

The Competition Pool is capable of achieving the guidelines with some modifications. The major issue is the lack of dedicated balance tank, as the system currently utilizes the scum gutters for this function. The Competition Pool surrounds may also add to the possibility of contamination as the current ‘fall’ is towards the scum gutters; allowing extra contaminates to enter the system.

 

The Outdoor pools are predominately in originally condition. The system is still operating well however, needs a number of improvements to maintain the current guidelines. The turnover rates and chemical levels of the two smaller pools can be vastly improved if they are placed on a separate filtration system.

 

The facility is currently operating outside the Health Department Guidelines and is incapable of achieving the turn over rates required. New guidelines are anticipated to be introduced in 2009 which will increase the pressure further on the facility. If the facility continues to obtain positive bacterial results, there is a real chance that the Health Department will shut the facility down until some action to resolve the issue is taken.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:       Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction 5b:      A range of cultural, sporting and leisure activities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Should Council accept the recommendation, the financial implication to Council is $2million dollars of capital expenditure.

 

Conclusion

 

An upgrade to the filtration system at Des Renford Aquatic Centre is imperative to ensure the ongoing operation of the facility. There is a daily threat of closure of the facility as it is not capable of maintaining the turnover rates required by the Department of Health’s Guidelines. The facility current attracts over 450,000 visits per annum and is a well utilised community asset, still in its original condition and utilised outside its maximum design.

 

After reviewing the filtration system of Des Renford Aquatic Centre, the following is considered necessary to ensure ongoing operation of the facility:

 

1.         Training Pool

 

Due to the vast number of improvements required to increase turn over rates and maintain the Health Department Guidelines, it is my opinion that it would be cheaper and more efficient to rebuild the entire structure and system. To maintain the same temperature, usage demographic and maintain Health Department Guidelines, this new system would need to include:

 

a)   A DE filtration system or similar

b)   Increased pump capacity and associated pipe work

c)   UV System

d)   Free chlorine chemical controller system

e)   Increase Balance tank volume and suitable screening

f)    Increase scum gutter size for increased volume and flow rate

g)   Two return lines to reduce possible dead spots located in the pool.

 

The estimated cost is approximately $950,000.

 

2.         Competition Pool

 

The system is predominately sound. However the following recommendations are required to ensure ongoing compliance with Health Department Guidelines:

 

a)   Install sufficient volume balance tank (100,000Ltrs) – possibly at Southern end of the pool

b)   Install pre-pump strainers

c)   Raise the edge of the pool and create a ‘fall away’ drainage system. (reducing possibility of contamination)

d)   Reconfigure inlet manifold system to improve operations

e)   Free Chlorine chemical controller system

f)    Resurface Pool interior.

 

The estimate cost is approximately $500,000.

 

3.         Outdoor Pools

 

The system, despite its age, is still very sound. However, operating all three outdoor pools off the same filtration system increases the possibility of cross contamination and the lower volume pools require increased turnover rates as per the Health Department Guidelines.

 

a)   Separate filtration for outdoor pools - separate the Wadding & Toddler pool from the 50 metre pool

b)   Remove cast iron multiport valve and install automatic backwash system

c)   Remove concrete filter system and replace with high rate sand filters

d)   Install adjustable return nozzles to balance flow across entire pool.

 

The estimate cost is approximately $550,000.

 

NOTE:  All estimates are based on ‘best estimate’ available at the time of compiling this report.

 

Recommendation

 

That Council consider the upgrade of the Des Renford Aquatic Centre filtration system at a cost of $2 million dollars in the 2009/2010 budget.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W25/08

 

 

Subject:                  Barriers Erected by Public Utility Providers

Folder No:                   F2007/00247

Author:                   Peter Stone, Manager Infrastructure Services     

 

Introduction

 

An ongoing issue is that public utility providers (including telecommunication companies) leave barricades (and other safety devices) on damaged infrastructure for a considerable time.  Their repair of damage is often delayed.

 

Issues

 

The barriers placed by public utility providers present duty of care concerns for Council.

 

The placement of barricades by public utility providers cannot be legally controlled by Council. However, in order to satisfy its duty of care, Council often places its own safety devices to protect the public from hurting themselves.

 

The process followed is:

 

1.     The damaged infrastructure/utility is reported by customer to Council’s Call Centre or by a Public Place Officer or other Council person.

2.     Information is then placed in Council’s customer request system (CRM).

3.     Depot staff contact the relevant public utility provider and record, on the CRM, the event number issued by the public utility.

4.     The customer is then notified of the information by post.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 6:       A Liveable City.

Direction 6a:      Our public assets are planned, managed and funded to meet the community expectations and defined levels of service.

 

Financial Impact

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

That Council continues with the practice of: identifying damaged public utility infrastructure, providing safety management devices.  However, lobbying the “Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy” to seek improvements on the matter.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Mayor seek a meeting with the Federal “Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy” and deal with this matter.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Works Committee

11 November 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W26/08

 

 

Subject:                  Request for Alcohol Ban in Bieler Park, Randwick

Folder No:                   F2005/00873

Author:                   Kerry Colquhoun, Acting Co-ordinator Parks and Recreation     

 

Introduction

 

The purpose of this report is to propose that an alcohol ban be enforced at Bieler Park, Randwick. This report describes the reasons for the proposal and confirms Council’s ability to ban alcohol in parks.

 

Council has received representations from a resident of Gilderthorpe Avenue, Randwick, requesting an alcohol ban within Bieler Park. According to the resident, people regularly consume alcohol within Bieler Park, adjacent to the children’s playground. The drinkers allegedly become increasingly intoxicated and undertake inappropriate behaviour.

 

Legislation allows Council to resolve to ban the consumption of alcohol in any Council owned park/reserve. Council can resolve to place a full ban on alcohol or may ban alcohol from sunset to sunrise only. It is generally considered reasonable to ban alcohol from sunset to sunrise in parks which have picnic facilities and/or sports fields, while other parks may have a full alcohol ban. In the case of Bieler Park, a full ban seems most appropriate.

 

Issues

 

The consumption of alcohol in a public place and the resultant antisocial behaviour is an ongoing concern within the community. However, Council officers believe that the prohibition of alcohol within public places should be selective and carefully considered, as it restricts people’s rights. The punitive reinforcement of the ban is also very difficult with only limited Police resources to control the activity.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2:           A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2c:        Strong partnerships between Council, community groups and government agencies.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The request received, to ban alcohol in Bieler Park, is supported by evidence provided by nearby residents. Therefore, it is appropriate to ban the consumption of alcohol at this park. 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That a full ban be placed on the consumption of alcohol in Bieler Park and that the appropriate signage is installed.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Location Map of Bieler Park

 

 

 

 

 


Location Map of Bieler Park

Attachment 1