Environment Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 12 August 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee

12 August 2008

 

 

 

 

5 August 2008

 

 

Environment Committee Meeting

 

 

Notice is hereby given that an Environment Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 12 August 2008 at 6:30pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, B Notley-Smith, Belleli, Hughes, Kenny, Matson (Chairperson), Nash (Deputy Chairperson), Tracey, White, Woodsmith.

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members.

 

NOTE:    At the extraordinary meeting held on 22 May 2007, the Council resolved that the Environment Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

 

Environment Committee Meeting - 8 July 2008

 

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

 

Urgent Business

Greening Randwick Reports

Nil

Environment Reports

E19/08      Prince Henry Sustainability Audit

E20/08      Rebates to Randwick Residents for Rainwater Tanks and Greywater Systems

E21/08      Summary of Grants and Awards received by Council's Sustaining our City Initiative, 2005-2008    

 

Notice of Rescission Motions

Nil 

 

 

Closed Session

 

Nil

 

Notices of Rescission Motions

 

Nil

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Environment Committee

12 August 2008

 

 

 

Environment Report No. E19/08

 

 

Subject:                  Prince Henry Sustainability Audit

Folder No:                   F2004/07970

Author:                   Karen Armstrong, Manager Strategic Planning     

 

Introduction

 

Council resolved on 27 May 2008, that:

 

Council’s Environment Committee considers Ms Newman’s request for:

 

a)     An update on whether the Vision for a new Village (Prince Henry) is being achieved;

b)     An audit of the sustainability objectives of the Prince Henry site plans (original and the amended) be undertaken; and

 

Appropriate community consultation with the La Perouse Precinct Committee form part of this process.

 

This report explains the vision for the site and provides an audit of the sustainability objectives of the Prince Henry development controls and subsequent development applications, as a basis for consultation with the La Perouse Precinct Committee.

 

Issues

 

Background and vision for the Prince Henry site

The Prince Henry site comprises 83.9 ha, of which 33.85 ha is being redeveloped for a mix of residential, commercial, community and recreation uses, and the remainder is occupied by the Coast Golf Course. The site retains 19 buildings of high/ exceptional heritage significance along with a range of aboriginal heritage sites, remnant and threatened bush land, wetlands, creeks and the Little Bay Beach.

 

The key planning instruments for developing the Prince Henry site are the Randwick local Environmental Plan (LEP) and the Prince Henry Development Control Plan (DCP). The DCP incorporates the original adopted masterplan (and subsequent amendments) that established the framework for the land uses, development and conservation of the site.

 

The vision for the site is identified in the DCPs objectives (see Section 1.4) and ‘desired future character’ statement (see S. 2.10). This includes environmental and water sensitive urban design, heritage and landscape conservation, environmentally sustainable development and a mix of residential, community and open space land uses.

 

Landcom has also released information through out the planning and development phases, referring to their vision to transform the site into ‘a new village’, and this concept has been contained in early brochures (see attachment 1 – 2001 Vision Document) and through the masterplan and amendments.

 

State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) BASIX, progressively introduced since June 2004, is the key State Government policy now guiding the sustainability outcomes.

 

This State Policy applies across NSW and sets common sustainability targets for residential development. The BASIX SEPP notes that ‘competing provisions’ in other environmental planning instruments (LEPs or DCPs) are of no effect when they aim to reduce water consumption, reduce emissions of greenhouse gases or improve the thermal performance of buildings that are assessed under the SEPP.

 

a) Audit of planning framework

The original masterplan was adopted in November 2001, subject to variations, and has had 4 subsequent amendments, all approved and all subject to variations. These are outlined and described in Attachment 2 and provide an understanding of changes made over time and how these may have affected the vision and outcomes for the site.

 

An LEP and DCP was prepared in 2004. The LEP rezoned the site from Special Uses to a mix of residential, public open space and environmental protection zones, to reflect the redevelopment proposal for the site and to ensure conservation of the natural and built heritage environment. The DCP set out the more detailed planning provisions than the LEP. Subsequent masterplan amendments are incorporated into the DCP for this site.

