Environment Committee Meeting

 

  BUSINESS PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 13 May 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Centre 30 Frances Street Randwick 2031

Telephone: 02 9399 0999 or

1300 722 542 (for Sydney metropolitan area)

Fax:02 9319 1510

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

www.randwick.nsw.gov.au


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Committee

13 May 2008

 

 

 

 

6 May 2008

 

 

Environment Committee Meeting

 

 

Notice is hereby given that an Environment Committee Meeting of the Council of the City of Randwick will be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, 90 Avoca Street, Randwick, on Tuesday, 13 May 2008 at 5:30pm.

 

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, B Notley-Smith, Belleli, Hughes, Kenny, Matson (Chairperson), Nash (Deputy Chairperson), Tracey, White, Woodsmith.

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members.

 

NOTE:    At the extraordinary meeting held on 22 May 2007, the Council resolved that the Environment Committee be constituted as a committee with full delegation to determine matters on the agenda.

 

Apologies/Granting of Leave of Absences 

Confirmation of the Minutes

Environment Committee Meeting - 8 April 2008

Declarations of Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Interests

Address of Committee by Members of the Public

Urgent Business

Greening Randwick Report

Nil

Environment Reports

E11/08      SCCG CSIRO Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability Assesment Report

E12/08      Partnering Support for Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration Project

E13/08      Partnership with ME Lighting to  support the Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration Project and Extension to Randwick's Home Energy Makeover.    

 

 

 

Closed Session

 

Nil

 

Notice of Rescission Motions

 

Nil

 

 

…………………………………………………….

Ray Brownlee

General Manager

 


Environment Committee

13 May 2008

 

 

 

Environment Report No. E11/08

 

 

Subject:                  SCCG CSIRO Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability Assesment Report

Folder No:                   F2006/00362

Author:                   Bronwyn Englaro, Senior Sustainability Officer     

 

Introduction

 

A climate change vulnerability assessment report was released on Tuesday 29 April by CSIRO and the Sydney Coastal Councils Group (SCCG), in a partnership project to assist the Sydney Coastal Councils to understand their vulnerability to climate change and to help prepare to adapt to the potential impacts of climate change.

 

This project is part of a Australian Greenhouse Office (AGO) funded program, with SCCG partnering with CSIRO and the University of the Sunshine Coast to undertake research on regional approaches to managing climate vulnerability in the Sydney region. This two year project commenced in November 2006, with the research, consultations with the local councils, and this recent report now complete. The project will be finalised by November 2008 with preparation of 3 local case studies.

 

The vulnerability assessment report is recognised by the authors as a sound starting point for councils and communities to understand the relative significance of potential climate change impacts. It also provides a basis for further, more definitive research and for assisting councils to identify management measures to address climate change suitable to their local circumstances. Given its broad and regional level analysis of climate change investigations, the report does not suggest any management actions for councils.

 

This report outlines the process and consultations involved in the preparation of the vulnerability report, the report results and the next steps of research.

 

Background

 

The aim of this project was to develop and trial a method for a systems approach to regional climate change adaptation strategies in large urban areas. The project has the following three key stages:

 

1.     Climate Change vulnerability mapping

2.     Issues workshops

3.     Adaptive capacity case studies.

 

The research looked at “vulnerability” to climate change impacts based on a risk assessment approach. It is not a predictive model and does not attempt to measure probabilities or magnitude of impacts.

 

Five areas of potential climate change impacts were investigated, being:

 

a.     Extreme heat - human health effects

b.     Sea level rise - coastal management

c.     Extreme rainfall - stormwater management

d.     Bushfire

e.     Natural ecosystem and assets.

 

Each of the above issues were analysed using a broad range of data reflecting three areas of vulnerability: ‘exposure’ (eg measures related to topography, climate), ‘sensitivity’ (measures related to land cover and development density) and ‘adaptive capacity’ (measures related to material and social capital eg access to technology, leadership). The modelling weighted this data and analysed it to create vulnerability scores, which were then mapped to identify potential vulnerability on a scale of 1-9.

 

Workshops for this project were conducted for each of the 15 local government areas represented by the SCCG. Randwick’s workshop was held on Thursday 6 September in the Randwick Room and was well attended by 12 staff from a range of Council Departments.

 

At this Workshop the regional vulnerability mapping process was discussed as a tool to identify individual council priorities for climate change adaptation. The workshops involved linking the vulnerability assessment with councils’ own knowledge and risk management experience, to identify the implications of climate change. It also provided an opportunity for Council to identify specific strengths and weaknesses with regards to building future capacity for responding to climate change. The data presented at this workshop was only for Randwick Council and an opportunity for comparison to other SCCG Councils was not provided as the focus of the workshop was on Councils own capacity to respond to climate change impacts.

 

The next stage to complete the project is a more detailed analysis via 3 case studies, for which the research team has chosen Mosman, Sutherland Shire and Leichhardt councils. These case studies will examine these council adaptation strategies for water, infrastructure/asset protection and public health.

 

Study Outcomes

 

The study results for Randwick City did not score the highest on any one of the 5 issues across the SCCG. Our highest vulnerabilities were identified for sea level rise (and thus coastal management issues) and ecosystems (reflecting our coastal location and high proportion of natural areas for a dense urban area). This notes that these are a priority management for Council, as already recognised in the City Plan and the range of Council’s open space and coastal management plans and practices.  Vulnerability to sea level rise is shown in figure 2 of attachment 2.  This figure indicates high vulnerability to sea level rise in the vicinity of Port Botany and Botany Bay Foreshore areas at La Perouse.  This is thought to be due to the low elevation and relatively flat nature of these areas in comparison to the rest of the LGA.

 

The report’s overall vulnerability findings for each SCCG council are summarised in Table 1 (see Attachment 1). This table averages the council vulnerability scores for each of the 5 climate change issues investigated into one score. While noting that caution should be used over direct comparisons of these scores given the different and variable input to the rating process, the report nevertheless notes some validity in the comparison between councils.

 

In this overall figure, the average score for all councils was 6 and for Randwick City the score was 7, which is within the ‘high vulnerability’ category set at 7-9. Not surprisingly, other densely developed areas also scored the same eg City of Sydney, North Sydney, Leichhardt. Other councils, Botany bay City and Rockdale, scored more highly.

 

Given its ease of access and accuracy, ABS demographic data appears to have been heavily weighted in the modelling. Data used from the ABS included details of home ownership, age and annual income, which are reported in international studies to be factors influencing a population’s ability to respond to various climate change impacts. Not surprisingly, thus, in areas of higher population and development densities such as Randwick City, greater vulnerability scores thus arise on climate change issues. This emphasis on the adaptiveness data suggests an area for the model’s improvement. More detailed modelling applied to individuals councils may, for example, be able to extend this more general data to more specifics, such as council initiatives that minimise vulnerability eg for Randwick City our bushland management planning and practices.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome:  10: A healthy environment.

Direction:  10b: Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

The report concluded that different areas of Sydney will experience climate change in different ways depending on their geographic location, demographics, and the resources and tools at their disposal to manage future climate change risk.

 

These vulnerability maps are to be revised over time based upon the feedback from the SCCG Councils, the acquisition of new data, and insight acquired through more detailed up assessments of adaptive capacity.

 

A full copy of the report is available from the SCCG website -  http://www.sydneycoastalcouncils.com.au and a reader survey has been included to collect feedback and suggestions from the report. The modelling data and weighting will be further queried by Council in this survey opportunity.

 

Council will continue to work with SCCG in initiatives such as this research for identifying and addressing the potential impacts from climate change, and in working together to enhance and refine this modelling as a useful tool for informing councils. Council will also continue discussions with SCCG and the State and Federal Governments in the development of strategies to incorporate climate change adaptation into local planning frameworks.

 

Recommendation

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

Attachment/s:

 

1.View

Table 1 Mean Vulnerability scores for SCCG Councils

 

 

2.View

Climate Change Vulnerability in Randwick

 

 

3.View

Adaptation Project Summary Sheet

 

 

 

 

 


Table 1 Mean Vulnerability scores for SCCG Councils

Attachment 1

 

 

 


Climate Change Vulnerability in Randwick

Attachment 2

 

 


 


Adaptation Project Summary Sheet

Attachment 3

 

 


 


Environment Committee

13 May 2008

 

 

 

Environment Report No. E12/08

 

 

Subject:                  Partnering Support for Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration Project

Folder No:                   F2008/00082

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

To advise Council of a partnering opportunity to be taken up with Todae, a sustainable ideas and retail shop, to conduct workshops, information sessions and promote sustainability products for residents of the Eastern suburbs from Barrett House, Randwick as part of the 3-Council Ecological Footprint project for a period of 10 months.

 

Issues

 

A very successful launch of the Barrett House Sustainable Demonstration project was held on the evening of 19 March 2008. This represents a major step in establishing Barrett House as an important regional resource for residents of the 3 local government areas of Waverley, Woollahra and Randwick.

 

The sustainability consultants engaged in preparing the designs and ideas for development of Barrett House as a demonstration sustainability house also identified a number of sustainability businesses willing to support the project with discounts or offers to the house itself and/or the residents of the 3 Council areas.

 

The partnership opportunity covered in this paper is with a local sustainability business operating as Todae. Todae is a well known retailer whose business focuses on advising, selling and installing a comprehensive range of sustainability products, including solar, wind, rainwater, greywater systems etc. Todae trades from a shopfront in Glebe but is opening a new shopfront shortly in the Eastern suburbs. Discussions with Todae have indicated they are willing to support and assist in the implementation of the Barrett House Demonstration Sustainability project by making their staff and products available over a period of 10 months.

 

Todae’s support and involvement in the Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration project includes:

 

1.  Provision of static displays of sustainability products such as solar panels, hotwater systems, greywater or rainwater systems, small wind turbines etc in the house for set periods;

2.  Delivering workshops and information sessions provided by Todae for members of the community and residents on the range of sustainability products displayed or promoted through Council’s sustainability program. These information sessions will focus on the technical requirements and practical issues related to costs, approvals required, siting and other related issues enabling householders to make informed decisions on which of the devices and other sustainability measures are appropriate for their particular dwelling type and circumstances;

3.  Todae staff available at no charge during these sessions at Barrett House;

4.  Discounts of between 10 and 20 percent would be offered to residents of the 3 Council areas during this time;

5.  Todae will cover expenses, delivery and removal costs, public liability and work cover for their staff involved.

 

Benefits of proposal

 

1.  Importantly the concept of and access to Barrett House as a sustainability demonstration house is realised with a company such as Todae opening and being available in the House during the timeframe in which further development plans and approvals are sought for the House itself and while follow-up retrofitting options are considered;

2.  The proposal provides an opportunity for immediate specialist advice and information to be provided regularly to residents on a full range of sustainability products in keeping with the practical sustainability demonstration nature of the 3-Council project;

3.  Residents will gain additional benefit through discounts on offer by Todae on particular sustainability products during the promotional period;

4.  The availability of Todae staff is at no cost to Council will enable Barrett House to open to the public with a much lower demand on the time of the 3-Council Project Officer and other Council staff;

5.  The approval for Todae to operate within Barrett House assists in achieving the goals of the sustainability demonstration project over the short term while a longer term proposal is prepared and put out for market testing.

 

Conditions of use and access by Todae:

 

1.  Todae understands Council is not endorsing their products or their business and that other similar businesses or companies providing similar products or discounts will be able to market or promote themselves through Council during the ten month period (and may also have access to Barrett House to display their products);

2.  No sales will be made or paid for at Barrett House (unless approved otherwise);

3.  Todae understands that other sustainability products or information on similar products will be able to be displayed for information purposes if necessary at Barrett House during the 10 month period subject to a rostering program to be discussed with them.

4.  This is for a 10 month period only with no guarantee of extension.

 

Council’s Public Officer has advised that these limitations and conditions satisfy Council’s probity issues in relation to this partnership.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction:          10(a) Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable                             practices.

Outcome 8:       A Strong Local Economy.

Direction:          8(d) Develop and strengthen effective partnerships with key locally                 based organisations.   

 

Financial impact statement

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

Conclusion

 

This proposal assists in fulfilling the Sustainability Demonstration objectives at Barrett House over the short term while the sustainability consultants’ designs and plans are considered, approved and implemented. 

 

Involving Todae in the Barrett House project as outlined above will enable this momentum and interest to be maintained around a ‘local’ business.

