Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

6 March 2007

 

WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY 13TH MARCH 2007 AT 6:00 PM

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, Cr P. Tracey, Crs Andrews, Belleli (Chairperson), Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Matson, Notley-Smith, Seng & White.

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2004, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE WORKS COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

 

1           Apologies/Granting of leave of absences

 

2           Confirmation of the Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY 13TH FEBRUARY, 2007.

 

3           Declaration of Pecuniary & Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

4           Addressing to Committee by Members of the Public

 

5           Urgent Business

 

6           Works

 

6.1                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 8/2007 - REQUEST TO RENAME QUARRY RESERVE, MAROUBRA "PERIN QUARRY".

2

6.2                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 9/2007 -   TREE REMOVAL - FROMELLES WAY

4

6.3                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 10/2007 -   REQUEST FOR CHANGE OF STREET NAME - PART OF DOWLING STREET BEHIND THE SOUND BARRIER.

8

6.4                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 11/2007 - RAINBOW STREET/ BOTANY STREET, KINGSFORD/RANDWICK.

10

 

7           Confidential Items (Closed Session)

 

8           Notices of Rescission Motions

…………………………………

GENERAL MANAGER.


 Director, City Services' Report 8/2007

 

 

SUBJECT:

REQUEST TO RENAME QUARRY RESERVE, MAROUBRA "PERIN QUARRY".

 

 

DATE:

14 February, 2007

FILE NO:

F2005/00217

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES      

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

A request has been received from Mr Richard Perin, son of the late Mr Perin of No 2 Flower Street, Maroubra, requesting Council to consider re-naming Quarry Reserve, Maroubra, to “Perin Quarry”, in memory of his late father who resided and reared his family in the area for many years and who help to establish the reserve..

 

Some 40 years ago his father lobbied for the now Quarry Reserve to be a parkland and organised a petition to be presented to Council, helping to develop the area as it is today.

 

ISSUES:

 

The subject area is located at the top of the Randwick City Council depot area, and is the parkland which extends from the corner of Storey Street and Flower Street and continues through to Moverly Road.

 

Mr Richard Perin informed Council that his father was very concerned about his young family not having sufficient open space and play area, the increased traffic and diminished property values and he lobbied for the preservation of the area as park land and when various unsuitable development applications were made to Council, he arranged the petition which was signed by many local residents.

 

Mr Perin’s advises that his father met with The Hon Lionel Bowen and presented the petition to Mr Bowen and who then referred the matter to Council.

 

Mr Perin comments that the park was where he and his friends played throughout his childhood and he and his family’s connection to the now Quarry Reserve and its surrounds is “as strong as anyone can claim…..it gave my family a new life in a new country after the war and it helped shape who I have become.”

 

Mr Richard Perin’s father passed away over 15 months ago and he now requests Council to consider that this reserve be named after his father as a testimony for his efforts to preserve the parkland. Quarry Reserve, which was created in the 1970’s, was named after a nearby quarry.

 

An inspection of the Council Minutes between 1960 and 1985 does not reveal any mention of a petition. At a Council Meeting on 6 February 1973 Council refused permission for the Australia Wool Board to dump fill in the quarry as there was a proposal to make it a reserve.

 

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Mr Richard Perin believes that his father’s vision and efforts would be well recognised by re-naming the reserve “Perin Quarry,” as he believes that without his father’s efforts, the park could now be developed, instead of the interesting historical and story revealing place it is today.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

RELATION TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2     A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a    Maintain a current understanding of our community’s needs.

Key Actions:   Regularly consult our community on their needs.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That the proposal to re-name Quarry Reserve to “Perin Quarry” be advertised and interested parties be invited to make submissions and comments on the proposal and that the matter be brought back to Council after the closing date.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

MARK SHAW

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

MANAGER TECHNICAL SERVICES


 

Director, City Services' Report 9/2007

 

 

 

SUBJECT:

TREE REMOVAL - FROMELLES WAY

 

 

DATE:

1 March, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/07359

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES     

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The NSW Department of Housing has applied to Council for consent to remove nine (9) mature Casuarina glaucas (She Oaks) from the common areas surrounding Nos 1 and 2-14 Fromelles Way, Matraville.

 

ISSUES:

 

The subject trees are mature specimens, in good health, which contribute significantly to the amenity of the local area. They are important providers of habitat and a food source for a variety of native birds and other fauna.

 

There are no signs of disease or decay in any of the trees and they provide important screening/softening along the common areas of a large Department of Housing estate.

 

The reasons given for wanting the trees removed are that they encourage anti-social behaviour because the dense canopies block out light and make the laneway quite dark, that the thick carpet of needles they have deposited creates a liability issue (trip hazard), that the darkness allows drug-related activities to flourish and that the needles also provide an ideal depository for discarded hypodermic syringes.

 

A number of the trees are also planted far too close to buildings and structures and it is only a matter of good luck that roots from the subject trees have not caused major property damage.