 

Attachment 3 lists and maps the status of dwelling approvals on the site today. With subsequent masterplan amendments, the dwelling estimates have reduced from approximately 930 dwellings in the original adopted masterplan to 814.  To date, 634 dwellings have been approved.  

 

b) Audit of Sustainability Principles and Objectives

This audit is based on the Prince Henry DCP key sustainability principles (Section 2.9) and the objectives in Part 5 - Sustainable Design and, where relevant, the BASIX SEPP.

 

The key sustainability elements to be considered are:

 

·      energy and greenhouse

·      total water cycle management

·      waste management and minimisation

·      design, heritage and landscape conservation

·      community services, and

·      environmental education

 

c) Energy and Greenhouse (Section 5.1 and 5.3 of DCP)

The DCP objectives, in summary, are to minimise the demand on non-renewable energy resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions; incorporate energy efficient design into buildings; promote renewable energy technologies and products; and use natural climate elements such as breezes, aspect, to minimise energy demands.

 

Response to objectives:

The BASIX SEPP measures override Council’s DCP in relation to residential development. The SEPP applies to all new single dwellings and semis, alterations and additions over $50,000 and multi-unit housing.

 

The BASIX energy reduction targets (on average NSW residential use) are:

 

·      New single dwellings and semis’ – 40%

·      3 storey multi-unit – 35%

·      4 and 5 storey – 30%

 

BASIX requires that all residential development must obtain a BASIX certificate and meet these targets prior to lodging the DA with Council.

For other development, the DCP provisions apply and a Sustainable Building Report (SBR) is required for:

 

·      Existing heritage buildings and structures

·      Community Centre

·      All new multi-unit and mixed use development (pre BASIX)

 

Attachment 4 lists the DAs approved for the site and those with a BASIX certificate or a SBR.

 

Development across the site has thus met the requirements for energy efficiency and reduction in greenhouse impacts.

 

d) Total water cycle management (Section 5.2)

The DCP objectives, in summary, are to reduce consumption of potable water; maximise the use of community based stormwater harvesting and detention; use rainwater tanks; and improve stormwater quality.

 

Response to objectives:

 

Grey Water

Water sensitive measures are being provided within the Prince Henry development area. 5 of the 8 grey water recycling systems now installed in Randwick City are on the Prince Henry site:

 

·      2-8 Jenner St (New Apartment buildings)

·      10-16 Jenner St (New Apartment buildings)

·      50 Jenner St (Adaptive reuse of Pathology Building)

·      1 Pavilion Dr (Adaptive reuse of Matron Dickson Building)

·      7-11 Brodie St (New aged care facility)

 

Water Sensitive Urban Design

A Total Water Cycle Strategy (TWCS) has been prepared for the whole Prince Henry site to capture and reuse storm and rain water. The Strategy, and the other water sensitive urban design initiatives across the site, won Council the 2003 NSW Sustainable Water Challenge.

 

The Deed of Agreement Council signed with Landcom in March 2005 emphasises that the storm water management and reuse systems installed in accordance with the TWCS are in a ‘good and working state’ prior to dedication to Council.

 

For each allotment and all development applications must demonstrate how they are consistent with this strategy (excluding dwelling houses). Following the introduction of BASIX, development needs to provide a BASIX Certificate. All development within the Prince Henry Site has complied with the requirements, being a 40% reduction in water use on the average residential rate in NSW.

 

Bio-retention Swales

Swales specifically designed and installed for the treatment of stormwater / improvement of water quality have been constructed in the following areas:

 

·      Reserve near Jennifer Street (McCartney Oval)

·      The Coast Golf Club, along the western edge of the 7th fairway

·      Common Boundary Prince Henry Community Centre and The Coast Golf Club

 


Irrigation Pond

An irrigation pond has been constructed for stormwater and rainwater harvesting for reuse as irrigation water, on the eastern edge of the 7th fairway (capacity of approx. 3 mega litres). This pond will be the primary source of irrigation water for reserves and certain community association land/trust land within the Prince Henry site.