 

Recommendation

 

That this report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil

 

 


Environment Committee

13 May 2008

 

 

 

Environment Report No. E13/08

 

 

Subject:                  Partnership with ME Lighting to  support the Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration Project and Extension to Randwick's Home Energy Makeover.

Folder No:                   F2008/00082

Author:                   Peter Maganov, Manager Sustainability     

 

Introduction

 

To advise Council of a partnership arrangement between local lighting manufacturer ME Lighting and Randwick Council as an extension to Randwick’s Home Energy Makeover program and in support of the Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration project.

 

Issues

 

LED replacement downlights in Barrett House

Following Council’s announcement of its plans to develop Barrett House as a Sustainability Demonstration House, local lighting manufacturer ME Lighting approached Council in relation to a new product they have developed for the Australian (and international market). ME Lighting, based in Rosebery, has been manufacturing LED lighting systems for almost two decades and displaying these systems at events such as the Melbourne Floriade and the Chelsea Flower Show.

 

While much of ME Lighting’s business is in external LED lighting systems, the company has developed an internal LED downlight to replace energy-inefficient halogen downlight systems. ME Lighting’s initial offer was install their new LED downlights into Barrett House for display and demonstration purposes. These lights are 90 percent more energy efficient than existing halogen downlights with a much longer life span due to the much lower power being drawn and the heat generated from the lighting systems. These LED downlights also operate under a much smaller transformer requirement than halogen systems resulting in lower heat and energy losses or fire risks in roof areas where they are installed.

 

ME Lighting has now installed their energy efficient LED downlights into one side of Barrett House with the installation of their replacement downlights metered separately from the remaining downlights. This separate metering and visual display enables visitors to see immediately the energy consuming difference between the two downlight systems.

 

LED replacement downlights in Barrett House

Council’s Home Energy Makeover program is going into a new phase following the availability of rebates on offer from both the Commonwealth and NSW Governments and the completion of Randwick’s main rebate program with residents. While the Makeover program is now to be rolled out across Waverley and Woollahra Councils as part of the 3-Council Ecological Footprint project, the new phase in Randwick is aiming to focus on halogen light replacements. While halogen light replacements were offered during Randwick’s own program they were not taken up to a large extent as the bulk of residents were more interested in the solar hotwater, thermal insulation or upgrades of energy efficient whitegoods.

 

The smaller scale extension of Randwick’s Home Energy Makeover will link with ME Lighting and offer residents an incentive program to replace energy inefficient halogen downlights with alternative energy efficient downlights, particularly focussing on LED downlight replacements.

 

Residents will be free to choose which energy efficient downlights they purchase but ME Lighting will offer a discount to Randwick residents on their products of approximately 10 percent on top of the rebate offer.

 

Due to the number of downlights installed in homes a 40 percent rebate will be offered upto a maximum of $800 per household, plus the discount offered by ME Lighting. Electrical installation is not covered in the rebate.

 

Residents who agree to participate and receive the rebate will be required to provide Council with additional information enabling a series of case studies to be collated for future use by Council. The offer will be limited to a specific timeframe (commencing from June 2008) and a fixed number of residents (maximum of 80 households) on a first come, first serve basis. The case study information will become available to assist householders undertake similar projects in the future.

 

Council’s Public Officer has advised that this partnership and the non exclusive offer to residents to choose where they purchase their halogen downlight replacements satisfies the necessary probity issues in relation to this offer.

 

Relationship to City Plan

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

Outcome 10:      A Healthy Environment.

Direction:          10(a) Council is a leader in fostering environmentally sustainable                             practices.

                       10(f) Greenhouse gas emissions are reduced.

 

Financial impact statement

 

The rebate will be payable from the Climate Change budget of the environmental levy program.

 

Conclusion

 

This is an innovative partnership with a local supplier with a long track record and credibility in the industry. Their product is a first for Australia and Randwick’s involvement would be a pre-cursor to their successful launch of the product on the Australian market. The LED halogen replacements are at the more expensive end of the market with halogen and compact fluorescents replacements much cheaper but still not as energy efficient (or heat reducing) as the LEDs.

 

This is also a very positive way of progressing and marketing the Barrett House Sustainability Demonstration project and continuing the Home Energy Makeover in a much more targeted manner through the involvement of an innovative local business.

 

Recommendation

 

That this report be received and noted.

 

 

Attachment/s:

 

Nil