 

The attached photographs demonstrate the size of the trees and highlight how close they are to adjacent buildings and brick walls.

 

It should be pointed out that this species is regarded as inappropriate as a street tree species by Council and that they are usually removed from footpath and nature strip areas whenever the opportunity presents itself.

 

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10:          A healthy environment.

Direction 10b:           Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed.

Key Action:            Implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The trees are proposed to be removed by contractors engaged by the Department of Housing and as such there will be no cost to Council.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Although these trees are significant in the landscape and they provide important shade, screening and habitat, they are all planted in inappropriate positions close to private infrastructure.

 

The copious amounts of leaf litter they drop pose a liability issue with slipping and drug users casually discard their used syringes in that leaf debris.

 

Because the trees are so large and close together they inhibit the amount of night light in the common walkway area and residents are fearful of using those areas.

 

The Department of Housing has engaged a private contractor to undertake a complete upgrade of the area, including terracing of rear gardens and new fencing. It is proposed that the removal of the nine She Oaks would be included in this upgrade.

 

Should approval be granted, the trees would be replaced with a large number of more appropriate 100-litre native trees.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That approval be granted to the Department of Housing to remove the nine requested Casuarina glaucas (She Oaks) and two smaller Lagunaria patersoni (Norfolk Island Hibiscus) and that they be replaced with an appropriate number of advanced 100-litre tree species.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Series of photographs of Casuarina glaucas requested for removal.

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 

 

Walkway viewed from the east – trees block out a large amount of light

 

Trees planted much too close to brick fence and footpath

Trees too close to properties and dropping large amounts of needles

 

Casuarina needles cover a large area and pose a liability issue – also used to discard used syringes.


 

Director, City Services' Report 10/2007

 

 

SUBJECT:

REQUEST FOR CHANGE OF STREET NAME - PART OF DOWLING STREET BEHIND THE SOUND BARRIER.

 

 

DATE:

28 February, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/07140

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES     

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

An e-mail has been received from Ms Amanda Finch of 25 Dowling Street, Kensington, suggesting that Council survey the local residents of Dowling Street, Kensington, behind the sound barrier, asking for their views for a street name change.

 

ISSUES:

 

 Ms Finch advises in her correspondence that -

 

“I have spoken to many residents of Dowling Street, Kensington who live behind the sound barrier and all have been in agreement that the road needs to have a name change, due to the confusion this name generates.

 

Since 2000 when the sound barrier was erected there is no access to Dowling Street (behind the sound barrier) from the main Dowling Street which runs onto Southern Cross Drive. The only way to access it is from Todman Avenue (and that only gives access to Nos. 1 – 23) or from Milroy Avenue which gives access to the rest of Dowling Street from No. 25 onwards behind the sound barrier. Nor is there any vehicular exit from Dowling Street behind the sound barrier onto Dowling Street/Southern Cross Drive. 

 

After seven years I still find people driving up and down trying to find their way back onto the main road  (I had to give directions to two motorists just last week.)

 

It is extremely confusing for delivery people, couriers and taxis when you try to explain you live in Dowling Street, but they can’t actually access it from Dowling Street.  If they do not turn off at Todman Avenue they end up on Southern Cross Drive and cannot turn off until Mascot.

 

To add to the confusion, Dowling Street is south of South Dowling Street which makes directions even more difficult.

 

The other point is Dowling Street behind the sound barrier is no longer a street.  It is a one-way, one lane road that goes to no-where. It is a dead end at the Southern Cross Drive end.

 

I believe it would be more appropriate to call this area behind the sound barrier Milroy Lane or Todman Lane  (there is already a Dowling Lane. )

 

Could you please do a survey of Dowling Street (behind the sound barrier), residents as I am sure you will find the vast majority agree with me.”

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 2     A vibrant and diverse community.

Direction 2a    Maintain a current understanding of our community’s needs.

Key Actions:   Regularly consult our community on their needs.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

In view of the apparent confusion of locating this Council controlled road of Dowling Street, Kensington, it would seem appropriate to survey the local residents and owners of Dowling Street, in the vicinity of the sound barrier, to obtain their views of a possible name change and this matter be brought back to Council with the residents’ suggestions and comments.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

a)  a survey be prepared to ascertain the views of the local residents and owners in the vicinity of Dowling Street (behind the sound barrier) and a report be brought back to Council after the closing date;

 

b)  opinion be sought from Council’s Heritage Planner regarding appropriate names for this section of Dowling Street, which reflect the history of the location; and

 

c)  the view of public authorities be obtained concerning the possible name change.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

Nil

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

MARK SHAW

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

MANAGER TECHNICAL SERVICES


 

Director, City Services' Report 11/2007  

 

 

SUBJECT:

RAINBOW STREET / BOTANY STREET, KINGSFORD / RANDWICK.  

 

 

DATE:

1 March, 2007

FILE NO:

f2004/08216

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Council, on the Motion of Councillor Andrews and Councillor White, resolved that:

 

          The Randwick Traffic Committee investigate the re-opening of the intersection of Rainbow Street and Botany Street, Kingsford.  Further, that they investigate the implementation of traffic signals or a roundabout at this location with a report to come back to an Ordinary Council Meeting for discussion.

 

This report examines this matter and provides a recommendation.

 

ISSUES:

 

Rainbow Street, between Anzac Parade and Avoca Street, is a State Road under the care and control of the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) of NSW. Council has no power to alter any traffic control facility upon Rainbow Street without the explicit approval of the RTA.  Also, the Randwick Traffic Committee has no authorisation to recommend alterations to any State Roads. 

 

Direct access in a north/south direction along Botany Street, at Rainbow Street, was eliminated with the introduction of a median traffic island in the early 1980’s, due to a very poor crash history at the intersection. 

 

Botany Street is primarily a residential street which runs from Bunnerong Road in the south through to Alison Road in the north.  It is principally a two way, two lane street with parallel parking generally permitted alongside the kerb.  It intercepts 4 major roads with the following controls:

 

Road

Control

Anzac Parade

Traffic Signals, allowing all movements.

Rainbow Street

A median along Rainbow Street allows for left turns only in and out of Botany Street.

Barker Street

Roundabout, allowing all movements.

High Street

Traffic Signals, allowing all movements

 

It should be noted that the Barker Street intersection, currently controlled by a roundabout, has a poor crash history.

 

Removal of the median island at the Rainbow / Botany intersection is likely to significantly increase traffic flow along all parts of Botany Street; both north and south of Rainbow Street.  A count of the residential dwellings between Anzac Parade and High Street reveals that there are some 400 dwellings with a frontage to the street.  The residents of these dwellings are most likely to have strong concerns about re-introduction of more through traffic to their street. 

 

Also, increased traffic volumes through the Botany / Barker Street intersection would most likely adversely affect pedestrian and vehicular safety at this intersection which is currently performing poorly.

 

A search of Council’s correspondence records, for the nine years from 1997 to current, reveals that only one item of correspondence (dated Nov 2001) has been received by Council seeking the re-opening of the subject intersection. No other representations seeking this change have been identified (apart from the subject Notice of Motion).

 

Following Council’s Resolution the matter was referred to Randwick Traffic Committee where the following recommendation was made:

 

          That no action be taken on this matter until such time as Council has undertaken a full traffic impact study of the area to ascertain the effects of the proposal.

 

A full traffic impact study would require a significant number of Origin / Destination surveys of Botany Street, Avoca Street and Anzac Parade etc.  These surveys are very labour intensive as they require the recording of number plates at numerous ‘origin’ screening points and the recording of number plates at numerous ‘destination’ screening points.  All of the collected ‘origin’ data then needs to be compared to all of the collected ‘destination’ data in order to ascertain the existing routes of vehicles through the system.  A study then needs to be made of the data to determine what would be the likely impact of removal of the median island. 

 

The study would then attempt to ascertain the likely re-assignment of traffic flows from one route to other routes.  Also, the study would examine the preferred method of intersection control (traffic signals / roundabout / other…).  Currently traffic signals at such a location would cost approximately $150,000 - $200,000.  A roundabout would cost some $90,000 - $100,000.  It is understood that the study itself would cost in the order of $40,000 - $60,000.

 

If this study were to recommend that an adjustment to the intersection was possible the matter would then require referral to the RTA for its consideration.  Part of the RTA’s consideration would be an assessment of the community’s opinion on the proposal with an examination of any community consultation which had occurred.

 

Ultimately the RTA would still be in a position to reject any proposal put to it, on technical or any other grounds.

 

 It is understood that one rationale for the suggested re-opening of the intersection is the current poor performance of the adjacent north/south route, being Avoca StreetAvoca Street is also a State Road under the care and control of the RTA.  It is considered that rather than pursue the removal of a facility which has been in place for some 25 years and which assists in the reduction of through traffic on a local residential street and about which Council has received only one external request in the last 9 years, Council may wish to seek the cooperation of the RTA in making the parallel State Road, being Avoca Street, perform better.

 

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 9:            Integrated and Accessible Transport

Direction 9d:          Residential amenity is protected by appropriate traffic management.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Given the likely negative opinion of the existing residents of Botany Street to a proposal which would significantly increase traffic flows along their street; and given the very low level of community members requesting such a proposal; and given the significant costs involved, it is considered that no further action be taken with regard to this proposal, at this time.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council not pursue, with the RTA, the re-opening of the intersection of Rainbow Street and Botany Street, Kingsford/Randwick, at this time.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil.

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

TONY LEHMANN

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

MANAGER, INTEGRATED TRANSPORT



 

Confidential Items (Closed Session)

 

Notices of Rescission Motions