Works Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 10 June 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Works Committee

10 June 2008

 

 

3 June 2008

 

Works Committee Meeting

 

Notice is hereby given that a Works Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 10 June 2008 at 6:00pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, B Notley-Smith, Andrews, Belleli (Deputy Chairperson), Hughes (Chairperson), Matson, Seng, Tracey, White.

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members.

 

NOTE:    At the Extraordinary Meeting held on 28 September 2004, the Council resolved that the Works Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

 

Confirmation of the Minutes  

 

Works Committee Meeting - 13 May 2008

 

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

 

Urgent Business

 

Works Reports

 

W11/08     Council - Owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) Outside 36 Gale Road, Maroubra

W12/08     Council owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hills weeping fig) outside 129 Bunnerong Road, Kingsford

W13/08     Randwick General Cemetery

W14/08     Pedestrian Safety - Alison Road/The Avenue, Randwick - RTA signals proposal.    

 

Notice of Rescission Motions

 

Nil 

 

Closed Session

 

Nil

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager


Works Committee

10 June 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W11/08

 

 

Subject:                  Council - Owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hill's Weeping Fig) Outside 36 Gale Road, Maroubra

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

Introduction

 

The owners of 36 Gale Road, Maroubra, have written to Council requesting the removal and replacement of a large and significant Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside that property

 

Issues

 

The roots of this tree have caused minor damage to the adjacent front brick fence over several years, as well as causing ongoing damage to the surrounding footpath, kerb and gutter and an adjacent driveway and garage.

 

The damage being caused to the driveway and footpath in particular are creating a very serious liability issue that needs to be addressed as soon as possible.

 

The tree is in excellent health and is approximately 18 metres tall with a canopy spread of between 18-20 metres. Although the tree is only one of two of this species remaining in this section of Gale Road, its good health and size make it a landmark within the street.

 

The tree is growing under overhead powerlines and adjacent to a street light and domestic service wires and has to be regularly pruned to maintain the statutory clearances from these wires.

 

There is an absence of large street trees growing along the same section of nature strip as this tree and its removal would cause a significant loss of amenity and wildlife habitat. This could be negated to some degree with the planting of several super-advanced tree species of a type nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

The subject tree has been assessed as having a moderate risk potential. It has also been assessed as having a medium hazard rating when issues such as failure potential, target rating and the size of any potential branch failures are considered.

 

It has been acknowledged as having significant scenic/environmental amenity and as providing important habitat/food source. Conversely, the effect of removal on soil stability/land degradation would be negligible.

 

This tree has been assessed by a Council tree officer as having an amenity value of $21,600 – using the Standards Australia AS – DR99307 valuation guide.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  10: A Healthy Environment.

Direction:  10b: Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed

 

Key action: Implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts

 

Financial impact statement

 

The total cost to remove and stump grind the subject tree and to re-instate the nature strip, footpath and surrounding infrastructure would be approximately $3,500 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

Conclusion

 

This species of tree is entirely inappropriate for growing in a confined nature strip situation such as this, immediately adjacent to front brick fences, concrete footpath, driveway and nearby garage.

 

The footpath and driveway next to the tree have been damaged over a long period and were recently removed. They have both since been temporarily replaced in asphalt.

 

This is because the spread and sheer size of a large number of roots from this tree are such that root pruning is simply not possible and even if it was it would not ensure that future damage to private property could be avoided.

 

Council’s Tree Gang arborist has inspected the roots of the subject tree and is of the opinion that to sever all roots that are causing structural damage would render the tree unstable and would have a detrimental impact on its long-term health.

 

The installation of a tree root barrier is not a feasible option because it would also compromise the stability of the tree and would adversely impact upon its long term health. Any such barrier would only be a temporary solution to a small number of the problems associated with the tree and eventually tree roots would simply grow over or under any such barrier.

 

The only effective long-term solution to dealing with the range of problems being caused by the roots of this tree would be to remove it completely and replace it with several more appropriate tree species.

 

Recommendation

 

That the large Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside 36 Gale Road, Maroubra, be removed and that it be replaced with several more appropriate tree species as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

36 Gale Road, Maroubra

 

 

 

 

 


36 Gale Road, Maroubra

Attachment 1

 

 

 

        Showing Centre cut away to allow for cable clearance

 

 

 

 

          Size of tree in comparison to adjacent residences

 

        Tree has to be regularly pruned out of overhead powerlines

 

 

 

        Large percentage of canopy overhangs into private property

 

        Large tree roots growing across driveway in several places

 

 

 

        Masses of tree roots growing under brick fence and into property

 

 


Works Committee

10 June 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W12/08

 

 

Subject:                  Council owned Ficus 'Hillii' (Hills weeping fig) outside 129 Bunnerong Road, Kingsford

Folder No:                   F2004/07359

Author:                   Bryan Bourke, Tree Management Officer     

 

 

Introduction

 

The owners of 129 Bunnerong Road, Kingsford, have lodged an insurance claim with Council alleging serious damage to their property caused by the roots of a large and significant Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside that property.

