Administrative Centre

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

Tel: 02 9399 0999

Fax 02 9319 1510

DX 4121 Maroubra Junction

general.manager@randwick.nsw.gov.au

INCORPORATED

AS A MUNICIPALITY

22 FEBRUARY 1859

PROCLAIMED AS

A CITY JULY 1990

 

4 June 2002

 

 

COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF RANDWICK WILL BE HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, 90 AVOCA STREET, RANDWICK, ON TUESDAY, 11TH JUNE 2002 AT 5:30 PM

 

Committee Members:                  His Worship, the Mayor, Cr D. Sullivan, Crs Backes (Chairperson), Matson, Notley-Smith, Procopiadis, Tracey (Deputy Chairperson), and Whitehead.

 

Quorum:                                      Four (4) members.

 

NOTE: AT THE EXTRAORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 5TH SEPTEMBER, 2000, THE COUNCIL RESOLVED THAT THE COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE BE CONSTITUTED AS A COMMITTEE WITH FULL DELEGATION TO DETERMINE MATTERS ON THE AGENDA.

 

1           Apologies

 

2           Minutes

 

CONFIRMATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE COMMUNITY SERVICES MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY, 9TH APRIL, 2002.

 

3           Addresses to Committee by the Public

 

4           Mayoral Minutes

 

5           Community Services

 

5.1                        

DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT'S REPORT 29/2002 - VACATION CARE PROGRAM.

2

 

5.2                        

DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT'S REPORT 30/2002 - SMALL GRANTS (SECTION 356) TO NON-PROFIT COMMUNITY GROUPS AND ORGANISATIONS.

5

 

5.3                        

DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT'S REPORT 31/2002 - YOUTH SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM.

10

 

 

 

5.4                        

DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT'S REPORT 32/2002 – NAIDOC WEEK CELEBRATIONS.

13

 


 

5.5                        

DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT'S REPORT 33/2002 - COUNCIL'S HOME MAINTENANCE AND MODIFICATION SERVICE.

15

 

6           General Business

 

7           Notice of Rescission Motions

 

 

 

 

………………………………

GENERAL MANAGER

 

 


 

Director Planning & Environment's Report 29/2002

 

 

SUBJECT:

VACATION CARE PROGRAM

 

 

DATE:

28 May, 2002

FILE NO:

98/S/4413

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT   

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Council offers a Vacation Care Program during the school holiday periods for children in the Randwick Local Government Area aged between 5-12 years.

 

The Program offers both centre based activities and excursions.  A preferential booking and promotion system is in place that encourages the participation of children from disadvantaged backgrounds with a particular focus on children from the South Ward.

 

The April 2002 Vacation Care Program maintained a full enrolment of 30 children per day and the activities were supervised by a co-ordinator and two activities workers.  The program operated from the Kooloora Community Centre at Malabar and the cost per child was $15.00 a day for full fee playing families and $5.00 per child per day concession rates.  An additional $5.00 was charged on the excursion days to cover extra costs such as bus hire.

 

BACKGROUND:

 

Council’s Vacation Care Program commenced operation in 1993 at Kooloora Community Centre.  The program targets families who experience social or economic disadvantage and/or live in the South Ward of the Randwick LGA.  The program aims to provide a range of high quality social, recreational and other developmental experiences for children aged 5-12 years.

 

The program initially operated three days a week for 20 children.  The attendance fee was $5.00 per family per day, with an additional one off $5.00 excursion fee per family per program.  The program expanded in 1998 to operate five days a week and provide places for 30 children per day.  The cost for children to attend the service increased in 2000 to $10 per child per day (or $5 per day, concession rate).  A one off fee of $10 per child ($5 per child concession) was also charged per program to cover the costs of excursions.  In 2001, Council endorsed a further increase to $15 per day per child, for full fee paying families, the concession rate remaining the same.  Council continued to provide some discretion to families attending in relation to family fee per day.

 

ISSUES:

 

Bookings for Vacation Care Programs have traditionally been taken at the Bowen Library, however have now moved to the Customer Service Section at Randwick City Council.  A preferential booking and promotion system continues to encourage the South Ward target group to utilise the program.  The April program maintained full enrolment and attendance of 30 children per day.

