Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

 

5th April, 2005

 

WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY,

12TH APRIL, 2005 AT 6:00 P.M.

 

 

Committee Members:               His Worship the Mayor, Cr M. Matson, Crs Belleli, Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Notley-Smith (Chairperson), Seng, Sullivan, Tracey & White.

 

Quorum:                                   Five (5) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2004, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE WORKS COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

 

 

1           Apologies

 

2           Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 8TH MARCH, 2005.

 

3           Declaration of Pecuniary & Non-Pecuniary Interests

 

4           Addresses to Committee by the Public

 

5           Mayoral Minutes

 

5.1                        

MAYOR'S MINUTE 37/2005 - BANNER ACROSS COOGEE BAY ROAD, COOGEE.

2

 

 

6           Works

 

6.1                        

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 30/2005 - COOGEE BEACH PARKING SCHEME.

4

 

6.2                        

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 31/2005 - CCA TREATED TIMBER AND RELATED ISSUES.

12

 

 

6.3                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 32/2005 - ROADS & TRAFFIC AUTHORITY FUNDING OFFERS 2005-2006.

19

 

6.4                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 33/2005 - TWO COUNCIL OWNED FICUS 'HILLII' GROWING OUTSIDE 10 GEORGE STREET, RANDWICK.

21

 

6.5                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 34/2005 - FITNESS SYSTEM - ASSESSMENT OF THE IDENTIFIED SITES TO DETERMINE THE MOST SUITABLE LOCATION FOR THE INSTALLATION OF AN OUTDOOR EXERCISE SYSTEM.

24

 

6.6                      

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES' REPORT 35/2005 - LOCAL ROAD REHABILITATION INCLUDING ROADS TO RECOVERY.

28

 

 

7           General Business

 

8           Notice of Rescission Motions

 

…………………………..

GENERAL MANAGER


 

MAYOR'S MINUTE 37/2005

 

 

SUBJECT:

BANNER ACROSS COOGEE BAY ROAD, COOGEE.

 

 

DATE:

23 March, 2005

FILE NO:

F2004/06257

 

 

REPORT BY:            MAYOR   

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

A request has been received from Council’s Environmental Health Unit Team Leader seeking Council’s assistance in installing and dismantling a banner across Coogee Bay Road, Coogee, as part of a stormwater and education campaign funded by the Sydney Coastal Council Group and the Roads and Traffic Authority.

 

ISSUES:

 

The colourful banner reading – The Beach is Sick of your Rubbish” is to be installed across Coogee Bay Road for approximately two weeks.  The campaign is considered to be a very worthwhile educational program aimed at raising awareness in keeping our beaches clean and Council’s help with associated fees is recommended.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The costs are as follows:-

 

Application fee                                     $  85.00

Erection and remove banner across road           $544.50

Road fee                                                          $456.50

Total:                                                             $1,086.00

 

CONCLUSION:

 

It is considered that Council vote to waive the fees associated with the installation and dismantling of a banner across Coogee Bay Road and funds be allocated from the Contingency Fund 2004/2005.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

a)       That Council vote to waive the fees associated with the installation and dismantling of a banner across Coogee Bay Road and $1,086.00 be allocated from the Contingency Fund 2004/05; and.

b)      The event organiser undertakes to appropriately and prominently acknowledge and promote Council’s contribution during the campaign.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

MURRAY MATSON

 

MAYOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director, City Services' Report 30/2005

 

 

SUBJECT:

COOGEE BEACH PARKING SCHEME

 

 

DATE:

30 March, 2005

FILE NO:

F2004/07230

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

At its meeting held on 22nd June 2004 Council resolved that the Coogee Parking Scheme draft report be adopted in principle and that the report be placed on public display and referred to the Traffic Committee for consideration. The draft report was subsequently considered and adopted in principle by the Traffic Committee on 14th July, 2004, and was placed on public display during September-December 2004.

 

ISSUES:

 

Numerous suggestions/proposals were submitted by both members of the Traffic Committee and members of the public in relation to certain aspects of the draft report. The attached final report provides a comprehensive review of these submissions and where appropriate amendments have been incorporated into the final report. These amendments are itemised in Section B of the final report, and are summarized in Table 1 of the report.

 

The significant amendment incorporated in the final report is the extension of parking restrictions to 10pm in areas of high night time activity. This measure is unusual and has only been introduced following careful consideration of the benefits and costs of enforcing these restrictions (It should be noted that the only other locations in the city where restrictions extend to 10pm are in The Spot Parking Scheme, and along Marine Parade and in the Maroubra Beach pavilion carpark).This matter is fully assessed in Section B.1 of the final report and it is the recommendation of the final report that the proposal be adopted on both parking and social grounds.

 

The final report was considered by the Randwick Traffic Committee at its meeting held on 9th March 2005 and the Committee concurs with the recommendations of the final report with the exception of proposals A (Carr Street) and C (Dolphin Street). Both the police and RTA representatives to the Traffic Committee consider that vehicle volumes and speeds in these two streets are too high and therefore they do not support the introduction of angle parking at this time. The concerns of the Committee members were duly noted and Council’s representative advised that the matter would be referred by Council to the RTA for consideration. In the mean time the Committee concurred that the scheme should proceed with parallel parking retained in these two locations. Amended plans 9C and 11C are attached to this report showing the retention of parallel parking in these two locations.

 

The police representative to The Traffic committee also raised concern over the enforcement of the parking scheme and requested an assurance from Council that adequate enforcement resources will be provided. Council’s representative has advised the Committee that Council intends to recruit an additional ten(10) patrol officers to improve enforcement across the city and therefore will assure the adequate enforcement of this parking scheme.

In accordance with Council’s draft policy for the introduction of permit parking schemes it is proposed, subsequent to adoption of this scheme by Council, that the scheme be advertised for four weeks and that letters and information brochures be forwarded to all premises within the Spot precinct. It is envisaged that the Coogee Beach Parking Scheme will be operational by 1st August 2005.

 

ALIGNMENT WITH PAID PARKING PROPOSAL:

 

The Coogee Beach Parking Scheme and its three sub-precincts (Across CO1, CO2 & CO3) encompasses the entire area currently under investigation for the introduction of paid parking in the Coogee Basin.  The resident parking scheme is however considerably larger in area than the paid parking scheme so as to provide a buffer for residents adjacent to the proposed paid parking scheme.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

The introduction of this scheme involves installation/alteration of signposting, construction of islands and kerb extensions, and bay marking and linemarking. All works for this scheme will be funded from the current budget allocation for the introduction of Parking Schemes during 2004/2005.  This work is estimated at $60,000.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The final report on the Coogee Beach Parking Scheme confirms the need and demand for a Resident Permit Scheme in the Coogee Precinct. Additionally the report identifies medium cost proposals to improve both the quantity and availability of public parking within the precinct to the benefit of all users. The proposals conform to the proposed policy and procedures for permit schemes and conform fully to relevant legislation.

 

It is considered that the Coogee Beach Parking Scheme, as detailed in the final report and subsequent amendments, should be adopted with the aim of implementing the scheme by 1st August 2005.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

i.        The Coogee precinct be adopted as an area-based parking scheme with three sub-precincts, namely, northern precinct (Area CO1), central precinct (Area CO2) and the southern precinct (Area CO3).

 

ii.       The Coogee Resident Parking Scheme, Visitor Parking Scheme and General Parking Scheme be adopted,

 

iii.      Council submit proposals A and C to the RTA for consideration.

 

iv.      All traffic facilities and signposting as detailed in Plans 1-24 of the final report, as amended, be implemented.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Agenda and Minutes of Special Traffic Committee Meeting held on 9 March, 2005.

Amended Plans Nos 9C & 11C - retention of parallel parking.

Amended Plan No 6D - correction of typographical error.

Under separate cover:

Report: Final Report - Coogee Beach Parking Scheme"

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

ALAN OPERA

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TRAFFIC ENGINEER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXERT FROM TRAFFIC COMMITTEE AGENDA

 

ITEM B9 - TRAFFIC COMMITTEE MEETING  9th MARCH 2005

COOGEE BEACH PARKING SCHEME

 

At the Traffic Committee meeting held on 14th July, 2004, the committee adopted the Coogee Beach Draft Parking Report in principle in order for the report to be placed on public display. The attached report entitled “Final Report - Coogee Beach Parking Scheme” provides summary and analysis of these consultative processes.

 

Numerous suggestions/proposals were made by both members of the Traffic Committee and members of the public in relation to certain aspects of the draft report. The attached final report provides a comprehensive review of the draft report in light of these submissions and where appropriate amendments have been made and have been incorporated into the Final Report.

 

It is proposed that the Coogee Beach Parking Scheme be fully operational by 1st July 2005. The introduction of this scheme involves installation/alteration of signposting, construction of islands and kerb extensions, and bay marking and linemarking. The proposals recommended by the final report will be funded from Council’s 2004/2005 budget and, subsequent to adoption of the scheme by Council, the scheme will be advertised and works will be instigated in accordance with council’s procedures for the introduction of parking schemes..

 

As recommended in the draft report and as adopted by Council, two(2) additional parking patrol officer’s position will be created to effectively enforce this scheme. It should also be noted however that the final report recommends that a further two(2) positions be created to provide enforcement up to 10pm.

 

The final report on the Coogee Beach Parking Scheme confirms the need and demand for a Resident Permit Scheme in the Coogee Precinct. Additionally the report identifies medium cost proposals to improve both the quantity and availability of public parking within the precinct to the benefit of all users. The proposals conform with the proposed policy and procedures for Permit Schemes and conform fully with relevant legislation.

 

It is considered that these parking schemes should now be adopted with the aim of implementing the scheme by the middle of this year.

 

It is recommended that:

 

The Coogee Beach Precinct Resident Parking Scheme, Visitor Parking Scheme and General Parking Scheme be adopted and that all traffic facilities and signposting as detailed in Plans 1-24 of the final report be implemented.

 

ATTACHMENT

Report: “Final Report – Coogee Beach Parking Scheme”

 

 

TRAFFIC COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that:

 

i.        The Coogee precinct be adopted as an area-based parking scheme with three sub-precincts, namely north precinct (Area CO1), central precinct (Area CO2) and southern precinct (Area CO3);

 

ii.       The Coogee Resident Parking Scheme, Visitor Parking Scheme and General Parking Scheme be adopted and that all traffic facilities and signposting as detailed in Plans 1-24 of this report be implemented except introduction of parallel parking in lieu of angle parking as shown on the plans for Carr Street, between Arden Street and Brook Street and Dolphin Street, between Brook Street and Mount Street, due to the large volumes of traffic on these streets; and

 

iii.      The Police representative stated that his concurrence to the above recommendations are subject to the condition that Council employ four(4)additional parking rangers to enforce the resident parking scheme in the Coogee Beach precinct.

 


BROOK       STREET,NOT TO SCALE,N,27.4m,204.6m,198.1m,ARDEN       STREET,NP 8AM-6PM,NS,62.5m,1,84.6m,2,122.2m,139.3m,163.1m,52.1m,63.0m,82.8m,98.4m,133.4m,166.9m,199.5m,204.3m,207.8m,MA11774,193.5m,151.8m,0.0m,0.0m,177.0m,189.0m,STREET,CARR,109.3m,3,5,6,7,NP,LZ 6AM - 12.30PM,1P 12.30PM - 6PM,TOURIST,NS,8,9,10,11,13,14,15,16,17,COACHES,2P 8AM-10PM,PERMIT PARKING,1P 8AM-10PM,PERMIT PARKING,2P 8AM-10PM ,PERMIT PARKING,MA11787,MA11788,MA11789,MA11775,MA11776,MA11777,4,18,12,119.6m 

 


DUDLEY
STREET,NOT TO SCALE,N,NEPTUNE     STREET,92.5m,55.4m,11.7m,0.0m,MA11756,SEWER,E.A. KIOSK,0.0m,3.2m,24.8m,MA11757,53.6m,MA11758,79.0m,MA11759,SEE
PLAN 6C,90º UNRESTRICTED,NS,4P 8AM - 10PM,2P 8AM-8PM,90º PERMIT PARKING,1,2,3,4,34.5m,5,6,7,BEACH,STREET 


MOUNT       STREET,NOT TO SCALE,N,0.0m,0.0m,177.1m,BROOK       STREET,GLENWOOD,19.0m,48.6m,57.0m,18.1m,84.4m,202.3m,52.6m,67.7m,2,1,LZ 6AM-12.30PM,8.2m,NS,3,NS,5,33.5m,4,6,123.1m,116.7m,7,SY12714,SY12715,SY12710,SY12716,SY12717,SY12718,0.0m,71.3m,DOLPHIN,STREET,2P 8AM-10PM,PERMIT PARKING,SY12711,SY12713 



  

Director, City Services' Report 31/2005

 

 

SUBJECT:

CCA TREATED TIMBER AND RELATED ISSUES

 

 

DATE:

21 March, 2005

FILE NO:

F2004/06466

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES      

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

At its meeting held on 22nd March, 2005 Council resolved: 

 

“That a report be brought before the next Works Committee meeting on options to deal with the installation of treated pine in Council owned parks, playgrounds and properties”.

 

ISSUES:

 

Report:

 

Introduction:

 

Chromate Copper Arsenate (CCA) is chemical wood preservative consisting three elements, copper chromium and arsenic. It is used to protect wood from rotting and being attacked by fungus, termites or other wood-boring insects.

 

There are two main arsenic based timber treatment products available in Australia, Chromate Copper Arsenate and Arsenic Trioxide. CCA is generally used on wood intended for out door uses, such as telegraph poles, decking and fencing, in landscaping and in building structures. It is also used in residential, school and community play ground applications.

 

Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) announced the reconsideration of the registration of timber treatment products containing arsenic, and the approval of the labels associated with those products due to new information, some from overseas and some from Australia, that CCA treated timber structures may pose health and environmental risk higher than previously thought.

 

Finally, the APVMA Media Release dated 15 March 2005 states that they are moving to phase out the use of CCA treated timber.

 

According to APVMA Principal Scientist, Dr David Loschke, the uses of CCA treated timber would be phased out over a 12 month period to the end of March 2006.

 

The review of arsenic timber treatment began in 2003. The review concluded that the authority could not be satisfied that the CCA Treated Timber did not pose a health risk for the people, particularly children, who had frequent and close exposure to treated timber products such as garden furniture, decks and play ground structures.

 

The labelling of CCA treated timber is also included in the review as a means of improving consumer awareness.

 

Health Risk of CCA Treated Timber:

 

Arsenic is a known human carcinogen and is acutely toxic at certain levels. It is naturally found in the environment at low levels (in water, food, air and soil). Therefore, people can be exposed to these chemicals through sources other than CCA treated timber. But regular exposure to certain uses of CCA treated timber may add an additional level of exposure to arsenic. Particularly children can be exposed to arsenic, more likely than adults, due to their hand to mouth behaviour.

 

According to Sydney Morning Herald, the authority is particular concerned with children aged between three and five who frequently put their fingers in their mouths after touching treated timber. In 2003 a US study found frequent exposure to CCA treated timber play equipment greatly increased a child’s risk of developing bladder and lung cancer. (Herald, 16 March 05)

 

Environmental Risk of CCA Treated Timber:

Arsenic is a chemical element and is a natural constituent of the earth's crust. It occurs naturally in rocks and soil, water, air, and plants and animals.  Arsenic can be released into the environment through natural occurrences such as volcanic activity, erosion of rocks, and forest fires, or through human actions. The concentration can be increased in the above mentioned sources through the leaching of arsenic from treated timber during treatment process and old existing structures.

 

Uses of CCA Treated Timber in Council

 

Randwick City Council has been using CCA treated timber more than 30 years in the following structures:

 

Ø Picnic Tables

Ø Hand Rails

Ø Fencing

Ø Decks

Ø Landscaping

Ø Park Furniture

Ø Exterior seating

 

Alternative Uses of CCA Treated Timber

 

There are several alternative chemicals being promoted as alternatives to CCA but, while although they do not involve arsenic or chrome, they still pose environmental and health risks.  However, there is a broad spectrum of non-chemical wood treatments as well as substitute materials that do not require treatment.  For example, untreated hardwoods that are naturally pest-resistant can provide a timber alternative and timber can be substituted for by other materials.  This is not an attractive option to the timber industry. (Beder, 05).

 

However, timber can be substituted by other materials, depending on the required application.  These include steel, concrete, plastic marine pilings, composite lumber made with recycled plastic, some of which can be recycled materials to reduce the environmental impacts of its manufacture and disposal.  On the other hand CSIRO continues to promote the use of CCA-treated timber because alternatives include more environmentally harmful materials such as aluminium, steel and concrete.   These are not renewable resources, therefore greenhouse gases are generated in large quantities during their manufacture’ (CSIRO, 2005)

 

 

Risk of Existing CCA Treated Timber in the Council Area

 

·    Community people can be exposed to arsenic through existing CCA treated timber structure in play grounds, parks and coastal walkway. The probable risk of exposure to a child is more likely, particularly because of their hand to mouth behaviour.

 

·    Several studies reveal that the people who treat the timber and work with it once it has been preserved are also exposed to health risks if they do not take any sufficient precautions. (APVMA 05). The Council’s operational workers are working with CCA treated timber for construction and maintaining Council facilities.

 

·    Because CCA leaches out of the treated timber over time there can be residues of arsenic, copper and chromium on the surfaces of the wood and it can be washed off by rain to accumulate in the soil, which results in surface water and ground water pollution and causes contamination of soils.  It can be also released to air when treated timber is burned, particularly during bushfires.

 

Existing CCA Treated Timber

 

Following the Media Release on 15 March 2005, people are concerned about their existing CCA treated structures, however, there are no proper guidelines or recommendations available from APVMA or any other regulatory authority in Australia, which determine the fate of existing CCA treated structures.

 

According to NSW Health Department, there is no need for existing CCA timber structures in good condition to be removed on the basis of concerns about toxicity. (NSW Health,  05)

 

To date no overseas regulator has required the demolition of CCA treated structures.

 

However, to reduce the risk of harm to health and environment, some studies indicate that certain penetrating coating applications such as oil-based semi transparent stains, when used on a regular basis may reduce the potential for CCA exposure.  However, there have some uncertainties with the effectiveness of film-forming or non-penetrating stains due to cracking, peeling and flaking.

 

CCA Treated Timber usage restrictions in Overseas Countries

 

In the United States, the USEPA has facilitated voluntary phase out of CCA treated Timber for use in domestic situations.

 

In Canada, the regulatory authority has also granted the voluntary cancellation of almost all residential uses of CCA.

 

The EU issued a directive to member States to stop use by 30 June 2004 of CCA treated timber in residential construction where people would be likely to have direct skin contact with the treated wood.

 

Disposal of CCA Treated Timber

 

As a consequence of the APVMA Media Release dated 15 March 05, it is likely that Council will receive the certain amount of dismantled CCA treated timber structures presented in either the domestic waste or trade waste streams.  In response to the above mentioned situation, Council needs to develop its own correct collection and disposal procedures in collaboration to other regulatory authorities.

 

The Department of Environment and Conservation NSW (DEC) has classified CCA timber waste as inert waste, which can be disposed of to most suburban Class II landfills.  They also require that landfill staff be informed that the load is CCA treated timber.   Collex Pty Ltd has verified that the Port Botany Transfer Station is able to continue to receive CCA treated timber as the material is being taken to a DEC-approved Class II landfill, in accordance with the DEC’s General Approval for immobilisation of CCA contaminants.

 

DEC considers that CCA treated timber waste from industrial sources should only be disposed of certain landfills in accordance with DEC’s ‘General Approvals of Immobilisation of Contaminants in Waste’. CCA treat timber waste must not be burned or used as mulch/soil amendment. (DEC, 05)

 

Due Diligence / Duty of Care of Council

 

To reduce the risk of harm to the community, the Council may consider the following measures:

 

Ø cease buying and using CCA treated timber in Council owned facilities.

Ø look for alternative products to the use of CCA treated timber

 

Ø conduct an environmental audit to establish:

- the total usages of CCA treated timber in the Council area

- the physical condition of CCA treated timber structures in such uses

Ø conduct a risk assessment based on the audit findings

Ø implement the audit findings according to risk assessment

Ø develop correct disposal procedures for getting rid of CCA treated timber from the residential premises eg. backyard vegetable gardens

Ø recommending that CCA treated timber not be cleaned with any reactive products such as bleaches or caustic products

Ø develop and implement standard working procedures for dealing with CCA treated timber for internal and external workers

Ø develop precautionary measures and instruct the workers to follow the precautionary measures

 

Conclusions:

 

The APVMA Media Release and report highlight that there is an intrinsic risk with leaching of the elemental components of CCA, namely Copper, Chromium and arsenic.  The APVMA will act to ensure labelling of CCA treated timber products carries the appropriate warnings.  Council should consider duplicating such warnings on existing CCA treated timber structures, pending further analysis of corrective measures, as listed above.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

There is no direct financial impact for this matter.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council:

 

1.       Note the Environmental Management Officer’s report;

 

2.       Endorse the Due Diligence / Duty of Care measures contained in the report; and

 

3.       Review the implementation actions in relation to these measures in six month’s time.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

1.  Copy of APVMA Media Release dated 15 March 2005.

 

2. List of Report References

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

ZAMON SAMSUZ

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT officer

 

 

 

Attachment 1

 

 

AUSTRALIAN PESTICIDES AND VETERINARY MEDICINES AUTHORITY

 

spacer

“SOME USES OF CCA TIMBER TREATMENTS TO BE PHASED OUT”

Media Release 0501 dated 15 March 2005

The national agricultural chemical regulator, the Australian Pesticides & Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) is moving to phase out uses of copper chrome arsenate (CCA) timber treatments that it cannot be confident are safe. The phase out is one of the conclusions contained in the final report of the APVMA’s review of arsenic timber treatments released today.

APVMA Principal Scientist, Dr David Loschke, said that certain uses of CCA would be phased out over a 12 month period to the end of March 2006.

‘Over the same time the timber industry will be able to implement new procedures and upgrade their plants and processes to meet higher environmental standards and the recognised Australian Standards for timber treatment facilities,’ Dr Loschke said.

‘The review of arsenic timber treatments began in 2003. A critical issue in the review was whether or not arsenic was able to leach out of treated timber and if so, what were the likely implications for people and the environment.’

‘The review concluded that the APVMA could not be satisfied that there wasn’t a health risk for people, particularly children who had frequent and close exposure to treated timber products such as decks, garden furniture and playground structures.’

‘Other key outcomes of the review include the requirement that CCA treated timbers be clearly labelled to improve consumer awareness and the introduction of greater controls on the availability and use of CCA by timber treatment plants,’ Dr Loschke said.

‘The APVMA has no regulatory authority over existing CCA treated structures. We are making our report available to other relevant authorities for them to consider. However, at this stage, no other countries that have examined this issue, and that includes those that have phased out the use of CCA, are recommending the dismantling of existing structures.’

The actions that the APVMA is taking to manage the risk of exposure to arsenic from CCA timber treatments follow a rigorous scientific assessment and are consistent with those taken recently by other leading regulatory agencies in Europe, the USA and Canada.

You can find the final chemical review report and answers to frequently asked questions on the APVMA website.

Media contact:   Dennis O’Leary – APVMA Public Relations Manager
Ph: 02 6272 3797 or Mob: 0408 644245


Attachment 2

LIST OF REPORT REFERENCES

 

 

1. APVMA 2005,The Reconsideration of Registration of Arsenic Timber Treatment Products (CCA and Arsenic Trioxides) and their associated labels- Review Series 3-The Report of Review Findings and Regulatory Outcomes Summary Report- Review Series, Australian pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority, Canberra.

 

2. APVMA 2005, Arsenic Based Timber Treatments- Frequently Asked Questions, Australian pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority, Canberra.

 

3. APVMA 2005, Media Release- Some Uses of CCA Timber Treatments to be Phased Out , Australian pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority, Canberra.

Media Release

 

4. Beder, S and Hall, N, 2005, Treated Timber, Ticking Time-bomb- The Need for a Precautionary Approach to the Use of Copper Chrome Arsenate (CCA) as a Timber Preservative, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

 

5. EPA 2005, Environmental Compliance Report: Wood Preservation Industry- Question and Answers, NSW Environment Protection Authority, Sydney.

 

6. NSW Health, 2005, Consumer Info- CCA (copper, chrome and arsenic) Treated Timber, NSW department of Health, Sydney.

 

7 Sydney Morning Herald, March 2005, Banned: the pine in garden furniture, Sydney.

 

8. US EPA, 2004, CCA Guidance- Question and Answers, US Environmental Protection Agency, USA.

 


 

Director, City Services' Report 32/2005

 

 

SUBJECT:

ROADS & TRAFFIC AUTHORITY FUNDING OFFERS 2005-2006  

 

 

DATE:

16 March, 2005

FILE NO:

F2004/08309 & F2004/07155

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES   

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Council has received offers for 2005-2006 funding from the Roads & Traffic Authority, for the National Black Spot Programme, and the Regional Road Repair Programme. Council is required to respond to these offers by 30 April 2005.

 

ISSUES:

 

The Federal Minister for Local Government, Territories and Roads has approved the projects below for construction by Council which are fully funded under the National Black Spot Programme.  

 

Project

Cost

Retrofit existing roundabout at Rainbow Street and Canberra Street, Randwick with kerb blisters at all exit and entry points and improve bike access.

$30,000

Install a “No RightTurn” sign, a pedestrian refuge and relocate stop lines with associated kerb blisters at Todman Avenue and Balfour Street, Kensington.

$25,000

Retrofit existing roundabout at Moverly Road and Garden Street, Maroubra with kerb blisters at all exit and entry points and improve bike access.

$30,000

 

The above projects were nominated under the programme due to their poor accident history. These projects are eligible under the programme criteria of at least three casualty crashes in the most recent 5 years of crash data, and a safety Benefit Cost Ratio of 2.0 or greater.

 

The Roads & Traffic Authority has advised that funding on a 50:50 contribution basis is available for the following projects:

 

 

 

 

 

Location

Treatment

 

RTA Allocation

 

Council Allocation

Todman Avenue; Kensington Road to Anzac Parade, Kensington

Road Rehabilitation

Regional Road

 

$62,500

 

$62,500

Anzac Parade; Beauchamp Road to Franklin Street, Malabar (one direction)

Road Rehabilitation

Regional Road

 

$75,000

 

$75,000

Coogee Bay Road; Carrington Road to Mount Street, Coogee

Road Rehabilitation

Regional Road

 

$85,000

 

$85,000

 

The total funding required by Council is a total of $222,500. This amount would need to be allocated by Council as part of the 2005-2006 budget.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

Funds are required to be allocated for Repair Programme projects in the amount of $222,500 in the 2005-2006 budget.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Participation in the National Black Spot Programme and Repair Programme requires acceptance of grant funds and conditions.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

1.       Council accept the National Black Spot Programme funding for 2005-2006 totalling $85,000;

2.       Council accept the Roads & Traffic Authority’s offer of $222,500 under the 2005-2006 Regional Road Repair Programme, and provision of a matching $222,500 allocation be made in Council’s 2005-2006 budget.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Letter of Offer 2005-2006 National Black Spot Programme

Letter of Offer 2005-2006 Regional Road Repair Programme (All Under Separate Cover) 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

MALCOLM HILL

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

ASSET ENGINEER


 

Director, City Services' Report 33/2005

 

 

SUBJECT:

TWO COUNCIL OWNED FICUS 'HILLII' GROWING OUTSIDE 10 GEORGE STREET, RANDWICK. DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

 

 

DATE:

16 March, 2005

FILE NO:

F2004/07359

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The managing agents for 10 George Street, Randwick, N G Farah Coogee, have written to Council detailing the problems associated with two very large Council-owned Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping figs) growing on the nature strip outside that property and requesting that the subject trees be removed and replaced with more appropriate species.

 

ISSUES:

 

The trees are both approximately 20 metres in height with canopy spreads of around 18 metres. They are in excellent health with sound branches and they are two of five mature specimens of the same species growing within the street.

 

The northern tree is situated directly above a stormwater pit and at any particular time of the year they both shed an inordinate amount of leaf litter and associated debris. As a result of this the street is often covered with rotting leaves and water forms ponds along a large section of the western side of the street.

 

The canopies of both the subject trees overhang into the adjacent block of units to a large degree and branches have had to be regularly pruned away from the building.

 

The concrete footpath immediately adjacent to where the trees are growing has had to be repaired in bitumen on several occasions because of tree root damage caused by both trees. This footpath area will need to be repaired yet again very soon as a result of sustained and serious root damage.

 

Tree roots have also damaged the adjacent kerb and gutter and are growing under the roadway. It would be reasonable to assume that over time these roots would undermine the roadway itself and that this damage would need to be rectified as a result.

 

Tree roots from these trees have also caused regular and serious sewerage blockages within both the nearby units and adjacent properties and roots from the trees have been found as far away as the rear yard areas of several properties.

 

It is likely that if these two trees are retained they will continue to cause structural damage to the front brick fences of the adjacent block of units and that at some stage roots will enter and cause damage to either or both adjacent properties.

 

These two trees are so large that root pruning of any significance is simply not an option and this is why the original concrete footpath that was damaged by tree roots has been replaced in bitumen on a number of occasions.

 

The two trees have been assessed as having a low risk potential. They have also been assessed as having a medium hazard rating when issues such as failure potential, target rating and the size of any potential branch failures are considered.

 

They have also been assessed as having significant scenic/environmental amenity and as providing a significant habitat/food source. The effect of removal on soil stability/land degradation would be negligible.

 

Both these trees have been calculated as having an average amenity value of $21,600 – using the Standards Australia AS – DR99307 valuation guide.

 

As a result of damage to private property and public infrastructure caused by the roots of this species of street tree in George Street, Randwick, three mature specimens were removed some five years ago and replaced with an appropriate number of Jacaranda mimosifolia (Jacarandas).

 

These trees were removed after extensive consultation with residents and the replacement species was selected by the majority of residents/property owners living within the street.

 

At that same time property owners were advised that the remaining five trees would be removed over a ten year period and that this would allow replacement trees to become well established - while at the same time minimising the loss of amenity within the streetscape.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

Funds have been specifically allocated by Council this financial year for the removal of recognised aggressive rooted street tree assets and the removal and stump grinding of these trees will be paid for within this budget.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

This species of tree is entirely inappropriate for growing in a confined nature strip situation such as this, immediately adjacent to a stormwater pit, two concrete driveways, concrete footpath and adjacent unit block.

 

The footpath next to the trees has to be continually repaired because of tree root damage and large tree roots will continue to damage adjacent retaining walls and to enter and possibly damage actual properties themselves.

 

Tree roots are also damaging sewerage pipes, stormwater pipes and have virtually destroyed the two adjacent concrete driveways – to the extent that residents are having difficulty driving their cars in and out of their garages.

 

The installation of a tree root barrier is not a feasible option because it would compromise the stability of the trees and would adversely impact upon their long term health. Any such barrier would only be a temporary solution to a small number of the problems associated with the trees and eventually tree roots would simply grow over or under any such barrier.

 

The only effective long-term solution to dealing with the range of problems being caused by the roots of these two street trees is to have them removed and replaced with an appropriate number of advanced Jacaranda mimosifolia (Jacarandas) – as has happened with the three Ficus ‘Hillii’ previously removed from within this street over recent years.

 

Council at its Ordinary Council Meeting held on Tuesday, 23 November, 2004, resolved that Works Committee would consider and determine any applications/requests (not subjected to delegated authority) associated with the removal of significant trees (Resolution 295).

 

However, there are a number of procedural and/or policy matters relating to a number of elements within Resolution 295 that are still either being drafted or are the subject of legal opinion/briefing.

 

It is therefore perhaps appropriate that until these matters have been fully resolved and Council commences its adopted development consent procedure for dealing with the proposed removal of significant trees within the City, that any such recommendations are forwarded to Works Committee for resolution. 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

THAT the two Ficus ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing outside 10 George Street, Randwick, be removed and replaced with an appropriate number of Jacarandas – as per the originally adopted procedure for the removal and replacement over a ten-year period of all Hill’s Weeping figs growing within George Street, Randwick.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

1.Tree Assessment Forms.

2. Photographs. UNDER SEPARATE COVER     

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER


 

Director, City Services' Report 34/2005

 

 

SUBJECT:

FITNESS SYSTEM - ASSESSMENT OF THE IDENTIFIED SITES TO DETERMINE THE MOST SUITABLE LOCATION FOR THE INSTALLATION OF AN OUTDOOR EXERCISE SYSTEM.

 

 

DATE:

16 March, 2005

FILE NO:

98/S/2754

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

 

Council recently resolved to consider funding, in the 2005-2006 budget, for the installation of an outdoor exercise system such as the “Exercite System”.  The system is comprised of 15-20 exercise stations such as chin up bars, balance walk, push up beam, step up and parallel bars.  

 

Council at its Works Committee Meeting held on 12th October, 2004, resolved that a report be presented to Council on the assessment of the identified sites to determine the most suitable location for the installation of an outdoor exercise system.

 

The sites that were listed as suitable in the initial report to Council are Arthur Byrne Reserve, Maroubra Beach, Jack Vanny Reserve at Maroubra Beach and Burrows Park at Clovelly Beach. These sites were listed as suitable as they are located along the coastal walkway where the outdoor exercise system could compliment other fitness activities such as jogging, walking and exercising.

  

ISSUES:

 

A ranking system was established to assist in determining the most suitable location for the outdoor exercise system. Each of the listed locations (and some specific sites within these locations) was evaluated using the following criteria.

 

1.       Level of usage and proximity to the coastal walkway. A higher value was given to the sites with the greatest visitation and those sites closest to the route of the coastal walkway.

2.       Site suitability. A higher value was given to locations where adequate space on a relatively level surface exists and where there would be no need to remove existing trees and shrubs. 

3.       Proximity to related infrastructure such as car parks and recreational amenities (showers, toilets, playgrounds, open space etc). A higher value was given to locations that are close to these amenities as the combination and proximity of these facilities add value to the exercise experience.

4.       Level of exposure to prevailing weather conditions.  A higher value was given to locations that have protection from prevailing winds. .

5.       Consistency with the area Plan of Management. A higher value was given to locations where the installation of the facility would be consistent with the Plan of Management for the identified park/reserve.

6.       Scenic quality. A higher value was given to locations with a coastal vista.

 

For the purpose of evaluating the sites and determining the most suitable location for the outdoor exercise system the following system was used - a location that rates a high value assessment against the criteria is allocated 3 points, a location that rates a medium value assessment against the criteria is allocated 2 points and a site that rates a low value assessment against the criteria is allocated 1 point. Points were allocated against each of the criteria for each of the listed locations.

 

The following table indicates the total value awarded to each site as assessed against the criteria.

 

LOCALITY

TOTAL CRITERIA ASSESSMENT VALUE

Arthur Byrne Reserve

– Site 1.

Grassed area adjacent to the eastern side of the skate park facility

 

 

 

16

Arthur Byrne Reserve

- Site 2.

Grassed area located to the south of the skate park facility and to the west of the existing trees

 

 

13

Jack Vanny Reserve, Maroubra

 - grassed area to the west of Mahon Pool

 

15

 

Burrows Park, Clovelly

- general site assessment

14

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:  

 

The total cost of supplying and installing an outdoor exercise system has been estimated at $51,000.  This cost includes the purchase and installation of the equipment and the required area of softfall.  Whilst there is no Australian Standard that covers the installation of such equipment, it is common practice for these exercise stations to be grouped together and to have an appropriate under surface material, such as a pine bark mulch or other impact absorbent material together with edge restraints.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

An assessment has been conducted to determine the most suitable location for the installation of an initial outdoor exercise system using the matrix outlined earlier in this report.  Accordingly, an area within Arthur Byrne Reserve adjacent to the eastern side of the skate park facility as shown in the attachment has been selected as the preferred location.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That

 

1.       Should Council resolve to provide funding in the amount of $51,000 in the 2005-2006 budget for the installation of an outdoor exercise system; and

 

2.       the outdoor exercise system be installed in Arthur Byrne Reserve (Site 1) at Maroubra Beach, on the grassed area directly to the east of the skate park facility.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Aerial view of Arthur Byrne Reserve, Maroubra.

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

LISA DURLAND

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

LANDSCAPE TECHNICIAN

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Director, City Services' Report 35/2005

 

 

SUBJECT:

LOCAL ROAD REHABILITATION INCLUDING ROADS TO RECOVERY

 

 

DATE:

24 March, 2005

FILE NO:

F2004/07156

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Council has taken advantage of discounts offered under the SSROC Supply of Road Construction Materials and Services Contract, and consequently, funds are available to undertake additional local road rehabilitation. 

 

ISSUES:

 

Council’s engagement of CSR Emoleum for road works under the SSROC Supply of Road Construction Materials and Services Contract provides for discounts on works submitted to the contractor by set deadlines.

 

In meeting these deadlines Council has successfully secured discounts of approximately $185,000 for the Local Roads Rehabilitation Programme, and $75,000 for local road rehabilitation under the Federal Government’s Roads to Recovery Programme. These discounts represent approximately 10% savings for both Council’s Local Road Rehabilitation Programme and the Roads to Recovery Programme.

 

It is proposed that rehabilitation works be undertaken at Dampier Street, Chifley between Forrest Street and Wassell Street, utilising the available funds under the Local Roads Rehabilitation Programme.

 

It is proposed that rehabilitation works be undertaken at Dudley Street, Randwick between Byron Street and St Pauls Street, utilising the available funds under the Federal Government’s Roads to Recovery Programme.

 

These streets have been prioritised utilising Council’s Pavement Management System, and project level assessment.

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

 

A saving in the amount of $185,000 from the Local Roads Rehabilitation Programme and a saving in the amount of $75,000 from the Roads to Recovery Programme has been achieved. The savings are proposed to be reallocated within the same programmes to ensure compliance with grant funding requirements and provide greater benefit for the community from these infrastructure renewal programmes.

 

The reallocation of savings within both the Local Roads Rehabilitation Programme and the Roads to Recovery Programme to undertake additional works is cost neutral to Council. 

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Additional road projects to be completed utilising discounts achieved under the SSROC Supply of Road Construction Materials and Services Contract have been prioritised utilising Council’s Pavement Management System, and project level assessment.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

1.       Rehabilitation works be undertaken at Dampier Street, Chifley between Forrest Street and Wassell Street, utilising the available funds under the Local Roads Rehabilitation Programme.

 

2.       Rehabilitation works be undertaken at Dudley Street, Randwick between Byron Street and St Pauls Street, utilising the available funds under the Federal Government’s Roads to Recovery Programme.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

JORDE FRANGOPLES

MALCOLM HILL

DIRECTOR, CITY SERVICES

ASSET ENGINEER