 

Buffer Zones

Landscaped buffer zones have been created to the west of the 7th fairway bio-retention swales and on the southern side of the 10th fairway and watercourse running through the fairway, (i.e. separating development site and the watercourse draining through the 10th fairway).

 

Watercourse Improvements and Beach Remediation / Clean up.

The water course draining through the 10th fairway has had waste products removed from embankments, general erosion control measures installed, new overbridge positioned and a general clean up undertaken.

 

Little Bay Beach is to be cleared of waste building products and general litter/waste prior to dedication to Council.

 

General Stormwater Principles

Wherever possible stormwater has been discharged to bio-retention swales and/or storage ponds within the golf course land. The stormwater runoff is therefore being treated to improve stormwater quality and made available for reuse for irrigation of the golf course, reserves, landscape areas in Anzac Parade and certain community association/Prince Henry Trust land.

 

All developments have provided sediment / silt arrestor pits within the individual sites prior to the discharge of stormwater external to the site.

 

All areas draining to Anzac Parade discharge through an onsite stormwater detention basin. This minimises the potential impact of stormwater discharge on sites downstream from the development site and reduces potential for erosion together with stormwater inundation of property.

 

e) Waste management and minimisation (Section 5.4)

The DCP objectives, in summary, are to encourage waste minimisation, recycling and reuse onsite.

 

Response to objectives:

 

A waste management plan must be submitted with each DA for the site, consistent with the NSW better practice guide.

 

Landcom has indicated that building construction waste to landfill will be reduced by 85% across the site, through avoidance, reuse and recycling strategies. Conservation of the 19 heritage buildings onsite provides for waste minimisation through reduced demolition waste and reduced demand for new building materials on-site

 

Demolition and civil works on-site are also expected to achieve 95% reuse and recycling (after hazardous materials). 

 

f) Heritage and landscape conservation (Sections 2.5, 2.6, 2.7)

The DCP objectives, in summary, are to conserve the significant heritage and landscape elements of the site, while adapting them for suitable re-use.

 

Response to objectives:

Heritage conservation is directed by the Conservation Management Plan and Specific Elements Conservation Policies. These have been prepared by a suitable heritage expert, GML, and provide the basis for detailed design.

A total of 19 heritage buildings are proposed to be retained on-site.  These include former hospital wards, operating theatres and nurses’ accommodation.  They are being adaptively reused for housing and community group accommodation.  Adaptive reuse of existing buildings supports sustainability through reduced demolition waste and fewer materials used for construction of new buildings. 

The site is listed on the State Heritage Register (following nomination by Landcom), recognising its significant buildings, Eastern Suburbs Banksia scrub, the Little Bay Geological site, and Aboriginal and archaeological elements.

 

Certain areas within the Prince Henry Development Site have been quarantined from development and zoned ‘Environment Protection’. These include 4 areas containing Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub and/or Remnant Vegetation and the geological/ Ochre Site on Gubbuteh Road.

 

A Bushland Management Plan was prepared and adopted in 2003 to ensure their conservation and actions include weeding, erosion control, fencing, ecological burns and mulching.

 

g) Community Services and Transport

The DCP objectives, in summary, are to integrate the site with the surrounding community and to provide for community uses and services on-site.

 

Response to objectives:

 

The redevelopment includes public access and facilities as follows:

 

·      Public beach, toilets and stairs

·      Community Cultural Centre – including auditorium, meeting rooms, public parking and café

·      Public parks

·      Community spaces

·      Local shops

·      Proposed bus route and facilities within the site

·      On and off street parking

·      Cycle and pathways and bike facilities

·      8 affordable housing units

 

Existing community groups using the hospital site prior to redevelopment have been catered for on the site in upgraded or new facilities.