 

April’s program had a multicultural theme with each day celebrating a diversity of arts, food and music.  Indigenous artists taught the children how to make boomerangs, paint dot pictures and told them stories of the Dreamtime.  An African dance workshop, Japanese kite making, a Royal National Park excursion and a Mexican theme rounded off a successful two week program.

 

Kooloora Community Centre subsidised 15 places in the Vacation Care Program to the benefit of children in the local area.  As many of the children attending this program are from disadvantaged backgrounds and displayed challenging behaviour, the issue of supervision levels needs to be re-assessed.

 

The levels of staffing and the experience of staff employed to work on the Vacation Care Program need to be assessed to ensure that the program is equipped to deal with the situations which can arise when working with numerous children displaying challenging behaviours.

 

In previous Vacation Care Programs, parents of children attending the program have been asked to volunteer to assist paid workers when taking the children on excursions.  With the introduction of the Working with Children Check through the Commission for Children and Young People, the recruitment of parents as volunteers is no longer a viable option.  The time involved in gaining a clearance for volunteers would be too long and would not fit in with the programs timetable.  It is therefore not considered appropriate for Council to continue to seek volunteer participation in the Vacation Care Program.

 

Interest has been expressed from the Benevolent Society and Kooloora Community Centre in working in partnership with Council in the delivery of future Vacation Care Programs.  These two organisations have a great level of experience and expertise in conducting these types of programs and Council’s Community Development Department could greatly benefit from working collaboratively with these other stakeholders in delivering a more effective and efficient program.  Kooloora Community Centre already provides tremendous support to the program by making available the premises and also with the use of the Centre’s bus.  During the July program Kooloora will also be providing the additional resource of a bus driver/worker who will also assist with supervision duties.

 

The Benevolent Society is held in high regard within the community services sector and has an enormous level of experience in the delivery of prevention and intervention programs particularly around the issues of child protection and families “at risk”.  The Benevolent Society has a well organised and professional structure in place relating to recruitment of qualified and skilled paid staff and volunteers.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

The Vacation Care Program offered by Council provides a much needed service particularly to residents from low socio-economic backgrounds that have difficulty in accessing affordable and appropriate activities and care for their children during holiday periods.

 

Whilst Council’s resources in advertising, enrolling and managing the Vacation Care Program are efficient and effective, the contribution from organisations such as the Benevolent Society & Kooloora Community Centre will greatly enhance the quality and consistency of the program content.

 

Working collaboratively with these organisations will ensure that children attending the program, many of whom have challenging behaviours and are vulnerable to being “at risk”, will have a more professional and integrated program of activities to participate in, combining both recreational and personal development elements.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

It is recommended that:

 

1.         Council endorses the next Vacation Care Program which will be conducted at the

Kooloora Community Centre between 8th – 19th July 2002.

 

2.         Council’s Vacation Care Program for the September/October school holiday period is conducted in partnership with the Benevolent Society and Kooloora Community Centre.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

LIZ COLLYER

ACTING DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

CO-ORDINATOR

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

 


 

Director Planning & Environment's Report 30/2002

 

 

SUBJECT:

SMALL GRANTS (SECTION 356) TO NON-PROFIT COMMUNITY GROUPS AND ORGANISATIONS

 

 

DATE:

21 May, 2002

FILE NO:

98/S/0180

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT    

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Council provides financial assistance to local non-profit community groups and organisations under Section 356 of the Local Government Act (1993).  The aim of the Council’s Small Grants Programme is to encourage new initiatives and programmes to enhance the quality of life of residents in the Randwick Local Government Area.

 

The total budget for 2001/2002 is $26,468.00 (excluding GST).  This report provides recommendations regarding the allocation of these funds for the 2001/2002 funding period.

 

ISSUES:

 

Randwick City Council offers financial assistance through the Small Grants Programme to local non-profit community groups and organisations.  The funding is non-recurrent and provides for one off projects and programmes that have a direct benefit to people living in the Randwick local area.  The Guidelines for the Small Grants Programme are attached to this report.

