Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

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general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

3 July 2007

 

WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL,

90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK ON TUESDAY, 10TH JULY 2007 AT 6:00 PM

 

 

Committee Members:       The Mayor, Cr P. Tracey, Crs Andrews, Belleli (Chairperson), Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Matson, Notley-Smith, Seng & White.

 

Quorum:                       Five (5) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2004, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE WORKS COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

1      Apologies/Granting of leave of absences

 

2      Confirmation of the Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 12TH JUNE 2007.

 

3      Declaration of Pecuniary & Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

4      Addressing to Committee by Members of the Public

 

5      Urgent Business

 

6      Works

 

6.1                     

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 36/2007 - SPEEDING IN THE VICINITY OF BARWON PARK, MATRAVILLE.

2

6.2                     

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 37/2007 - COUNCIL-OWNED FICUS 'HILLII' (HILL'S WEEPING FIG) GROWING OUTSIDE 8-10 ABBOTT STREET, COOGEE.

4

6.3                     

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 38/2007 - REMOVAL OF FICUS 'HILLII' ADJACENT 26 EASTERN AVENUE, KENSINGTON.

14

 

7      Confidential Items (Closed Session)

 

8      Notices of Rescission Motions

 

 

……….……………………………..

GENERAL MANAGER


  

Director, City Services' Report 36/2007

 

 

SUBJECT:

SPEEDING IN THE VICINITY OF BARWON PARK, MATRAVILLE.

 

 

DATE:

15 March, 2007

FILE NO:

F2006/00101

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The streets surrounding Barwon Park in Matraville are narrow, local streets whose primary function is to provide vehicle access for residents to their properties.  It has been reported to Council that incidences of vehicles speeding in these streets have become more apparent, and it has been requested that investigations take place to determine the extent of any speeding problem and possible measures that can be introduced to remedy this situation.

 

ISSUES:

 

At the Ordinary Meeting of Council, it was resolved on the Motion of Councillors Belleli and Notley-Smith, that:

 

The Traffic Committee conduct a street meeting with the residents of the streets around Barwon Park and a report be brought back to Works Committee with possible solutions to prevent the speeding of vehicles in this locality.

 

To determine the extent of this speeding problem, speed counters were placed in Barwon Crescent, Gwydir Avenue and Clarence Street.  For the period between 13 July 2006 and 20 July 2006, the number of vehicles using these streets and the speed at which they were travelling was recorded.  A summary of vehicle volumes and speeds for each street is shown below.

    

 

Street

Average Daily Speed (km/h)

Average Daily

Volume

Barwon Crescent

48

125

Gwydir Avenue

49

173

Clarence Street

52

204

 

The speed counts showed that the average daily speeds of vehicles were within an acceptable range of the 50 km/h urban speed limit, and the low volume of traffic suggests that the users of these streets are local residents accessing their homes. 

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

 

 

Outcome 9:            Integrated and Accessible Transport.

Direction 9d:          Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Differential coloured pavement treatments in conjunction with gutter crossings at the entry points to these streets and the act as speed calming devices reduce the speed at which vehicles enter the streets.  The narrow carriageways also serve to reduce the vehicle speeds in these streets.  Based on the results from the speed counts, the installation of additional traffic calming measures is not warranted, and would detract from the residential streetscape of the locality.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil.

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

TONY LEHMANN

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

MANAGER, INTEGRATED TRANSPORT


  

Director, City Services' Report 37/2007

 

SUBJECT:

COUNCIL-OWNED FICUS 'HILLII' (HILL'S WEEPING FIG) GROWING OUTSIDE 8-10 ABBOTT STREET, COOGEE

 

 

DATE:

19 June, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/07359

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

On 31 May, 2007, the owner of 8 Abbott Street, Coogee, wrote to Council expressing concerns about the damage being caused to his property by the roots of a Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside his property and detailing a range of problems associated with that tree.

 

The owner of 10 Abbott Street, Coogee, has in the past also written to Council highlighting the problems he is experiencing with tree roots from the same Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ growing on the nature strip outside his property and requesting that a range of damage be rectified by Council.

 

ISSUES:

 

The owners of both these properties have been experiencing a range of tree root-related issues for some years caused by the roots of this tree and up until now they have not requested the removal of the tree.

 

Specifically, the problems associated with the tree range from branches growing into powerlines and being regularly pruned, ongoing footpath damage and repair, large branches falling in high wind events, root damage to the roadway and adjacent kerb and gutter, and tree root problems now extend to structural damage to both adjacent properties.

 

A recent site inspection confirmed these problems and reinforced the fact that roots from the tree are causing ongoing and increasing damage to Council infrastructure, as well as increasingly serious damage within the front yard areas of both properties.

 

The tree concerned is in excellent health and is one of several growing along Abbott Street, Coogee. The tree is approximately 12-15 metres in height and is also around 15 metres across the canopy. It is an important provider of habitat and food source and provides significant visual amenity along the northern side of the street.

 

Council’s tree gang recently trenched along the front of both properties and discovered extensive tree root material fanning out into both residences. These tree roots are substantial and contribute significantly to the stability and vigour of the tree.

 

Because of the extent of tree root intrusion and the proximity of the property boundaries to the tree, it is not possible to sever intruding tree roots and to install a functional tree root barrier.

 

Root barriers are not historically effective with this species of tree and the amount of tree root material concerned would render the tree unstable if it were severed.

 

Any such action would also have an adverse effect on the long-term health and viability of the tree and would certainly allow the introduction and intrusion of fungal pathogens into the basal area of the tree.

 

Because the tree is growing on an embankment the removal of large amounts of root material on the northern side of the tree would seriously compromise its stability, particularly as the majority of canopy overhangs the roadway on the southern side of the tree.

 

Tree roots also extend a large distance along the embankment where the tree is growing and these constitute a serious liability issue to Council. The owner of 8 Abbott Street advises that what prompted him to write to Council seeking removal and replacement of the tree was the fact that his young son tripped on exposed tree roots whilst exiting their premises.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:          A Healthy Environment.

Direction 10b:           Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:            Develop and implement policies, programmes and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The cost to remove and stump grind this large street tree, to re-instate the damaged nature strip area and to replace the tree with one or two advanced Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pillys) would be in the vicinity of $3,500 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The roots of this large Council-owned street tree are causing ongoing and increasing damage to the adjacent footpath, kerb and gutter and roadway and this will worsen for as long as the tree is retained.

 

Branches have to be regularly pruned out of the domestic service wires, overhead powerlines and the canopy creates significant shadowing of the adjacent footpath at night.

 

The roots of the tree have now intruded into several properties and are specifically causing (or have the potential to cause) increasing structural damage to the two adjacent properties.

 

Of major concern is that the tree will eventually cost Council a much more considerable amount of money for property repairs, as well as constituting an ongoing trip liability hazard, should it be retained.

 

The removal and replacement of this tree would certainly fall within the parameters originally set out in Council’s resolution relating to aggressive-rooted street trees, although its removal would have a major impact on the visual and wildlife habitat amenity of the surrounding streetscape.

 

The owners of both adjacent properties who are now directly affected by tree root damage are resigned to the fact that the only effective long-term solution for dealing with the tree root damage being caused to their properties is the removal of the subject tree. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That the Council-owned Ficus microcarpa var. ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside 8 and 10 Abbott Street, Coogee, be removed and replaced with an appropriate number of more appropriate tree species, as per Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Series of photographs showing size and location of Ficus 'Hillii' and detailing a range of damages issues.

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

 

 

 

Cracks appearing in front fence – caused by Ficus ‘Hillii’ tree roots

 

Ficus ‘Hillii’ viewed from Abbott Street

Extensive tree root material running into both 8 and 10 Abbott Street, Coogee

 

Tree roots growing under front brick fence

Roots growing under footing into property

 

Root mass adjacent front brick fences

Large tree root growing under entranceway into 10 Abbott Street

Entranceway into front of 10 Abbott St – pavers allowing temporary access

Tree roots undermining kerb and gutter and roadway

 

Tree roots have lifted kerb and undermined roadway

Roots protruding above nature strip – liability issue

 

Tree is highly prominent and significant in streetscape

 


Director, City Services' Report

38/2007 

 

 

SUBJECT:

REMOVAL OF FICUS 'HILLII' ADJACENT 26 EASTERN AVENUE, KENSINGTON.

 

 

DATE:

2 July, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/07359

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

As a result of the obvious decline in health of a large Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing in the nature strip adjacent to 26 Eastern Avenue, Kensington, I requested that a report be provided to Council by an independent arborist detailing its health and long-term viability. 

 

ISSUES:

 

The subject tree is one of a group of four planted in the nature strip adjacent to the above property (in Day Avenue) that are all approximately 50 years old. The other three trees are in good health and they contribute significant visual amenity to this section of the street. There are several trees of the same size growing on the opposite side of Day Avenue and they all form an impressive tunnel effect.

 

The tree is approximately 12 metres in height with a canopy spread of around 8-9 metres.  It is in very poor health based on canopy leaf cover and the extent and size of dead branches.

 

The structure of the tree is also poor because of the number of dead and dying branches and there is likelihood that some of these branches may fall if the tree is retained for any length of time.

 

The tree is growing underneath overhead powerlines and branches have to be regularly pruned to maintain statutory clearances.

 

This tree has had to be root pruned on at least two occasions to deal with root damage to adjacent infrastructure and all four trees were root pruned a decade or so ago because of root damage caused to the side brick fence of the adjacent property.

 

There are no obvious above ground signs of root rot fungus or any other fungal disease but there may be internal decay not evident from a visual inspection.

 

In some sections of the trunk, there are large patches of dry and cracking bark, which has peeled away from the trunk itself, and this is a further indication that the tree is in declining health.  

The decline in this particular tree has been relatively sudden and a visual inspection revealed no obvious reason for this deterioration – particularly as the other three adjacent trees remain in a healthy condition.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:          A healthy environment.

Direction 10b:         Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:                Implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The cost to remove and stump grind this fig tree and to replace it with a super-advanced 100-litre replacement tree would be in the vicinity of $3,000 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The subject tree is not only in a seriously declining state of health but it now represents a serious public liability issue for Council.

 

There are no signs of poisoning or other untoward activity in relation to the tree and no adjacent property owners have indicated that they have any serious issues with the tree.

 

Regrettably, the tree has deteriorated to the extent that it is highly unlikely that it will ever recover and the consultant arborist who inspected and assessed the tree asserts that a strong case can be made for its immediate removal and replacement.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That the unhealthy and declining Ficus ‘Hillii’  (Hill’s Weeping fig) street tree growing adjacent to 26 Eastern Avenue, Kensington, be removed and replaced with an advanced 100-litre Waterhousia floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly).

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 



 

Confidential Items (Closed Session)

 

Notices of Rescission Motions