 

Issues

 

The roots of this tree have caused increasing damage to the adjacent front brick fence of this property over many years, as well as causing ongoing damage to the surrounding footpath, kerb and gutter and the adjacent driveway into 131 Bunnerong Road.

 

The owners are claiming that tree roots from the tree have caused extensive damage to their residence and the size of roots entering the property and the direction in which they are travelling would tend to support this claim.

 

The tree is in excellent health and is approximately 12 metres tall with a canopy spread of between 12-16 metres. It is part of a predominantly single species streetscape along the eastern side of Bunnerong Road, Kingsford, and as such it has important amenity and habitat value.

 

It is growing under overhead powerlines and the canopy has to be regularly pruned to maintain the statutory clearances from these wires. It also has to be regularly pruned out of service wires entering the property.

 

The tree has been regularly root pruned in an attempt to minimise damage to private property and public infrastructure – as recently as November 2007 and March 2008 – but tree roots have simply grown back and continued to cause damage. Roots growing into the front of 131 Bunnerong Road have also had to be root pruned to negate damage to the driveway and front fence of that property.

 

The subject tree has been assessed as having a moderate risk potential. It has also been assessed as having a medium hazard rating when issues such as failure potential, target rating and the size of any potential branch failures are considered.

 

It has been acknowledged as having high scenic/environmental amenity and as providing important habitat/food source. Conversely, the effect of removal on soil stability/land degradation would be negligible.

 

This tree has been assessed by a Council tree officer as having an amenity value of $11,860 – using the Standards Australia AS – DR99307 valuation guide.

 

 

 

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  10: A Healthy Environment

Direction:  10b: Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

Key action: Implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts

 

Financial impact statement

 

The total cost to remove and stump grind the subject tree and to re-instate the nature strip, footpath and surrounding infrastructure would be approximately $3,000 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget. There would also be a cost to replant several super-advanced tree species to replace this tree if it were removed.

 

Conclusion

 

The roots of this tree have a history of causing damage that far belies its size. The footpath and driveway next to the tree have been regularly damaged and replaced over a long period of time.

 

Council’s Tree Gang has severed damaging tree roots adjacent to both 129 and 131 Bunnerong Road on a number of occasions but this is only ever going to be a temporary measure.

 

The installation of a tree root barrier is not a feasible option because it could compromise the stability of the tree and adversely impact upon its long term health. Any such barrier would only be a temporary solution to a small number of the problems associated with the tree and eventually tree roots would simply grow over or under any such barrier.

 

Because of the intrusive nature and size of the roots on this tree, there is no guarantee that if the owners of either adjacent property effect extensive repairs to their residences that roots will not cause further damage in years to come.

 

The only effective long-term solution to dealing with the range of problems being caused by the roots of this tree would be to remove it completely and replace it with several more appropriate tree species.

 

Recommendation

 

That the Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside 129 Bunnerong Road, Kingsford, be removed and that it be replaced with several more appropriate tree species as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Series of photographs detailing the extent of tree root damage caused by the Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing on the nature strip outside 129-131 Bunnerong Road, Kingsford

 

 

 

 

 


Series of photographs detailing the extent of tree root damage caused by the Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing on the nature strip outside 129-131 Bunnerong Road, Kingsford

Attachment 1

 

 

Tree roots entering 131 Bunnerong Rd, Kingsford

 

Tree roots undermining front fence at 129 Bunnerong Rd

Tree roots running across footpath area outside 129 Bunnerong Rd

 

Tree roots running across footpath area outside 131 Bunnerong Rd

Tree roots running across footpath and driveway into 131 Bunnerong Rd

 

 


Works Committee

10 June 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W13/08

 

 

Subject:                  Randwick General Cemetery

Folder No:                   F2005/00922

Author:                   Jorde Frangoples, Director City Services     

 

 

Introduction

 

The Randwick General Cemetery covers an area of approximately 3.5 hectares and contains 10,800 inscriptions; this represents approximately the actual number of people buried in the cemetery. The number of plots is less as many plots contain multiple burials.  The land on which the cemetery is located is owned by Randwick City Council (RCC).