 

The Small Grants Information Kit that contains the guidelines and an application form was promoted through the Mayor’s Column and an advertisement in the Southern Courier on 26 February 2002.  Information was distributed through a mail out to 57 local community groups.  Council’s Community Development Officers presented information to the Inner & Eastern Sydney Migrant Interagency, the Eastern Sydney Disability Interagency and the Randwick Interagency.  Information Kits were also made available under Council’s web page at www.randwick.nsw.gov.au.  Application for funding closed on 28 March 2002.

 

65 applications for funding were received requesting a total of $62,457.82.  This represents an increase of 14 % from the 57 applications received last year.  Grants are limited to $1,000 per application.  A number of applications have been received from organisations that have not previously applied for funding.

Attachment 1 provides details of the 65 grant applications received and groups and organisations that have been recommended for funding this year.  Attachment 2 is a copy of the Guidelines for Small Grants and the criteria that applications have been assessed against.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Attachment 1 outlines the applications that have been recommended for funding under the 2001/2002 Small Grants Programme.  These community groups and organisations have been identified as providing valuable services to residents in the Randwick Local Government Area.  The contribution made by Council through the Small Grants Programme will enhance the provision of services to residents in the Randwick LGA.

 

Those applications that have not been recommended for funding do not necessarily mean that the project/programme seeking funding is not seen to be of benefit to the residents of the Randwick LGA.  On this occasion, these applications have not been considered as being of as greater priority in meeting the local area need as those recommended for funding.

 

If those applicants who have not been successful in this years’ funding wish to pursue other avenues for funding, the Community Development Team would be keen to provide advice on other funding programmes through the State and Federal Governments which may be more appropriate for the funding of their projects.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

It is recommended that the report on allocations of Council’s Small Grants Programme for 2001/2002 under Section 356 of the Local Government Act (1993) be received and the recommendations made in the summary attached as Attachment 1 be accepted.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

1.         Summary of Applications and Recommendations for Council's Small Grants Programme for 2001/2002 (under separate cover)

2.         Guidelines for Small Grant Applications

 

 

 

………………………………

 

 

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

LIZ COLLYER

ACTING DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

 

CO-ORDINATOR

 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

PREPARED BY SUSANNA SUSIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENT 2:

 

 

Randwick City Council

GUIDELINES for Small GrantS TO

COMMUNITY GROUPS/ORGANISATIONs

 

 

Randwick City Council assists in the delivery of services, resources and events to communities in the Randwick local government area[1] by providing one-off grants to local community organisations and groups on an annual basis.

 

Guidelines and an Application Form are provided in this Information Kit.

 

OBJECTIVES

Small Grants are provided for community development projects which:

 

·    Encourage new responses to the development of community life in Randwick

·    Demonstrate a clear benefit to the local community

·    Enhance local service delivery

·    Enhance the development of community networks

·    Promote increased access to and use of resources in the local area

·    Support skills development and self help activities by local community groups

 

AMOUNT OF GRANTS

·    The current budget for Small Grants is $26,000 in total

·    Individual grants are limited to a maximum of $1,000 per project

·    The majority of grants are $500 or less

·    Please be aware that there are always more applications than funds available. Randwick City Council cannot guarantee to fund any applicant, to fund the full amount requested, or to fund an organisation every year.

 

FUNDING CRITERIA

The following are eligible for funding:

·    Non profit community organisations or groups

·    Organisations providing a service or activity which is wholly or substantially for the benefit of Randwick residents or the Randwick local government area

 

The following are not eligible for funding:

·    Commercial organisations and enterprises

·    Government departments or agencies

·    Organisations which hold a liquor licence

·    Individuals

Small Grants are available for the following:

·    Services, resources and events to local communities

·    Small projects

·    Specific activities or items in a larger project

·    Specific activity or equipment costs

·    Community services, community arts, information and education etc

 

Examples of projects funded previously include self image and protection workshops for older and young women, art workshops and exhibition for people with a disability, equipment for a local swimming club, a camp on the south coast for young people, establishment costs for a local support group, a training workshop in life history, equipment for a permaculture garden, a stage concert by young Sri Lankan artists.

 

The following will not be funded:

·    Non-specific expenditure, eg. administration

·    General shortfalls in funding

·    Ongoing salary costs

·    Completed projects

·    Profit making projects

 

THE APPLICATION PROCESS

The timetable for the grants may vary from year to year.

