Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

 

6th June, 2006

 

 

COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 13TH JUNE. 2006 AT 5:30 P.M.

 

Committee Members:         His Worship, the Mayor, T. Seng, Andrews (Deputy Chairperson) Kenny, Matson, Procopiadis, Tracey (Chairperson) & Woodsmith

 

Quorum:                            Four (4) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2004, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

 

1           Apologies

 

2          Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 9TH MAY, 2006.

 

3           Declaration of Pecuniary & Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

4           Addresses to Committee by the Public

 

5           Community Services

 

5.1                      

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING REPORT 51/2006 - VACATION CARE PROVISION.

2

 

5.2                      

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING REPORT 52/2006 - CHRISTIAN-MUSLIM PUBLIC PEACE FORUM.

7

 

5.3                      

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING REPORT 53/2006 - NAIDOC WEEK 2006.

10

 

5.4                      

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING REPORT 54/2006 - HEALTHY LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANTS PROGRAM.

12

 

 

6           Library

 

6.1                        

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 37/2006 - REVIEW OF POLICY ON LIBRARY LOAN LIMITS.

14

 

6.2                        

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 38/2006 - DEBT RECOVERY ACTION FOR LONG OVERDUE LIBRARY ITEMS.

19

 

 

7           General Business

 

8           Notice of Rescission Motions

 

 

 

 

…………………………

GENERAL MANAGER

 


 

Director, City Planning Report 51/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

VACATION CARE PROVISION

 

 

DATE:

24 May, 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/07695

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

At the March 14 Community Services Committee Meeting it was resolved (Woodsmith/Matson) as follows:

 

That:

 

a)      Council officers investigate the service providers and ability of appropriate agencies to provide a safe and affordable April school holiday program at the Kooloora site and subject to an agency meeting the requirements, it be engaged to run the Vacation Care Program; and

 

b)      Council seek a long term partnership with an organisation that has the skills and expertise to operate holiday programs commencing June / July 2006.

 

ISSUES:

 

Anecdotal evidence from children and parents confirmed that the April 2006 Vacation Care program was a great success.  Both Kooloora and Botany Family and Children’s Centre staff also agreed that the program was successful during an evaluation meeting of the program.

 

As part of the evaluation meeting a number of issues were raised including programming, healthy eating habits, communication, attendance and funding. 

 

Programming – through discussions and observations staff found that the children required clear boundaries and guidelines to assist in directing acceptable behaviour at the centre.  Staff found that providing structured programming provided the children with routines that allowed them to feel more secure.  As a result, the service has shifted the focus to development of life skills including issues of food preparation, healthy eating patterns and appropriate ways of communicating with staff and other children.

 

Healthy eating habits – vacation care staff noted that many children attended the centre without having breakfast and their lunch often consisted of ‘snack foods’ with little nutritional value.  It was agreed that children need to have a healthy breakfast and lunches should not consist of unhealthy snack bars.  If the partnership is to continue, the service is requesting that Council support investigations of a healthy breakfast club as part of the Vacation Care program.  In addition, Council would amend enrolment forms to inform parents of acceptable lunch provisions.

 

Attendance – On average there were 18 children attending the program.  The program can accept up to 25 children on any day.  The Kooloora Community Centre noted that as it was the first program implemented by Botany Family and Children’s Centre, the program organisers considered that a smaller number would enable them to monitor the implementation. It was agreed by all parties that Kooloora will endeavour to fill all subsidised positions and if unable to do so, the positions will be filled by requests made to Council.

 

Funding – Botany Family and Children’s Centre noted that existing funding did not adequately cover the costs of providing a high quality vacation care program.  It should be noted that when the program was run by the Benevolent Society, the organisation provided substantial subsidy to the program as a part of its agreement with Council.  Council noted that the budget has been set for 2006/07 and there has been no increase in funding.  Both Kooloora and Botany Family and Children’s Centre have been asked to provide a detailed budget costing. 

 

Botany Family and Children’s Centre has identified a number of additional costs that were not budgeted.  These include increasing staff wages to ensure the service provides a high quality program.  In addition, the service provided additional consumables to ensure the children were provided with healthy meals whilst attending the centre.  The service also has in kind costs including recruitment of staff, training, policy development, program development and general supervision of the staff and program.

 

Kooloora Community Centre provides considerable support to the program, including the use of bus for excursions, use of the facility and funding for perishable consumables.   In addition Kooloora plans to make a worker available to participate in the next two programs.  Kooloora applies for and in previous years has received funding from CDSE to subsidise 20 positions.

 

Both services have expressed a commitment in delivering ongoing Vacation Care programs dependent on financial viability and ongoing support from all agencies involved.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

Council currently provides $30,000 per annum direct financial assistance by subsidising the Vacation Care program plus one off yearly equipment costs of $600 and $400 for other essentials including consumables.  This amount has remained the same since 2002.  

In addition, Council provides funding to employ a cleaner costing $6,807.    This is part of annual grant provided to Kooloora and it will be reviewed as a part of Council’s subsidy and grants program.  The funding has been budgeted for the 2006-07 period.  This allows the service to ensure the centre is cleaned and ready for the next day’s activities.

 

Council continues to provide assistance through indirect costs including access to the Council’s bus free of charge, administration costs including bookings at Customer Service, mailouts, and general admin support.

 

In March 2006, the NSW Industrial Relations Commission awarded a 3.5% increase in award wages for each year for the next three years for child care workers.  This will also have funding implications.

 

Botany Family and Children’s Centre has provided a budget breakdown detailing costs in providing a high quality life skills development program.  The Centre has noted that staffing costs are $37,000, program costs of $2,000, and excursion costs $3,000, a total of $42,000.  Part of these costs were subsidised by Benevolent Society as a major partner with Council.   

 

Botany Family and Children’s Centre have also detailed costs that they will meet as part of implementing the program including $1500 program development, purchasing $550, admin $500, activities organisation $350, supervision $1,300 and supply of equipment $1,000, a total cost of $5,200.

 

Kooloora Community Centre’s six monthly costs include forgoing normal rental income of $1,000, bus hire and driver $1,892, support worker for the program $2,646, administration costs $309.80 and $100 for consumables for participants.  The total cost to Kooloora is $5,947.80.

 

In addition to these wage costs, many not for profit and community based organisations have seen increasing costs for insurance premiums and other compliance requirements.

 

The total cost for Council for 10 week Vacation Care Program will be $42,000.

 

Council will also seek State and Commonwealth Government funding opportunities for the delivery of this service.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The Vacation Care Program offered by Council provides a much needed service particularly to residents in the South Ward, from low socio-economic backgrounds that have difficulty in accessing affordable and appropriate activities and care for their children during holiday periods.

 

Council’s Management and Social Plan clearly identify the need for affordable social and recreational activities for disadvantaged groups including Vacation Care programs.  Most importantly, Council recognises the importance of best practice models and that services enhance participant’s health and wellbeing.

 

The April program was highly successful and Council should endeavour to continue this partnership.

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council agree to:

 

a)       fully fund the Vacation Care program ensuring a high quality program that meets the educational, social, and recreational needs of participants.

 

b)      continue to fund the cleaning costs associated with the Vacation Care program and make payment upon completion of the program and invoice received.

 

c)       commit to implement July school holiday program in collaboration with Botany Family and Children’s Centre and Kooloora Community Centre.

 

d)      formalise the partnership with a Memorandum of Understanding between Council, Botany Family and Children Services and Kooloora Community Centre to implement Vacation Care programs during the school holidays for a period of 6 months, with review to extend for another year.

 

e)       make appropriate amendment to 2006-2007 budget.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

1.  April 2006 Timetable.

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

SHANE LOWE

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING

ACTING TEAM LEADER

 

 

...............................................

MELINDA LEVES

ACTING YOUTH SERVICES OFFICER


BOTANY FAMILY & CHILDRENS CENTRE

 

APRIL VACATION ACTIVITIES PROGRAM

MONDAY 17

TUESDAY 18

WEDNESDAY 19

THURSDAY 20

FRIDAY 21

 

 

 

Easter Monday

Public Holiday

 

 

 

Intro & Welcome

Vacation Care Rules

Badge & Mask Making

Vacation Care Idol

Playdough making

Cooking a 3 Course Lunch and setting table for a Dinner Party

Vacation Care Idol

Computer Games

11years & over at the Shack Youth Service

for a day of Pool Comp & other

 

 

 

 

Power House Museum

Bring a packed lunch

 

 

 

Botany Big Splash

Sausage Sizzle

& Sports Day

 

MONDAY 24

TUESDAY 25

WEDNESDAY 26

THURSDAY 27

FRIDAY 28

 

Clown Town and Party Lunch

MUST bring socks to wear

 

Anzac Day

Public Holiday

 

Greek cooking day and lunch

Vacation Care Finals

Clay Pot Making

Imax Theatre

“Walking on the Moon”

Lunch at Darling Harbour

Making pirate costumes

Malabar Beach Lunch Party

Treasure Hunt and Tea Ball Game

Don’t forget a packed lunch & drink, a change of clothes, hat & sunscreen each day!!


 

Director, City Planning Report 52/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

CHRISTIAN-MUSLIM PUBLIC PEACE FORUM

 

 

DATE:

1 May, 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/08174

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The Columban Mission Institute (CMI), a Catholic organisation, had written to Council seeking Council’s support to hold a public forum promoting Christian-Muslim relations in the Randwick City area.  At the 14 March 2006 Community Services Committee meeting Council resolved “that the request from the Columban Mission be referred to Council’s Multicultural Advisory Committee for consideration and recommendation to Council”. The Multicultural Advisory Committee considered this matter at the 24 April 2006 meeting.

 

ISSUES:

 

An invitation was extended to the Institute to address the Committee. Anne Lanyon Coordinator of the Centre for Peace, Ecology and Justice and Carole Gan from CMI attended the meeting and discussed the proposal. An apology was received from Sr Pauline Rae from CMI. The Committee was informed that forums had been held at 12 councils in NSW, recently at Kogarah and Hornsby Councils. The format of the forums includes two Christian and two Muslim speakers with a gender balance, discussing the theme of peace and active non violence. Although the CMI is a Catholic organisation, occasionally it uses other Christian denomination clergy to be speakers. A question and answer session is included. Council usually provide a venue, refreshments and publicity. Columban Mission provide the MC and between 150 to 200 people are expected to attend the forum. The forum does not promote the two religions as such.  The forums provide information and skills people can use to promote peaceful coexistence.

 

The Committee supported CMI’s proposal in principle, however it felt that it was important that all local Christian Church leaders be encouraged to support the forum to their congregations. It was also considered important that the forum attract non Catholic people even though the auspicing body is a Catholic organisation.

 

The Committee recommended that Council support the Columban Mission’s proposal. To hold a free Christian-Muslim Public Peace Forum and that Council publicise the forum; provide funds for publicity flyers;  allocate funds for light refreshments at the event;  publicise the event in the Mayor’s column and provide free use of the Town Hall for a weekday evening event. It also was recommended that the Mayor or his nominee to be invited to open the Forum. The Committee further recommended that any further forums or activities emanating from this event, supported by Council, should focus on the involvement of all faiths, not just Christian and Muslim, in order to promote community harmony across all communities in the Randwick City.

 

If the event is supported by Council, it is anticipated that the event would be held in September 2006, on a week- day evening.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The cost to hold and support this event would entail the following costs which could be charged to the 2006/2007 Contingency Fund budget:

 

·    Waiving of fees for use of Town Hall     $540

·    Advertisement in Courier News Paper $850

·    Printing $260

·    Provision of light refreshments               $800 (for approx 150–200 people)

TOTAL:                                                                $2,450.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The public peace forum would be seen as an important Council initiative to promote community harmony and understanding between the Christian and Muslim faiths and be a catalyst for other future interfaith activities, involving all faiths, in the Randwick City area. It would reaffirm Council’s commitment to a culturally diverse and harmonious community.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

a)       Council support a Public Peace Forum on Christian- Muslim relations in conjunction with the Columban Mission Institute.

 

b)      Any future activities and forums emanating from the Christian–Muslim Peace Forum with the support of Council should include the opportunity for all faiths to participate.

 

c)       Council support the event by providing a venue, refreshments and publicity to a total of $2,450.

 

d)      The Mayor or his representative be given the opportunity to address the Forum on behalf of Council.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

COLIN ROSENFELD

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICER MULTICULTURAL & SPECIAL PROJECTS

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director, City Planning Report 53/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

NAIDOC Week 2006

 

 

DATE:

2 June, 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/07684

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

NAIDOC Week dates back to 1957, when the National Missionary Council of Australia nominated the second Sunday in July to be a day of remembrance for Aboriginal people and their heritage. In 1957, the day was known as NADOC being the acronym for National Aborigines’ day Observance Committee. In 1991, NADOC became NAIDOC to include Torres Strait Islanders.

 

The themes presented each year have represented issues of importance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This year NAIDOC Week will be held from 2 – 9 July, and the theme for NAIDOC 2006 is “Respect the Past – Believe in the Future”.

 

This theme has been embraced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities so they may stand up for their culture, their way of life and themselves.

 

ISSUES:

 

Randwick City Council in partnership with the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council, Guriwal Aboriginal Corporation and Guriwal Respite and Transport has developed a range of activities and events to celebrate NAIDOC Week 2006.

 

Events will be held from Sunday 2 to 9 July, with each event focusing on a different age group. During the week service providers will hold an information day and other activities such as children’s day at Woomera Oval and community day at Yarra reserve will be held.

 

Koori Radio will transmit live from Yarra Reserve at the community day and a community BBQ will be hosted by Guriwal Aboriginal Corporation.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The financial impact to Council for the above activities will be $6,942 which has been allocated within the 2006/07 Community Development budget.

CONCLUSION:

 

Council’s participation in NAIDOC Week celebration is a further evidence of Council’s commitment in working together with ATSI community in developing, promoting and celebrating ATSI’s significance to this region.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

1.         That Council endorse the planned activities as stated in the report.

2.         That Council assist with any promotional material (poster/flyers) for NAIDOC Week.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

WAYNE COOK

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICER ABORIGINAL SERVICES

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director, City Planning Report 54/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

Healthy Local Government Grants Program

 

 

DATE:

2 June, 2006

FILE NO:

F2005/00704

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING   

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The Local Government and Shire’s Association provides funding under its Healthy Local Government Grants to promote health issues within all communities within NSW.

Randwick City Council lodged an application with the Local Government and Shires Association of NSW for funding to implement a program within the Aboriginal community of La Perouse and surrounding areas. This program which will be implemented in partnership with South Eastern Sydney Northern Sector Aboriginal Health Unit is designed to provide the participants with the knowledge of a healthier lifestyle.  It will provide appropriate information on chronic diseases and proper dietary and nutritional eating and exercise. The issues surrounding Aboriginal health have been well documented and Randwick City Council identified a need to enhance a current program which complements an existing program of healthy lifestyle within Aboriginal communities.

 

ISSUES:

 

Randwick City Council has received $11,000 for this program in partnership with South Eastern Sydney Northern Sector Aboriginal Health Unit. The funding will be paid in two stages of $5,500. The aim and objectives of the program is to promote the physical activities such as walking and healthy eating habits within the Aboriginal community. A detailed program is in the development stage. The program will be widely promoted.

Council is required to report to the Local Government and Shires Association of NSW on funding expenditure and program outcomes.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The cost of the program will be covered by $11,000 funding received from the Local Government and Shires Association of NSW. The current staffing arrangement will resource this program.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Council Officers together with South Eastern Sydney Northern Sector Aboriginal Health Unit through the development of cultural appropriate projects aims to improve the health and well being of the target group within the Aboriginal community.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

WAYNE COOK

DIRECTOR, CITY PLANNING

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICER ABORIGINAL SERVICES

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Director, City Services' Report 37/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

REVIEW OF POLICY ON LIBRARY LOAN LIMITS.

 

 

DATE:

21 April, 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/08387

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Randwick City Library & Information Service is reviewing the existing policy on loan limits with a view to increasing the limit for Adult, Young Adult, Junior, Councillor and Council Staff membership categories.  The following report provides information and reasons for increasing the loan limit.

 

ISSUES:

 

The Library Services Loans Policy was last reviewed on 30 June 2001. Considerable changes have taken place since that time. This includes changes to loan periods, introduction of the fee based Toy & Game Library,  the introduction of new media such as CD-ROM games and graphic novels as well as the impact of new technology such as the ability to renew items via the library catalogue on Council’s website.

 

Feedback from customers through the quarterly Continuous Improvement Strategy surveys as well as verbal feedback has highlighted customer demand for an increase in the number of items that can be borrowed on a single Adult, Young Adult or Junior membership.

 

In 2003, coincidental with the introduction of Digital Versatile Disks (DVDs) a review of loan periods for all formats was undertaken. Customer feedback resulted in a reduction in loan periods for Magazines, Compact Disks, Video recordings and DVDs. With the vast variety of resources that are available many customers feel that an increase in the limit is required. Many families prefer to have a single membership so that it is easier to manage library loans and avoid late fees.

 

The proposal is to increase the maximum number of items that can be loaned on Adult, Young Adult, Junior, Councillor and Council Staff membership categories from ten items to fifteen items.  The loan limit on the Toy & Game Library memberships will remain at five items due to the high demand for toys and games and the planned extension of this service to Randwick Branch Library in late 2006.

 

 

Reference Items

A review of the loan policy for items located in reference collections has resulted in a proposal to allow for an overnight loan in special circumstances.

 

The lending of reference items would take place only in extenuating circumstances and would generally be limited to items of a very specific nature .The main purpose of this type of loan would be to support students who may have a time-sensitive need for a very specific resource such as an art book or HSC resource and only if lending copies are not available. In certain circumstances for example, students need to scan colour pictures, a facility that is not available at Randwick City Library due to technical constraints with the Council network.

 

Resources such as encyclopaedias, dictionaries and other multi-volume titles would not be available loan. In most cases these resources are available electronically and remotely through the library pages on Council’s Internet site.

 

The overnight loan would be approved by the Shift Supervisor, Coordinators or Manager, Library & Community Services. Customers who borrow reference material would also be informed of the penalties for not returning these items in the agreed time, which would include immediate suspension of borrowing privileges.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The financial impact is nil.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

By increasing in the loans limits for Adult, Young Adult, Junior, Councillor and Council Staff membership categories many customers will find it easier to manage their library loans. The change to the loans policy may also result in an increase in loans overall.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

a)       the increase in loan limits for Adult, Young Adult, Junior, Councillor and Council Staff membership categories to fifteen items per membership, be supported; and

 

b)      the reviewed Library Services Loans Policy be adopted.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Draft Revised Library Services Loans Policy No 7.01.04  

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BARRY MCGUREN

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

ACTING MANAGER, LIBRARY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES


RANDWICK CITY COUNCIL

CITY SERVICES: LIBRARY & COMMUNITY SERVICES

 

LIBRARY SERVICES LOANS POLICY

REVISED DRAFT

 

Review date:  18/04/2006                                                                  Policy No. 7.01.04

 

1.         OUTLINE

 

The purpose of the document is to outline the policy and procedures for lending library resources to library members and identify the library resources that are available for loan so as to maximise the use of those resources and ensure their equitable use. This includes the specification of the following:

 

a)         The maximum number of items which can be loaned

b)         The maximum loan period, or periods for which items can be loaned

c)         Those items that are identified as being NOT FOR LOAN

d)         Guidelines for renewing and placing holds for items on loan.

 

2.         LENDING OF LIBRARY MATERIALS

 

Registered library members are able to borrow a range of library materials. The maximum number of items that a customer can have on loan at any one time is fifteen [15]. Types and loan periods are detailed in the table in 2.1.1.

 

The exception to this is the Toy & Game Library. A special membership is required for this collection. See 2.2 for information on the Toy & Game Library.

 

2.1.      Categories of materials for loan and lending periods

 

The following table outlines the types of library materials that can be borrowed, maximum numbers that can be borrowed, loans periods and number of renewals permitted.

 

ITEM TYPE

MAXIMUM NUMBER

LOAN PERIOD

RENEWAL

Books

15

28 days

2

Magazines

15

14 days

2

Compact discs

/CD-ROMs

15

14 days

2

Kits

15

28 days

2

Video recordings

15

14 days

2

DVD recordings

15

14 days

2

HSC lending collection

15

14 days

2

Inter-library loans

15

At the discretion of the owning library

At the discretion of the owning library

Reference

Not for loan

Overnight loan may be approved in special circumstances

 

Nil

Newspapers

Not for loan

 

 

Locals studies

Not for loan

 

 

 

2.1.1    Toy Library Loans (for financial members of the Toy & Game Library only)

 

Toys and Games

5

14 days

2

 

2.2       Variations to loan periods for high demand material

 

At various times loan periods may be varied for certain item categories or collections. This is usually as a result of heavy demand or because of the size of the collection.

This is usually a two-week period.

 

A distinctive wrapper or sticker will be used to identify such items and the due date is altered accordingly. Items that may fit into this category include current best sellers. These items cannot always be renewed.

 

 Customers are notified of these variations by library staff and in library publicity.

 

2.3       Loan periods for Council staff and Councillors

 

The loan periods for all Council staff and elected representatives are the same as those set out in the above table.

 

2.4       Renewal of items on loan

 

An item can be renewed twice provided this is done on or before the due date. Once an item is more than one week past the due date it cannot be renewed except under very special circumstances as determined by the shift supervisor. As overdue items incur a fine, any items that are renewed after the due date will incur that fine and library staff must inform customers of this at the time of the renewal.

 

Items may be renewed in person, by telephone or via the Council website www.randwick.nsw.gov.au . Items can be renewed at any one of the three library service points.

 

An item that is on hold for another library customer cannot be renewed and must be returned by the due date. Customers who do not return items that have a hold placed against them may have membership privileges suspended or withdrawn.

 

2.5       Inter-library loan material

 

Library customers may request the loan of items not held in the Randwick City Library Service. A cost is incurred for this service [see Fees & Charges Policy No: 7.01.05. Loan of this material is at the discretion of the lending/owning library. Loan periods are at the discretion of the lending/owning library. Renewal of inter-library loans is also at the discretion of the lending library.

 

The inter-library loan service is useful as it provides access to an enormous number of collections and resources. Misuse of this service, such as late return or loss of items by library customers can result in Randwick City Library customers being unable to access the collections of other libraries.

 

2.6       Reference & Local Studies resources

 

Materials in these categories are not for loan. They have been provided for use within the library. Some materials are of a rare and sometimes fragile state and conditions of access are outlined in the Local Studies (Conditions of use) Guidelines.

 

Special provision for an overnight loan of material from the reference collection may be made at the discretion of the Shift Supervisor, Coordinators or the Manager, Library & Community Services.

 

2.7       Placing of items on hold/reservation

 

Library customers who are registered members may place a hold on items that are on loan. A cost is incurred for this service and is payable upon collection of the item on hold [see Fees & Charges Policy No: 7.01.05]. Customers are notified either by telephone or mail and the item is held for collection at the relevant library service point for a period of seven [7] days. If the customer fails to collect the item within that period the item either goes back to the library shelves or, if other customers have also placed holds on the title, it will be made available to the next customer in the queue.

 

2.8       Returning borrowed library materials

 

Library customers may return items borrowed from any of the three library service points to any one of those libraries. There is one exception. Toys and Games can only be borrowed from and returned to the Bowen Library.

 

After hours return chutes are located at all three library branches if customers are unable to return items within library opening hours. Only books and magazines should be placed in the book chute. Audiovisual materials are prone to damage if deposited in the book chute.

 

Items that are returned after the due date will incur a late fee [see Fees & Charges Policy No: 7.01.05].

 

 

G:\BusinessPaper\DAIS\C060421-DAIS-4698.doc


 

Director, City Services' Report 38/2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

DEBT RECOVERY ACTION FOR LONG OVERDUE LIBRARY ITEMS.

 

 

DATE:

31 May, 2006

FILE NO:

F2004/08383

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Randwick City Library & Information Service will be commencing a debt recovery program to recoup long overdue library items or their replacement value. This program will commence in late June 2006.

 

The following report provides information about the processes in place to recover overdue items and analysis of the value of items currently long overdue.

 

ISSUES:

 

Value of items currently on loan and long overdue

As at 30 May 2006 1218 library members (2.7% of total library membership) have items on loan with a status of Long Overdue which have a replacement value of $116,324.15 including GST to the value of $10,574.92.

 

Overdue items procedures

Randwick City Library & Information Services has a policy and procedures in place to notify library members that they have items past the due date that need to be returned and that are accruing late fees. This includes:

 

First & Final Overdue Notice – produced 14 days after due date and delivered either by automated telephone message or as a printed notice via Australia Post.

 

Final Account – produced 14 days after the First & Final Overdue Notice if the borrower has failed to return the item or items. This account includes the replacement cost of each overdue item.

 

All library members are provided with a printed receipt at that time of issue which details items on loan and dates due. Customers are able to renew items and check there account details 24/7 by contacting a library staff member, via the Internet or the library telemessaging system. 

 

 

Debt Recovery Procedures

These procedures are in place to ensure that those library members who either fail to respond to the First & Final Overdue Notice and/or Final Account or who have left the area and taken library resources with them can be traced and held accountable for non-return of those resources. Debt recovery is taken on an annual basis as there is considerable effort on the part of staff to check and prepare for debt recovery action.

 

In 2004 prior to the migration to the Amlib Library Management System (LMS) from the GEAC LibsPLus LMS a program of debt recovery was instigated to try and retrieve as many long overdue library items as possible. At that time only customers with more than $100.00 in resources were targeted.

 

In 2005 there were a number of issues with the new Amlib LMS in the Councils Online environment which made it advisable not to proceed with debt recovery action.

 

Debt Recovery Agency Appointed

Prushka, a company with considerable experience in debt recovery for public libraries in Australia was engaged to action debt recovery in March 2004. This company worked through until late 2004. In this case defaulting members with a  total of $32,255.00 in long overdue resources were targeted. The debt recovery process recovered $3,600.00 in either resources returned or moneys collected. As this was the first debt recovery action ever taken by Randwick City Library many items were some years overdue and it was quite a challenge to track down debtors.

 

Prushka operates on a ‘No Recovery No Charge’ basis. It bears all expenses, including all bank fees, letters, legal costs, investigations, field visits, credit card fees etc. For debts up to $150.00 Prushka charges 38.5% of monies collected [or value of recovered resources] and 27.5% for debts over $150 where monies or resources are collected.

 

In a number of cases the company has located debtors who had moved to regional and interstate locations and either recovered the resources or replacement value of the items.

 

2006 Debt Recovery Action

In June 2006 library staff will check the shelves at all library locations to ensure that items with a status of Long Overdue have not been inadvertently returned without being taken off library memberships. This will minimise adverse customer reaction and ensure that records are as accurate as possible prior to taking debt recovery action.

 

Debt Recovery Pending notice

Prior to sending any member details to Prushka a Debt Recovery Pending notice will be sent to all members with items on loan with a status of Long Overdue. They will be given the opportunity to return these items within fourteen days so as to avoid debt recovery action. This notice will be produced using the Amlib LMS and duplicates the information provided in the Final Account notice, including an itemised account and full replacement costs.

 

A certain number of notices will come back marked ‘return to sender’. This allows library staff to update membership records and provides valuable information that can be forwarded to the debt recovery agency.

Prushka Demand letter

In the case of items that are not returned or customers who do not contact the library, the customer and item details will be forwarded to Prushka for further action. This action initially involves a letter of demand on Prushka letterhead. Any items or monies returned as a result of this letter do not attract a commission.

 

Prushka in-house collection action

Those members who do not respond to the demand letter will be referred to Prushka for further action. At this time the commission charges come into effect if monies or resources are recovered. Once this action is taken, defaulting library members must communicate with Prushka staff and can no longer speak to library staff without prior notice from Prushka.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

Postage for approximately 1200 Debt Recovery pending

notices @  $0.50 each:                                                                   $600.00

Prushka letter head - approximately 1000 @$2.15 per letter:                $2150.00

 

Cost of recovery-

Library members with debts up to $150.00:                  38.5% of monies collected

Library members with debts over $150.00:                   27.5% of monies collected

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The debt recovery process adopted by Randwick City Library is thorough and fair to library customers. It ensures that customers are given every opportunity to return long overdue library resources before taking the more serious action of recovery.

 

This process is only used to target a very small percentage of library members but it is essential to ensure that library resources are available for all members of the Randwick City community and that serious debtors are held accountable.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council support the debt recovery program adopted by Randwick City Library to ensure that long overdue library resources are returned or paid for.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BARRY MCGUREN

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

ACTING MANAGER LIBRARY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES.

 


 

General Business

 

Notice of Rescission Motions