Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

 

5th August, 2003

 

 

WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 12TH AUGUST, 2003 AT 6:00 P.M.

 

 

Committee Members:               His Worship, the Mayor, Cr D. Sullivan, Crs Backes, Bastic (Chairperson), Greenwood, Schick, Seng and White (Deputy Chairperson) and Whitehead.

 

Quorum:                                   Five (5) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 5TH SEPTEMBER, 2000, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE WORKS COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

 

1           Apologies

 

2           Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE WORKS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 8TH JULY, 2003.

 

3           Addresses to Committee by the Public

 

4           Mayoral Minutes

 

5           Works

 

5.1                      

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 38/2003 - LANDSCAPING PROPOSALS FOR CAPTAIN COOK STATUE.

2

 

5.2                      

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 39/2003 - WASTE CALENDAR.

7

 

5.3                      

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 40/2003 SIGNIFICANT TREES WITHIN THE CITY OF RANDWICK.

11

 


5.4                      

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES' REPORT 41/2003 - ENERGY AUSTRALIA SUBSTATION - PROPOSED INSTALLATION IN ALFREDA STREET AND ST PAULS STREET.

16

 

 

6           General Business

 

7           Notice of Rescission Motions

 

 

 

 

……………………………….

GENERAL MANAGER


 

Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 38/2003

 

 

SUBJECT:

LANDSCAPING PROPOSALS FOR CAPTAIN COOK STATUE

 

 

DATE:

31 July, 2003

FILE NO:

98/S/3315

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES   

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

At Council’s Meeting of 10th December 2002, it was resolved,

 

“That a report be prepared for the Works Committee on the feasibility of replacing the paving around the base of the Captain Cook statue with appropriate decorative plant species or the installation of planter boxes within the statue’s compound”.

 

The purpose of this report is to discuss the merits of the two proposals, such as feasibility, appearance, cost and maintenance requirements.

 

ISSUES:

 

Captain Cook Statue is located at the intersection of Avoca Street and Belmore Road, Randwick, and was sculpted and unveiled in 1874. Conservation works were completed in April 2001, and at that time it was envisaged that the deteriorated paving would be upgraded to improve the appearance of the compound and raise the profile of this well-established citywide landmark.

 

The conservators who carried out the works advised that planting in the vicinity of the statue should be avoided, as it would cause an increase in moisture levels around the base of the plinth, potentially causing salt damage to the sandstone.

 

Planter boxes were suggested for this reason, as they’re elevated above ground level and would not come into direct contact with the stone. The cost for the supply and installation of planter boxes and plants has been estimated at $17,500.00.

 

Minor cost savings are possible with this option, as the existing pavers may not have to be removed or replaced if they’re hidden well enough underneath the planters.

 

Just as with in-situ plants, planter boxes will also require regular, ongoing maintenance, but more importantly, the use of planters in an area of this size and shape would be likely to give a cluttered, unnatural appearance, which is considered undesirable for this location.

 

The subject area has a south facing aspect, and experiences half to full sun for most of the year. A small drainage hole has been drilled through the sandstone in the northeastern corner of the compound, but the presence of moss indicates inadequate drainage and constant moisture.

 

The poor appearance of the compound can be attributed to the absence of an access gate, which means that little or no maintenance can be conducted, and has resulted in a build up of rubbish and weeds throughout.

 

Council’s Heritage Officer has advised that the existing fence should not be replaced due to its historical significance. However, site inspections revealed that it is in the advanced stages of corrosion, and has rusted right through in numerous areas, so a replacement fence in the same colour and style may be a worthwhile consideration now or at a later date; regardless, a lockable access gate should be installed on the northern side of the fence to enable general maintenance to be carried out.

 

The existing pavers are non-descript, and since they provide no real visual impact, it is suggested that they be replaced with a garden of the same era and origin as the statue. The landscape theme in this instance is ‘formal English’, and would include an evergreen hedge of Common box (Buxus sempervirens) around the perimeter of the compound, with a colourful, annual flower display bed through the middle.

 

The hedge will require trimming once every few weeks during the warmer months and periodically at other times to retain a neat, clipped appearance. The flowerbed will require more intensive maintenance as annuals need to be replaced at the end of their flowering season, typically every 2-3 months, but this will be offset by the impact of the vibrant colours they will provide.

 

If at a later date, annuals are considered to be too labour intensive, they can simply be replaced by other evergreens such as Gardenia or Lavender, which would still be in keeping with the formal English landscape theme.

 

In order to provide a reliable water source and ensure the long-term health and viability of these plants, it is proposed that a simple ‘nozzle spray’ irrigation system be installed throughout the compound.

 

To avoid moisture build up around the sandstone, it is proposed that soil be gently sloped away from the statue, and that slotted agricultural line be installed throughout the area to ensure optimum drainage. It may be necessary to provide one or two extra drain holes to ensure that any excess moisture is removed form the compound as quickly as possible.

 

A setback of around 500mm will be provided around the statue using either decorative gravel or pavers, with a small path also to be provided to allow access to maintain the plants. The total costs for this option have been estimated at $5,000.00.  A proposed plan is attached.  This does not include the cost of replacing the surrounding fence and installing a suitable gate.

 

Investigations with ‘Dial before you dig’ have confirmed the absence of underground services and utilities in the immediate vicinity of the statue and compound.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The existing pavers are not suitable for such a high profile location, and should be removed and replaced with more suitable features that will improve the appearance of the statue and compound.

 

Investigations into landscaping proposals have revealed that a formal English themed garden, as detailed above, is the preferred option in terms of both appearance and cost.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That,

 

Consideration be given to:

 

1)         the existing pavers being removed and replaced with a permanent formal English themed garden comprising a Buxus hedge and annual display, and

 

2)         a lockable access gate being installed on the northern side of the fence to enable maintenance of the landscaped areas;

 

in formulating the 2004/05 Capital Works Programme.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Draft plan of landscaping proposal.

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

MICK SAVAGE

DAVE MEREDITH

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

LANDSCAPE TECHNICIAN

 

 

 

 




 

Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 39/2003

 

 

SUBJECT:

WASTE CALENDAR

 

 

DATE:

31 July, 2003

FILE NO:

98/S/3606 xr 98/S/0178

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting on 26 November 2002, Council resolved:

that a report be prepared and brought to Council on a supplement to and/or possible replacement of the Randwick City Council waste calendar. The report should look at the feasibility of introducing an area specific sticker for all household waste bins. The sticker could detail:

a)   The day of the week that the bins are collected;

b)   The day of recycling collection;

c)   Days of the month or dates that the various clean-up services are provided in that area;

d)   Information related to Council’s new clean-up services;

e)   Contact numbers for the reporting of illegal dumping; and

f)    Any other relevant information.

And Council undertake a community survey to determine the likely acceptance of such a proposal.

 

ISSUES:

 

Waste Services

 

Randwick City Council delivers about 108,000 services to over 51,000 residential occupancies around the city. Council provides the following domestic waste services to the community:

a)         Rubbish Collection. For the purpose of efficient delivery of once a week rubbish collection service to every residential occupancy, the city has been divided into 10 smaller areas. During each working day rubbish is collected from two areas and the whole city is covered in 5 working days of the week.

b)         Recyclable Collection. This service is provided once in a fortnight on the same day of rubbish collection in alternate weeks. So, recyclable collection services are provided to one of the 10 areas everyday.

c)         Green Waste Collection. This service is also provided to each occupancy once in a fortnight on the day of rubbish collection in alternate weeks to recycling collection.

d)         Clean-up Collection. Council delivers 4 clean-up services to each residential occupancy per year. Out of these 4 services, 2 are provided on the basis of as and when needed – through service booking system. The other 2 services are provided on prescheduled days for each specific area.  For the purpose of efficient delivery of the scheduled clean-up services, the city has been divided in to 12 smaller areas. Residents are advised to present their scheduled clean-up material before 5:30 on a scheduled Monday, but not before preceding Friday night, and the presented material is collected by Friday.

 

Dynamic Waste Management Technology

 

Waste management is one of the most essential services the community needs and because of health, environmental and other reasons this is a mandatory service local government is required by law to deliver to the community. Thanks to advancement of science, everyday the understanding of the environmental parameters of waste management is changing and the competition in the industry is increasing. All these forces are pushing for new technology that will result in better environmental and economical efficiencies. Everyday new waste management technologies are emerging that has made waste management a very dynamic industry. 

 

Alternative waste technology has become a very popular topic in waste management research. Ideas like one bin management of domestic waste for better environmental, economical and social benefits is currently being tested at commercial scale in different parts of the world. It is expected that in the five years time there will be many more technologies with better triple bottom-line outcomes.

 

Waste Calendar

 

In November Council prepares a calendar showing the days of each service, except for On-call Clean-up Service, in each area. This year’s calendar consisted of two parts: one part showing the days of rubbish collection, recycling collection and green waste collection; and the other part showing the days of scheduled clean-up collection. They also include relevant waste management information. The general part of the calendar has been prepared for 10 individual areas and the clean-up part has been prepared for 12 individual areas with different days of collection.

 

In terms of collection day, only rubbish collection day remains the same irrespective of month or year, as every week it is same and it’s enough to know which day of the week the collection is on. Because recyclables and green waste collection days are alternating, it’s important that the residents know in which week recyclables are is collected and in which week green waste is collected. This can be specified using a yearly calendar.

 

For scheduled clean-up it is important that collection days for different collection areas are advised every year.

 

Unfortunately, very often residents lose or misplace their waste calendars. Sometimes calendars get damaged during delivery by rain or storm. Council keeps stock of calendars so that additional calendars can be delivered incase residents lose their calendars and request for one.

 

Sticker

 

A sticker with collection day/s and other relevant information if stuck on to a bin is very user-friendly and the sticker will tell the resident which day the bin to be presented for collection if the bin is collected every week on the same day of the week. Once a sticker is placed on a bin, the sticker will remain on the bin for many years and will provide the user with useful information. In case of Randwick City Council’s waste services, sticker can be used only on the rubbish bin.

 

It is not possible to prepare a sticker showing the collection days of recycling bin and green waste bin, currently collected on alternate weeks, without being month and year specific. Neither can scheduled clean-up collection dates for a particular collection area be shown on a sticker without being year specific.

 

Currently Council provides dry recyclable and green waste collection services fortnightly on alternate weeks. If the collection frequencies are changed from fortnightly to two collections per month and scheduled as first and third weeks of a month for recycling and second and fourth weeks of a month for green waste collections, then the collection days can be specified in a permanent sticker. In this scenario, there will be 24 recyclable collection services and 24 green waste collection services in a year and 4 times in a year collections will happen once in 3 weeks. This will create two problems, one is that the recycling bins will not be able to accommodate 3 weeks’ recyclables and will cause overflowing, and the other is that the number of services per year will reduce from 26 to 24. Council’s contract for recyclable collection is for 26 collections and will require renegotiation. If the sticker says that the collection of recyclables is on the first week of each month, this may become confusing for some residents, as there will be some first weeks of month without having all the days of a week. For example, for those missing collection on Monday in the first week of a month will have their first collection on Monday of the second week of the month. It can be confusing as to whether it is recycling Monday or green waste Monday. 

 

If the collection system needs to be changed to keep up with any technology changes in waste management, stickers with fixed information may become a barrier to such changes. 

 

Currently recycling and green waste bins have stickers detailing what can be put into the bins, A new sticker is being developed for the garbage bin detailing collection day, and recycling and green waste reminders including collection frequency information.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Yearly area specific waste calendars are required to keep the residents informed of as to which day of a month in a year their scheduled clean-up, and recycling and green waste bins are scheduled to be collected.

 

Permanent stickers with collection and other relevant information are user-friendly. Unfortunately, it is impossible to prepare stickers covering service delivery information including bin collection days for all the waste management services for more than one year.

 

A new garbage bin sticker with collection day and service information is being developed.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council:

 

1.         Note that yearly area specific waste calendars are required to keep the residents informed of day and month of scheduled clean-up, recycling and green waste collection;

 

2.         Note that permanent collection day specific stickers placed on recycling and green waste bins are user-friendly, but they are not suitable for waste services currently provided by Randwick city Council; and

 

3.         Note that a new user-friendly garbage bin sticker with collection day and relevant service information is being developed.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

MICK SAVAGE

TALEBUL ISLAM

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

ACTING MANAGER WASTE

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 40/2003

 

 

SUBJECT:

SIGNIFICANT TREES WITHIN THE CITY OF RANDWICK

 

 

DATE:

31 July, 2003

FILE NO:

R/0340/02 xr R/0249/03

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Randwick City Council at its ordinary Council meeting held on 25 March, 2003, resolved that Council acknowledge the significance of the two Ficus species (fig trees) present in triangular median strip areas in Govett Street, Randwick, and Dudley Street, Coogee, and also that a report be prepared on methods to acknowledge the significant trees growing within the Randwick City area.

 

ISSUES:

 

In response to Council’s request that the two Ficus species referred to above be acknowledged for their regional significance, Mr Ralph Clark, a qualified tree surgeon who specialises in the care and management of fig trees, was engaged by Council to prepare a report on the significance and long-term viability of the two subject trees.

 

Mr Clark has provided two reports to Council – one that deals with two Ficus macrophyllas (Moreton Bay figs) growing in Govett Reserve, Randwick, and another which assesses a large Ficus microcarpa var. ‘Hillii’ (Hill’s Weeping fig) growing in a road triangle on the corner of Coogee Bay Road and Dudley Street, Coogee.

 

It is likely that the two fig trees in Govett Reserve were planted between 1913-1914 when the park was dedicated to William R Govett – a former NSW Government surveyor.

 

They are typical of species that were planted on a large scale in parks and reserves during that period and as such they have considerable heritage significance. The larger specimen is in good health and creates a particularly dramatic ambiance. 

The smaller twin-trunked tree, however, has a large and extensive internal cavity just above ground level and because of this it constitutes a very real risk to public safety.

 

When you consider the weight inherent in the twin canopies of this tree, serious consideration should be given to it being removed as soon as possible and being replaced with an appropriate super-advanced tree species.

 

This is the recommendation of Mr Clark and it is all the more pressing because of its closeness to an adjacent popular children’s playground area.

 

The larger tree is in need of some remedial pruning to remove minor deadwood and rubbing branches and this will help to maximise the Safe Useful Life Expectancy (S.U.L.E.) of this magnificent specimen.

 

The large fig tree in the triangular open space area on the corner of Coogee Bay Road and Dudley Street, Coogee, is a Ficus microcarpa var. ‘Hillii’ which was probably planted at some period not long after the Second World War.

 

This tree has grown particularly well – probably as a result of plenty of sunlight and a more than adequate continuous water supply. It contributes very dramatically to the surrounding landscape by providing food source and habitat and by significantly camouflaging and softening surrounding houses and blocks of units.

 

Both the trees alluded to in Council’s Resolution (75) held on Tuesday, 25 March, 2003, are highly significant and worthy of retention.

 

As a result of urban consolidation there are a variety of ever-increasing pressures being brought to bear on the City’s vegetative assets that may eventually not only threaten their sustainability but in the longer term their very existence.

 

This situation simply reinforces the importance of trees in open space areas and highlights the need to manage and maintain them as appropriately as possible.

 

Because of growing concerns that many trees were being lost through property development and indiscriminate tree felling, Council introduced a Tree Preservation Order to protect and preserve mature and significant trees throughout the City.

 

Whilst this Order has generally worked very effectively in ensuring that consent is obtained for the pruning and/or removal of most trees, trees that are of special value to the environment and the community may need added protection to ensure their long-term retention.

 

The most effective and widely used method for determining and acknowledging significant trees within local government areas throughout the Sydney metropolitan area are significant tree registers.

 

A number of Sydney Councils have established significant tree registers specifically for the purpose of registering significant tree assets growing within their jurisdictions.

 

These registers cover trees growing on both private property and public land and permission to prune or remove trees on any such register generally will not be issued except in exceptional circumstances.

 

Any such significant tree register would need to have clearly defined selection criteria that could include any number of qualities.

 

The National Trust suggests that a significant tree could be:

 

·          Any tree/s of outstanding aesthetic quality;

 

·          Any tree/s outstanding for its large height, trunk diameter or canopy spread;

 

·          Any tree/s which occurs in a unique location or provides a significant contribution to the landscape, streetscape or townscape, including remnant vegetation and important landmark trees;

 

·          Any tree/s associated with a well known public figure or ethnic group;

 

·          Any tree/s commemorating or having association with an important historic event;

 

·          Any tree/s that is rare to an area or is of a rare species or variety generally, including endangered species;

 

·          Any tree/s which exhibits a curious growth form or physical feature including unusually pruned forms;

 

·          Any tree/s which is of horticultural or generic value and could be an important source of propagating stock;

 

·          Any tree/s which forms part of a recognised historic garden, park or town.

 

It would obviously be of paramount importance to ensure that any such criteria did not compromise the intent of any previously adopted Council resolutions or policies or that they did not adversely impact upon the ongoing management/maintenance of Council’s tree assets.

 

An example of where there is likely to be a serious conflict is the implementation of Council’s recently adopted strategy for the progressive removal and replacement of aggressive-rooted street trees throughout the City.

 

Tree species such as Ficus ‘Hillii’, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Casuarina glauca and Harpephyllum caffrum would obviously satisfy some of the above criteria even though their roots are causing an unsustainable amount of damage to both private property and public infrastructure.

 

The assessment of any tree/s for inclusion on any significant tree register should include not only its cultural, historical, scientific and aesthetic significance but just as importantly its health and lifespan prospects.

 

 

Therefore, any discussion on significance should at the very least include:

 

·          The height and spread of a tree or group of trees;

·          How visible the tree/s are (their visual amenity);

 

·          How common the tree/s are to the area;

 

·          Could they possibly be transplanted or new plants of the same species grown on the site (if appropriate);

 

·          Are they endemic to the site;

 

·          Do they provide habitat and/or food source;

 

·          Whether they have cultural or heritage value;

 

·          The health and structure of the trees and their lifespan – Safe Useful Life Expectancy (S.U.L.E.);

 

·          Potential liability/duty of care issues.

 

These issues would certainly need to be incorporated into any criteria established for determining what trees would be included on any proposed significant tree register.

 

Council has been advised by Mr Noel Ruting, of the landscape consultancy firm LandArc Pty Ltd, that a significant tree register utilising the same criteria as that contained in the Woollahra significant tree register would cost upwards of $40,000 to implement.

 

Mr Ruting has drafted significant tree registers for a number of Sydney Councils, including Woollahra, North Sydney, Willoughby and Camden, and is well credentialed in the preparation of this type of document. 

 

CONCLUSION:

 

It could reasonably be argued that there is a growing and increasingly relevant need for both the protection of significant trees and for the establishment of a significant tree register within the City of Randwick.

 

Both Waverley and Woollahra Councils have significant tree registers that have been in operation for over a decade. These registers cover significant trees on private property, within parks and open space areas and on all public land.

 

They provide a tool for assisting in the retention of significant tree assets and strengthen and complement existing tree management instruments such as Tree Preservation Orders.

 

Both these tree registers were prepared by private landscape consultancy firms that specialise in this type of work. Randwick City Council does not have within its existing tree management area the resources necessary to undertake this time-consuming and extensive exercise.

 

Therefore, extra funding in the vicinity of $40,000-50,000 would need to be specifically allocated by Council to allow for the drafting and implementation of a contemporary significant tree register.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That:-

 

1.         Council approve the removal of the diseased Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig) growing in the south-west corner of Govett Reserve, Randwick, as a matter of urgency;

 

2.         Council’s tree management staff implements an appropriate pruning and maintenance regime to maximise the long-term viability of the Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig) growing in Govett Reserve, Randwick, and the Ficus microcarpa var. ‘Hillii’ growing in the triangular open space area on the corner of Coogee Bay Road and Dudley Street, Coogee; and

 

3.         Funding of $50,000 specifically for the purpose of establishing a Significant Tree Register that would acknowledge significant trees within the City of Randwick be considered as part of the 2004/05 budget.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

MICK SAVAGE

BRYAN BOURKE

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

TREE MANAGEMENT OFFICER


 

Director Asset & Infrastructure Services' Report 41/2003

 

 

SUBJECT:

ENERGY AUSTRALIA SUBSTATION - PROPOSED INSTALLATION IN ALFREDA STREET AND ST PAULS STREET

 

 

DATE:

31 July, 2003

FILE NO:

98/S/4982

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES  

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Energy Australia has written to Council indicating a requirement to provide an additional 2 substations at either end of Alfreda Street or its vicinity and one in St. Pauls Street, Randwick just west of Perouse Road (a copy of the correspondence is attached as Appendix A) The substations are required to meet the existing demands of  electricity in both the Coogee Bay Road and the Spot business districts where shops have been refurbished.  Due to the size of the shops it is not physically possible to provide these substations on the customer premises.  It should be noted that the recently completed Rugby Club redevelopment has had a substation built on site at the front and that this has been enclosed for aesthetic purposes.

 

The actual size of each substation in plan is 2680 mm x 1450 mm and its height is

1570 mm.  However, with clearance requirements the actual area required for this facility is 5300mm x 3300mm in plan.

 

Location sketches for each substation are attached as Appendices B, C & D.  It was agreed on-site that these locations provided the minimum impact on Council infrastructure and surrounding residents.  While the substations in Appendices B & D are located on public roads, the one in Appendix C is actually located in a landscaped area which is part of the outer area of Coogee Oval near the car park.  The alternative was to place it closer to Arden Street, which would have had a worse impact on the Coogee Streetscape.

 

The two Coogee substations, which are not directly adjacent to residential properties will certainly be visible from the properties on the southern side of Alfreda Street.  The St. Pauls Street substation (while the suggested location is opposite a blank wall) will still be visible to the adjacent property and properties across the road.  All of these property owners will feel the brunt of having to look at these structures.

 

.

CONCLUSION:

 

While not regarded as an acceptable addition to the Alfreda and St. Pauls Street streetscapes, Energy Australia officers have indicated that the provision of these substations is necessary to provide the basic energy requirements of the adjoining community.  Under their legislation Council cannot stop the provision of these facilities and Council has only been consulted with a view to determining their exact locations.  It is therefore considered that Energy Australia be advised that Council accepts the inevitability of these facilities at the agreed to locations and that Energy Australia should carry out its own community consultation to advise all of the affected residents of the need to provide these substations at the subject locations.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

a)         Energy Australia be advised that Council accepts that these three new substations need to be provided as dictated in the report and that they be located as approximated on the attached plans.

 

b)         Energy Australia carry out the necessary community consultation with adjoining owners and residents in close proximity to the new substations

 

c)         Energy Australia liaise with the adjoining owner of the St. Pauls Street substation to determine the exact location for the substation in front of the blank wall of this property.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

A.  Letter from Energy Australia dated 1st July, 2003.

b.   Proposed Electricity Substation cnr Brook and Alfreda Street, Coogee.

c.   Proposed Electricity Substation - Coogee Oval (near south eastern end of oval).

d.  Proposed Electricity Substation - The Spot Randwick. (ALL UNDER SEPARATE COVER.) 

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

MICK SAVAGE

FRANK ROTTA

DIRECTOR ASSET & INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

MANAGER - DESIGN