 

The community centre of approximately 1500 sq meters is currently being constructed on-site to Council’s specifications for outstanding environmental, social and economic sustainability both in design and practice. A Building Sustainability Report (BSR) was prepared, noting the energy and water saving measures and leading ESD design features, including the ‘green roof’ incorporated into the total water cycle management process for the site.  The BSR forms Attachment 5 .

 

h) Environmental education (Section 5.5)

The DCP objectives, in summary, include the education of residents on the sustainability features of the development and encourage use of water and energy efficient features.

Response to objectives:

Landcom has advised that, in accordance with these objectives, it is providing each owner with an Eco Package and a new Q&A section on the Prince Henry website allows owners to ask the Sustainability Officer questions about their home. The information is passed from Landcom, through the developers (eg Stockland) to th e final owners.

The Eco-Package educates homeowners about the sites sustainability initiatives and how to use them. It includes discount coupons to purchase environmentally friendly household products and high efficiency appliances from local manufacturers and suppliers. Information on energy efficiency, heating and cooling of homes, selecting energy and water efficient appliances, water sensitive garden design and practical examples of minimising impact on the environment are also included. 

Through smart metering, the operation and performance of dwellings can be monitored and benchmarked and internal layouts optimised as the occupants settle in, to ensure good air circulation and quality and an optimum comfort level for occupants.

Landcom has advised that a sample of households is being used to measure the performance and operation. This will take place over a 2-3 year period to help new owners adapt to their new environment.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 4:     Excellence in urban design and development.

Direction 4a:   Improved design and sustainability across all development.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The audit shows that the development of the site has met the sustainability objectives of the masterplan and DCP. The site is seen as a leading and award winning example of sustainability and urban design outcomes across the State.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That Council note this sustainability audit as a basis for consultation with the La Perouse Precinct Committee.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Landcom Vision Brochure 2001

 

 

2.View

Prince Henry EPI Timeframe

 

 

3.View

Prince Henry Site Update: Approved DAs (at 21 July, 2008)

 

 

4.View

Approved Prince Henry Site DAs (at 21 July, 2008)

 

 

5.

Prince Henry Community Centre Building Sustainability Report

 

 

 

 

 


Landcom Vision Brochure 2001

Attachment 1

 

 






 


Prince Henry EPI Timeframe

Attachment 2

 

 

 


Prince Henry Site Update: Approved DAs (at 21 July, 2008)

Attachment 3

 

 



 


Approved Prince Henry Site DAs (at 21 July, 2008)

Attachment 4

 

 









 


Prince Henry Community Centre Building Sustainability Report

Attachment 5

 

 





 


Environment Committee

12 August 2008

 

 

 

Environment Report No. E20/08

 

 

Subject:                  Rebates to Randwick Residents for Rainwater Tanks and Greywater Systems

Folder No:                   F2004/07910

Author:                   Helen  Morrison, Project Officer Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

Updating Mayoral Minute 53/2007:

(a)    Council agree to the development and implementation of Randwick’s Water Saving Rebate providing incentive rebates for the installation of rainwater tanks or greywater systems in homes or units of Randwick residents;

(b)    Council approve an amount not exceeding $80,000 from Randwick’s Sustaining our City environmental levy for this scheme for a period of 12 months, after which a report on the success or learning of such a scheme be brought back to Council; and

(c)    Council staff use the 12 month trial of the Water Saving Rebate as the basis for funding applications to continue or support this scheme.

 

Issues

 

Council’s Water Saving Rebate program approved in June 2007 is an innovative program aimed at providing financial incentives for householders who wish to install rainwater tanks or greywater systems within their homes. The program also operates in conjunction with financial incentives for the installation of energy saving downlights by Randwick residents.

 

The residential rebate program complements Council’s own sustainability efforts in carrying our major water and energy saving projects at Council sites. An additional focus of the residential rebate program is to ask participating householders to provide Council with a range of information on the tasks, difficulties and advantages of the work carried out. Information will be collated into case studies to assist in future sustainability programs and projects within Randwick.

 

To facilitate the rebates available, Council’s Sustaining our City staff held workshops for residents explaining the rebate process and the need to document works carried out. Although the workshops were fully subscribed, the uptake of the program has been slow although strong interest continues, especially as the rebates are being offered to support other State and Commonwealth government rebates.

 

Council has set aside up to $80,000 for these financial incentives. Due to the slow uptake of rebates it is proposed that the program continues until early 2009 so that it can be promoted at other Sustaining our City events, including our “Sticky Beak” Open Days and next year’s EcoLiving Fair. During this time Council staff will also continue to seek additional funding support for this initiative from external grants programs.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10a:    A healthy environment.

Direction 10a:    Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

10f:    A total water cycle management approach including water conservation, reuse and water quality improvements is adopted.

10g:   Greenhouse gas emissions reduced.

 

Financial impact statement

 

Eighty thousand dollars from the Environmental Levy’s Water Conservation budget was allocated to assist in the financial incentives rebates for residents with around $10,000 currently allocated to householder installations to date.

Conclusion

 

The rebate program on offer is innovative for local government in the range of options available to residents and in that it supports other financial incentives on offer from Commonwealth and State Governments. The focus on collecting case study information from each participant will provide an added benefit to the environmental outcomes expected. The extension of this initiative ensures a maximum benefit to the greatest number of Randwick residents.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee

12 August 2008

 

 

 

Environment Report No. E21/08

 

 

Subject:                  Summary of Grants and Awards received by Council's Sustaining our City Initiative, 2005-2008

Folder No:                   F2004/08350

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

To provide an overview of grants and awards received by Council’s Sustaining our City initiative over the years to date of the environmental levy program.

 

Issues

 

Awards

In addition to the external grants attracted to the environmental levy program, a range of Sustaining our City projects and programs have been the recipient of NSW, national and international awards over the past 3 years. The main awards received are summarised on the attached page with perhaps the most prominent or comprehensive represented as:

·      2008 Dougherty Award for a community event (NSW)

·      2008 Sustainable Water Management (Australia)

·      2007 Banksia Environmental Award for Local Government (Australia)

·      2007 Sustainable Cities Award for Local Government (NSW)

·      2007 National Local Government Awards for Greenhouse Action and Water savings

·      2006 Gold Criteria category for the International Liveable Communities Awards in China against 16 other city finalists across the world.

·      2005 Excellence in the Environment Award for Local Government (NSW).

 

Grants

Over the past 4 years, Sustaining our City staff have successfully applied to a number of external grants programs for additional resources to supplement Council’s sustainability efforts and initiatives. As listed on the attached pages, the total funding attracted to Council’s Sustaining our City projects and programs to date is just over $2.6 million with a further $2.7 million worth of funding applications awaiting decision by Commonwealth and State agencies.

 

·      The main areas of funding received include:

·      Resource conservation           $1.88 million

·      Coastal walkway                   $  285,000

·      Energy conservation              $  211,000

·      Water saving                       $  150,000

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10(a):  Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable practices.

 


Financial impact statement

 

The financial impact for this matter is a positive for Council with $2.6 million in additional funding attracted to Council’s sustainability efforts and initiatives.

 

Conclusion

 

Randwick’s sustainability efforts under Council’s environmental levy program has attracted substantial external recognition and resourcing from external grants and awards programs. Further opportunities exist for similar recognition and grants for the remaining months of the levy program. The additional resources and recognition provided over this time demonstrate the added benefit of the levy program and Sustaining our City to Council and its community.

