Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

 

3rd February, 2004

 

 

WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 

10TH FEBRUARY, 2004 AT6:00 P.M.

 

 

Committee Members:               His Worship, the Mayor, Cr D. Sullivan, Crs Backes, Bastic (Chairperson), Greenwood, Schick, Seng and White (Deputy Chairperson) and Whitehead.

 

Quorum:                                   Five (5) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 5TH SEPTEMBER, 2000, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE WORKS COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

 

1           Apologies

 

2           Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 2ND DECEMBER, 2003.

 

3           Addresses to Committee by the Public

 

4           Mayoral Minutes

 

5           Works

 

5.1                      

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 1/2004 - EUCALYPTUS CAMALDULENSIS (RED RIVER GUM) GROWING WITHIN 9 CHAPEL STREET, RANDWICK.

2

.

5.2                      

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 2/2004 - RAINBOW STREET ALLOCATION OF FUNDS FOR FOOTPATH CONSTRUCTION ASSESSMENT.

5

 

5.3                      

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 3/2004 - EUCALYPTUS BOTRYOIDES GROWING WITHIN 20 CHURCH STREET, RANDWICK.

8

 


 

5.4                      

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 4/2004 - COUNCIL TREE GROWING OUTSIDE 116 ALMA ROAD, MAROUBRA.

10

 

5.5                      

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 5/2004 - NAMING OF UNNAMED LANE BETWEEN KARA STREET AND HOWARD LANE, RANDWICK.

12

 

5.6                        

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 6/2004 - 31 ABOUD AVENUE, KINGSFORD - COUNCIL TREE.

14

 

 

6           General Business

 

7           Notice of Rescission Motions

 

 

 

………………………………….

GENERAL MANAGER


 

Acting Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 1/2004

 

 

SUBJECT:

EUCALYPTUS CAMALDULENSIS (RED RIVER GUM) GROWING WITHIN 9 CHAPEL STREET, RANDWICK

 

 

DATE:

22 January, 2004

FILE NO:

P/016004

 

 

REPORT BY:            ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The owner of 9 Chapel Street, Randwick, has applied to Council for consent to remove a large Red River gum from within the south-western corner of that property.

 

The subject tree is approximately 15-16 metres in height with a canopy spread of around 16-18 metres. The tree is in good health and is an important provider of habitat and food source for a variety of fauna and birdlife.

 

ISSUES:

 

The owner originally applied to Council for consent to remove this tree on 26 February, 2003, and this was refused because the tree was in good health and was significant in the streetscape.   He has since re-applied to have the tree removed and has provided a variety of documentation to support his request for removal.

 

A tree report provided by Treescan Urban Forest Management recommends the removal of the tree and sites as reasons its relatively short Safe Useful Life Expectancy (S.U.L.E.), unsuitable location, actual and potential structural damage and potential hazard caused by branch failure.

 

There are also a number of other reasons cited in correspondence to Council by Matthews Solicitors for the tree to be removed and these will all be addressed where appropriate.

 

The tree does show signs of longicorn beetle attack but this is nowhere near the 40-60% specified in the report provided by Treescan.  However, it is quite severe and has implications for the structure and long-term health of the tree.

 

Even though the tree has been ‘lopped’ at some time in the past it is not, in my view, in poor structural condition. A visual inspection of the canopy reveals no evidence of major branch failure even though there were extreme winds throughout the Sydney metropolitan region in August, 2003.

 

There has been photographic evidence provided of two reasonably sized branches that have recently fallen from the canopy of the tree and there is no doubt these could have caused injury or damage had they fallen on persons and/or property.

 

Excavation immediately adjacent to the residence indicates that roots from the tree are growing under the building but at this stage they are not causing structural damage. The tree is situated only about three metres from the residence.

 

A large amount of the tree’s canopy is growing into the adjoining property at 7 Chapel Street, Randwick, and overhangs the Council footpath and nature strip area.

 

Because of this there is an increased possibility of injury or damage being caused should branches fall from within the canopy of the tree.

 

Tree roots have uplifted adjacent footpath slabs and these have been replaced in asphalt because root pruning was not a viable option.

 

It has been claimed that the owner of the property has had to carry out expensive plumbing works as a result of tree root intrusion but no documentation has been provided to support this claim.

 

The tree had caused damage to the front fence of the neighbouring property and, although relatively minor, this is likely to continue.

 

It has been suggested that this tree could achieve a height at maturity of 25-35 metres but I consider this unlikely. It is more likely to attain a mature height of possibly 20 metres with a canopy spread of around the same.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The longicorn infestation referred to at the base of the subject tree was not present when the tree was assessed in February, 2003, and at that time there was no evidence of major branch failure within the canopy of the tree.

 

However, the situation and health of the tree have changed reasonably significantly since that time.

 

The tree has a relatively short S.U.L.E. and as a result of a variety of factors is now in a slowly declining state of health.

 

The owners of adjacent properties likely to be affected by the removal of this tree have expressed in writing their support for its removal and replacement with a more appropriate species.

 

The report provided to the owners of the tree recommends that a new landscape for the garden area would be designed that should include replacement planting of suitable tree species.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That approval be granted for the removal of the Eucalyptus camaldulensis growing within 9 Chapel Street, Randwick, on the condition that it be replaced with a more appropriate native tree species that will attain a height at maturity of between six-eight metres.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

TIM MCCARTHY

BRYAN BOURKE

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Acting Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 2/2004

 

SUBJECT:

RAINBOW STREET ALLOCATION OF FUNDS FOR FOOTPATH CONSTRUCTION ASSESSMENT

 

 

DATE:

13 December, 2003

FILE NO:

R/0635/02

 

 

REPORT BY:            ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES           

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

At the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 25th November 2003, it was resolved that:

 

“a report be prepared for the Works Committee on Council allocating funding in next year’s Works Budget for the construction of a footpath on the northern side of Rainbow Street between Canberra Street and Bangor Park”.

 

ISSUES:

 

A meeting of Council on 17 September 2002 resolved that a 5-year footpath construction programme was to commence beginning 2003/04 for the construction of footpath along one side of all streets in South and Central Wards that currently contain no footpaths on either side of the roadway.

 

A site inspection revealed that Rainbow Street between Canberra Street and Bangor Park contains existing concrete footpath for the full length of the southern side of Rainbow Street and on the northern side of Rainbow Street between Canberra Street and no.202. 

 

Inspection of both sections of footpath revealed that footpath is of serviceable condition apart from a few irregularities such as height discrepancies between concrete slabs measuring below 10mm and slight cracking on the concrete surface, but not presenting any significant risks.

 

The section of Rainbow Street between no.204 to the eastern end of Bangor Park (Hendy Avenue) does not contain constructed footpath.  The current surface, especially the area adjacent to Bangor Park, is extremely eroded mainly as a result of pedestrian and vehicular thoroughfare to Ellen Street (north).

 

The estimated cost for footpath construction at the abovementioned section of Rainbow Street is $40,000, which includes the cost to construct 230 metres of footpath and to carry out any necessary rock excavation works.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Although Council resources are currently directed to the provision of one footpath on streets containing no footpaths, in order to improve accessibility to Bangor Park, it is recommended that the necessary funding be allocated towards the construction of footpath on Rainbow Street between no. 204 and Bangor Park (Hendy Avenue).

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council allocate necessary funds and prioritise footpath reconstruction as part of a future works programme.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Motion Pursuant to Notice

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

TIM McCARTHY

ANNIE SHUM

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

ANCILLARY ASSETS ENGINEER

 



 

Acting Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 3/2004

 

 

SUBJECT:

EUCALYPTUS BOTRYOIDES GROWING WITHIN 20 CHURCH STREET, RANDWICK

 

 

DATE:

22 December, 2003

FILE NO:

P/014478

 

 

REPORT BY:            ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The owner of 20 Church Street, Randwick, has written to Council requesting that a recent decision not to grant approval to remove a large Eucalyptus botryoides (Bangalay) growing within the front of her property be reviewed.

 

The owner previously applied to Council under the provisions of its Tree Preservation Order on 21 August, 2001, for consent to prune the subject tree. Permission was granted to undertake the deadwooding of the tree and to remove three specified branches only.

 

ISSUES:

 

The tree concerned is approximately 18-20 metres in height with a canopy spread of around ten metres. It is in good health, although there is some minor deadwood within the canopy, and it contributes significantly to the surrounding landscape.

 

Despite comments to the contrary by the owner, the tree is a significant habitat specimen and provides an important food source for native birdlife and other fauna. She states that during recent thunderstorms at least ten large branches fell from the tree and that she has grave concerns for herself and members of her family.

 

An inspection of the tree by Council’s Tree Management Officer on 26 November, 2003, found no evidence to support this claim – there were signs that some small branches may have detached themselves from within the canopy but nothing substantial.

 

The roots of the tree have caused minor damage to the footpath slabs adjacent to the front of the property but there is no damage at present to the front brick fence nearby.

 

The tree is immediately adjacent to the driveway into the property but is several metres from the residence itself.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The subject tree, although very large, is structurally sound and significant in the streetscape. It has been underpruned in the past to a height of approximately six-seven metres and its canopy is a broad dome shape.

 

This pruning has ensured that branches are well clear of adjacent powerlines and that they do not overhang the roadway.

 

Council’s Tree Management Officer can see no legitimate nor compelling reason to remove this large, healthy tree and its removal would mean a significant loss of food source and habitat in a section of the street devoid of significant native vegetation.

 

However, the owner has expressed genuine concerns for her family and members of the public should a branch from the tree fall to the ground and no amount of reassurance seems to be able to dispel those concerns.

 

At the very least there should be replacement tree/s planted within the property as soon as practicable that could become well established before any approval to remove the tree is granted. 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

THAT approval not be granted for the removal of the Eucalyptus botryoides (Bangalay) growing within the front of 20 Church Street, Randwick, until one or two more appropriate tree species have been planted within the front of the property and have become well established.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

TIM MCCARTHY

BRYAN BOURKE

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Acting Director Asset & Infrastructure

Services' Report 4/2004

 

 

SUBJECT:

COUNCIL TREE GROWING OUTSIDE 116 ALMA ROAD, MAROUBRA

 

 

DATE:

8 January, 2004

FILE NO:

R/0024/03

 

 

REPORT BY:            ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES   

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The owner of 116 Alma Road, Maroubra, has requested that Council remove the Harpephyllum caffrum (Kaffir Plum) growing in the nature strip outside the above property.

 

The tree is in good health and is part of a predominantly single-species planting scheme running along both sides of the street.

 

ISSUES:

 

The roots of this tree have and are still causing structural damage to the owner’s property as well as to the adjacent driveway and footpath.The canopy is growing into overhead service wires and overhangs into his property to a large degree.

 

During seasonal fruiting the tree is filled with fruit bats and they produce excessive amounts of excreta and this concerns the owner.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

This is one of the four species recommended by Council in November, 2002, for progressive removal and replacement with more appropriate tree species.

 

Roots from this particular specimen have been severed on two occasions but they continue to intrude into the adjacent property. Root pruning is only ever going to be a temporary solution to an ongoing problem.

 

The owner of the property has expressed a desire to have this tree removed and replaced with a Gleditsia triacanthos ‘Sunburst’ – as per Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.


RECOMMENDATION:

 

That approval be granted to remove the Council-owned Harpephyllum caffrum (Kaffir Plum) growing on the nature strip outside 116 Alma Road, Maroubra, and that a more appropriate native tree species be planted as a replacement.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

TIM MCCARTHY

BRYAN BOURKE

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Acting Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 5/2004

 

 

SUBJECT:

NAMING OF UNNAMED LANE BETWEEN KARA STREET AND HOWARD LANE, RANDWICK

 

 

DATE:

7 January, 2004

FILE NO:

98/S/1368

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES    

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

On 22 April 2003, a letter was received from a resident of Randwick, regarding the naming of an unnamed lane between Kara Street and Howard Lane, in Randwick.

 

 

ISSUES:

 

The currently unnamed lane between Kara Street and Howard Lane provides direct access and frontages to three properties.

 

The affected residents currently have a street address to Howard Street although the entry to their property is situated on this unnamed lane.  The current registered street address of these residents will remain unchanged. 

 

The naming of a road should adhere to a number of guidelines set out by the Geographical Names Board (GNB) regarding aspects of naming such as uniqueness, spelling and source.

 

Council acknowledges that unnamed roads in the Randwick City area should have a name for the purposes of identification and clarity.  It is considered appropriate that the unnamed lane referred to in this report be designated a new name that is in accordance with the GNB guidelines.

 

The naming of lanes is usually related to the names of adjoining streets, for example Kara Street and Kara Lane, Howard Street and Howard Lane. In this instance all neighbouring street names already exist with a corresponding lane name.

 

 

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Currently streets in the surrounding area are named after character names from the Shakespearean theme “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, including Titania, Oberon and Helena.  These names were designated when the land was first subdivided into housing estates in the 1890’s.

 

Character names from this play that have not been used and are options include Theseus, Lysander, Demetrius, Hippolyta, Philostrate and Puck.  The GNB Guidelines advise that names should be easy to read, spell and pronounce. 

 

In keeping with guideline objectives, it is considered that “Puck” is a suitable name for this unnamed lane.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:

 

·          the unnamed lane located between Kara Street and Howard Lane be named Puck Lane

·          notice of proposal be served with:

·          Land and Property Information

·          Local newspaper

·          the affected residents be notified of Council’s resolution and name proposal.  

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Copy of GNB Guidelines for the Naming of Roads

The Roads Act 1993 (Section 162) 

Locational plan of the unnamed lane   (ALL UNDER SEPARATE COVER.)

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

TIM MCCARTHY

ANNIE SHUM

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

ASSETS ENGINEER - ANCILLARY

 

 

 


 

Acting Director Asset & Infrastructure

Services' Report 6/2004

 

 

SUBJECT:

31 ABOUD AVENUE, KINGSFORD - COUNCIL TREE

 

 

DATE:

8 January, 2004

FILE NO:

R/0005/03

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The owner of 31 Aboud Avenue, Kingsford, has requested that Council review its decision not remove the large Council-owned Eucalyptus species (Gum tree) growing in the nature strip outside the above property.

 

Several other residents living in properties adjacent to where this tree is situated have co-signed a petition supporting the removal and replacement of this tree.

 

ISSUES:

 

The owner has provide a list of reasons for wanting the tree removed, including fallen branches, root damage to adjacent footpath, safety fears, ongoing leaf litter problems, etc.

 

The owner of 33 Aboud Avenue, Kingsford, has also expressed those same concerns over a relatively long period of time and is one of the co-signatures requesting removal.

 

Council’s Tree Management Officer inspected the tree on Wednesday, 19 November, 2003, and found that a large branch approximately eight metres in length had snapped from within the canopy and was lying over the nature strip and onto the roadway.

 

There was evidence of fairly extensive deadwood and decay within the canopy which had occurred since last inspected the tree on 31 May, 2000.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The subject tree is approximately twelve-fifteen metres in height with a canopy spread of approximately eight metres. It is significant in the streetscape and is an important provider of habitat and food source.

 

However, it has declined in health since mid-2000 and there are numbers of dead branches within the canopy

 

Several residents have expressed concerns about the danger this tree now poses and they have supported its removal and replacement with a more appropriate tree species.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That approval be granted to remove the Council-owned Eucalyptus species (Gum tree) growing in the nature strip outside 31 Aboud Avenue, Kingsford, and that a more appropriate native tree species be planted as a replacement – as per Council’s Street Tree Masterplan.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

TIM MCCARTHY

BRYAN BOURKE

ACTING DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

tree management officer