Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

 

19 August 2008

 

WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 13TH FEBRUARY 2007 AT 6:00 PM

 

Committee Members:           The Mayor, Cr P. Tracey, Crs Andrews, Belleli (Chairperson), Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Matson, Notley-Smith, Seng & White.

 

Quorum:                           Five (5) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2004, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE WORKS COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

1           Apologies/Granting of leave of absences

 

2           Confirmation of the Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 5TH DECEMBER 2006.

 

3           Declaration of Pecuniary & Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

4           Addressing to Committee by Members of the Public

 

5           Urgent Business

 

6           Report of Committee

 

6                      

REPORT OF THE GREENING RANDWICK COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK HELD ON TUESDAY, 5TH DECEMBER, 2006.

2

 

7           Works

 

7.1                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 1/2007 - LEMON SCENTED GUM (CORYMBIA CITRIODORA) GROWING WITHIN FRONT OF 44 MILROY AVENUE, KENSINGTON.

4

7.2                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 2/2007 - COUNCIL OWNED FICUS 'HILLII' (HILLS WEEPING FIG) OUTSIDE 328-330 ALISON ROAD, COOGEE.

11

7.3                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 3/2007 - ELLA RESERVE, QUARRY RESERVE AND WRITTLE PARKS - PLAYGROUND UPGRADES.

18

7.4                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 4/2007 - PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION PLAN.

26

 

 

 

8           Confidential Items (Closed Session)

 

9           Notices of Rescission Motions

 

 

 

…………………………………..

GENERAL MANAGER


REPORT OF GREENING RANDWICK COMMITTEE MEETING OF
THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
RANDWICK

HELD ON TUESDAY, 5TH DECEMBER 2006 AT 5:05 PM

 

 

PRESENT:

 

The Mayor, Cr P. Tracey (East Ward)

 

East Ward                                  -        Cr M. Matson (Chairperson)                    

 

Community Representatives           -        Mr R. Creaton, Ms J. Batty, Ms J. McGirr &

Ms R. Wade

                            

OFFICERS PRESENT:

 

Director, City Services                                                         Mr J. Frangoples

Tree Management Officer                                                     Mr B. Bourke  

Senior Administrative Coordinator                                          Ms J. Hartshorn

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE:

 

Cr R. Belleli.

 

1.         APOLOGY/IES/GRANTING OF LEAVE OF ABSENCES:

 

There were no apologies.

 

2.         DECLARATION OF PECUNIARY & NON-PECUNIARY INTERESTS.

 

Nil.

 

3.         ADDRESSING OF COMMITTTEE BY MEMBERS OF THE PULBIC.

 

Nil.

 

4.         GREENING RANDWICK.

 

4.1      DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 88/2006 - DRAFT SIGNIFICANT TREE REGISTER.  (F2004/07359)

 

RECOMMENDATION: (Matson/Tracey):

 

That:

 

a)     Council proceed with the current Draft Register of Significant Trees as Stage 1 of the project and that the Register be placed on Public Exhibition for a period of two months to allow comments and feedback from the community and other stakeholders and that at the expiration of that period a report be prepared addressing any issues raised in relation to the document; and

b)     Funding for Stage 2 of the Register of Significant Trees be considered for inclusion in the 2007/2008 Budget, with particular consideration being given to:

 

a.      the Bundock Street defence site;

b.      the Anzac Rifle Range at Malabar; and

c.      remnant native tree species.

 

5.2      DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 89/2006 - URBAN FOREST MANAGEMENT.  (F2004/07359)

 

RECOMMENDATION: (Matson/Tracey):

 

That:

 

a)     The Urban Forest Policy be disengaged from the originally proposed software tool discussed in the exhibited draft;

 

b)     Council seek advice from Newcastle Council on alternative techniques for assessing Randwick’s tree canopy cover for calculating the contribution made to the community of that coverage;

 

c)     The policy be redrafted and re-exhibited;

 

d)     Randwick City Council’s Management Plan incorporate into it appropriate key performance indicators derived from the application of the Urban Forest Policy.

 

The meeting closed at 5.38 pm.

 

 

 

 

………………………………….

CHAIRPERSON

 

 


 

Director, City Services' Report 1/2007

 

 

SUBJECT:

LEMON -SCENTED GUM (CORYMBIA CITRIODORA) GROWING WITHIN FRONT OF 44 MILROY AVENUE, KENSINGTON

 

 

DATE:

1 February, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/07359

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The owner of 44 Milroy Avenue, Kensington, has written to Council requesting a review of its decision not to grant consent to remove a large Corymbia citriodora (Lemon-scented Gum) from the front of her property.

 

The owner of that property has applied to Council on several occasions over a ten-year period to have this tree removed and it has been refused on each occasion because of its health, significance and the fact that any damage has been relatively minor.

 

ISSUES:

 

The latest Tree Preservation Order (TPO) application for the removal of this tree (lodged with Council in October, 2006) cited as reasons for its removal, among other things, inappropriate location, inappropriate species, structural damage, branches overhanging the residence and a fear of falling branches.

 

A subsequent site inspection undertaken by Council’s tree officer found the tree to be in excellent health and contributing significantly to the arboricultural amenity of the area. There was visual evidence that the tree was causing structural damage to a small brick fence immediately adjacent to the tree and there is some ‘bowing’ in the concrete driveway.

 

The tree is situated less than 200mm from the front brick fence and around 300mm from a smaller brick fence on the western side of the tree.

 

The adjacent footpath has been recently replaced as a result of tree root damage and at this point there has been no recurrence of root damage.

 

The subject tree is approximately 12-15 metres in height with a canopy spread of 6-8 metres. It is in excellent health and is an important provider of habitat and food source.

 

The two central leaders of the tree pass along either side of the domestic service wires entering the property and the owner has concerns that in a storm it could bring those wires down.

 

The owner also has concerns that branches may fall onto her property and that of her neighbour, even though a site inspection reveals that no branches have snapped from within the canopy. There is also very little deadwood within the canopy – which is common for this species of tree.

 

The tree is situated immediately to the north of two (2) mature Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ street trees, which would afford it significant shelter from southerly winds.

 

It drops a large amount of leaf litter on a continuous basis and this is exacerbated when rain periods create water ponding adjacent to the driveway and gutter. The owner also states that leaves are constantly blocking her gutters and causing water damage to the residence.

 

The property owner bought the tree as a seedling more than 30 years ago and thought she was doing the right thing by planting an Australian native tree – not knowing how large it would eventually grow.

 

She is 86 years old and both she and her daughter are extremely worried about the consequences of retaining this tree – no matter how unfounded most of those concerns are.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 1: Leadership in sustainability.

Direction: A ‘Sustainable City’ is one that meets the needs of the present, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their environmental needs.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

This tree is growing on private property and therefore there are no financial impacts on Council.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The tree is large, healthy and significant and its retention would certainly conform with the intent of Council’s Tree Preservation Order. It provides important visual amenity within the surrounding area and it provides much-needed habitat for birds and other fauna.

 

It could be argued that it is planted too close to the front and side brick fences and it is certainly causing damage to both the fences and adjacent infrastructure.

 

However, this damage could be rectified without the tree being removed. The foundations to any new fence could be piered over any tree roots or the fence could be replaced with another style, such as wooden pickets.

 

The driveway and adjacent footpath could be replaced if they were further damaged at a relatively minor cost to Council that would certainly be offset by the amenity the tree provides.

 

It should be pointed out that should the tree be removed the loss of visual amenity would be negligible from the street because of the size of the canopies of the two adjacent Ficus ‘Hillii’ street trees.

 

The tree has recently been inspected by two Council tree officers and neither could find any justifiable or compelling reason to grant consent to remove it – they are both of the opinion that its visual amenity and horticultural significance outweigh the relatively minor structural damage the tree is causing.

 

The tree owner has provided no evidence that the tree is causing structural damage to the residence itself and they have been advised that should any such damage become apparent the matter would be reviewed.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That the Corymbia citriodora (Lemon-scented Gum) growing within the front of 44 Milroy Avenue, Kensington, be retained until such time as it can be demonstrated that it is causing actual structural damage to the residence itself.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Series of photographs showing the subject tree from outside the property and damage being caused by its roots to both private property and public infrastructure.

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TREE MANGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

View of tree within property from street – canopy largely covered by Ficus ‘Hillii’ street trees

 

 

 

 

Accumulated leaf litter on nature strip – note ponding in street after rain event

 

 

 

 

Damage to side and front brick retaining walls – side wall only four courses high and insignificant

 

 

 

Slight ‘bowing’ in footpath – not necessarily caused by tree roots from Gum

 

 

 

 

Tree root damage to front brick fence – footpath only recently repaired

 

 

 

 

Property viewed from street – tree barely noticeable

 


 

Director, City Services' Report 2/2007

 

 

SUBJECT:

COUNCIL OWNED FICUS 'HILLII' (HILLS WEEPING FIG) OUTSIDE 328-330 ALISON ROAD, COOGEE.

 

 

DATE:

10 January, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/07359

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES     

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The owners of 328 Alison Road, Coogee, have made a claim against Council for extensive tree root damage caused to the front of their property by the roots of a very large and significant Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside that property.

 

The damaged footpath area outside 326-330 Alison Road has been removed because of public liability concerns, as well as to allow the extent of any tree root activity to be properly assessed.

 

ISSUES:

 

The roots of this tree have caused ongoing and extensive damage to two adjacent front brick fences over a number of years as well as to the surrounding footpath, kerb and gutter and an adjacent driveway and garage.

 

The damage being caused to the driveway and footpath in particular are creating a very serious liability issue that needs to be addressed as soon as possible.

 

The tree is in excellent health and is approximately 18 metres tall with a canopy spread of between 18-20 metres. Although the tree is the only one of this species remaining in this section of Alison Road, its good health and size makes it a landmark within the street.

 

The tree is growing under overhead powerlines and adjacent to a street light and domestic service wires and has to be regularly pruned to maintain the statutory clearances from these wires.

 

There is an absence of street trees growing along the same section of nature strip as this tree and its removal would cause a significant loss of amenity and wildlife habitat. This could be negated to some degree with the planting of several super-advanced tree species of a type nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

The subject tree has been assessed as having a moderate risk potential. It has also been assessed as having a medium hazard rating when issues such as failure potential, target rating and the size of any potential branch failures are considered.

 

It has been acknowledged as having significant scenic/environmental amenity and as providing important habitat/food source. Conversely, the effect of removal on soil stability/land degradation would be negligible.

 

This tree has been assessed by a Council tree officer as having an amenity value of $21,600 – using the Standards Australia AS – DR99307 valuation guide.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 10: A Healthy Environment

Direction 10b: Environmental risks and impacts are strategically managed

Key action: Implement policies, programs and strategies to manage environmental risks and impacts.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The total cost to remove and stump grind the subject tree and to re-instate the nature strip, footpath and surrounding infrastructure would be approximately $3,500 and this would come from Council’s annual tree management budget.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

This species of tree is entirely inappropriate for growing in a confined nature strip situation such as this, immediately adjacent to front brick fences, concrete footpath, driveway and nearby garage.

 

The footpath next to the tree has been severely damaged over a long period and was recently removed. Where possible, the footpath has been re-instated in concrete and the remaining damaged footpath and driveway areas have been temporarily replaced in asphalt.  This is because the spread and sheer size of a large number of roots from this tree are such that root pruning is simply not possible and even if it was it would not ensure that future damage to private property could be avoided.

 

The installation of a tree root barrier is not a feasible option because it would compromise the stability of the tree and would adversely impact upon its long term health. Any such barrier would only be a temporary solution to a small number of the problems associated with the tree and eventually tree roots would simply grow over or under any such barrier.

 

The only effective long-term solution to dealing with the range of problems being caused by the roots of this tree would be to remove it completely and replace it with several more appropriate tree species.

 

Council at its Ordinary Council Meeting held on Tuesday, 23 November, 2004, resolved that Works Committee would consider and determine any applications/requests (not subjected to delegated authority) associated with the removal of significant trees (Resolution 295).  However, there are a number of procedural and/or policy matters relating to a number of elements within Resolution 295 that are still either being drafted or are the subject of legal opinion/briefing.

 

It is perhaps appropriate therefore that until these matters have been fully resolved and Council commences its adopted development consent procedure for dealing with the removal of significant trees within the City, that any reports dealing with these matters be forwarded to Works Committee for resolution. 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That approval be granted to remove the large Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing on the nature strip outside 328 Alison Road, Coogee, and that it be replaced with several more appropriate tree species as nominated in Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Photos of tree and roots.

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Tree is situated adjacent to power pole, street light and service wires

 

 

      Tree pruned around power lines – significant in streetscape

 

        Extensive tree root expansion across driveway – root pruning not viable

 

 

        Roots entering and undermining adjacent garage

 

        Roots extending across driveway area – too large to root prune

 

 

Roots undermining front of property – damaging garage, fence, entranceway

 

         Roots damaging kerb and gutter, protruding above nature strip

 


 

Director, City Services' Report 3/2007

 

 

SUBJECT:

ELLA RESERVE, QUARRY RESERVE AND WRITTLE PARKS - PLAYGROUND UPGRADES

 

 

DATE:

1 February, 2007

FILE NO:

PROJ/10251/2006; PROJ/10248.2006; PROJ/10250/2006

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES       

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Randwick City Council approved funds in the 2006-07 Capital Works Budget to upgrade playgrounds in the following parks:

 

·     Ella Reserve, Malabar -               $100,000

·     Quarry Reserve, Maroubra -        $88,000

·     Writtle Park, Randwick -             $96,000

 

The new playgrounds have been designed to meet the needs of local residents in conjunction with extensive community consultation. Following on from comments made at the onsite consultation meetings, the concept designs were revised and placed on public exhibition. The community were again invited to provide comments on the designs. At the close of public exhibition period, Council had received letters by a number of local residents outlining concerns and providing comment in regards to the new playgrounds and requesting alternative works for both the playgrounds and parks overall. 

 

During the public exhibition period Council proceeded with the design development and documentation for the playgrounds. The playgrounds are scheduled to be constructed by the end of June 2007.

 

BACKGROUND:

 

In October 2006, Council staff held a site community consultation with local residents at each park. A concept design was presented to the participants.  The design for each playground included the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISSUES:

 

Council undertakes community consultations to ensure that residents have the opportunity for input on the playground design. Further to comments from the on site meeting, the concept designs were revised and placed on public exhibition. In each case, the exhibition was held for two weeks, from 14 November to 28 November 2006, and showed the revised concept designs. The community were again invited to make further comment.

 

At the close of the public exhibition, Council received five letters for Ella Reserve, one letter and one petition (signed by twenty six persons) for Quarry Reserve and one letter for Writtle Park.

 

The following table summaries the issues raised by residents and a response to those matters:

ELLA RESERVE, MALABAR

Identified Issue

Response

1. Install new play equipment to cater for broader age groups.

The new play equipment caters for children from 0 to 12 years. The park has sufficient open space for informal ball games and an access path for bike riding. These activities already cater for older children.

2. Delete the proposed shade structure and plant additional shade trees. The cost of the shade structure would be better spent in additional play equipment.

Under current Council Resolution a Shade Structure is to be provided over the playgrounds. Trees have been proposed as part of the upgrade, however will not provide sufficient shade for 5 – 10 years.

A significant portion of the budget has already been allocated towards equipment including swings, a slide, climbing net and activity panels.

3. The proposed seating and swing set to be located towards the centre of the park and away from nearby houses.

Proposed seating and swing set has been relocated towards the centre of the park. There would be no additional cost in locating the play area at the south western part of the site (as opposed to the north eastern part of the site). 

4. Additional planting to be child friendly.

Selected natives grasses have soft foliage and grow to approximately 300mm in height. Selected trees have a high canopy and provide adequate screening and without enclosed spaces. 

5. Remove timber decking to allow for additional play equipment.

The timber decking will be removed as part of the upgrade to provide for additional play equipment.

6. Treat white ants in existing timber posts.

All posts infested by white ants have been treated and will be removed before the commencement of the playground construction.

 

QUARRY RESERVE, MAROUBRA

Identified Issue

Response

1. A new playground will attract anti-social behaviour and should not be proposed for this park. Other suitable locations include Latham Park, Fowler Reserve, Ryan and Byrne Avenues. 

Council has allocated funds to upgrade this existing playground. The existing equipment is damaged and does not comply with Australian Standards. Several residents who attended the on site consultation meeting were in support of the new playground. Following residents comments, the proposed playground has been relocated closer to Cantrill Avenue, which is in close proximity to existing street lighting and away from nearby residents.

2. Petition - Improve assess across the site by installing a concrete footpath.

Provision of a footpath along the length of the park is not part of the playground objectives. The estimated cost to construct the required footpath (approx 600 m2) is in the order of $55,000. Funds are not available from the playgrounds programme to undertake these works.

3. Petition - Include lighting within the park.

The proposed playground is located in close proximity to existing street lighting. Provision of lighting throughout the park is not part of the playground objectives. The estimated cost to install lighting as suggested and in accordance with relevant standards (approx 20 lights) is in the order of $120,000. Funds are not available from the playgrounds programme to undertake these works.

 

 

 

 

WRITTLE PARK, RANDWICK

Identified Issue

Response

1. Install new play equipment to cater for broader age groups.

The new play equipment caters for children from 0 to 12 years. The park has sufficient open space for informal ball games. These activities cater for older children.

2. Increase the size of the shade structure to include the swing set.

A shade structure had been included as part of the proposed playground. The structure will provide shade to most of the play equipment. The swing set will not be covered by shade. A larger structure will result in additional costs and a significant portion of the playground deleted. 

3. Install a low bench or table.

A large picnic palette will be included in the proposed upgrade. 

4. Install a bike track around the perimeter of the park.

Provision of a bike track around the perimeter of the park is not part of the playground objectives. The estimated cost to construct the suggested bike track (approx 300 m2) is in the order of $30,000. Funds are not available from the playgrounds programme to undertake these works.

5. Upgrade the existing bubbler.

A new bubbler will be provided as part of the playground upgrade works.

6. Install new bin surrounds.

 

A new bin will be provided as part of the playground upgrade works. New bins will also be provided within the park.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 5:               Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Direction 5b:             Maximise opportunities for residents and visitors to enjoy both active and passive open space uses.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Randwick City Council has allocated funds to upgrade the existing playgrounds in Ella Reserve, Quarry Reserve and Writtle Park. The new playgrounds include contemporary play equipment, new furniture, safety fencing, soft fall, shade sails and planting. Some residents have raised concerns in relation to the upgrade of the playgrounds.

 

As stated earlier in keeping with Council’s standard project delivery process Council has carried out extensive community consultation and have already completed the design and documentation phase of the playgrounds.  Construction of the playgrounds is scheduled to be completed by June 2007.

 

Most of the concerns raised by residents who attended the site meetings and provided comment during the public exhibition period will be addressed by Council by undertaking the playground works. Appropriate community consultation was undertaken for the new playgrounds and the needs of the broader community have been met. It is considered appropriate to undertake the playground upgrade works as currently designed.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

a)  The playgrounds in Ella Reserve, Quarry Reserve and Writtle Park be constructed in accordance with the concept designs subject to minor modifications outlined in Table 1 of this report; and

 

b)  Persons making submissions in relation to the projects be notified of Council’s decision.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

1.  Ella Reserve - Concept Design

2.  Quarry Reserve  - Concept Design

3.  Writtle Park  - Concept Design.     

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

HAYLEY SEGEDIN

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

LANDSCAPCE ARCHITECT

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Attachment 1 – Ella Reserve – Concept Design


 

 

 

Attachment 2 – Quarry Reserve – Concept Design


 

 

 

Attachment 3 – Writtle Park – Concept Design


 

  

Director, City Services' Report 4/2007

 

 

 

SUBJECT:

PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION PLAN

 

 

DATE:

1 February, 2007

FILE NO:

F2004/08408

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

A pesticide is any substance or mixture of substances used to destroy, suppress or alter the life cycle of any pest. A pesticide can also be an organism. Pesticides include herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, fumigants, bactericides, rodenticides, baits, lures, repellents and pesticides used on animals to control external parasites.

 

Due to recent amendments to the Pesticides Regulation 1995, Council is required to prepare a Pesticides Use Notification Plan by 1 February 2007.  A pesticides use notification plan will explain how a Council will notify members of the community about the use of pesticides in the public places that it owns and controls.

 

The Pesticides Use Notification Plan has been finalised after public viewing and comments.

 

ISSUES:

 

Summary of Draft Notification Plan.

 

Council uses of pesticides consist of applying herbicides for weed control and applying insecticides to manage certain insect pests. Council also uses pesticides in the parks and public gardens, playgrounds, bushland reserves, sand dunes, picnic areas, sporting fields and ovals, road verges and reserves, laneways and pathways, easements accessible to the public, drains. Council chambers, libraries, community halls/centres and childcare facilities.

 

Council is required to notify the residents and facility users before using pesticides in any area in the city. The Pesticides Use Notification Matrix in the attached report demonstrates different types of communication required to notify the community regarding use of pesticides. A notification sign is required to be erected at the site prior to and following use of a pesticide.  The notification sign is an important part of the plan, which must include product name, purpose, date of use, place of use, contact telephone number and health risk information.

 

Department of Environment and Conservation officers were consulted during the preparation of the Pesticides Use Notification Plan.

 

 

 

Notification of Draft Plan to Community for Comments.

 

Council advised residents of the content of the plan by the following methods:

 

o        making a copy of the Draft Plan available for public viewing free of charge in Council’s libraries and Administrative Centre, 30 Frances Street, Randwick NSW 2031, during office hours for a period of 4 weeks

o        placing a copy of the draft plan on the Council website at http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ for a period of 4 weeks

o        placing a notice in The Southern Courier that a Draft Plan has been prepared, where it can be viewed and the period that the Plan will be available for public viewing, and

o        providing a copy of the Draft Plan to all Precinct Committees.

 

No submissions were received in relation to this matter.

 

Once the Plan has been adopted by Council, Council will be required to:

·         place a notice in The Southern Courier that a Final Pesticide Use Notification Plan is in existence for Randwick Council. The notice will state:

o   the area in which the plan operates and

o   where a copy of the final plan will be displayed.

·         publish a notice in the NSW Government Gazette that a final Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been completed.

Council may also consider inserting a leaflet in the annual rates notice advising residents of the Plan and where they can view a copy of it.

In addition Council is required to publish a notification (where the final notification plan will be operated and where it can be viewed) in the NSW Government Gazette. Once this has occurred Council is required to notify Department of Environment and Conservation regarding procedures of the finalisation of the Pesticides Use Notification Plan.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 3:            An informed and engaged community. Our community will be participating in shaping of our City.

Directions 3a:        Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide services.

Key actions:           Create effective communication processes and methods between Council, Precinct committees, our community and other key stakeholders.

 

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The signs for notification will be funded from the Open Space Operational Budget.

 

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The preparation of the Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been prepared and exhibited in accordance with the relevant legislation.  Compliance with the requirements of the plan will ensure that the community is better informed about what, when, why and how pesticides are being used and managed with respect to public places in the Randwick City area.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

a)  the Pesticides Use Notification Plan be adopted;

 

b)  a notice be placed in The Southern Courier in accordance with the requirements of the legislation that a Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been adopted by Randwick City Council; and

 

c)  a notice be published in the NSW Government Gazette advising that a Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been prepared in accordance with the relevant legislation.

 

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

1.  Copy of public notification - "The Southern Courier, 31 October, 2006"

2.  Copy of the Pesticides Use Notification Plan.

   

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

ZAMAN SHAMSUZ

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

Environmental management officer

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment 1

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PESTICIDE USE NOTIFICATION PLAN

 

1.     introduction. 6

1.1 ..... Summary of pesticide use by Council 6

2.     Outdoor PUBlic Places covered by this plan. 7

3.     Indoor Spaces. 7

4.     Pesticide notification matrix. 7

5.     notification arrangements. 14

5.1...... Emergency pesticide application. 14

5.2...... Sensitive Places. 14

5.3...... When notification will not be given. 15

6.     Information Provided in the notification. 23

7.     how the community will be notified of DRAFT plan. 23

8.     future reviews of the plan. 24

9.     contact details. 24

10.   LIMITATIONS. 24

11.   references. 25

 

 


 

1.           introduction

This Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Pesticides Regulation 1995 (the Regulation). The Plan sets out how Randwick City Council (Council) will notify the community of pesticide applications it makes or allows to be made to public places that it owns or controls. The aim of the Plan is to meet the community’s general right to know about pesticide applications made to outdoor public places that are owned or controlled by Council. The Plan allows members of the community to take action to avoid contact with pesticides, if they wish. Council ensures that pesticides are applied to public places in a safe and responsible manner in accordance with relevant legislation (Pesticide Act 1999 & Pesticide 1995 Regulation Amended), minimising harm to the community or the environment.

The Plan will also serve as a field resource document for the Council staff and contractors that apply pesticides in Randwick City.

 

The Plan details how the community will be informed of pesticide use by the Council and its representatives in public places. The Plan describes:

 what public places are covered by the plan

 who regularly uses these public places and an estimate of the level of use

 how and when Council will provide the community with information about its pesticide applications in public places (i.e. what notification arrangements will be used)

 how the community can access this plan and get more information about Council’s notification arrangements

 how future reviews of the plan will be conducted, and

 contact details for anyone wishing to discuss this plan with Council.

1.1 Summary of pesticide use by Council

 

The majority of pesticide use consists of applying herbicides for weed control and applying insecticides to manage certain insect pests. Frequency of programmed applications range from weekly to monthly for bush regeneration areas; 6-8 times per year for sports fields; 2-5 times per year for parks and gardens; and two to four per year for public thoroughfares. Insecticides are used for termite and cockroach control to protect structures and public safety wherever this is considered an effective solution. Other pesticide uses include fungicides, and rodenticides. Further information on Council’s pesticide use can be obtained by visiting the Council website www.randwick.nsw.gov.au or by calling the Environmental Management Officer on (02) 9399 0712.

2.           Outdoor PUBlic Places covered by this plan

·         The Council proposes to use, or allow the use of pesticides, in the following categories of outdoor public places within Randwick City:

·         parks and public gardens

·         playgrounds

·         bushland reserves

·         sand dunes

·         picnic areas

·         sporting fields and ovals

·         road verges and reserves

·         laneways and pathways

·         easements accessible to the public, and

·         drains.

 

These categories are all covered by this Plan.

3.           Indoor Spaces

Though not required under the amended Pesticide (1995) Regulation this Plan will also provide information on how notice will be provided to the community of pesticide use in the interior of the following Council buildings:

  The Council Chambers

  libraries

  community halls/centres, and

  childcare facilities.

4.           Pesticide notification matrix

The Pesticide Notification Matrix (Table 1) outlines the analysis pathway that determined what type of notice will be given to the community by the Council about pesticide use in Council controlled public places. This basic risk analysis was dependent on the public places identified, community user groups, an estimate of public space use and the type of pesticide used and its application.

 

The public place where the pesticide application will occur will influence the type of notice given. The type of public place will determine what type of interaction the public is having with the environment. Public places where the public is more likely to expose themselves to pesticides will have more comprehensive notice arrangements than a public place where public interaction will bring them into little or no contact with pesticides.

The frequency with which the community uses a public space directly affects the level of exposure the community has to pesticides. Public places which are frequented very often by large numbers of people will expose a high number of people to pesticides and will thus have more comprehensive notice arrangements compared to public places that do not.

Integral to the decision on the type of notification to be given is the distinction between:

  spot pesticide application by which the Council means pesticide application applied by hand or by a hand-held applicator and

  broad scale pesticide application by which the Council means any pesticide application from a moving vehicle or an irrigation / watering system.

 

The above considerations are presented in a table format (Table 1) to demonstrate that the Council has considered the likely risks of pesticide exposure to the community in Randwick City.


 

 

 

TABLE 1: PESTICIDE NOTIFICATION MATRIX

 

Public places

 

Regular user groups

 

Level of use of public place

 

Type of pesticide use

e.g. Spot/Broad scale herbicides or insecticides

 

Notification Arrangements

 

Public gardens, parks and beachside parks

 

 

 

       Children and young families

       Seniors

       General recreational users (e.g. joggers, dog-walkers, picnickers)

       School groups

       Pets

       Casual hirers for special events

Very High (frequent use by multiple users, with short to medium length stays)

       Spot  spray /injection of herbicides, fungicides or insecticide

 

 

       Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

TABLE 1: PESTICIDE NOTIFICATION MATRIX – (CONT’D)

Public places

 

Regular user groups

 

Level of use of public place

 

Type of pesticide use

e.g. Spot/Broad scale herbicides or insecticides

 

Notification Arrangements

 

Bushland reserves

(including sand dunes and beachside reserves)

       Children and young families

       Seniors

       General recreational users (e.g. joggers, dog-walkers, picnickers)

       Beach goers

       School groups

       Pets

Bush care and bush regeneration groups

Medium to Very High in summer (used by multiple users, with short to medium length stays)

       Spot spray /injection of herbicides, fungicides or insecticides

 

       Broad scale selective herbicides

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Picnic areas

 

 

 

       Children and young families

       Social / recreation groups (e.g. religious or sporting clubs)

       Seniors

       School groups

       Pets

High (particular on weekends, public holidays and school holidays)

       Spot spray /injection of selective herbicides

 

       Rodenticide baits

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Playgrounds

 

 

 

       Children and young families

       Seniors

       School groups

       Social / recreation groups (e.g. religious or sporting clubs)

 

 

 

High (particular on weekends, public holidays and school holidays)

       Spot spray /injection of selective herbicides

 

Section 5.3

 

Sporting fields and ovals

 

 

 

 

       Sporting clubs and associations

       School sports groups

       General recreational users (e.g. joggers, dog-walkers)

       Children and young families

       Pets

       Casual hirers for special events

High to medium

       Spot spray /injection of selective herbicides

 

       Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides and insecticides

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Road verges, road reserves,  footpaths and easements accessible to the public (e.g. road)

       Local residents

       People who work in the area

       Joggers and walkers

       Pets

       Children and young families

 

Medium to low (not actively used by community)

       Spot spray /injection of herbicides

 

       Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Laneways, pathways and drains

 

       Local residents

       People who work in the area

       Joggers and walkers

       Children and young families

       Pets

Medium

 

       Spot spray /injection of herbicides

 

       Broad scale selective or non-selective herbicides

 

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Council Nursery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Local Residents

 Building occupiers / workers

 General public

 Families

 Seniors

 

 

High use for Building occupiers/workers,

controlled use for the general public.

 Spot herbicides, insecticides and fungicides

 Snail baits

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

Interiors of public buildings the Council owns or has control over

       Building occupiers / workers

       Children

       Families

       School Groups

       Seniors

Casual hirers for special events

Very High

Controlled Use

       Fumigation Insecticide

       Spot insecticide and bait insecticide

       Rodenticides and bait bird control

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2

 

Swimming pool buildings and grounds

       Building occupiers / workers (e.g. council chambers)

       Children

       Families

       School Groups

       Seniors

 

Very High in summer

Low in winter

Controlled Use

 

       Fumigation Insecticide

       Spot insecticide and bait insecticide

       Rodenticides ait

       Spot herbicides or fungicides

Section 5.3

Refer Table 2


5.   notification arrangements

This section describes how and when Council will provide notice of pesticide use in public places, including special measures for sensitive places, arrangements for emergency pesticide applications and circumstances where notice will not be given. This section details further considerations regarding pesticide application and provides in a table format what type of notification is to be given (Table 2).  In Table 2 public places with the same notification arrangements are merged together to reduce repetition.

The pesticide use notification arrangements table (Table 2) will also serve Council staff and Council appointed sub-contractors with a usable document when applying pesticides within the Council Local Government Area.

It must be noted that if a pesticide label states a timeframe of safe re-entry into a pesticide application area longer than what has been outlined in Table 2, then the notification arrangements should be changed accordingly.

5.1         Emergency pesticide application

Cases where emergency pesticide applications are required:

 nuisance biting insects

 dangerous/venomous  insects

 rodents (that pose an immediate health hazard), or

 aesthetic / maintenance pests, which are destroying sporting fields, council gardens or council timber infrastructure.

5.2         Sensitive Places

 

Clause 11J (1) of the Pesticides Regulation 1995, defines a sensitive place to be any:

·         school or preschool

·         kindergarten

·         childcare centre

·         hospital

·         community health centre

·         nursing home and

·         a place declared to be a sensitive place by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) now a part of the Department of Environment and Conservation.

 

If any pesticide application is to occur in a council controlled area that is in or adjacent to any of the above listed places then the notification arrangements for Sensitive Places (Table 2) is to be implemented.

5.3         When notification will not be given

Notification will not be given by the Council, Council appointed contractors or Council approved volunteer groups for:

 minor control of indoor and out door insect pests using domestically available (e.g. from a local supermarket) baits or aerosol spray cans

 minor spot weed control using domestically available herbicides using hand held spray bottles with 10 Litres or less of ‘ready to use’ product

 cut-and-paint or stem injection techniques for:

o   removal of pest trees

o   trees at risk of falling, or

o   tree branches that need to be removed as the pose risk to people and/or property.

 Public places over which persons or organisations hold an existing lease on Council land. For these places, Council will not provide notification of pesticide use, but it will request the lessee to carry out notification of the lessee pesticide use in a manner consistent with this plan. Where possible, Council will require lessees, as a condition of their lease, to comply with this plan.

 Maintenance herbicide use by residents that apply herbicide on Council footpaths / verge areas in front of their properties.

 


TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGMENTS

 

Public Places

 Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Public Gardens, Parks and Beachside Parks

 

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 48 hours prior for broad scale application event.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48 hours for broad scale application.

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

  Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council Environmental Management Officer (refer Section 9).

  If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

  The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

 

Picnic Area and Playgrounds

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

 

  Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council Environmental Management Officer (refer Section 9).

  If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

  The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

 

 

                 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

 Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Sports Fields and Oval

  Install a Pesticide Use Notification sign with the details prescribed in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48 hours after application.

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

  Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council Environmental Management Officer (refer Section 9).

  Sport teams / Schools can register with the council contact to be added to the mailing list

  If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

  The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

Bushland Reserves including Sand Dune Reserves

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usage area 24 hours prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 24 hours after application.

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

 

  Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council Environmental Management Officer (refer Section 9).

  If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

  The quarterly pesticides usages plan of the area will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

 

 

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

 Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Road Verges,

Road Reserves,

Footpaths, and

Accessible Easements / Drains

Onsite Notification will not be given

 

  Advertise map of planned usages area monthly in the local Newspaper with details on Council’s website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/

  If Council is unable to use the pesticides on the proposed date for rain or any other reason, it will be used in the next 48 hours.

Council Nursery

  Install a permanent Pesticide Use Notification sign with the details prescribed in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan. The sign will also have changeable dates that will detail a week in advance the pesticide use in the public placed. The sign will also detail the previous week pesticide use.

Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign at the sites when the rodent Bait stations are being used.

 

  Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council Environmental Management Officer (refer Section 9).

  Put Pesticide Use notification sign on staff notice board at the time of application and to remain for 24 hours afterwards.

 

 

Interiors of Public Buildings.

(library, Council Building etc)

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 24 hours prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48 hours after application.

  Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council Environmental Management Officer (refer Section 9).

  Details for scheduled pesticide will be available on the Council website http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ and from Council offices with notification of the availability of this information being advertised in the local press.

  Put Pesticide Use notification sign on staff notice board at the time of application and to remain for 24 hours afterwards.

 

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Swimming Pool and Building Grounds

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, at the entrance / entrances of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

  Details for scheduled pesticide use can be requested from the Council Environmental Management Officer (refer Section 9).

  Place Pesticide Use notification sign on staff notice board 24 hours before any pesticide application and to remain for 24 hours afterwards.

 

 

 

Any of the above Locations adjacent to a Sensitive Place

School or Preschool

Kindergarten

Childcare Centre

Hospital

Community Health Centre

Nursing Home

Place declared to be sensitive by DEC.

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, in the immediate vicinity of the proposed usages area 72 hours prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

 

  The above on site notification will not be applicable for footpath.

  Contact the controller or occupier of sensitive places by telephone, email or a posted letter. The controller / occupier will be instructed of the nature of the pesticide application and all information detailed in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan at least 72 hours prior to pesticide application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2: PESTICIDES USE NOTIFICATION ARRANGMENTS – (Cont’d)

 

Public Places

Onsite Notification

Duration and Location

Offsite Notification Methods

Emergency Application Area in Public Places EXCEPT Sensitive Places

 

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, in the immediate vicinity of the proposed usages area 1 hour prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 48hours after application.

 

  NONE

Emergency Application Area in Public Places adjacent to Sensitive Places

School or Preschool

Kindergarten

Childcare Centre

Hospital

Community Health centre

Nursing Home

Place declared to be sensitive by DEC.

  Erect Pesticide Use Notification Sign, as described in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan, in the immediate vicinity of the proposed usages area 2 hours prior to any pesticide application.

  Pesticide Use Notification Sign to stay in application area for 72 hours after application.

  Contact the controller or occupier of sensitive places by telephone or a council officer visiting the premises. The control / occupier will be instructed of the nature of the pesticide application and all information detailed in Section 6 of the Draft Pesticide Notification Plan. 

 


6.           Information Provided in the notification

In accordance with clause 11L (2) (g) of the Pesticide Regulation (1995), notices of pesticide use must include all the following information:

 the full product name of the pesticide to be used

 the purpose of the use

 the proposed date of use, dates of use or range of dates of use

 the place of use

 a contact telephone number or email address for the officer of the public authority whom the affected persons can contact to discuss the notice, and

 any warnings about limitations on the subsequent use of or entry onto the land if such warnings are specified on the approved label/materials safety data sheet for the pesticide or in the permit for use of the pesticide.

7.           how the community will be notified of DRAFT plan

 

Council  advised residents of the contents of the  Plan on the 31 October 2006 by the following methods:

  making a copy of the Draft Plan available for public viewing free of charge in Council’s libraries and Administrative Centre, 30 Frances Street, Randwick NSW 2031, during office hours for a period of 4 weeks

 

  placing a copy of the draft plan on the Council website at http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/ for a period of 4 weeks

 

  placing a notice in The Southern Courier that a Draft Plan has been prepared, where it can be viewed and the period that the Plan will be available for public viewing, and

 

  providing a copy of the Draft Plan to all Precinct Committees.


Once the Plan has been finalised after public viewing and comment, Council will:

  place a notice in The Southern Courier that a Final Pesticide Use Notification Plan is in existence for Randwick Council. The notice will state:

the area in which the plan operates and

where a copy of the final plan will be displayed.

  Place a notice in the NSW Government Gazette that a final Pesticide Use Notification Plan has been complete and

  include a leaflet in the annual rates notice advising residents of the Plan and where they can view a copy of it.

8.      future reviews of the plan

Council will review the Pesticide Use Notification Plan every 3 years. The review will include:

·         a report on the progress of implementing the Plan

·         placing the Plan on public exhibition, with any proposed changes and calling for public submissions and

·         making recommendations for alterations if appropriate to the Plan in the light of public submissions.

9.      contact details

Anyone wishing to contact Council to discuss the notification plan or to obtain details of pesticide applications in public places should contact Council Call Centre on 1300 722 542.

10.         LIMITATIONS

The conclusions presented in this report are relevant to the condition of the site and the state of legislation currently enacted as at the date of this report.  We do not make any representation or warranty that the conclusions in this report will be applicable in the future as there may be changes in the condition of the site, applicable legislation or other factors that would affect the conclusions contained in this report.

OTEK has used a degree of skill and care ordinarily exercised by reputable members of our profession practising in the same or similar locality. Conclusions are based on representative samples or locations at the site, the intensity of those samples being in accordance with the usual levels of testing carried out for this type of investigation. Due to the inherent variability in natural systems we cannot warrant that the whole overall condition of the site is identical or substantially similar to the representative samples.

 

This report has been prepared for Randwick City Council and for the specific purpose to which it refers. No responsibility is accepted to any third party and neither the whole of the report or any part or reference thereto may be published in any document, statement or circular nor in any communication with third parties without our prior written approval of the form and context in which it will appear.

This report and the information contained in it is the intellectual property of OTEK.  Randwick City Council is granted an exclusive licence for the use of the report for the purpose described in the report.

 

11.         references

Australian/New Zealand Standard 4360:2004 Risk Management, Standards Australia.

NSW Government Amended Pesticide (1995) Regulation.

NSW Government Pesticide Act (1999).

NSW Department of Environment and Conservation, Environmental Protection Authority Website: (Accessed 22nd May 2006) http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/pesticides/

 

 

 

 

 



 

Confidential Items (Closed Session)

 

Notices of Rescission Motions