 

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Randwick Council’s Sustaining our City Initiative – Major Grants and Awards Received, 2005 – 2008

 

 

 

 

 


Randwick Council’s Sustaining our City Initiative – Major Grants and Awards Received, 2005 – 2008 /

Attachment 1

 

 

Randwick Council’s Sustaining our City Initiative –

Major Awards Received, 2005 - 2008

 

Year

Award category

Awards / Organisation

Sustaining our City project or initiative

2008

Dougherty Award

 

Community event (NSW) - LGSA

“Come and Have a Sticky Beak” Open Days at Council’s Nursery, Depot, DRAC and Recycling Centre

2008

Sustainable Water Management

World Environment Day Awards - United Nations Assoc of Australia

Council’s water saving initiatives (Depot, Nursery, DRAC and Recycling Centre)

2007

Climate Change Adaptation & Mitigation

Excellence in the Environment – LGSA

Randwick’s Home Energy Makeover

2007

Local Greenhouse Action

National Local Government Awards - Commonwealth Govt

Retrofitting Randwick for Energy Savings

2007

Community Water Grants – Water Saving

National Local Government Awards  -Commonwealth Govt

Retrofitting Randwick for Water Savings

2007

Community Partnerships

Inaugural Australian Sustainable Cities Awards – Keep Australia Beautiful

Community and business partnerships for sustainability

2007

Young Legends

Inaugural Australian Sustainable Cities Awards – Keep Australia Beautiful

Environmental achievement and education

2007

Overall Local Government

NSW Sustainable Cities Awards – Keep Australia Beautiful

Randwick’s Sustaining our City initiative

2007

Overall Local Government

National Banksia Environmental Awards – Banksia Foundation

Randwick’s Sustaining our City initiative

2007

3 R’s, Reduce, Re-use, Recycle

Institute for Public Works Engineers Australia

Waste avoidance and recycling – Council’s Recyclng Centre

2006

Environmental education, awareness and research

NSW Green Globes – NSW Government

Randwick’s Sustaining our City initiative

2006

Gold Criteria Award

International Liveable Communities

Randwick’s Sustaining our City initiative

2005

Overvall Sustainability (Local Government)

Excellence in the Environment – LGSA

Randwick’s Sustaining our City initiative

 

 

 

Randwick Council’s Sustaining our City Initiative –

Major Grants Received, 2005 - 2008

 

Year

Funding amount

Funding Organisation

Sustaining our City project or initiative

2008

$11,000

RTA Bike Week

3 Council Ecological Footprint project

2008

$10,000

Natural Resources Advisory Council – Forging Partnerships

City / Country Sustainability Schools Exchange

2008

$50,000

Local Adaptation Pathways Program – Australian Greenhouse Office

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation planning for Randwick

 

$71,000

Sub-total

 

 

2007

$130,000

Metropolitan Greenspace Program – Dept of Planning

Coastal walkway – Bunya Pde

2007

$120,000

Metropolitan Greenspace Program – Dept of Planning

Coastal walkway – Bicentennial Park, Yarra Bay

2007

$200,000

Demand Management Policy Program – Dept of Planning

Randwick’s Home Energy Makeover

2007

$1,880,000

Urban Sustainability Program – NSW Govt

3-Council Ecological Footprint Project

2007

$100,000

Community Water Grants – Commonwealth Govt

Des Renford Aquatic Centre – stage 2 water saving project

 

$2,430,000

Sub-total

 

2006

$50,000

Sustainability Showcase Grants _ DECC

Sustaining our City Review

2006

$45,000

Community Water Grants – Commonwealth Govt

Des Renford Aquatic Centre – stage 1 water saving project

2006

$45,000

Community Water Grants – Commonwealth Govt

Community Nursery water saving project

2006

$7,000

GreenPower promotion – Dept Energy, Utilities & Sustainability

Promotion of Accredited GreenPower

2006

$4,500

Solar rebate – Dept Energy, Utilities & Sustainability

Solar panels at Works Depot

2006

$35,000

Metropolitan Greenspace Program – Dept of Planning

Coastal walkway – bush tucker trail, Yarra Bay

 

$186,500

Sub-total

 

 

$2,687,500

TOTAL