Administrative Centre

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Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

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general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

3 April 2007

WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 10TH APRIL 2007 AT 6:00 PM

 

 

Committee Members:       The Mayor, Cr P. Tracey, Crs Andrews, Belleli (Chairperson), Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Matson, Notley-Smith, Seng & White.

 

Quorum:                       Five (5) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2004, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE WORKS COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

1      Apologies/Granting of leave of absences

 

2      Confirmation of the Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 13th MARCH 2007.

 

3      Declaration of Pecuniary & Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

4      Addressing to Committee by Members of the Public

 

5      Urgent Business

 

6      Works

 

6.1                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 14/2007 - RANDWICK COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RISK MANAGEMENT.

2

6.2                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 15/2007 - STAGE 2 - SIGNIFICANT TREE REGISTER.

4

 

7      Confidential Items (Closed Session)

 

7.1                      

CONFIDENTIAL DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 16/2007  ARBORIST'S TREE ASSESSMENTS/REPORTS

7

 

8      Notices of Rescission Motions

 

…………………………………..

GENERAL MANAGER


 

Director, City Services' Report 14/2007

 

 

 

SUBJECT:

RANDWICK COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RISK MANAGEMENT

 

 

DATE:

28 March, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/06416

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES      

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting on 16 September 2004, Council noted the progress report on the emergency risk assessments by the Emergency Risk Management Assessment Committee (ERMAC), a sub-committee of the Randwick Local Emergency Management Committee.  

 

The conduct of the assessments has been in accordance with the process derived from the NSW State Emergency and Rescue Management Act 1989 and amendments (the SERM Act) and guidelines produced by the State Emergency Management Committee.   These guidelines require that the community be engaged in a consultation process at successive stages of the Emergency Risk Management process.  This has been completed.

 

ISSUES:

 

The Randwick Community Emergency Risk Register (Risk Register) has undergone several reviews by the ERMAC.  The Risk Register was on public exhibition from 30 January to 16 February 2007.  The package on public exhibition was:

 

1.     Randwick Community Emergency Risk Register

2.     Context Statement

3.     Glossary of Terms

4.     Briefing note about making enquiries and how to lodge submissions.

 

The exhibition was available to be viewed at Council’s Customer Service Centre, the three (3) Council libraries and on Council’s website.  This availability was advertised in the Southern Courier newspaper, including in the Mayoral column.

 

There were no submissions received as a result of the public exhibition period. Only one person rang about the Risk Register and she praised its comprehensiveness. 

 

In accordance with State Emergency Management Committee guidelines, the Risk Register was submitted to the Georges River District Emergency Management Committee (District Committee).  With one amendment, the Risk Register was adopted by that Committee on 16 March 2007.  The District Committee provides it to the State Emergency Management Committee. 

 

Thus, this Randwick Community Emergency Risk Register is now presented to Council for adoption. 

 

The review process for Community Emergency Risk Registers is, of course, ongoing.

 

The Randwick Local Disaster Plan (DISPLAN), adopted on 20 June 2001 is being reviewed based on the amended Randwick Community Emergency Risk Register.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The emergency risk assessment process by the Randwick Local Emergency Management Committee is completed.  Thus, the Randwick Community Emergency Risk Register is presented to Council for adoption.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council adopt the Randwick Community Emergency Risk Register as adopted by the Georges River District Emergency Committee and provided to the State Emergency Management Committee.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

(ALL UNDER SEPARATE COVER)

 

1.  Randwick Community Emergency Risk Register adopted by Georges River District Emergency Management Committee covering letter to key community groups of individuals.

2.  Context Statement

3.  Glossary of Terms

4.  Briefing accompanying the Risk Register package on public exhibition.     

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

PETER STONE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

CHAIR RANDWICK LOCAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

 


  

Director, City Services' Report 15/2007

 

 

SUBJECT:

STAGE 2 - SIGNIFICANT TREE REGISTER

 

 

DATE:

2 April, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/07359

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Council at its Works Committee meeting held on Tuesday, 5 December, 2006, resolved that it consider a Stage 2 of the Significant Tree Register as part of next year’s budget and that consideration be given to sufficient allocation to allow for the extent of the research for Stage 2 to cover the Bundock Street Defence facility, the Anzac Rifle Range at Malabar and remnant native tree species as outlined on page 22 of the Register considered by the Greening Randwick Committee.

 

 

ISSUES:

 

Council’s Greening Randwick Committee has expressed concerns that the draft Register of Significant Trees does not contain what it considers to be large areas of significant vegetation in places such as the Defence facility in Bundock Street, Randwick, the Anzac Rifle Range, Malabar, and a number of remnant bushland areas throughout the City.

 

Council’s draft Register of Significant Trees identified predominantly “cultural” trees (ie, significant specimen trees and groups) growing within a largely modified and urban environment.

 

By comparison, the remnant bushland areas within the Randwick LGA contain many trees of varying size, age and structure - from seedlings/saplings through to old growth specimens. These trees are generally associated with a full suite of plants comprising an ecological community (eg, trees, shrubs, vines, groundcovers, etc).

 

Randwick’s remnant bushland described as Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub (ESBS) is highly significant. ESBS has been scheduled as an endangered ecological community (Schedule 1 Part 3) under the NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act (1995) and has been listed as endangered under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. ESBS is currently the subject of a draft recommendation by the Department of Environment and Conservation (NSW) as critical habitat. Critical habitat is an area identified as being “crucial to the survival of particular threatened species, populations and ecological communities.”

 

The largest core areas of ESBS in the Randwick LGA are located on the coastal sandstone plateaus and outcrops of Malabar Headland and Botany Bay National Park - areas outside Council’s control.

 

The draft Register of Significant Trees identified a number of remnant native specimen trees, which in some instances occur in association with native understorey components of the Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub. Notably, these scheduled individual specimens and small groups/populations satisfy the criteria for significant trees and include listings such as Woody Pears (Xylomelum pyriforme) at Randwick Racecourse and Purcell Park and the remnant population of mesic understorey species at Fred Hollows Reserve and adjacent properties. Some of these specimen trees are of considerable age and are amongst the oldest trees listed in the Register.

 

By contrast, many other small remnant native populations may, or may not, include trees or any other understorey components. The population may be comprised of immature trees and/or saplings or only seedlings or regrowth of understorey shrubs and groundcovers.

 

These items are sometimes the last vestiges of the Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub. They often occur in places where current management regimes restrict opportunities for natural recruitment. Notably, these populations all share a common characteristic – they are a vital part of the City’s natural heritage.

 

Natural heritage incorporates a broad spectrum of values ranging from existence value at one end (ie, living organisms and ecosystems may have value beyond social, economic or cultural values held by people) to socially based values at the other end. The fundamental concept of natural heritage which most clearly differentiates it from cultural heritage is identified in the Australian Natural Heritage Charter, 1999, as:

 

 

In the broader context, Randwick’s natural heritage includes places of significant natural biodiversity and geodiversity (eg, sandstone scarps and rock outcrops, sand dunes, wetlands and lakes).

 

There are many isolated examples and populations of small but significant vegetative communities within the Randwick LGA, sometimes in association with other native species, but usually occurring within weed infested and highly modified habitat.  Although most of these items do not satisfy the criteria for a “significant tree”, their significance in terms of natural heritage values has been highlighted in the draft Register of Significant Trees (Vol.1 pp.21-22).

 

Rare examples of the Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub are under considerable threat from the processes of further clearing, fragmentation and attrition, particularly within the context of urban development and consolidation.

 

While the larger remnant populations have been identified as critical habitat in the draft recommendation by the Department of Environment and Conservation (NSW), smaller remnant populations have received no formal recognition. It is important that these smaller remnant populations be given appropriate recognition and protection - otherwise they are likely to disappear.

 

As part of the objectives of the Randwick City Plan, Council is currently drafting a Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the management and protection of native flora and fauna within the entire City of Randwick.

 

This strategy is intended to be consistent with the objectives and outcomes of the National Biodiversity Strategy and the NSW Biodiversity Strategy and it will include all areas of remnant bushland within the Randwick LGA – including the Bundock Street Defence facility, the Anzac Rifle Range and the remnant native tree species highlighted on page 22 of the draft Register of Significant Trees.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 7:         Heritage that is protected and celebrated

Direction 7a:       Our heritage is recognised, protected and celebrated

Key actions:        Research and recognise those areas of our natural/cultural, maritime and Aboriginal heritage that are not fully documented.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The comprehensive assessment of all significant vegetation within the Bundock Street Defence facility, the Anzac Rifle Range at Malabar and remnant native tree species as outlined on page 22 of the Register of Significant Trees is to be undertaken as part of Council’s Biodiversity Conservation Strategy.  This strategy is currently being drafted by Council’s Supervisor – Open Spaces and there would therefore be no additional financial impost on Council.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Apart from the core bushland areas of Malabar Headland, Anzac Rifle Range and Botany Bay National Park, Randwick City contains a large number of fragmented and isolated individual and small group vegetative remnants – including critical habitat Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub.

 

The importance of the City’s remaining natural heritage is recognised by both Council and the broader community as being highly significant and under constant threat and it is, therefore, appropriate that those areas be identified and properly managed.

 

Council’s Biodiversity Conservation Strategy will include the assessment of all areas nominated in Works Committee Resolution W56 and this strategy will include comprehensive vegetative management plans and Action Plans for all those areas.  As such, it would be unnecessary to include a Stage 2 in Council’s draft Register of Significant Trees to cover the areas nominated by the Greening Randwick Committee.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council not proceed with the drafting of a Stage 2 of the Significant Tree Register because the areas nominated for inclusion in that document will be comprehensively assessed as part of Council’s Biodiversity Conservation Strategy.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER