Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

1st October, 2002

 

 

 

COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 13TH AUGUST, 2002 AT 5:30 P.M.

 

Committee Members:                  His Worship, the Mayor, Cr D. Sullivan, Crs Backes (Chairperson), Matson, Notley-Smith, Procopiadis, Tracey (Deputy Chairperson), and Whitehead.

 

Quorum:                                      Four (4) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 5TH SEPTEMBER, 2000, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

 

1           Apologies

 

2           Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 9TH JULY, 2002.

 

3           Addresses to Committee by the Public

 

4           Mayoral Minutes

 

5           Community Services

 

5.1                      

DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT'S REPORT 48/2002 - HOME MAINTENANCE AND MODIFICATION SERVICE HACC VALIDATION.

2

 


 

6          Library

 

6.1                        

DIRECTOR GOVERNANCE MANAGEMENT & INFORMATION SERVICES' REPORT 28/2002 - BOWEN LIBRARY WEEKEND OPERATIONS.

4

 

 

7           General Business

 

8           Notice of Rescission Motions

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………..

ACTING GENERAL MANAGER


 

Director Planning & Community Development's Report 48/2002

 

 

SUBJECT:

Home Maintenance and Modification Service HACC Validation.

 

 

DATE:

1 August, 2002

FILE NO:

98/S/1999

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Randwick City Council’s Home Maintenance and Modification Service, provides services to frail older people, people with disabilities and their carers within the Randwick Local Government Area. Council employs two full-time Home Maintenance Officers who provide small to medium maintenance modifications to clients in the target groups identified above.  Modifications include the installation of handrails, widening of doors for wheelchairs, installation of locks and security and minor plumbing and electrical work.

 

The service is funded under the Home and Community Care Program (HACC). The Commonwealth government in consultation with States and Territories has developed a set of National Service Standards for Home and Community Care Programs. The NSW Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care has recently undertaken a validation process of all Home and Community Care Programs to assess services performance against the National HACC Standards.

 

ISSUES:

 

On Friday 5th July, 2002, Council’s Home Maintenance and Modification Service participated in the first round of validations. A validator appointed by the Department of Ageing Disability and Home Care visited Council and utilising The Standards Instrument, measured the quality of Council’s Home Maintenance and Modification Service against the HACC National Service Standards.

 

The Standards Instrument clearly shows services those areas they are performing well in and identifies those areas that need attention. The validation process is designed to work as a continuous improvement tool.

 

We have received advice from the Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care that Council’s Home Maintenance and Modification Service scored 18.75 out of a possible score of 20. The Department considers this score to be a high overall performance against the standards.  

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Council’s Home Maintenance and Modification Service is offering a high quality service to older people and people with disabilities and their carers from the Randwick Local Government Area. The results from the validation process supports Council’s commitment to high quality service to local residents.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

It is recommended that this report by received and noted.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

LIZ COLLYER

ACTING DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

CO-ORDINATOR, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director Governance Management & Information Services' Report 28/2002

 

 

SUBJECT:

BOWEN LIBRARY WEEKEND OPERATIONS

 

 

DATE:

1 August, 2002

FILE NO:

98/S/0255

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR GOVERNANCE MANAGEMENT & INFORMATION SERVICES  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

The resolution of the Community Services Committee Meeting held on Tuesday 10th July 2001 [Director Community Development’s Report 15/2001] was “that a further report on weekend operations and usage levels be provided after a twelve-month period of operation” in relation to weekend opening hours at the Bowen Library. The following report provides information and analysis of usage on Saturdays and Sundays.

 

ISSUES:

 

Hours of Operation

 

The Bowen Library operates to the following opening hours:

 

Monday – Friday 10.00am – 9.00pm

Saturday 9.30am – 4.00pm

Sunday 12 noon – 4.00pm

 

Weekday hours of operation commenced with the opening of the Bowen Library in 1991. This included opening the library on Saturdays from 9.30 to 12 noon.

Saturday hours were extended from 12 noon commencing 10th April 1999.

Sunday operations commenced on 25th March 2001.

 

In a normal week, without public holidays, the Bowen Library operates for a total of 65.5 hours. Weekend operations comprise 10.5 hours or 16% of the total hours of operation.

 

Staffing weekend operations

 

Bowen library weekend operations are currently staffed with a mix of permanent staff and contract library assistants. The general breakdown is as follows:

 

Saturday – 2 permanent staff and 5 contract staff [total 7 staff]

Sunday – 2 permanent staff and 4 contract staff [total 6 staff]

For a period of time Saturdays were staffed entirely by contract staff members. However, given the high demand for research and homework assistance it became apparent that service levels were being compromised during the busiest periods of operation. It became necessary to reinstate permanent staff with both high-level research experience and a sound working knowledge of the resources and facilities available at the Bowen Library, as well as sound knowledge of the workings of the Council. As a result, two permanent staff members are now rostered to provide information services and to oversee the provision of other services such as circulation, PC troubleshooting and other customer issues.

 

A number of contract staff have now been working at the Bowen Library for nearly two years and have gained enough experience to be able to staff the information services desk at peak periods.

 

By monitoring and analysing usage levels it has also been possible to stagger staffing levels to better cope with demand. For instance, most contract staff work from 10.00am – 4.00 pm on Saturdays while permanent staff commence at 9.00 am to ensure that the library is set-up and ready to open at 9.30.

 

During the quieter months, after the HSC and during the Christmas school holidays it is possible to reduce the number of staff working on weekends. The monetary savings are put towards training contract staff during the week so as to ensure the best possible weekend service.

 

Usage levels weekday and weekend

Analysis of usage of services

 

The Director Community Development’s Report 15/2001 outlined initial observations on the similarities and differences in usage patterns between Saturday and Sunday operations. Of particular interest was the shift from loans and returns on Saturdays to a much heavier demand for information services and homework help on Sundays. While there tended to be a rapid movement of customers into and out of the library on Saturdays, customers were more likely to stay for a longer period of time on Sundays.

 

After more than twelve months of operation this still tends to be the pattern of usage. Saturdays have high volume arrival/departure times followed by periods of lower demand [such as lunch time] while Sundays tend to be constant in terms of flow and demand – especially so on the Information Services desk.

 

The gradual increase in the number of free research-only Internet personal computers has been a considerable drawcard on all days of the week. Weekends are especially popular because students may not have access to such services that would normally be provided at school, TAFE or university, and people in full time employment may find this the only time to utilise the Internet. Library staff have found that the level of information required by weekend customers has increased, as are the expectations of those customers that their information requests will be satisfied.

 

Staff rostered to the Information Services desk need to somewhat vigilant and adept at diplomacy in juggling the demands of customers for Internet time. Many customers would happily sit on an Internet station for almost the entire 4 hours on a Sunday. On Sundays in particular it is very difficult to persuade customers to leave at closing time, despite messages over the PA system. Many people are still entering the library at 3.30 pm with the expectation that they will be able to have their information needs satisfied within half an hour.

 

Weekend usage as a percentage of total usage

Hours of operation:

Over the twelve-month period the Bowen Library operated for a total of 3167 hours with weekend operations accounting for 504 hours or 16% of total hours of operation [hours of operation were somewhat reduced over the previous year as a result of the ten day closure in January for the Bowen Library redesign].

 

Visits:

A total of 62,809 customers visited the Bowen Library on weekends in the twelve month period commencing Saturday 24th March 2001.This represents 21% of total visits to the Bowen library for the same period [see Figure 1 below].

 

Figure 1: Bowen Library Visits

 

Loans/renewals:

Similarly, 22% of all loans/renewals for the same period were carried out on weekends or 110,719 items out of a total 520,115 loans/renewals for the same twelve-month period [see Figure 2 below].

 

Figure 2: Bowen Library loans/renewals

New memberships:

On average 30 new members are registered at the Bowen Library on weekends. This equates to an average of 1440 new memberships per annum or 28% of all new memberships in the 2001/2002 Financial Year.

 

Average circulation [loans/returns/renewals]

 

The pattern of usage has not varied greatly since Sunday operations commenced, although the volume of loans/renewals/returns has increased on average on Sundays, so that hourly circulation on both days is very similar [see Table 1 & Figure 3 below].

 

Usage levels compare very favourably with average total and hourly weekday usage, especially given the abbreviated hours of operation on weekends. In particular, hourly usage levels  [visits, loans] testify to the volume of traffic moving in and out of the library on weekends.

 

Table 1: Average Usage – Bowen Library

 

Average Saturday

Average Sunday

Total Saturday/ Sunday

 

Average weekday

 

Hours open

6.5

4

10.5

 

11

Loans/renewals

1412

806

2218

 

1806

Returns

1304

775

2079

 

N/A

Total circulation

2716

1581

4297

 

N/A

Patron visits

921

464

1385

 

1042.5

Patron visits per hour

142

116

132

 

94.8

Loans per hour

188

201.5

211

 

164.2

Circulation per hour

418

395

409

 

N/A

 

Figure 3: Bowen Library Combined Average Weekend Usage Statistics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Affect on total usage levels

 

While it will not be clearly evident what affect expanded weekend hours of operation has had on overall usage levels until a further twelve month period can be used as a comparison, there has been a 7% increase in circulation at the Bowen Library in the 2001/2002 Financial Year. Over the same period however, there has been a 1% decrease in visits to the Bowen Library, which is as a result of a corresponding decrease in hours of operation for that period [as a result of the Bowen redesign and other weekend closures].

 

There is anecdotal evidence to suggest that customers who normally visited the Bowen Library on Monday evenings now visit on Sundays. Monday evenings have traditionally been the busiest evenings. They are now marginally quieter, though still quite busy, especially during school terms and university semesters. The change in patterns of usage has been reflected in the introduction of an 11.30 am- 7.30 pm shift for all weekday shifts at Bowen and the reduction in one staff member being required to work until 9.00 pm. The staff member rostered to work until 7.30 pm assists in covering the busiest period of the afternoon/evening, 3.30 pm – 7.30 pm.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The expansion of weekend operations at the Bowen Library has been an unqualified success from the very first Sunday opening in March 2001. Customers are obviously taking advantage of the opportunity to utilise the services and resources available to them outside normal working/weekday hours. In many cases they may be customers who are unable to attend the library at any other time. On average, the Bowen Library experiences the highest per-hour volume of usage over the weekend than at any other time. Consideration may be given to further expanding weekend hours of operations, such as increasing Sunday hours at the Bowen Library and Saturday hours at Randwick Branch Library, but will require additional funding if an increase in weekend hours of operation is to be implemented.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

a)         That the Committee note the report.

b)         That a follow-up, comparative report be provided after another full year of Saturday/Sunday operations at the Bowen Library.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

MARK HUMMERSTON

 

DIRECTOR GOVERNANCE MANAGEMENT & INFORMATION SERVICES