 

Currently approximately 3 funerals occur each year at the Cemetery.

 

Issues

 

Randwick Cemetery is located on Malabar Road near the intersection of Arden Street. In this section of Malabar Road there are single storey residences that overlook the Cemetery. The Cemetery is flanked to the western side by residential flat buildings and Emily McCarthy Park.

 

Council Officers have identified space at the cemetery that can be utilised as burial space, either as crypts or individual plots.  It is likely to be (subject to survey) in the vicinity of 8 to 15 spaces. 

 

With the current fees and charges this could yield approximately $50,000 in fees (depending on number of sites). These funds could be utilised to complete some minor capital works within the cemetery.  These works could include a new boundary fence, pathways and signage.

 

In addition, the Department of Lands has released a discussion paper entitle “Sustainable burrials in the Sydney Greater Metropolitian Area” that may impact on the future operation of the cemetery.  A copy is attached to this report.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 7:       Heritage that is protected and celebrated

Direction 7a:      Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

It is proposed once the sites are accurately located to offer them for sale through the Mayor’s Column.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

That this report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.

Plan of the Randwick Cemetery

under separate cover

 

2.

Department of Lands Discussion Paper

under separate cover

 

 

 

 


Works Committee

10 June 2008

 

 

 

Works Report No. W14/08

 

 

Subject:                  Pedestrian Safety - Alison Road/The Avenue, Randwick - RTA signals proposal.

Folder No:                   F2004/08309

Author:                   Tony Lehmann, Manager Integrated Transport Management     

 

Introduction

 

The RTA commenced a statewide program to remove all multi-lane zebra crossings throughout NSW, or replace them with pedestrian traffic signals.  This direction arose following the high profile incidents involving Miss Sophie Delezio.  Sophie was the young child involved in a car crash at a child care centre and also involved in a car crash on a multi-lane zebra crossing.

 

Issues

 

In examining this location, the RTA advised that, due to the narrow nature of The Avenue, installation of pedestrian signals could only be achieved if The Avenue were to be made one way.  The RTA examined the likely impacts of the imposition of a one-way movement upon The Avenue, between Frances Street and Alison Road.

 

The RTA agreed to fund the appointment of a Council directed consultant to examine the likely impacts of this proposed one-way movement.  The consultant studied the area bounded by Cowper Street, Avoca Street, Alison Road and Cook Street. 

 

In summary the consultant advised the following:

 

“From the observations, traffic surveys, data analysis and traffic simulation modelling undertaken it is evident that the provision of traffic control signals at the intersection of Alison Road and The Avenue will have a negligible impact on traffic movements within the Study Area.

 

There are significant benefits for pedestrians with the provision of traffic signals at the intersection of Alison Road and The Avenue. Traffic signals will control traffic travelling on Alison Road and The Avenue as well as pedestrians intending to cross these streets. This control will regulate traffic and pedestrian movements and clearly indicate to drivers and pedestrians when they can pass through or across the intersection.

 

The proposed traffic signals will also improve safety for pedestrians crossing The Avenue. Apart from those few residents on the eastern side of The Avenue between Alison Road and Frances Street there is no reason for pedestrians to cross The Avenue to or from Alison Park other than at the new signals and crossing at Alison Road or at the Frances Street intersection.” …

 

“The investigations and traffic simulation model undertaken for this Study indicate that Option 2, i.e. traffic signals at the intersection of Alison Road and The Avenue and a one-way southbound traffic flow on The Avenue provides the maximum pedestrian and vehicle safety improvements and least impact on residential amenity and traffic flows within the Study Area.”

 

It should be noted that the RTA is soon to commence community consultation on this matter.

 

Whilst the RTA is examining this location regarding new traffic signals Council will also examine the possibility of re-locating the existing Bus Zone and bus shelter on the northern side of Alison Road, east of Abbey Street in order to accommodate the pedestrian desire lines through the Park.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:       Integrated and accessible transport.

Direction 9a:      A network of safe and convenient walking paths and cycle ways linking major land uses and recreation opportunities.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter, the RTA is fully funding all changes required with this installation.

 

Conclusion

 

Given the significant pedestrian safety improvements arising from the replacement of the existing multi-lane zebra crossing with pedestrian traffic signals, and, given the consultant’s assessment that the proposed signals and the requirement for a one-way movement will have a negligible impact on traffic movements within the area, it is considered that the proposed signals be supported.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil