Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

 

1st August, 2006

 

 

COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 8TH AUGUST 2006

AT 5:30 P.M.

 

 

Committee Members:                  His Worship, the Mayor, T. Seng, Andrews (Deputy Chairperson) Kenny, Matson, Procopiadis, Tracey (Chairperson) & Woodsmith

 

Quorum:                                      Four (4) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2004, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

 

 

1           Apologies

 

2           Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 11TH JULY, 2006.

 

3           Declaration of Pecuniary & Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

4           Addresses to Committee by the Public

 

5           Community Services

 

5.1                        

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING REPORT 67/2006 - ANTI RACISM AND COMMUNITY HARMONY PROJECT.

2

 

 

6           Library

 

6.1                        

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 61/2006 - LIBRARY & INFORMATION SERVICES STRATEGY FOR OLDER PEOPLE IN THE RANDWICK CITY COMMUNITY.

4

 

6.2                        

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 62/2006 - LIBRARY COUNCIL OF NSW DEVELOPMENT GRANT 2006/07.

11

 

 

7           Notice of Rescission Motions

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………….

GENERAL MANAGER

 

 


 

Director, City Planning Report 67/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

Anti Racism and Community Harmony Project.

 

 

DATE:

13 July 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/06290

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING   

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Council has received funding from the Department of Community Services Community Solutions funding to implement an “Anti Racism and Community Harmony Project”.  This funding was announced by the Minister for Youth, the Hon. Reba Meagher, during a Forum she hosted on racism and community harmony.

 

The funding criteria clearly state that young people must be involved in the development and implementation of the project.  Councils involved are therefore required to recruit young people to be involved in the development and steering of the project. 

 

ISSUES:

 

Every Council in NSW was offered a $2,000 grant to implement an “Anti Racism and Community Harmony Project” in their area, regardless of size or youth population.

 

Randwick City Council has a significant youth population when compared to surrounding Councils.  As a result, the Community Development Youth Officer has been working with Waverley, Botany and Woollahra Councils to develop and implement a joint project across the Eastern Suburbs and City areas.  This would allow a pooling of resources and greater use of limited funds in the development of the activities. 

 

A detailed program will be developed and presented to Council.  To fulfil the requirement of funding young people will need to be involved.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

The relationship with the City Plan is as follows:

 

Outcome 3:      Vibrant and Diverse Community

Direction 3d:     An expanded range of community services that meet the community’s needs

Direction 3e:     Strong partnerships between Council, community groups, and government agencies

Key Action:      Encourage and seek opportunities to expand appropriate community services

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

As a result of working collaboratively with Waverley, Woollahra, City of Sydney and Botany Councils, the total budget for the project across four Councils will be $8,000 including GST.

 

Additional costs to Council will be minimal and relate only to staff costs.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The development of an “Anti Racism and Community Harmony Project” across the four LGA’s, will allow the development of a significant project that will address issues of “Anti Racism and Community Harmony”.

 

It is anticipated that the development of a youth forum and resulting media strategy will have far reaching positive outcomes for the youth involved and the broader community.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council note and agree to the development and implementation of the “Anti Racism Community Harmony Project” as a collaborative project between the four councils.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

MELINDA LEVES

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING

ACTING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICER YOUTH SERVICES

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director, City Services' Report 61/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

LIBRARY & INFORMATION SERVICES STRATEGY FOR OLDER PEOPLE IN THE RANDWICK CITY COMMUNITY

 

 

DATE:

26 July, 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/08383

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Randwick City Library & Information Service is developing a dynamic marketing strategy to meet the growing demand by members of the community who are fifty-five and over for relevant library and information services.

 

The following report provides information and the framework that has been developed to capture the needs of this important target group and information on future strategic directions in terms of library services, collections and programs for seniors.

 

ISSUES:

 

Public libraries throughout NSW face an imminent ‘age tsunami’ as the baby boomer generation reaches retirement. Retirees and older people have traditionally been an important target market for public libraries. The impact of a greatly increased proportion of older people in communities will be an important consideration in library planning, facility design, resourcing, marketing strategies, the development of strategic partnerships and staffing.

 

The State Library of NSW has released an issues paper Active, Engaged, Valued: Older people in NSW Public Libraries. This document concisely highlights key issues and provides guidelines for developing services. It can be viewed at http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/pls/publications/pdf/active_engaged_valued.pdf

 

A number of library staff attended the ‘Sensational Seniors’ seminar and workshop organised by the Public Libraries Marketing Group in June 2006. The information and ideas gleaned from this seminar, the issues paper, demographic data and local knowledge and experience has been used to develop the Randwick City Library Seniors Strategy,

 

Randwick City Council’s ‘Positive Ageing Strategy (2005 Draft)’ clearly outlines the task ahead for service providers in the Randwick City LGA:

 

“With people living longer, the period after retirement, from paid work is becoming longer, and for many people, more active. They have more time for education, recreation, cultural pursuits and voluntary work.  People will expect more from retirement and will be looking to have quality lifestyles, wherever possible.  Older people will continue to seek appropriate access to services to support their day to day living needs, as well as to other activities.”

 

Older people in Randwick – a demographic snapshot

 

Approximately 13% of Randwick City’s population is currently aged 65 years and over, and this is projected to grow to 16.3 % by 2022.  The City’s 85 years and over population is also projected to increase from 1.7 to 2.6 % of the population.

 

Currently Randwick City has an ‘elderly to child ratio’ of 0.9, meaning that it has around nine elderly (65 years and over) for every ten children (aged 0-14 years). This ratio will increase over the projection period, to 1.3, or 13 elderly for every ten children by 2022. The crossover (to more elderly than children) is projected to occur around 2009.

 

Randwick City’s 65 years and over population, is projected to grow from its current 16,564 to around 21,550 by 2022 (30.4 %). The number of people aged 85 years and over, will increase from 2,196 to approximately 3,410 (61.9 %).

 

The aging Culturally & Linguistically Diverse (CALD) community in Randwick

 

According to Census 2001 data the largest CALD group of seniors in Randwick is the Greek community (1638 people). Older people from the Chinese background constitute a smaller group. However, the Chinese population in Randwick has been rapidly growing – a 30% increase from the previous Census, and it is anticipated that older people from this community will constitute a considerable group. Other potential target groups are older people from Italian, Russian and Spanish backgrounds.

 

There is clear evidence that as people from certain CALD communities grow older they return to reading in their native language. This is particularly so of people who migrated in the 1950s and 1960s when the opportunities to learn English were limited and the primary focus of new arrivals was on employment and financial security. In many cases these people arrived without the ability to read and write in their native language, let alone acquiring these skills for a new language.

 

Library Membership Analysis

 

As can be seen from the data provided in Table 1 and the accompanying charts there is a clear opportunity to develop services and programs that will encourage a greater percentage of older people in Randwick City to become members of Randwick City Library:

 

 

 

 

Table 1 Library membership 60+ years as percentage of population in 2005

 

Age Group

Bowen

Randwick

Matraville

RCLIS Total

RCC LGA Total

% RCLIS to RCC

60-69 years

1373

714

128

2215

8460

26.20%

70 + years

1301

195

776

2272

11759

19.30%

 

 

 

 

Randwick City Plan and Management Plan 2006-2009

 

As part of the Library & Community Services contribution to the target outcomes of both the Randwick City Plan and the Management Plan, in particular:

- Outcome 3. An Informed and Engaged Community and

- Outcome 5. Excellence in Recreation & Lifestyle Opportunities,

 a group in the Randwick community is identified and targeted each year to increase patronage and library membership. The 2006/2007 target group is older people or seniors.

 

Outline of strategy:

 

Seniors Working Group

 

A small team of library staff has been established to develop the Seniors Strategy including the programs, services and collections. The first meeting, held in July 2006 was used to brainstorm ideas and to develop a plan of execution.

 

Representatives from Council’s Community Development section have also been invited to participate as their expert knowledge and contacts will be invaluable and there is a clear opportunity to develop services in partnership.

 

Community forums and surveys

 

It is clear that the development of any strategy needs direct input from the target group as well as important stakeholders and service providers. As such, two community forums have been organised to provide an opportunity to capture that information.

 

The forums are to be held on following dates:

 

·    Tuesday 29 August 2006, 10.30am at the Bowen Library, Maroubra

·    Thursday 31 August 2006, 10.30 am at Randwick Branch Library

 

The times and dates chosen take into consideration the preference of older people to attend functions during the day and provides an opportunity to utilise the Library bus service.

 

The forums will be structured in such a way as to provide a broad outline of the strategy including examples of services, and activities that library is considering, as a means of triggering ideas and input  from the forum participants.

 

A survey will be developed that can be provided in hard copy at the forums and when other opportunities arise as well as being available online through Councils website.

 

Collections

 

While Randwick City Library certainly caters for the older demographic in its collections as demand grows there will be a need to boost those collections and to identify new resources to meet demand. This includes:

 

-       Large Print in English and in Languages Other than English (LOTE).

-       Spoken Word resources in English and in Languages Other than English (LOTE).

-       Digital Versatile Disks (DVD) with subtitle and language selection options.

-       Targeted subject areas in both Large Print and Spoken Word formats such as health, lifestyle and legal information.

 

Services, programs of events and activities

 

The development of relevant programs will be crucial to attracting and satisfying the demands of current and future retirees. Library staff have already developed a number of ideas that will be offered at the community forums. They include:

 

-       Rewarding reading programs, similar to the library’s highly successful Summer Reading Club for children.

-       Programs of talks such as history, lifestyle, health, superannuation, law.

-       Dedicated seniors area with appropriate furniture, notice boards

-       Investigation of feasibility of providing Home Library Services to housebound residents, hospitals and nursing homes in the LGA. This service is currently provided by Waverley Library at an annual cost of approximately $70,000.00.

 

Strategic Partnerships

 

The opportunity exists to develop partnerships with relevant organisations to share costs and deliver high quality services. For example, the excellent community meeting spaces at the Bowen Library & Community Centre can be optimised so that organisations such as University of the Third Age (U3A), Computer Pals and Coast Centre For Seniors could pilot programs such as Internet classes.

 

Membership has its privileges

 

Opportunity exists to utilise library membership as a means of attracting older people to the library. Some options include offering a Senior’s membership category for residents sixty and over that would deliver such privileges as:

 

-       Half price reservation fees

-       Half price e-mail/word processing fees

-       No late fees for overdue items (older people on the whole return library items on time and thus do not accrue late fees)

-       Free access to special activities or programs that might otherwise have a fee.

 

Library staff have already arranged for a special Gold Library membership card to be provided for those people who qualify for and want to take advantage of a Seniors membership.

 

Services for CALD older people

 

It is essential to ensure that local senior residents from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds have equal access to resources and services provided by the library and that their specific needs are appropriately addressed.

 

Randwick City Library & Information Service has been providing older people from CALD communities with relevant resources and services such as collection of books, magazines, newspapers and audiovisual material in community languages. Along with library collections educational seminars in languages other than English have been regularly organised to help older people deal with a variety of issues such as accessing the Internet, dealing with health problems and some general legal issues. Seniors from CALD backgrounds have been also the main participants in such successful library programs as English Conversation Classes and Migrant’s Story competition

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

This reports relates to the following outcomes in the Randwick City Plan-

 

OUTCOME 2: A VIBRANT AND DIVERSE COMMUNITY.

Direction 2a. A range of community services that meet the community’s needs. Action - Library services and activities developed to support “Older People”

 

OUTCOME 3: AN INFORMED AND ENGAGED COMMUNITY.

Direction 3a. Effective communication methods and technology are used to share information and provide services. Action – Develop a strategy for the provision of Council information in accessible formats that meet special needs, eg Large print etc.

 

OUTCOME 5: EXCELLENCE IN RECREATION AND LIFESTYLE OPPORTUNITIES.

Direction 5B. A range of cultural, sporting and leisure opportunities. Action – Provide specific programs and partnerships for older people in the City to encourage healthy lifestyles.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The overall cost developing a strategy to encourage greater usage of the library service will be absorbed in the existing Library Promotions budget while enhancements to collections will initially be covered by the current resources budget.

 

The proposed changes to fees and charges for Seniors is likely ton have minimal impact as, in general older people return library items on time. The offer of reduced fees such as item reservation and e-mail charges is likely to encourage greater usage as many pensioners see the current fees (especially e-mail charges) as prohibitive.

 

The opportunity may also exist to apply for additional funding for specific programs or collection enhancements through such avenues as the State Library/Library Council of NSW Development Grants.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Through the development of a comprehensive Seniors Strategy that encompasses community input Randwick City Library will be able to deliver relevant, highly valued programs, services and collections to older residents of the Randwick City community, enhancing and enriching their lives and helping to present Randwick City as a vibrant and inviting place to retire to.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council support the strategy for developing library services to the 55+ target group.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BARRY MCGUREN

 

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

CLIENT SERVICES COORDINATOR

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director, City Services' Report 62/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

Library Council of NSW Development Grant 2006/07

 

 

DATE:

25 July, 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/06613

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Randwick City Library has been successful in gaining a Library Development Grant from the Library Council of NSW of $11,447 for Babies loves Books: Lapsit Program. This project to implement a lapsit program for children under 18 months and their parents and carers will support the development of early literacy and family literacy in the community. The Library Council noted the good supporting documentation in the application and that sustainability of the project was addressed.

 

ISSUES:

 

Randwick City Library & Information Service aims to be a vital community hub, a meeting place and first choice for the residents of the City of Randwick. The aim of this lapsit program is to encourage parents to discover the benefits of reading and library membership from the earliest age through the provision of a pre-reading program that targets babies and their parents/carers.

 

The introduction of a ‘Babies loves books: Lapsit program’ has the dual purpose of developing a baby’s pre-reading skills as well as assisting parents to become literacy teachers for their children.

 

This sits well with one of the main objectives of libraries to promote reading and literacy.

 

 “Early years research shows that learning to read is the single most important factor in school success and that an early exposure to books and stories substantially contributes to success in early literacy” (North, Sue & Allen, Nola 2003)

 

“New scientific research shows that experiences after birth—particularly in the first three years of life—have a dramatic impact on brain development. That means that nurturing, talking to, singing to and reading to our youngest children will improve their ability to learn and develop throughout their lives” (White House Conference, 1997).

 

Community Need

 

With the enhancement of the Toy & Game Library Service and the establishment of an Early Childhood Centre within the Randwick Branch Library, the Randwick City library staff has noted an increased demand for services for children under 18 months.

 

This demand has been reflected in a survey which was conducted to gauge the interest in such a program. The results show there is interest in the program and that the majority of parents/carers want stories, music and finger puppets.

 

Anecdotally library staff report that many parents enquire about services and resources for very young children who are considered to be too young to attend regular weekly story time sessions.

 

A number of community organisations have expressed their interest in this project through letters of support for the Grant.

 

The 2001 Census shows that there are 3887 babies in the 0-2 year group in Randwick City Council. While this represents only 3.2% of the total population, it is 44% of all children aged 0-18 years old.

 

Most parents and carers borrow their baby’s books on an adult card for convenience, however, there are currently 56 babies aged 18 months and younger registered with their own card. 7126 picture books (84.65% of picture book collection) were loaned in the 6 month period to 14th February 2006 and in that time 82% of babies under 18 months with cards were actively borrowing. Once parents learn the value of books, most are avid borrowers.

 

Randwick City Library Service has a strong commitment to its services to children and youth. From January 2005 to December 2005, 7,694 children and teens attended 425 activities conducted by the library service. These included 5385 preschool children aged 2 to 4 years of age.

 

Benefits of the program to target group 0-18 months:

 

·    Provides a quality time for parent/carer and baby

·    Introduces children at the earliest possible age to the concept and benefits of reading

·    Introduces and develops pre-reading and language skills to babies

·    Gives parents/carers the skills and confidence to actively participate in their children’s development

·    Fosters a love and enjoyment of books and reading

·    Facilitates an informal support network for parents and carers

·    Introduces other media such as rhymes and music along with books and reading in a non-threatening atmosphere

 

 

 

 

RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLAN:

 

Outcome 5:     Excellence in recreation and lifestyle opportunities

Direction 5d:  Library programmes, resources and facilities provide innovative and inspirational opportunities for education and leisure

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The library has regular book sales that bring in $15,000-$20,000 per annum in additional funding. This fund can be utilised to purchase additional resources of around 120 books per annum as part of the continuing program as well as replacements for life expired resources.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

This Grant of $11,447 will allow the library to implement what promises to be a successful ongoing ‘Lapsit’ program aimed at under 18 months children and their parents and carers. It has been developed in response to an identified community need and promises to have long term literacy benefits for the community.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That this report be received and noted.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil.

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BARBARA TODES

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

MANAGER LIBRARY & COMMUNITY SERVICES

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Notice of Rescission Motions