 

Your interest in receiving an information kit can be registered by telephone, email, from Council’s webpage and at Council’s reception desk at 30 Frances Street, Randwick.

 

Requests for funding must be submitted on the application form for small grants.

·    A separate form is required for each project

·    Applicants can apply for multiple projects

 

Assessment of your application

The merit of an application for funding will be judged against the following criteria and the degree to which it addresses any or all of these categories:

 

·    Need identified by a community

·    Innovative projects

·    Numbers of people to benefit within Randwick LGA

·    The objectives of the Small Grants program (see previous page)

·    Ability of the applicant to access other funds

·    Resources to be contributed to the project by the applicant

·    Clearly stated goals

·    A realistically costed budget 

·    Demonstrated capacity/experience to manage and complete the project

·    The number and quality of applications for similar projects

 

The assessment process will involve the following steps:

·    A Council officer may seek further information from the applicant

·    All grant applications will be considered and assessed by Council officers

·    Final recommendations are forwarded to the Council for approval

·    Applicants will be advised within 4 weeks of the Council’s decision

·    Successful applicants will be required to sign a basic funding agreement, advise GST status and comply with Council GST procedures for the grant

 

CONDITIONS OF THE GRANT

·    Funds must be deposited in an account in the organisation’s name and used for the purpose applied for.

·    All publicity relating to the project must mention the contribution by Randwick City Council.

·    A report form for small grants must be completed within 3 months of completion of the project or at the end of the grant period.

 

ENQUIRIES

All enquiries should be directed to:

 

Planning & Environment Department

Randwick City Council

 

Street address:

Randwick City Council

Administration Building

30 Frances Street, Randwick

 

Postal address:

30 Frances St

Randwick 2031

 

Telephone:        9399 0677

Fax:                  9319 1183

 

Email:               susanna.susic@randwick.nsw.gov.au

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director Planning & Environment's Report 31/2002

 

 

SUBJECT:

YOUTH SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM

 

 

DATE:

30 May, 2002

FILE NO:

98/S/4589

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT   

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

This report details information on the Youth School Holiday Program that has been organised by Council on three separate school holiday periods since October 2001.

 

The most recent Youth School Holiday Program was held during the April 2002 school holiday period.  The program aims to provide recreational activities for young people aged 12 to 18 years over the four scheduled school holiday periods within the year.

 

Background

 

At the Community Services Committee Meeting on 9 October 2002, Council endorsed the trial of a Youth School Holiday Program within the 2001 October school holiday period.  The program provided four activities over a two week period including:  an excursion to Jamberoo, a visit to the Imax Cinema, a trip to Wonderland and a horse riding day.  A positive result was achieved with numbers of eighteen young people attending these activities that reached the maximum number of possible participants.

 

Due to positive feedback obtained from participants of the program and their parents, Council endorsed the implementation of a School Holiday Program for the January 2002 period.  Statistics from the January 2002 program indicated a much lower response to the October program.  Fewer numbers of young people attended the advertised activities with the ice-skating and ten pin bowling excursions cancelled.

 

 

January 2002 School Holiday Program

Activity

Number of Young People Attending

Ice Skating

Cancelled

Wonderland

4

Rock Climbing

7

Aquatic Centre

3

Fox Studio

4

Ten Pin Bowling

Cancelled

 

It should be noted that the maximum number of young people that could be accommodated each of these activities was eighteen.

 

An impacting factor on the January School Holiday Program may hae been the introduction of a prepayment scheme.  Previously, bookings for excursions had been taken over the telephone but the January Program saw the introduction of a prepayment system requiring bookings and payments to be made at Council’s Customer Service Centre.

 

ISSUES:

 

The Youth School Holiday Program was implemented for the third time in the April 2002 school holiday period.  The April program consisted of six activities over the two week period.

 

The program was advertised within the local high schools, the youth agencies within Randwick City, at local community events and the Mayor’s column in the Southern Courier.  The response rate to this program proved to be poor resulting in all but two activities being cancelled.  The maximum number of participants for each of the activities that did proceed was only four.

 

Whilst Council’s holiday program struggled to attract participants, the program offered by The Shack Youth Service at Maroubra recorded capacity numbers with most activities attracting a waiting list.

 

The Shack offers both excursions and centre based activities but due to the need for appropriate staffing levels and limited resources have been unable to accommodate all young people wanting to participate in the program.  The Shack offers subsidies for their activities increasing access to their programs for families from low socio-economic backgrounds.  The Police Citizens Youth Club offers another similar program.

 

Whilst Randwick City Council offers a range of activities to young people such as those in Youth Week, however, Council is not a regular direct service provider of centre based activities for young people.  It is more difficult to harness the participation of young people in school holiday programs.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Whilst there was a positive response to the first School Holiday Program in October 2001, this has not been maintained indicating the need to look for alternative ways to provide young people in Randwick City with recreational activities in school holiday periods.

 

Given that youth agencies such as The Shack, have a greater demand for youth activities, it may be more appropriate for Council to support local youth services in the future by providing resources to local youth agencies rather than through direct service delivery.  This would enable local youth agencies to cater to a larger population of young people.  In this way Council will remain active in the provision of services in this area encouraging young people to participate in local events, as well as provide opportunities for continued networking and the promotion of local initiatives.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

It is recommended that:

 

1.         Council work collaboratively with The Shack Youth Services in delivering a

school holiday program for young people in the Randwick LGA during the July

2002 school holiday period.

 

2.         Council work with in partnership with The Shack Youth Service and the Police Citizens Youth Club in developing structured youth programs such as skate clinics and competitions both in and out of school holiday periods.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

LIZ COLLYER

ACTING DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

CO-ORDINATOR

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director Planning & Environment's Report 32/2002

 

 

SUBJECT:

NAIDOC WEEK CELEBRATIONS

 

 

DATE:

31 May, 2002

FILE NO:

98/S/0216

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

This year’s NAIDOC week celebrations will be held from 7th – 14th July.  The theme for 2002 is “Recognition, Rights and Reform”.  The theme is about putting into practice some of the ideals of real reconciliation.  The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Commission is encouraging all Australians to join in local NAIDOC Week activities and to share in celebrations, which demonstrate the ideal of an inclusive but diverse nation.

 

BACKGROUND:

 

NAIDOC Week dates back to 1957 when the National Missionary Council of Australia nominated the second Sunday in July to be a day of remembrance of Aboriginal people and their heritage.  In 1957, the day was known as NADOC being the acronym for National Aborigines’ Day Observance Committee.  In 1991, NADOC became NAIDOC to include Torres Strait Islanders.

 

The themes presented each year have represented issues of importance to Indigenous people.

 

ISSUES:

 

Randwick City Council will again this year be providing a range of activities and events to celebrate NAIDOC Week.

 

Council’s Events Co-ordinator and Aboriginal Community Development Officers have been working with the Aboriginal Community at La Perouse in developing a program of events.

 

Randwick City Council’s NAIDOC Family Fun Day will be held on Saturday 13th July at Yarra Bay House at La Perouse.  A timetable of activities highlighting Aboriginal heritage and culture will run from 10.00am to 3.00pm.

 

Planned activities will include:  Traditional Storytelling, Traditional Dancers, Boomerang Throwing, Bands, a BBQ and Face Painting.

 

The Mayor of Randwick, Councillor Dominic Sullivan and Ken Foster, Chair of the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council will officially launch the day’s celebrations at 11.00am.

 

In the week leading up to the celebrations on Saturday 13 July, other NAIDOC activities are being planned in Council’s Bowen Library such as a Dreamtime Theme Art Competition for school children and Dreamtime Storytelling in local schools.

 

The NAIDOC Week celebrations will be promoted widely throughout the Randwick LGA including the Mayor’s Column the local press.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

With Council’s acceptance of the Draft Commitment to Reconciliation at the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Tuesday 28 May 2002, the NAIDOC Week celebrations present an opportunity to advance to reconciliation process.

 

The program for Council’s NAIDOC Week celebrations is evidence of Council’s Commitment to developing and promoting, as appropriate, indigenous involvement in events and local celebrations of significance that respect the dignity and protocols of the local indigenous community.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

It is recommended that this report be received and noted.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

LIZ COLLYER

ACTING DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

CO-ORDINATOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Director Planning & Environment's Report 33/2002

 

 

SUBJECT:

COUNCIL'S HOME MAINTENANCE AND MODIFICATION SERVICE

 

 

DATE:

31 May, 2002

FILE NO:

98/S/1999

 

 

 

REPORT BY:            DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT  

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

In September 2001, the Department of Ageing Disability and Home Care (DADHC) allocated additional funds to Randwick City Council’s Home Maintenance and Modification Service (HMMS). These funds amounting to $30,000 have been given to Council to enable the expansion of existing HMMS services and to deliver new services such as the undertaking of large projects of up to $5,000.

 

The allocation of these additional funds is consistent with policy changes to the State-wide HMMS Higher Level Scheme that involves larger works to homes to improve access and mobility.

 

At the Community Services Committee Meeting held on 11th September 2001 it was resolved that a report be provided to the Committee on the progress of the new services provided that this additional funding has enabled.

 

ISSUES:

 

From the period of July 2001 to April 2002, the Home Maintenance and Modification Service received a total of 819 referrals. Just over 500 of these referrals were from new clients and 311 were from existing clients.

 

Statistics also indicate that only 14% of all referrals are from clients from a non-English speaking background, yet 28% of local residents aged 55 and over speak a language other than English at home.  No referrals received were from clients identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (ATSI). These figures indicate that the message of the availability of Home Maintenance and Modification Services to NESB and ATSI communities needs attention. Community Education strategies targeting these communities need to be developed in consultation with other local service providers particularly ethno-specific and ATSI specific services.

 

Since the allocation of the new funding there have only been four larger scale jobs completed. All of these four jobs involved renovations to bathrooms and were undertaken in September and November 2001 and January and March this year. Each of these jobs received a subsidy of 20%, which is the current approved subsidy rate for larger scale jobs. The subsidy is taken out of the $30,000 grant provided by the Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care.  This subsidy rate though needs to be reviewed and bought into line with the subsidy guidelines implemented for the smaller scale jobs, which upon the referring agencies advice can be a full subsidisation of the job.

 

The Home Maintenance and Modification Service Guidelines advise that in relation to larger scale renovations, an Occupational Therapist must advice on the design and layout requirements of the clients. Therefore all larger scale jobs must be through the referral of Occupational Therapists unlike the smaller scale job requests, which can be through a self-referral process.

 

Stronger links and communications need to be made with local Occupational Therapists to highlight the availability of the new service of larger scale jobs and to encourage them to make better use of the benefits of the new service.

 

A community awareness program targeting local Seniors Centres and Senior’s Groups needs to be undertaken to create greater community awareness of the availability of this service and the processes needed for referral.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Whilst the demand for smaller scale Home Maintenance and Modification Service jobs continues to be strong, the slow pick up rate of the new service available needs to be addressed. Council’s Community Development Team will need to work with the Department of Ageing Disability and Home Care, local HACC Service Providers, Occupational Therapists, Hospital staff and ATSI specific and Ethno- specific organizations to develop culturally appropriate community education strategies designed to improve the usage rates of the new service.  

 

Council together with the Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care need to review the current subsidy rate of 20% for the larger scale jobs with consideration being given to increase the level of subsidy to be comparative to the subsidies offered with the Home Maintenance and Modification Service small-scale jobs.

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That Council’s Community Development Team, the Home Maintenance and Modifications Workers consult with the Department of Ageing Disability and Homecare, local HACC Service Providers, Occupational Therapists and Hospital Staff in the development of community education strategies designed to improve the usage rates of the new service.

 

That Council’s Community Development Team work collaboratively with local ATSI specific and Ethno-specific organizations in developing culturally appropriate strategies to improve the level of access to the Home Maintenance and Modification Service to clients from these target groups.

 

Council’s Community Development Team in consultation with local HACC Service Providers review the current subsidy rate of 20% for larger scale jobs with the view to making the service more accessible through affordability.

 

ATTACHMENT/S:

 

Nil

 

 

 

………………………………

………………………………

SIMA TRUUVERT

LIZ COLLYER

ACTING DIRECTOR PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT

CO-ORDINATOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

 



[1] Randwick LGA encompasses the suburbs of Chifley, Clovelly, Coogee, South Coogee, Kingsford, Kensington, La Perouse, Little Bay, Malabar, Maroubra, Matraville, Phillip Bay and Randwick